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Ulysses Spacecraft Not Dead Yet

kdawson posted about 6 years ago | from the it's-chilly-out-there dept.

Space 78

iminplaya sends in the good news that reports of the death of the Ulysses mission are premature. (We've discussed the impending shutdown of the 17-year-old mission a couple of times this year.) Ulysses is a joint NASA / ESA mission to study the sun from an orbit inclined almost 90 degrees from the ecliptic. From the Planetary Society blog post: "Ulysses is not dead yet. ESA issued a statement in February saying that, as Ulysses' radioisotope thermoelectric generators were running out of power, the spacecraft would likely die some time this year. The actual death blow to the spacecraft was likely to be the freezing of hydrazine fuel in a cold spot in a fuel line. Mission controllers found creative ways to prevent the freezing, but the solution was not a long-term one, and ESA had a ceremonial send-off and wrap-up of the mission in mid-June, announcing that the spacecraft would be shut down on July 1. However, it now appears that announcement was premature. ESA issued a statement on July 3 titled 'Ulysses hanging on valiantly.' And on Wednesday, the [Ulysses mission operations manager indicated] that Ulysses' voyage could actually continue for some time."

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78 comments

Of course it's not dead ... (2, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | about 6 years ago | (#24166913)

At least not until Netcraft confirms it.

And maybe not even then ...

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (1)

ya really (1257084) | about 6 years ago | (#24167015)

Not dead [wikipedia.org] . Just takes way too long to read and interpret.

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167067)

Of course it's not dead ...

That's right, it's not dead, not even close. In fact the people who said it's dead probably don't even know what something dead looks like.

However in other news, BSD is dead.

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (5, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | about 6 years ago | (#24167167)

I'll tell you what's wrong with it, my lad. 'E's dead, that's what's wrong with it!
No, no, 'e's uh,...he's resting.
Look, matey, I know a dead spacecraft when I see one, and I'm looking at one right now.
No no he's not dead, he's, he's restin'! Remarkable ship, the Ulysses, idn'it, ay? Beautiful solar collectors!
The solar collectors don't enter into it. It's stone dead.
Nononono, no, no! 'E's resting!
All right then, if he's restin', I'll wake him up! (shouting at the cage) 'Ello, Mister Ulysses! I've got a lovely fresh battery for you if you show...(owner hits the retros)
There, he moved!
No, he didn't, that was you hitting the retros!
I never!!
Yes, you did!
I never, never did anything...
(yelling) 'ELLO ULYSSES!!!!! Testing! Testing! Testing! Testing! This is your nine o'clock alarm call!

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167673)

Jolly good

Wakey Wakey Mr Grany
Nudge Nudge Wink Wink

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (1)

davolfman (1245316) | about 6 years ago | (#24168713)

You stunned 'im!

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (1)

ontheroll (1211614) | about 6 years ago | (#24170745)

Monty Python lawyers are on funny walking their way to you as I write this message. They should arrive sometime after ulysses dies.

In this case ... (1)

CustomDesigned (250089) | about 6 years ago | (#24167153)

you would need [space] Craft Net to confirm it.

Re:Of course it's not dead ... (1)

4D6963 (933028) | about 6 years ago | (#24167515)

Of course it's not dead...

It's resting!

*ducks*

Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (4, Funny)

morari (1080535) | about 6 years ago | (#24166921)

It'll probably return after twenty years or so, Poseidon be damned!

Re:Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167119)

An appropriate poem [utoronto.ca] for a dieing spacecraft.

Come, my friends,
'T is not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
Of all the western stars, until I die.
It may be that the gulfs will wash us down:
It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,
And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.
Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho'
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

Re:Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 6 years ago | (#24167605)

A dieing spacecraft is a spacecraft working in a factory?

Re:Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167735)

It'll probably return after twenty years or so

An appropriate poem

Meh. I've got a better one...

Ulysses, Ulysses, soaring through all the galaxies, in search of Earth, flying into the night!
Ulysses, Ulysses, fighting evil and tyranny with all his heart and with all of his might!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, no-one else can do the things you do!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, like a bolt of thunder from the blue!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, always fighting all the evil forces, bringing peace and justice to all!

Re: Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (1)

h4rm0ny (722443) | about 6 years ago | (#24170031)


Well that certainly beats the lines I was going to post:

Ulysses, Ulysses, soaring through all the galaxies, in search of Earth, flying into the night!
Ulysses, Ulysses, fighting evil and tyranny with all his heart and with all of his might!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, no-one else can do the things you do!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, like a bolt of thunder from the blue!
Ulysseee-eee-eees, always fighting all the evil forces, bringing peace and justice to all!

It's me Nono, small robot you know, friend of Ulysses!
Uly-eeessseess!
It's me Nono, small robot you know, friend of Ulysses!

Ulysses, Ulysses, could not find his destiny, leaving earth such a long time ago! (AIR GUITAR)

It's a rewrite of the original by Dante (2, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 6 years ago | (#24172517)

Dante, Inferno, Canto 26

Written over 700 years ago and still brilliant. This is just a small extract:

"O frati", dissi "che per cento milia
perigli siete giunti a l'occidente,
a questa tanto picciola vigilia
d'i nostri sensi ch'è del rimanente,
non vogliate negar l'esperienza,
di retro al sol, del mondo sanza gente.
Considerate la vostra semenza:
fatti non foste a viver come bruti,
ma per seguir virtute e canoscenza''.
Li miei compagni fec'io sì aguti,
con questa orazion picciola, al cammino,
che a pena poscia li avrei ritenuti;
e volta nostra poppa nel mattino,
de' remi facemmo ali al folle volo,
sempre acquistando dal lato mancino.
Tutte le stelle già de l'altro polo
vedea la notte e 'l nostro tanto basso,
che non surgea fuor del marin suolo.

"O brothers", I said, "who through a hundred thousand perils have sailed together towards the West
In this so small watch of our senses that is left to us, I do not wish to miss the experience of following the Sun to the world without people.
Consider the seed which gave rise to you: You were not made to live like animals, but to follow power and knowledge"

By this little speech I made my companions desire the journey so much I could scarcely have called them back:
We turned our poop to the morning, and made our oars wings in our mad flight, constantly gaining on the port side.
We saw at night all the stars of the South Pole, and our own could not rise out of the sea.

Re:Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24174229)

What an amazing poem -- many thanks for bringing it to my attention.

Of Course Ulysses's Dead! (3, Funny)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 6 years ago | (#24167237)

Ulysses S. Grant died at 8:06 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, 1885, at the age of 63 in Mount McGregor, Saratoga County, New York. His last word was a request, "Hydrazine."

Re:Of Course Ulysses's Dead! (1)

pharwell (854602) | about 6 years ago | (#24167633)

Ulysses S. Grant died at 8:06 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, 1885, at the age of 63 in Mount McGregor, Saratoga County, New York. His last word was a request, "Hydrazine."

Yeah, he may be dead, but who's buried in Grant's tomb?

Re:Of Course Ulysses's Dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185247)

If I get it right, do I get to play LSL?

Re:Of Course Ulysses's Dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24168365)

Oh right! Look kids! An American! The most famous Ulysses he knows is some army general...

Re:Of Course Ulysses's Dead! (2, Interesting)

QuoteMstr (55051) | about 6 years ago | (#24168593)

Well, to be fair, Odysseus was a general of sorts too. :-)

Re:Of Course Ulysses' Not Dead! (2, Funny)

FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) | about 6 years ago | (#24167519)

He's going to be pissed when he sees all the other satellites trying to make it with his wife.

It's the "last voyage" (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 6 years ago | (#24174123)

I've posted a brief extract from Dante below, but the Ulysses reference may not be to the return from Ilion (Odysseus/Ulysses are usually assumed to be the same hero). It is the last voyage not mentioned by Homer, but for which there seems to be another source. After his return to Ithaca Ulysses decides to make a last voyage with his companions to see the Western Mediterranean. He eventually passes beyond the Straits of Herakles (Gibraltar) and never returns.

In Dante (Commedia,Inf 26) his voyage beyond the Straits takes him to a point spherically opposite Jerusalem where he encounters the Mount of Purgatory (don't blame me, I didn't invent Catholic mythology) and his ship is sunk by a tornado before he can land on it. I assume that the idea of the voyage beyond the limits of what is known is the reason it is called Ulysses, not the ability to invent nasty tricks to defeat the Trojans.

Incidentally, Odysseus got a mention recently because astronomical references in Homer have allowed his return to Ithaca and defeat of the Suitors to be exactly dated. A knowledge of the classics may be utterly irrelevant nowadays, but it is interesting.

End idea (1)

Iceykitsune (1059892) | about 6 years ago | (#24166941)

When it IS going to end, plunge it into the sun with all the sensors sending as much data as they can.

Re:End idea (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167013)

Oh for fuck's sake, for the last time on /. IT CAN'T BE DONE.

You think it's like turning your car to make a left hand turn of something?!

Momentum... look it up.

Re:End idea (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167209)

A precise encounter with Jupiter would work. Maybe if instead of asking to "look up momentum" you had tried to come up with a proof, you would have seen the flaw in your thinking.

Re:End idea (2, Insightful)

Free the Cowards (1280296) | about 6 years ago | (#24167291)

How do you plan to arrange that close encounter when its current orbit takes it nowhere near Jupiter, genius?

Re:End idea (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167577)

Ulysses will get near Jupiter eventually. Maybe if instead of stating that "its current orbit takes it nowhere near Jupiter" you had tried to prove it by posting orbital elements, you would have seen the flaw in your thinking.

Re:End idea (2, Informative)

toddestan (632714) | about 6 years ago | (#24168845)

Ulysses will get near Jupiter eventually. Maybe if instead of stating that "its current orbit takes it nowhere near Jupiter" you had tried to prove it by posting orbital elements, you would have seen the flaw in your thinking.

"Eventually" isn't going to help any, if by that time the RTG is cooled down enough so that the hydrazine has frozen to a solid so that the craft can't be manuevered for the fly-by. That would be the flaw in your thinking.

Re:End idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24173779)

Jeeeeeeeesus, I thought people on /. were supposed to be smart...

Re:End idea (2, Funny)

caluml (551744) | about 6 years ago | (#24167885)

How do you plan to arrange that close encounter when its current orbit takes it nowhere near Jupiter, genius?

Move Jupiter then. Mohammed, mountain, mountain, Mohammed. Think outside the box sometime, genius. :)

Re:End idea (1)

IdeaMan (216340) | about 6 years ago | (#24183303)

I think that's the "Lower the gravitational constant of the universe" type answer. It worked with a few modifications IIRC.

Thank you (4, Funny)

gerf (532474) | about 6 years ago | (#24167685)

Thank you for telling people their idea is stupid. Sometimes they need it, the uneducated louts.

Now, I think NASA is overlooking a completely obvious and fooldproof solution. Problem: they have frozen pipes. They're also near the Sun. A quick flyby of the sun for some warmth, and they're good to go! However, if I remember my science classes correctly, they have to keep the pass under a certain speed, or they run into problems with humpback whales.

Re:Thank you (3, Funny)

hedwards (940851) | about 6 years ago | (#24169011)

Nonsense, they merely have to keep it going at least 50mph, otherwise a crazed biker will blow it up.

Re:Thank you (1)

JosKarith (757063) | about 6 years ago | (#24179125)

And they'll have to keep it under 88 or the Flux Capacitor'll kick in and then it'll end up before it was launched...

Re:Thank you (1)

HeadlessNotAHorseman (823040) | about 6 years ago | (#24192389)

On the other hand, if they can get it to reach 88mph, and source 1.2 jigawatts of energy from the sun, they could send it back in time and find out once and for all if the earth really was created 6000 years ago!

Re:End idea (4, Informative)

sjames (1099) | about 6 years ago | (#24167139)

If it had enough left for that sort of maneuver, it wouldn't be in trouble. Of course, it never had enough fuel to do that. It had just enough to reach a Juipiter fly-by in order to get into a near polar orbit of the Sun.

Tales of Brave Ulysses (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24166975)

You thought the leaden winter would bring you down forever,
But you rode upon a steamer to the violence of the sun.

And the colors of the sea blind your eyes with trembling mermaids,
And you touch the distant beaches with tales of brave Ulysses:
How his naked ears were tortured by the sirens sweetly singing,
For the sparkling waves are calling you to kiss their white laced lips.

And you see a girl's brown body dancing through the turquoise,
And her footprints make you follow where the sky loves the sea.
And when your fingers find her, she drowns you in her body,
Carving deep blue ripples in the tissues of your mind.

The tiny purple fishes run laughing through your fingers,
And you want to take her with you to the hard land of the winter.

Her name is Aphrodite and she rides a crimson shell,
And you know you cannot leave her for you touched the distant sands
With tales of brave Ulysses; how his naked ears were tortured
By the sirens sweetly singing.

The tiny purple fishes run lauging through your fingers,
And you want to take her with you to the hard land of the winter.

Re:Tales of Brave Ulysses (1)

morari (1080535) | about 6 years ago | (#24167111)

Always hard to beat The Cream!

On a related note, give Symphony X's "The Odyssey" a listen. It's a true rock opera.

First Markov (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167035)

dead yet hope that announcement was likely die some benign xband downlink well obviously well obviously well leave it now appears that as result of the redundant onboard receiver which is to prevent the pipes and they will get close to avoid freezing but the coming weekend we reestablish our fuel know some instruments for funding for couple of july well try to thaw the mission controllers found creative ways to validate our fuel has come and earthpointing manoeuvres interleaved when the spacecraft was sent by ulysses status dear ulysses status dear ulysses voyage could actually continue for some benign xband

olig... (1)

nih (411096) | about 6 years ago | (#24167107)

i'm not dead yet!

Re:olig... (1)

Trikenstein (571493) | about 6 years ago | (#24167123)

Soooo, it doesn't want to go on the cart?

Re:olig... (1)

ichthyoboy (1167379) | about 6 years ago | (#24167393)

No...in fact, the last data transmission received by the ESA ended with, "I think I'll go for a walk!"

today's NASA kids could learn from this. (4, Interesting)

timmarhy (659436) | about 6 years ago | (#24167109)

You don't need billion dollar budget programs to achieve amazing science, low cost well thought out missions can do great things. maybe it's the thinking part that has them stumped.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 6 years ago | (#24167191)

It's entirely possible that lack of funding could kill it before the hydrazine freezes over.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167487)

Well there's a tagline: "Lack of funding, kills stuff faster then outer space". I reckon the military might even pay to turn that into a weapon.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

smaddox (928261) | about 6 years ago | (#24168507)

Isn't separating an enemy from his funding one of the oldest military tactics in existence?

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24168813)

Well there's a tagline: "Lack of funding, kills stuff faster then outer space". I reckon the military might even pay to turn that into a weapon.

yes, now if the CIA would stop funding people like osama and hussein....

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

iminplaya (723125) | about 6 years ago | (#24169479)

*sigh* Another gag lost in space...

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (2, Interesting)

nacturation (646836) | about 6 years ago | (#24167319)

How do the inflation-adjusted costs of previous missions compare to current mission costs?
 

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (2, Informative)

Free the Cowards (1280296) | about 6 years ago | (#24167339)

ESA says [esa.int] the total cost of Ulysses has been about 1 billion Euro, which is about $1.5 billion US. Might want to try a different example.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (4, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | about 6 years ago | (#24167663)

that's 1.5 billion OVER 17 YEARS.

that's bargin basement space exploration. it's the perfect example, thank you very much.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (-1, Troll)

Free the Cowards (1280296) | about 6 years ago | (#24167781)

I understand what it means, and I realize it's a bargain. Still, it's a budget safely in the billions, and thus is a bad example to use when you're trying to show that you don't need billions.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

timmarhy (659436) | about 6 years ago | (#24169147)

i think you misunderstand what i was getting at - what did it cost to get the craft up there? if you choose to keep operating after it's inital objectives are complete that's going to be outside what's budgeted for the program. hence you don't NEED to blow billions just to complete a single mission when for a mere 1.5billion these old probes have completed MANY missions.

to put this in perspective it costs 1.3 billion PER MISSION for the shuttles, and it's predicted the shuttle program will have cost 173 billion when it wraps up in 2010. http://www.space.com/news/shuttle_cost_050211.html [space.com]

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1, Troll)

Free the Cowards (1280296) | about 6 years ago | (#24169247)

I understand his point fine. I even agree with it. But the fact of the matter is that this mission cost well over one billion dollars, which contradicts the basic statement he made in the original post.

What is it with space advocates and facts, never the twain shall meet? Any time you point out that things aren't as rosy as stated, you get all kinds of wacky defensive maneuvering instead of a simple "you're right about that, but".

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (2, Insightful)

macbuzz01 (1074795) | about 6 years ago | (#24168973)

$241,575.069 per day in US dollars.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

dylan_- (1661) | about 6 years ago | (#24175767)

$241,575.069 per day in US dollars.

Well, I can't believe you put down this as accurately as 0.1 of a cent, but:

  • Our year actually averages out to 365.2425, which gives $241,580.03 a day. Still, if you've thought of .25 I guess .2425 is easy to remember.
  • You could think of this as the amount the US national debt increases every 20 seconds or so. In other words, if you're not worried about the national debt, why worry about this expenditure?

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24170621)

Did you factor in inflation? Yes, most people forget inflation.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167541)

Ever heard of "Faster, cheaper, better?"

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (4, Insightful)

JoeRobe (207552) | about 6 years ago | (#24167871)

a) Ulysses has cost over a billion.

b) NASA has had spacecraft which have lasted longer than anyone thought they would. The current Mars rovers for example, and Mars Pathfinder, as well as the Galileo spacecraft, which had at least 4 extended missions. Not to mention the Voyagers. The correlation between cost and the lifetime of the craft is not coincidental.

c) Having a mission that lasts a long time is not indicative of a well thought out mission. I think if any agency is going to blow 1 billion on a mission, they're going to think it out pretty damn well. Imagine the public backlash if it weren't thought out (i.e. Mars Polar Lander)...

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 6 years ago | (#24169059)

Craft and instruments that out live their missions by as long as some of those have were over-engineered.

Yes, it's great that those are still useful, but it means that they were over-engineered and cost more than they really needed to. That's money which could be spent on other missions.

I'm not suggesting that NASA have its budget slashed, but praising an agency for what is essentially a form of screwing up isn't great. Or that projects be designed to last exactly the length of time desired, but ideally projects shouldn't require additional objectives after they launch to get the most out of them.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

Taleron (875810) | about 6 years ago | (#24173625)

If I were trying to hit the bullseye of a dartboard from 400 million miles with a 400 million dollar tea kettle, I think I'd want and possibly need to over-engineer the tea kettle.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

sjames (1099) | about 6 years ago | (#24175787)

Sometimes, over-engineering is exactly the right thing to do.

If they built it "just right" and any little thing went wrong, the mission fails and the money is all down the drain.

Over-engineer and you're much more likely to accomplish the mission. Usually, you get to add an extended secondary mission so the extra cost isn't a waste.

Re:today's NASA kids could learn from this. (1)

rastoboy29 (807168) | about 6 years ago | (#24170099)

Actually no, they tried that and they had a bunch of mostly failed missions.  That's why they quit doing that.

Space travel isn't that easy for us, yet.

Tales of Great Ulysses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167171)

Anyone else hearing Cream in their heads about now? It should be the mission theme song.

Tales of Brave Ulysses (1)

Alarindris (1253418) | about 6 years ago | (#24167293)

You thought the leaden winter would bring you down forever,
But you rode upon a steamer to the violence of the sun.

Re:Tales of Brave Ulysses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24167303)

Gee, I wish I'd thought of that, say, 45 minutes ago... Oh, wait - I did!

Re:Tales of Brave Ulysses (1)

Whiteox (919863) | about 6 years ago | (#24169913)

Then you've got to do the lead bit:
"Daaaa dum da da daa..."

Ulysses Spacecraft Not Dead Yet (2, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 6 years ago | (#24167555)

Ulysses Spacecraft Not Dead Yet

Hmm, that reminded me of this movie [youtube.com] ...

you FaiL It? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24168509)

Moans and groans operatinrg systems How is the GNAA

It just needs to... (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | about 6 years ago | (#24168771)

...find the kingdom of Hades; then the pipes won't be as lifeless as stone anymore and it can return home.

Ulysses, Ulysses
Soaring through all the galaxies
In search of Earth
Flying into the night...

Ejection from the solar system? (4, Interesting)

Phil Karn (14620) | about 6 years ago | (#24168827)

The blog article at the Planetary Society website says that Ulysses will encounter Jupiter and be ejected from the solar system. Is this a theoretical possibility, or has a date for this been determined? Ulysses originally encountered Jupiter to fling it out of the ecliptic plane so it could study the sun at high latitudes. Its aphelion is still at Jupiter's orbit. If it encounters Jupiter again, any number of things could happen to it. The statement about it being ejected seems to imply that a specific encounter trajectory is already predicted.

oblig. python (1)

simplerThanPossible (1056682) | about 6 years ago | (#24169497)

I'm feeling better

Ulysses Spacecraft Not Dead Yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24170399)

Zombie!

Orbiting what??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24170931)

Am I the only one that immediately thought.....

Whats a spacecraft doing orbiting an epileptic??

a useless spacecraft? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24173363)

Why does anyone care whether it's dead or not if it's useless?

Aliens Refueled it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24174865)

Some aliens stopped by and topped it off for us.

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