Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

20 Features Windows 7 Should Include

ScuttleMonkey posted about 6 years ago | from the downhill-since-dos dept.

901

Damian Francis writes "Australian computer expert Vito Cassisi has come up with a list of 20 features that Windows 7 should have. The article includes features like modularized OS, new UAC, program caching, standards compliant browser and a whole lot more with explanations as to why these features should be included. With Windows Vista only receiving a luke-warm reception, Microsoft needs to make sure Windows 7 is a winner from the get go." What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery?

cancel ×

901 comments

Easy... (5, Funny)

Naqamel (1138771) | about 6 years ago | (#24184853)

What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery?

A Linux kernel.

Re:Easy... (2, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 6 years ago | (#24185033)

Ronnggpq:

Emacs

Re:Easy... (3, Funny)

billlava (1270394) | about 6 years ago | (#24185329)

Vi

Re:Easy... (4, Funny)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | about 6 years ago | (#24185041)

Satan just called, he says he'd rather it stay nice and toasty down there.

Re:Easy... (5, Interesting)

negRo_slim (636783) | about 6 years ago | (#24185079)

What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery?

What is the one thing MS can do that no one else (realistically) can do these days? Games. They need to start thinking Windows needs not be a one size fits all approach. Why can I not install the most basic framework of the OS and DX in order to utilize all available resources of my rig?

I'm sure I'm not the only one at their without any choice in OS simply because my computer is most often used for games. Which if it's going to be that way, don't make a guy who tunes every bus speed and multiplier he access too use the same OS install his grandma would use to check her e-mails.

Re:Easy... (5, Insightful)

Trashman (3003) | about 6 years ago | (#24185175)

...
They need to start thinking Windows needs not be a one size fits all approach. Why can I not install the most basic framework of the OS and DX in order to utilize all available resources of my rig? ...

What you are reffering to is called an Xbox 360. I'm not saying that it's right, but it seems like that is the direction MS is taking games in.

Re:Easy... (2, Insightful)

Talderas (1212466) | about 6 years ago | (#24185341)

Unfortunately, the domain of strategy games has sorely lacked footing in breaking into the console market. Sure there's a few, but they're all turn based. You just can't get games like Starcraft, Warcraft, or any other type of Real Time strategy on a console.

Re:Easy... (1)

EricR86 (1144023) | about 6 years ago | (#24185221)

Maybe I'm just crazy but why is this considered such a "bad" idea?

Sure it would be a hell of a lot of work to the kernel to have it compatible with existing binaries and drivers, but I would imagine that Windows 7 kernel development is too. I mean it seems like a crazy idea, but doesn't it have a smidgen of merit to it?

Re:Easy... (1)

drsmithy (35869) | about 6 years ago | (#24185339)

Sure it would be a hell of a lot of work to the kernel to have it compatible with existing binaries and drivers, but I would imagine that Windows 7 kernel development is too. I mean it seems like a crazy idea, but doesn't it have a smidgen of merit to it?

No. It would be a massive, massive amount of work and net them no meaningful benefits.

To say nothing of the potential "viral GPL" problems.

Number 21 and 22 (4, Funny)

vivin (671928) | about 6 years ago | (#24185229)

21. Microsoft Bob!
22. Clippy7 /ducks

Forgetting something? (2, Interesting)

JYD (996651) | about 6 years ago | (#24185325)

I might be totally off the mark here, but is anyone forgetting about Seadragon - http://labs.live.com/seadragon.aspx [live.com] ? I mean, I know it's developed as part of Live, but the idea of Seadragon (or similar) working in an Windows OS is enough to stick it up Mac's Expose, no? Certainly Microsoft did not acquire Seadragon so that they can screw it up, right? Oh wait...

I'll believe it when I see it (5, Insightful)

areusche (1297613) | about 6 years ago | (#24184855)

Sadly what will happen is they will be slated for the final product and fail to make it in. I was really looking forward to Winfs. It design specs and features looked like a big benefit to Windows Vista. I'm still kinda bummed it was never included. :-/

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (2, Interesting)

The Ancients (626689) | about 6 years ago | (#24185007)

Sadly what will happen is they will be slated for the final product and fail to make it in. I was really looking forward to Winfs. It design specs and features looked like a big benefit to Windows Vista. I'm still kinda bummed it was never included. :-/

Since WinFS failed to make the cut for Vista, and ZFS (gotta be better - 'Z' comes after 'W' in the alphabet!) failed to make the cut for OS X 10.5, I'm going to go out on a limb here and hazard to guess that changing a file system in a desktop OS ain't that easy.

Speaking of which - how would WinFS and ZFS compare?

(OT) If I wasn't using Macs already, and ZFS arrived, that'd probably be enough to sway me. Awesome doesn't even start to describe it...

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (4, Insightful)

jandrese (485) | about 6 years ago | (#24185133)

The big difference is that ZFS will be available in your lifetime (in fact it's available now!). WinFS is one of those features Microsoft has been promising since NT4 that has never worked out for them. Frankly, I'm not so sure it's a good idea anyway.

ANYTHING as long as it doesn't fragment so easily. (2, Insightful)

khasim (1285) | about 6 years ago | (#24185161)

I don't care about all the cool features. Just give me a Windows filesystem that doesn't fragment during NORMAL usage.

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (4, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | about 6 years ago | (#24185141)

Speaking of which - how would WinFS and ZFS compare?

Much like chalk and cheese. WinFS is(/was) *not* a filesystem, it's a database/metadata layer that sits between the filesystem (NTFS) and the applications.

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (1, Informative)

negRo_slim (636783) | about 6 years ago | (#24185191)

Speaking of which - how would WinFS and ZFS compare?

To me at least, they appear to be two vastly different beasts... WinFS [wikipedia.org] / ZFS [wikipedia.org]

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (3, Informative)

the_brobdingnagian (917699) | about 6 years ago | (#24185207)

You can read ZFS on a standard Mac OS X 10.5 installation. You can even write ZFS if you download some files from Apple: http://zfs.macosforge.org/trac/wiki/?page_id=5 [macosforge.org]

Re:I'll believe it when I see it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185333)

I was really looking forward to Winfs. It design specs and features looked like a big benefit to Windows Vista.

Funnily enough, its design specs and features looked like a big benefit to every version of Windows all the way back to Windows 95. It's called "vapourware". You overpromise so the shiny new features (that you don't actually have to deliver) convince existing customers to "stay the course" instead of switching.

Two words (4, Funny)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 6 years ago | (#24184871)

EGA mode

Paucity (5, Funny)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 6 years ago | (#24184875)

What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery?

The ability to boot on a single core with 1GB of RAM in under 5 minutes?

Re:Paucity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185061)

Hell, I'd settle for the ability to RUN with 1GB of RAM without swapping.

Vista takes over 1GB of memory to show the desktop.

No joking.

If I wanted to run programs on my Vista laptop, I'd be stuck waiting for some 0.5GB of crap to be swapped out before anything else could run.

Thank God for Linux. It runs just fine on the machine and boots so much quicker it isn't even funny. (Something along the lines of 30 seconds versus a good 10 minutes for Vista.)

Re:Paucity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185153)

My old Pentium 4 with 256 megs of ram boosts up in a Windows OS in under 15 seconds, so they already have the ability that you require.

Re:Paucity (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 6 years ago | (#24185297)

Yeah, now try that again with a version released this millennium.

Re:Paucity (1)

the100rabh (947158) | about 6 years ago | (#24185319)

I dont know why instead of talking of better features most people are most content with older OS. Dear Sir, please switch to FreeDOS or something.

Re:Paucity (1)

Loopy (41728) | about 6 years ago | (#24185187)

I have a single-core 1GB machine sitting on my desk at home. It takes about 50 seconds to boot Vista 32bit home premium, which is about 10 seconds longer than Ubuntu (8.03) takes to boot. Methinks you should specify exactly how sucky of a single-core you're talking about.

Some suggestions (5, Funny)

bsDaemon (87307) | about 6 years ago | (#24184883)

Perhaps they could take FreeBSD, perhaps with a customized Mach kernel, and add a fancy, easy to use and intuitive graphical user interface?

oh, wait...

Microsoft sucks (-1, Flamebait)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 6 years ago | (#24184889)

Buy a Mac or switch to Linux already. Stop filling Microsoft's pockets.

Re:Microsoft sucks (5, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#24184973)

Perhaps we should look at the reason why we switched to Macs or to Linux. Lack of innovation and high prices. If MS can make a secure product, that is innovative, and affordable, I might buy it, or at least not wipe my OEM install of it. The fact though is, I don't think that MS can innovate, which is really sad.

Re:Microsoft sucks (0, Offtopic)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 6 years ago | (#24185001)

Changed my password, some fucker was using my account. Sorry for the crap he/she wrote.

Re:Microsoft sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185255)

Blast! My plans were foiled!
 
AC, away!

They Should (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24184897)

Include the not sucking feature, amirite?

Why not... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24184899)

Why don't they just work on trimming off some of the bloat already?

Just because system resources are cheaper now doesn't mean I'd like to waste them.

there is one not to include (4, Insightful)

Dan667 (564390) | about 6 years ago | (#24184907)

If Vista is any measure, Windows 7 should not include marketing driven development.

Re:there is one not to include (5, Insightful)

whoever57 (658626) | about 6 years ago | (#24184981)

if Vista is any measure, Windows 7 should not include marketing driven development.

No, they should definitely involve marketing -- just ask them what to do and do the exact opposite

1985 Technology (5, Insightful)

Chris_Stankowitz (612232) | about 6 years ago | (#24184917)

How about multiple desktops?! Native...that don't suck!

Re:1985 Technology (1)

DeadDecoy (877617) | about 6 years ago | (#24185273)

Ya multiple desktops is one of the reasons I've moved to Linux (that and the ability to program on the fly).
This may be a little off topic, but I'd also would like to see Windows Office tools support ODF, though I doubt they will produce anything that isn't purposely crippled. The only reason I want this is so I work in Linux while being able to collaborate with Windows users with minimal hassle.
Few things are worse than seeing Windows maul a perfectly good document with auto formatting and file conversion.

Re:1985 Technology (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 6 years ago | (#24185291)

This is key. I've yet to find a workable solution for virtual desktops on XP. MSVDM crashes my software. VirtuaWin and Vista/XP Virtual Desktops take forever to switch and can't guarantee the stack order of my windows after a desktop change. Totally useless.

Standards-compliant browser (1, Insightful)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 6 years ago | (#24184925)

Microsoft can only embrace and extend standards. Be afraid, be very afraid. Switch to Firefox, Opera or Safari, stop using Internet Explorer.

Re:Standards-compliant browser (0, Offtopic)

Yvan256 (722131) | about 6 years ago | (#24185051)

Changed my password, some fucker was using my account. Sorry for the crap he/she wrote.

Re:Standards-compliant browser (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#24185055)

But MS is moving that way with IE 8. The thing though is, they are like Apple and are only opening up to standards because they are losing marketshare and their name has been tarnished. Once they are back on top again, you will see more EEE, and I don't mean the miniature laptop.

5 features (2, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#24184927)

Here are 5 features from Linux that MS should include...

1. 3-D desktop, sure it may not be the most funtional thing, but it can sure perswade people to switch
2. Customized installs. For example, you should be able to install a ~4 GB full install with everything, or a ~1 GB minimal install with only the GUI and some programs
3. Themes. More then just a theme that makes it look like Vista, or 95, include various themes, make it look like an old school mac, or perhaps a bit like OS X.
4. -O3 for OEMs, for OEMs, MS should compile software -O3 so it is faster
5. Virtual desktops, why MS hasn't been including them is beyond me, they seem really easy to code

Really though, the killer app of Linux is. Customization. For MS to get more marketshare, you need to be able to customize everything on it. From the kernel to the GUI.

Re:5 features (1)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | about 6 years ago | (#24185203)

Really though, the killer app of Linux is. Customization. For MS to get more marketshare, you need to be able to customize everything on it. From the kernel to the GUI.

You can customize an install. Obviously, you cannot customize a kernel, that's pretty much what defines an OS. But you can install your own shells if you so please. Oh, they may not be easy to find, but they are out there. And I chose not to install many components the last time I installed windows. Saved some space and annoyance.

I agree on virtual desktops though. And how about sandboxes as well?

Re:5 features (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#24185281)

You can customize an install. Obviously, you cannot customize a kernel, that's pretty much what defines an OS. But you can install your own shells if you so please. Oh, they may not be easy to find, but they are out there. And I chose not to install many components the last time I installed windows. Saved some space and annoyance.

Yes, but you can't customize any existing Windows install to the amount I can for Linux. For example, my router runs Linux, it is rather minimal, my desktop runs Linux too, as does my laptop, and so does a supercomputer that takes up an entire room. Windows isn't that versatile. And for customizing the kernel I was referring to an easy way to chose what moduals (or whatever the Windows equivalent are) that get loaded on boot and such.

Re:5 features (1)

Klaus_1250 (987230) | about 6 years ago | (#24185231)

4. -O3 for OEMs, for OEMs, MS should compile software -O3 so it is faster

A compiler flag during buildtime doesn't sound much like a feature. Build a proper compiled binary can make quite a difference vs. a generic build.

Re:5 features (1)

0racle (667029) | about 6 years ago | (#24185331)

or a ~1 GB minimal install with only the GUI and some programs

That's all Windows is anyway.

Tombstone? (5, Funny)

Rinisari (521266) | about 6 years ago | (#24184931)

What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery?

A crust that rises.

13. WinFS (4, Funny)

asifyoucare (302582) | about 6 years ago | (#24184939)

Yeah sure, straight after Duke Nukem Forever comes out.

I was going to say "who cares" (1)

pembo13 (770295) | about 6 years ago | (#24184959)

But then I remembered a lot of you paid good money for your Microsoft products. So I guess, you should have your voices heard. It's a pity you can't just file an RFE though. Personally, if I don't have the time to at least file a decent, detailed RFE I shut up about it, and don't piss and moan. But I got my software free of charge. However, ood luck with your appeals to your vendor of choice, Microsoft.

Easy backup, for everybody. (5, Insightful)

millia (35740) | about 6 years ago | (#24184961)

While I'll go along with the one-version-to-rule-them-all idea, the most important thing?
Easy external backup, for everybody.
Apple has it right with time machine. No muss, no fuss, and I had only the tiniest of glitches when I restored onto a newer hard drive.

And if they don't do this, well, this needs to be a feature of Ubuntu. That'll gain them market share.

Re:Easy backup, for everybody. (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#24185223)

The difference is, with Apple, Jobs can tell all the fanboys to buy any hardware and they will. With MS it is different. For one, I don't even own a external HD, I back up my key files, but really that only leaves me with ~1 GB of space used up on a 2 Gig flash drive. There is no need to backup my entire HD really, and if I'm using Linux its quite easy to reinstall (I can get an install of Ubuntu up in ~30 minutes and it takes me about an hour to customize it to my liking whereas XP took me about ~3 hours to install and a good weekend to finish installing all the software and customizing).

Re:Easy backup, for everybody. (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 6 years ago | (#24185249)

Hey, if they would just let the user do a whole system copy
( copy c:/* e:/Dr_Evil-backups/14-July-2008 ) that doesn't
complain and crap out 5% of the way through that would be a
f*cking HUGE improvement right there.

So some file can't be copied right now? Big Deal. Skip it.

But don't kneecap my 50G copy operation over it.

Re:Easy backup, for everybody. (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 6 years ago | (#24185335)

First thing to do is fix windows then. If you want backups to work, firstly make the install use less disk space.

Yes, I know disk space is cheap nowadays, but Vista happily hogs 6+Gig [microsoft.com] in its 'uninstall' WinSxS directory. Fancy backing that lot up every time.

Hardware control and lockdown modes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24184967)

My only issues with windows stability since Windows 2000 have been attributable to hardware (not driver, hardware) - replace the defective hardware, and the problem goes away.
Defective drivers can cause the issues as well, and Windows does need to improve that front, but it doesn't seem as critical.
For this issue, MS should be more concerned about the hardware quality used by manufacturers. People assume it's the OS and it isn't often the case.
Sadly this isn't easily implemented, and stability testing can't be terribly great until something has been out a while.

After that, a lockdown mode, using something similar to the various sudo like systems available on any other modern OS, for any administrative task. Not MS's cheap vista imitation, something like real thing, with an actual password (either one admin password, or each person has their own admin password that isn't the same as their normal password). Then maybe we'd see some better security.

better command line (4, Interesting)

bugs2squash (1132591) | about 6 years ago | (#24184971)

Most of the issues I have with windows stem from lukewarm support of a text command line.

I don't want to have to run cygwin just to get a reasonable CLI. Even having done that, it's just too hard to manipulate the registry etc. through text commands. I'm sure with a little thought, MS could come up with an industry leading text based interface that I could ssh into with a reasonable way to switch between different users (with different admin privileges) on the server.

And make them /s not \s for \.'s sake.

Re:better command line (5, Informative)

Da Fokka (94074) | about 6 years ago | (#24185129)

Take a look at Windows Powershell [wikipedia.org] , formerly known as Monad. It's different than most Unix shells out there but once you get used to it, it's pretty powerful.

Re:better command line (1)

Unordained (262962) | about 6 years ago | (#24185167)

Does Windows PowerShell (Monad) [microsoft.com] not fit the bill for you? (I personally use cygwin too.) Even so, the world of graphical developers needs to remember that a GUI is nice, but a GUI that also takes command-line parameters and documents those parameters is even better. Without that, there's not much a command-line can do to glue those apps together.

Re:better command line (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | about 6 years ago | (#24185357)

So what you really want is a CLI that understands regular expressions. One of my pet fucking peeves since DOS 2.11.

What was this guy smoking? (5, Insightful)

NerveGas (168686) | about 6 years ago | (#24184977)

  A "Gaming Mode" to disable some services? When is the last time you said "Ah, crap, my error reporting service is making me lag?"

And Program Caching notice? The average user doesn't even know that Vista uses RAM. His suggestion would just confuse them more. We need fewer popup notifications, not more. Instead of cluttering the user's view, get stuff out of the way. Interfere less.

Re:What was this guy smoking? (1)

iamapizza (1312801) | about 6 years ago | (#24185195)

That doesn't mean that the convenience shouldn't be available to the advanced users. By that logic, the command prompt shouldn't be available in Windows because it may be confusing to some people. And regedit. Gamers don't generally disable the Error Reporting Services but it's often useful to turn off a few services that are hogging resources. On a new machine, services aren't a problem, but as the months go by and the machine heads towards the inevitable destiny of obsolescence, every little bit counts.

Jesus. (5, Interesting)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | about 6 years ago | (#24184985)

Features? It doesn't need new features, most people don't use the features it already has. What it needs is not to suck!

The first thing Microsoft needs to do is look at everything from the user perspective. What can be faster, lighter, more convenient? What can be more stable? The absolute last thing they need to do is to--even for a second--imagine that bolting some shiny crap onto Vista is going to somehow make people happy with it.

Christ. Some of the stuff he thinks 7 needs is stuff that would make any knowledgable geek recoil in horror. WinFS?!? Are you kidding me?

"Game Mode" so I can turn off the resource hogging of my OS and run a game? NO! Pay attention! I want the OS to not hog resources.

A standards compliant web browser? It's called Firefox. Next.

Site licensing for the home user? *pause for sardonic laughter* Yea, right, that's going to happen about the time Ballmer gay marries Steve Jobs.

The only things I think he had right (aside from the impossible things like a modular os, etc) were XP virtual machine/emulation, and a better UAC interface. An XP vm would be a quick and dirty fix for compatibility issues; Mac pulled this with OS9 emulation, and it definitely smoothed their adpotion of OSX. As far as the UAC, Microsoft has always been the king of suck as far as security interfaces go; I almost always end up having to disable security to get the machine to do the crap I want it to do, and while I've got faith in my upstream security, I'm the kind of person who can't ever have enough security, and it pisses me off when some of it is useless. If you have to disable security to make your machine work, it's WORTHLESS (I'm looking at you too Symantec).

blah blah. End rant.

Proper Dual Monitor Support (4, Insightful)

urbanriot (924981) | about 6 years ago | (#24185003)

It's mind boggling that third party apps (Ultramon, Oscar) or drivers (Matrox, Nvidia) have had better dual monitor support for Windows since NT, yet Microsoft hasn't implemented any of their features. As far as I can see, nothing changed in regards to dual monitor features since Windows 2000.

Re:Proper Dual Monitor Support (1)

rob1980 (941751) | about 6 years ago | (#24185279)

What features are there for dual monitors that aren't built into Windows? I've been running dual monitors at work and at home for a couple years now and haven't found myself wanting anything more out of what's built in, but I don't know what the alternatives are capable of.

5 pages with broken comments... got to be kidding (5, Informative)

FreakinSyco (873416) | about 6 years ago | (#24185009)

Being that gadget zone is still a fan of the Redmond, Washington, company (although we like Apple too), gadget zone contributor and computer expert, Vito Cassisi, has come up with the 20 Microsoft must do's to ensure the success of Windows 7.

20. Modularised OS

The great thing about being modular is that the OS can be modified easily. Think Linux here - in Linux everything is modular and replaceable. For example, you can replace the whole GUI component without affecting anything else. With the abundance of third party applications written for Windows, this would spur a whole new variety of customisation and open-source implementation.

19. XP Virtual Machine

It seems that the biggest issue with Vista was compatibility with older software/drivers. A solution may be to include an XP virtual machine which ensures compatibility with said software. Apple did a similar thing when they re-wrote their OS a few years back.

18. New UAC

In theory UAC was a great idea. It protected people from themselves, but it was too intrusive. An alternate idea is to teach the user the importance of limited accounts and how they prevent the accessibility of nasties such as viruses. UAC should be a single dialogue with 'Continue' and 'Cancel' and an explanation of why the user was interrupted.

17. Gaming Mode

Most Windows users like to dabble in a bit of gaming when on their PC. But the constant demand for computing power by the latest titles (read: Crysis) can leave the majority in the dark. Perhaps Microsoft can offer a mode similar to that of the current 'Safe Mode' which only initiates the required services for gaming. This would minimise overhead and increase performance.

16. Customised Install

The avid performance tweakers out there may have heard of the likes of NLite and VLite for XP and Vista respectively. These pieces of software allow you to remove unwanted components from the OS before you install it. This increases available HDD space, and also improves performance depending on the services cut out. Offering the same amount of control when installing Windows 7 would settle the 'Windows is bloatware' activists out there.

15. Productive GUI

Microsoft bit the bullet with Vista and changed the GUI to be attractive. This is fine by all means, but the productivity of this new GUI wasn't exactly enhanced all that much. Small things such as multiple desktops and simpler open/save dialogues can make all the difference. Perhaps even let the user modify the GUI to their liking, i.e. toolbar sizes etc.

14. All for One and One for All

Vista came out in so many versions that even Chuck Norris was bewildered. There should only be three, Home, Business/Pro, and Server. This would lessen the current Windows ambiguity.

13. WinFS

Whatever happened to the infamous NTFS replacement? Windows 7 would really benefit from an improved file system, and such an improvement is bound to attract businesses that shunned Vista for its lack of innovation and improvement. The relational database structure should enhance overall system performance.

12. Home User Licensing

Let's say you have 3 PCs in your house, two desktops and a laptop. You want to upgrade to Windows 7, but have to pay three times for three separate licences. In a world where P2P and torrents are commonly used, how many users would slip into the world of cracks and keygens? The solution (to an extent) would be to offer a home licence. A small fee to be able to use the OS up to, for example, five times in the one household would surely benefit both Microsoft and the average home user.

11. Driver Availability

Arguably the Achilles heel of Vista was the slow uptake of drivers by device manufacturers. Although this is hard for Microsoft to dictate, it would be in their best interest to promote driver production during the OS development stage. Even if the drivers are beta, it sure beats being left with no hardware functionality.

10. Standards Compliant Browser

This isn't much of an OS thing, but it is bundled so we have included it. Internet Explorer 8 would win the hearts of many web developers if it was created to web standards. There's nothing more frustrating than coding a website which works fine in Firefox and Opera only to have IE spit the dummy.

9. Program Caching

Currently, Vista caches commonly used software into RAM so that it launches faster. The main problem with this approach is that it confuses users into thinking Vista is using several hundred MB of RAM just for itself. A simple toolbar notification stating 'Vista is caching your programs to improve speed. Click here for more information', would end all the confusion.

8. Microsoft Toolbox

This is an idea we came up with which we believe would benefit many users with compatibility issues. The feature would list current drivers and patches for all installed hardware, games, and software. By having this all in the one place (possibly within Windows Update) users can keep their system up-to-date without seeking drivers and patches manually.

7. OS Restoration via imaging

System restore is a great companion when things go wrong. But sometimes the damage is too severe. By integrating a user friendly imaging solution, the user would be able to install everything they want, and then simply create an image of the setup. This image would be saved on another HDD or partition ready to restore in the case of a system failure.

6. Barebones Kernel

This idea has been thrown around by Microsoft, specifically 'MinWin'. Allowing the user to choose between this and the default kernel could potentially allow older systems (i.e. XP based) to run the new OS with decent performance levels.

5. 64bit only

The main difference between 32bit and 64bit is the amount of accessible memory or RAM. Plans to create a 32bit Windows 7 would be counterproductive, by then GPUs would use at least 1GB of VRAM, and the average system will most likely have upwards of 4GB of RAM. Considering the 4GB memory addressing limit of 32bit, you can see that confused customers won't be happy.

4. Better out-of-box burning capabilities

CD/DVD burning is a simple everyday task. Unfortunately, Vista cannot burn discs very well, and there is a severe lack of options. A decent burning service wouldn't go astray in Windows 7.

3. Diagnostic Tools

It happens all the time, you build your own PC and the OS install constantly crashes. You blame the OS, but really, something else is at fault (such as the RAM). If diagnostic tools similar to Memtest were included, issues like this could be detected without the need to find third party software.

2. Faster Boot and Shutdown

This seems to be something that constantly plagues Windows. A faster boot time would be a great first impression to many critics, and it'll save valuable time, especially when restarting for updates.

1. Simplify and manage startup items
Many users install software which starts up with Windows. All of this software opening at once causes lag and lack of usability for a considerable amount of time. A simple startup interface (not as daunting as the current MS Configuration Utility) would help users disable what they don't need running. Another feature would be to schedule programs to start after a certain amount of time. This would prevent the computer struggling to open several programs in one hit.

So that's it. gadget zone's guide for Microsoft on the 20 features that would make Windows 7 better than all its predecessors. Stevie B, we hope you're listening!

-5 pages with some numbers split over two pages... give me a break.

Windows 7 fix (5, Funny)

192939495969798999 (58312) | about 6 years ago | (#24185029)

1. edit the boot screen from "windows XP" to say "windows 7", then just re-release it as the new version and continue to refine XP's codebase. problems solved!

Who cares what it should... (1)

okigan (534681) | about 6 years ago | (#24185039)

Who has time to read these speculations. Who here cares what Win7 *should include*... given history of features taken out at the last moment -- wake us up when Win7 does include it.

What the!? (1)

jav1231 (539129) | about 6 years ago | (#24185047)

14. All for One and One for All
Vista came out in so many versions that even Chuck Norris was bewildered. There should only be three, Home, Business/Pro, and Server. This would lessen the current Windows ambiguity.


Which is it? One for all or not? Why should there be different versions of the OS at all? Server I can understand but desktop? This is one area that Vista was hurt in.

Re:What the!? (1)

jandrese (485) | about 6 years ago | (#24185227)

Why does it even need that? Just to milk businesses for more money? If the home user doesn't want to join a domain, well, they don't have to, but there's no reason to sell them the OS with those bits turned off except as a way of wringing more money out of business users. Same with services. Make it a checkbox on install and be done with it. If you really want to charge for an extra option, just make it a pay download or something so people can pick and choose what they need instead of having to pick up deluxe-ultimate for that one feature they needed over the bare-bones-basic version.

UAC (4, Insightful)

AlHunt (982887) | about 6 years ago | (#24185069)

Once Windows programs are written with UAC in mind, UAC won't be such a problem.

In theory UAC was a great idea. It protected people from themselves, but it was too intrusive. An alternate idea is to teach the user the importance of limited accounts and how they prevent the accessibility of nasties such as viruses. UAC should be a single dialogue with 'Continue' and 'Cancel' and an explanation of why the user was interrupted.

Re:UAC (1)

eric_brissette (778634) | about 6 years ago | (#24185355)

Once Windows programs are written with UAC in mind, UAC won't be such a problem.

This might be true some of the time, but Renaming a shortcuts on my desktop shouldn't produce two dialog boxes that require my attention. I'm pretty sure this isn't the application's fault.

How about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185077)

Get rid of the stupid and user hostile activation. No other OS has this, and MacOS is selling lots of copies every time there is a new release, and it has no activation. Stuff the CD in, click upgrade, and done.

Add SELinux policies onto every app. This should be part of a new MSI standard, where an app gives a manifest of permissions, minimum, normal, and maximum (some apps like Web browsers should never be given free reign and shouldn't install if they are forced to run as Administrator or system)

Ditch all but 3 versions. Home, pro, and corporate is good enough.

Advanced installer (1)

Daryen (1138567) | about 6 years ago | (#24185089)

First off, I'd like to say that I RTFA and agree with nearly all of their suggestions.

(Although some of them were rather silly, a cached programs popup? Like I need more popups on my toolbar. If users are smart enough to know how much page file Vista is using, they're smart enough to know why).

As a systems admin, what I'd really like in addition to the modular OS is a much advanced installer. I would like a full set of options on what to install and what not to install. (Lets go ahead an uncheck WMP DRM, Alexa [imilly.com] , Windows Messenger, and a whole other host of unnecessary crap). Maybe even a "quick minimal" installation of only the required components to get Windows to run. You'll notice even Vista runs fairly nicely once add SP1 and chop it up with a tool like vLite [vlite.net] .

Microkernel (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 6 years ago | (#24185093)

Windows 7 should be a modularized OS, like Minix. Oh, a microkernel.

Yet, the same folks will argue against a microkernel... mind you, Minix' stated goal is exactly WHY they want a modularized OS: to make driver crashes not tear down the system. Amusingly, it's also the same implementation: Move all drivers out of the core kernel.

Why do I see so many cries for microkernels these days, without the word "microkernel" attached? And with so much fighting AGAINST anything called a "microkernel"? What's in a name, what is a rose if not a rose...

Re:Microkernel (1)

jandrese (485) | about 6 years ago | (#24185265)

NT is already based around a microkernel, and all new versions of Windows are based on NT.

Let's scale back the flame in the Summary... (3, Insightful)

wikdwarlock (570969) | about 6 years ago | (#24185099)

...a hope for recovery?

Isn't this a bit gloomy? I know it's cool 'round these parts to bash M$, but seriously, do we HONESTLY believe that Vista, even the flop that it is, is marking some sort of very likely demise for Windows? Isn't it much more likely, that, as with 98 ME for example, users will suffer through the pains of Vista and M$ will continue to be the majority OS by a large margin for several years?

Nearly (4, Informative)

Toreo asesino (951231) | about 6 years ago | (#24185107)

new UAC, program caching, standards compliant browser

From what I've seen from builds so far, UAC is getting modified in that you'll be able to say "Don't bug me again for for X minutes"...program caching is in Vista called SuperFetch...works nicely if you have the RAM (even if people tend to complain it "uses my memory", ironically)...and IE8 is supposed to be standards compliant by default. So, out of that list, 2 out of 3 are already here if you don't use IE, and UAC prompts are rare if you don't use software from 10 years ago.

Vito Who? (1)

iamapizza (1312801) | about 6 years ago | (#24185109)

Who is Vito Cassisi and what makes him an 'expert'?

What are they recovering from? (1)

Computershack (1143409) | about 6 years ago | (#24185113)

What other features would you suggest to Microsoft if they are to have a hope for recovery? Why do they need to recover? They seem to be doing quite well. Its hardly like they've had a drop in value is it?

No DRM, (5, Insightful)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 6 years ago | (#24185145)

A proper Windows Classic GUI, and MUCH lower system requirements than Vista. Dual-booting XP works fine for running games, and that's all I need Windows for. Make me want to upgrade, don't force me. They tried that with Vista but I got Halo 2 to run on XP anyways. Also try to make UAC less of a PITA.

The Colin Chapman theory of design applies here: "To add speed, add lightness."

Vista is a fatass riced-out American SUV with flat tires and the brakes stuck halfway on. Dump that POS and try again.

How about fewer features (1)

smallshot (1202439) | about 6 years ago | (#24185171)

maybe if they cut back on all the 'features' there would be fewer problems. Anyone else in favor of windows 7 being built from scratch? They could always include an XP virtual machine. Maybe they don't do it because it might end up being too much like Linux...

Customizable Explorer toolbar (1)

QuailRider (853479) | about 6 years ago | (#24185173)

Why was this functionality removed? For the love of Jebus, can we please be allowed to turn the file tree view on and off with a click of a button, etc? I spend a lot of time moving files around, and the locked down Windows Explorer is one of the most annoying "features" I've encountered in Vista.

FORWARD SLASHES (5, Funny)

alan_dershowitz (586542) | about 6 years ago | (#24185183)

It's 2008. Dump the triumvirate of Windows design retardedness:

1. Drive letters (we are not using CP/M)
2. Backward slashes for directory separation (we are not using DOS)
3. CRLF (we are not using a typewriter!)

I sense a pattern... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185189)

My predictions for the next weeks (spoiler alert):

50 Features Windows 7 Can Include
75 Features Windows 7 May Include
100 Features Windows 7 Will Not Include

Features Windows 7 should include (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | about 6 years ago | (#24185193)

Balloon Help!!

Whoops - I thought it said System 7.

Scary introduction... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185219)

Windows Vista, the OS that everyone loves to hate. Despite its enhanced security, improved CPU scheduler and excellent stability, its still the flawed gem in many critics eyes.

Tough to sound convincing with a preface like that.

It should include (3, Interesting)

Sitnalta (1051230) | about 6 years ago | (#24185225)

1) Hardware acceleration
2) Only two versions. Home and Pro.
3) An expose function that is actually useful
4) Multiple desktops
5) IP over 1394a/b
6) NTFS support for Readyboost
7) Built-in support for running on a virtual machine
8) Better organization in the control panel and start menu.

And that's just off the top of my head!

The list : (1)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | about 6 years ago | (#24185235)

Australian computer expert Vito Cassisi has come up with a list of 20 features that Windows 7 should have :

1. Developers
2. Developers
3. Developers
4. Developers
5. Developers
6. Developers
7. Developers
8. Developers
9. Developers
10. Developers
11. Developers
12. Developers
13. Developers
14. Developers
15. Developers
16. Developers
17. Developers
18. Developers
19. Developers
20. Developers

TFA is crap (5, Insightful)

Interfacer (560564) | about 6 years ago | (#24185239)

I read that article earlier today, and it is complete drivel.
One of the points is they want to do away with UAC and instead educate the users.
But otoh they complain that there is no status bar telling people that Vista is using their RAM for caching. So what do you want the users to be: Expert or novice?
And I'm all for educating users, but
a) it doesn't work if they don't care and
b) Microsoft got bashed for not protecting the users. UAC enforces the design guidelines that were not enforced up until now.

And it has to be 'productive' Fine. You tell them what 'productive' constitutes and they'll be happy enough to implement it. As it is, usability experts find it difficult enough.
Is 'the gimp' so much better?

And it has to be rewritten from scratch.
You can complain about the Shell all you want, but the Vista kernel is an engineering masterpiece, and there are some real design innovations in there. Read 'Windows Systems Internals, 4th edition' if you don't believe me.

Yes, windows has its problems, but the list in TFA is complete bollocks as far as I am concerned. It is just a bunch of easy catchphrases for getting support from the windows bashers and for getting hits on their page.

Package manager (2, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | about 6 years ago | (#24185253)

The centralized repository of software is one place Linux really shines. It can be done more easily with open source software, but as the iTunes store shows us, it doesn't have to be open source. Microsoft could easily offer vendors a place in its own software store that's tied to the Add/Remove programs dialog. Want a freeware program, it's a couple clicks away. Want Photoshop, it's a couple clicks and a credit card number away.

I'd imagine there would be some anti-trust considerations though.

One feature that shouldn't be left out (2, Interesting)

geogob (569250) | about 6 years ago | (#24185267)

One feature I'd love to see is a desktop pop-up that comes up randomly telling me "There are unused services on your computer". That combined with a nice wizard that turns off all the services you never used, making your computer useless in the same process, would be wonderful.

I don't know what this guy was thinking... (1)

Tuberous (1325699) | about 6 years ago | (#24185269)

I failed to see a Complaint Box included in Vito's list. Also, I sense that he knows very little about Microsoft... Gaming Mode?

Better remote desktop support (2, Interesting)

91degrees (207121) | about 6 years ago | (#24185287)

The most recent "wouldn't it be nice if..." I wanted was a proper version of remote desktop. Something a little more like X where the architecture was actually designed to allow windows to be drawn efficiently on another machine, but some of the basic IO (such as rendering the text you've just typed in a dialog) to be handled locally.

I got a FEVER! (1)

Verdatum (1257828) | about 6 years ago | (#24185289)

...And the only prescription, is more Clippy!

Untrusted Apps (5, Insightful)

FrankSchwab (675585) | about 6 years ago | (#24185293)

1. I want to be able to install an application without having to give it complete and unfettered access to every single aspect of my machine. As a long list of "reputable" companies (Sony, Intuit, Apple, every game engine, etc) have proven, I can't trust any of them. They all want to install rootkits, spyware, adware, whatever they can when I choose to install their app. I can't find out beforehand what they're going to install, I can't easily find out afterwards what they did install.

Give me a way to sandbox every single app. I don't care if that means that I can't install an app that hooks the keyboard, or the filesystem. I want my machine to continue to run!

2. Implement a "Snitch" mode for performance. Tell me why my computer takes 3 minutes to boot, and name names. Tell me why my computer takes 2 minutes to shut down, and name names.

These are OS-level improvements (not eye candy implemented in the windows manager) that would make my life easier. /frank

Let me make my little 5 something list : (3, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | about 6 years ago | (#24185315)

- NO drm shit to slow down the computer
- No bloating of the system with embedded browsers, players or other shit
- Modular structure that only installs or loads stuff that is absolutely necessary
- No 2342532523 different versions that only came to being due to shit from the marketing department
- No 'we could do it, but we wont give some features to old oses to force you to go up to 7' thing, like the dx10 flop in vista
- NO 'win 7 certified' logo on computers that cant run win 7.
- Less chair throwing

that should get you going ...

How about a New Reference Point? (2, Interesting)

mpapet (761907) | about 6 years ago | (#24185317)

Instead of listing things that will never get done, let's discuss a general framework. (that will never get done....)

An OS that prioritizes consumer wants/needs BEFORE the media rights holders. How about sticking to the Doctrine of Fair Use as a start?

An OS with a simplified security scheme. I'm not talking about their blame-shifting "security" mechanism to which they are clearly committed.

They probably can't get back all of the developers they lost when they abandoned VB, but they need another VB for Schmoes to write their quick and dirty hacks.

I'd like a smarmy paperclip helper, please (4, Funny)

MattW (97290) | about 6 years ago | (#24185327)

I'd really like a smarmy paperclip that will pipe up all the time and suggest things. Say, it pops up while posting on the Intarwebs and says, "It looks like you're trying to spell the word 'ridiculous'. Can I help with that?"

Poetic Slashdotting (1)

wilsoniya (902930) | about 6 years ago | (#24185337)

Because sites that spread a relatively short article over 5 pages just to rake viewers across more ads deserve a good slashdotting.

Ew (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#24185343)

FTA:
"Vista came out in so many versions that even Chuck Norris was bewildered"

Really? Are Chuck Norris jokes still funny in Australia or something? Vito Cassisi, go back to 2004

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...