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Steven Hawking Considering Move To Canada

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the oh-canada dept.

Space 378

thepacketmaster learned of "...the possibility of Steven Hawking moving to Waterloo in Canada: 'A report out of Britain suggests Stephen Hawking is considering an invitation to come work at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics....But he's also being encouraged to move to Ontario by his University of Cambridge colleague Neil Turok, the mathematical physicist who will take over as Perimeter's executive director on Oct. 1. Perimeter confirmed last night that it has made a standing offer to Hawking...Turok is leaving Cambridge after failing to persuade university authorities, research councils and sponsors to spend $40 million...By comparison, Waterloo's Perimeter Institute has about $600 million in funding...The addition of Hawking to Perimeter's staff of top physicists would be a major coup for the research institute, founded in 1999 by Mike Lazaridis, founder and co-CEO of Research In Motion, which makes the BlackBerry.'"

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Didn't... (5, Insightful)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213859)

all the top phycisits start leaving Germany when things started going downhill?

Re:Didn't... (4, Funny)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213933)

And the physicists left too!

yes but there was a difference. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214003)

Some were Jewish and others didn't want to work for a corrupt regime.

I don't think our situation is that bad yet. Yet.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1, Interesting)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214125)

The difference is that the US' corrupt regime don't give a rats ass of your religion.
You'll all be wearing DHS shock bracelets soon enough.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214283)

I guess you don't know where Cambridge is. Must be an American.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (5, Insightful)

KillerBob (217953) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214591)

You laugh... but I've known people who live in Maine that couldn't find Canada on a map. I could understand from the deep south, where Canada is a mythical land of igloos and Eskimos, but Maine?!? There's parts of Canada that are further south than Maine, and there was a time when that state was part of Canada, for crying out loud....

Re:yes but there was a difference. (2, Interesting)

Gorshkov (932507) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215085)

Never mind Maine - there are parts of Canada are further south than parts of Northern California. Look on a map for Point Pelee sometime .....

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214727)

I got that wrong once...

I was talking about Cambridge in the context of text adventure games... You know, 'cause Cambridge, MA is where Infocom started out and all... And someone said if I wasn't talking about England then I should be clear about it... And I was all like, well, we are talking text adventures here, right? So maybe it's reasonable to assume Cambridge, MA?

As it turns out, one of the original text adventures ("Adventure", IIRC) was written in Cambridge, England, so I got to be wrong twice in one discussion. :D Live and learn, eh?

Re:yes but there was a difference. (5, Informative)

Xeger (20906) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214839)

To be fair, we have a Cambridge on this side of the pond, in Massachusetts, and it's home to a rather prestigious institution of higher learning. If one were unfamiliar with the work or background Stephen Hawking, it would be an innocent mistake to confuse our Cambridge (town) with your Cambridge (university).

Re:yes but there was a difference. (4, Funny)

geekwithsoul (860466) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214933)

And his synthesized voice tool should really be outfitted with an English accent :)

Re:yes but there was a difference. (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214299)

The difference is that the US' corrupt regime don't give a rats ass of your religion.

Two words: Intelligent Design.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

PawNtheSandman (1238854) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214365)

WAR Flying Spaghetti Monster

Re:yes but there was a difference. (4, Funny)

genner (694963) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214775)

Intelligent Design encompasses all religions except atheism.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214405)

Britain isn't in the the US, dumbass. It's in England.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214575)

Haha

Re:yes but there was a difference. (0, Offtopic)

SpzToid (869795) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214677)

Actually what you are referring to as Britain, also encompasses all of England, but also Ireland, Scotland, & Wales.
Some people refer to it as the United Kingdom, or the UK for short. Meaning England is only a portion of Britain.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

AndrewHowe (60826) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214761)

Only Northern Ireland is in the UK. It's also not in Great Britain. The UK is short for "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (and dependent territories)"

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

SpzToid (869795) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215059)

Please excuse me as I only submit wikipedia as a citation: "The United Kingdom is a union[7][8] of four constituent countries: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK [wikipedia.org]

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214155)

In our case, some are Muslim and others don't want to work for a corrupt regime.

Ok, so we're not committing genocide and are several orders of magnitude less evil. But the basic point still stands.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214605)

No, it really doesn't. Not at all.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (1)

snl2587 (1177409) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214843)

There isn't any corruption? Or racism? And scientists aren't willing to leave for greener pastures because of this? I'd like to know where you're getting your information.

Re:yes but there was a difference. (0, Troll)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214829)

genocide? currently, no.
Later, maybe but you'd have to have oil or something.
All you guys need now is Marshall law and you have a fascist state.
Think about it:
-Media is controlled
-they have an internal surveillance system
-Corps can do anything (FISA, DMCA, laws for sale)
-You have a gulag (GuantÃnamo)
-You have Rampant Cronyism and Corruption

Re:yes but there was a difference. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24215057)

All you guys need now is Marshall law

I guess that the way the US economy is being run could be considered 'providing economic aid to Europe', in a way similar to the Marshall Plan.

Its not for the WH cutting the NSF budget (0, Offtopic)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214955)

or related ones. I looked it up, the WH keeps requesting small increases to the NSF... http://www.nsf.gov/about/budget/ [nsf.gov] and they request specific amounts for projects only to see them whacked http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/12/us-budget-spell.html [wired.com]

Now I know, there are going to be the standard cry-about-Iraq-because-if-not-Iraq type crap totally ignoring the fact that just a small percentage of earmarks wasted on works named after LIVING congressmen could pay for any number of our own pet projects.

The money has always been there, Congress has the final responsibility for directing it correctly. Iraq is a very good excuse to spend money how they want while pointing "SEE SEE SEE SEE" elsewhere. In other words, one negative about Iraq that people ignore is that its mere existence allows Congress to waste money because they can always lay claim to the fact that Iraq consumes more.

without Iraq the money would be just as unavailable as it is today. This situation will not change until neither Democrats or Republicans are dominant.

One reason: (1)

zifferent (656342) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213863)

Just think of the tax savings!

Re:One reason: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214665)

Right. Another gimp foreigner we Canadians have to support.

Actually.... (5, Funny)

Urger (817972) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213867)

He's moving there to be closer to the headquarters of the Vice Presidential Action Rangers.

Re:Actually.... (3, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214045)

Do you really think he's a member of the current Vice Presidential Action Rangers? Hmm... nevermind, it could be that he has promises from all parties to be rehired after the election. Hopefully Gary faked his own death; the Rangers need his chaotic determination to complement Hawking's rigid mathematics.

Re:Actually.... (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214533)

I'm an 11th level vice president!

Not quite. (1)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214885)

He's going to start the Deputy Prime Minister's Action Rangers, a secretive, shadowy organization including such diverse Canadians as Jim Carrey, Mike Myers, the clone of Frederick Banting and Alex Trebeck.

A press release from the newly-minted organization stated:

"As there is currently no deputy prime minister in Canada, we welcome Dr. Hawking to the position and are together looking forward to the great things he can do for our country, which is large and mostly empty, like our prime minister's head."

I wonder (4, Funny)

xpuppykickerx (1290760) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213899)

how long it will take his little chair to get him there. Does that thing have snow treads?

Re:I wonder (4, Funny)

PawNtheSandman (1238854) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214399)

The wheelchair has a helicopter propeller that pops out of the chair back.

Re:I wonder (1)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214607)

You made my day: Thanks.

Yours,

Steven Hawking

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24215015)

Not long. Cambridge [wikipedia.org] is only about 20km from Waterloo. :-)

RIP UK Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24213913)

RIP UK science.

What a crying shame from a country that produced Newton.

Re:RIP UK Science (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214067)

Yep. But when the R&D budget falls below 1.5% of the GDP, this is bound to happen. Engineering and science research are thriving in the US and Canada because they both spend more than 3% of their GDPs on research, much of it in basic science. And this has been happening for over 50 years. This is why the US has created almost 50% of the science Nobel laureates in the last 50 years. Canada is also pulling far beyond its weight.

Fringe Benefits (3, Informative)

sssmashy (612587) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213915)

Canada also has better wheelchair access.

Its our (5, Funny)

BigJClark (1226554) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213921)


Its our national healthcare system.

Re:Its our (0, Troll)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213989)

Its our national healthcare system.

Hope it beats you're [sic] national grammar system.

=Smidge=

Re:Its our (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214273)

...that drove him away?

Re:Its our (2, Informative)

leoxx (992) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214595)

It's better than [cmwf.org] the American [openmedicine.ca] health [forbes.com] care [businessweek.com] system [commonwealthfund.org] , so that would be a plus compared to going to the USA.

Re:Its our (2, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214749)

Because they don't have that in the UK. Hang on...

NOOoOOOO!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24213965)

We must have him!! The US MUST have all the best scientists in the world...

Give him whatever he wants to become an American citizen, and that will prove that America is the brightest country....

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (2, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214071)

Probability states the worlds brightest people are probably in China or India. However due to political structure it may be harder to find these people in those countries. (less so in India)

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (5, Insightful)

gnuman99 (746007) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214553)

Your ideas are shaped not just by your capabilities, but the ideas and interactions you came up with when you were growing up.

I believe that there is a significant percentage of population (probably around 10%) that could be just as bright as the top people in sciences, but they just took a different path. They didn't get the encouragements, or maybe they just didn't meet a friend in the 5th grade that had the same interest as them.

There is more to whom we become than some political structure. The ultimate you is shaped MUCH closer to your personal life than even the city hall.

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (4, Interesting)

necro81 (917438) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214601)

That appeal to statistics assumes that the population of brilliant people (both inherently brilliant and the learned) is uniformly distributed among the rest of the population of the world. This is demonstrably not the case. Some cities have higher concentrations of inventors, entrepeneurs, PhDs, etc., than other cities of equal size. Perhaps one city has a university to draw these people in, while the other one doesn't. Perhaps one area, way back when, had a guy or group of people that made some major discovery, started a new industry, which set that region on the path to continued discovery (e.g., Silicon Valley).

The same could be said for countries as a whole. One would expect to find a greater proportion of scientists in an industrialized country over an agrarian one, or over a nation that has only recently industrialized.

I am not trying to make a nationalistic or xenophobic argument against India or China, because I know for a fact that they have lots of brilliant people, I am just trying to delve deeper into the notion that a larger national population equals a larger population of [whatever else].

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (1)

BluGuy (617572) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214789)

I think gnuman was referring to aptitude more than intelligence.

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (1)

sdpuppy (898535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214747)

Maybe.

But the problem is whether these people have opportunity (or reward) to work in the field in which they are talented.

Also a problem in the US - If you're in science in most cases you need to either truly love the field or otherwise be motivated in some manner for other than monetary gains (or otherwise go into law/business and contribute brilliance there).

example:

Disparity of salaries between University Professors and Football Coaches - overall, who provides more long term gain to society and who are rewarded more in terms of salary (almost an order of magnitude difference)?

http://pubs.acs.org/isubscribe/journals/cen/86/i28/html/8628education.html [acs.org]

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (1)

bmajik (96670) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215007)

Disparity of salaries between University Professors and Football Coaches - overall, who provides more long term gain to society and who are rewarded more in terms of salary (almost an order of magnitude difference)?

Well, on the point of providing value to society, that will rathole into a debate about what is "good for society", assuming that there's an objective or even subjective-with-high-consensus notion of such a thing. It's not clear that people want to live longer, healthier, more intellectually stimulating lives. Many people live too long and are bored. It's certainly clear that more US residents place a higher value on the entertainment offered to them by sporting events than whatever research and progress have done for them.

But like I said -- let's not rathole on that point :)

The second point is about rewards. I think it is worthwhile to point out that college sports are often _highly_ profitable to their host universities. I'm in general no fan of the typical games popular in the US, and especially so at the collegiate level. Even so, these programs tend to bring in a lot of money which is then diverted towards more academic purposes. Presumably, you see the (perhaps unfortuneate) utility in subsidizing higher-order activities with populist bread and circuses :)

Re:NOOoOOOO!!! (1)

Ziest (143204) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215097)

Mr. President, we must not allow a foreign scientist gap !

Like Freeman, but more not theoretical (5, Funny)

Rinisari (521266) | more than 6 years ago | (#24213983)

Mr. Turok, mathematical physicist and dinosaur hunter, to you, pal.

Re:Like Freeman, but more not theoretical (3, Funny)

MagdJTK (1275470) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214207)

I was actually lectured by Turok last year (in Electromag). I was thoroughly disappointed to see exactly zero dinosaurs throughout the twenty-four lectures. I mean, not even a pterodactyl!

Re:Like Freeman, but more not theoretical (5, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214547)

There may have been a velociraptor hiding under the seats without you even knowing. Those things are smarter than Republicans, and nearly as smart as cats.

who in their right mind (-1, Troll)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214001)

Who in their right mind would want to move to Waterloo?

I mean, really, the university isn't even the best in Ontario, let alone the country and Waterloo itself is in the middle of nowhere.

Re:who in their right mind (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214095)

I mean, really, the university isn't even the best in Ontario, let alone the country

For math and physics it sure is the best, especially with the perimeter institute there now. Sounds like they sent you a nice rejection letter :)

Re:who in their right mind (1, Insightful)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214433)

Actually, I refused to apply there because they pay female grad students in physics and astronomy $2000 more than their male peers and I don't think it's fair that I should get paid more for doing the same work, nor do I support an institution that would do such a thing. Also, they didn't have any profs with research that particularly interested me.

Re:who in their right mind (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214809)

I am a grad student in physics at waterloo (phd) and my female counterparts do not get paid anymore than me from the uni. Where the heck did you hear this?

Are you sure that you aren't just talking about 3rd party scholarships that are only available to women? The amount from you get from the actual university is the same for men and women.

Re:who in their right mind (1)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215001)

No, it was on their website. They posted their grad student salaries online. Although they seem to have redone their website for this since I last checked and taken this information down (i.e. it looks very different).

Re:who in their right mind (2, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214123)

I doubt Stephen Hawking gets out and about very much. And not just because of his disability. Many brilliant people are so eccentric they never need to leave their place of research, so it doesn't worry them too much whether their community is a happening place or not.

Re:who in their right mind (1)

vajaradakini (1209944) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214509)

This may be true, but man, I was stuck in Waterloo for a day and it was the most boring day I've ever had.

Side note: I somewhat forgot that the perimeter institute is based there (I'm not in theory so I don't pay much attention to where their institutions are actually located).

Re:who in their right mind (0, Flamebait)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214715)

You clearly know nothing about Hawking and nothing about people who do research. It beggars belief that someone as ignorant as you thought that your comment was worth putting on display for other people to read. What is this? Youtube?

Re:who in their right mind (1)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214321)

Waterloo is alright ... though the local Mennonite community lends a somewhat strange vibe.

Sounds like a headline from a 007 movie (4, Funny)

denzacar (181829) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214481)

"World's leading physicist moves to the university in the middle of nowhere"

I wonder...

Re:who in their right mind (2, Insightful)

robotoperasinger (707047) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214491)

Waterloo has the best or at least second best computer science, mathematics and engineering programs in Ontario. I'm not sure where you gathered your information. Maybe if you are talking about arts degrees, but that is not what Waterloo is known for. I also don't think that Hawkings is hankering to get a fine arts degree, either.

Re:who in their right mind (1)

Shambly (1075137) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214505)

I love waterloo, I decided to stay here after I got my university degree there. It's really nice to have an office with trees outside. It's only an hour away from Toronto, and it has a very large Asian community so the food here is great and varied. And despite what you think we are one of the premier Math and Computer science school in North America, we compete with MIT for contests.

Er.... (1)

Senjutsu (614542) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214635)

I mean, really, the university isn't even the best in Ontario, let alone the country and Waterloo itself is in the middle of nowhere.

Depending on what you're studying, Waterloo actually is the best University in the country.

The voice (4, Funny)

Megaweapon (25185) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214005)

Can we get the computerized voice with a Canadian accent, eh?

British? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214073)

I never realized Stephen Hawking was British. He doesn't sound it....

Standing offer to Hawking... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214083)

I hear he is no longer able to respond to such offers.

Perhaps Balmer might be able to make a modified version of such an offer that might be compatible with his current restraints.

Re:Standing offer to Hawking... (2, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214465)

Perhaps Balmer might be able to make a modified version

Computerized voice: "Steve, get your dirty hands off my chair."

Hawking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214093)

This bird's gotta fly!

They see me rollin (5, Funny)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214157)

They hatin Patrolling they tryin to catch me theorizing dirty Tryin to catch me theorizing dirty

He'll have to redohis phrase box, ay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214173)

Kooky Kanux talk funny, ay?

So do Minnesotans, North AND South Dakotans, and don't even mention NEW Englanders, and NEW Hampshire may as well be another country.

Phew! (3, Funny)

Harold Halloway (1047486) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214183)

No more traffic jams on Silver Street.

In other news... (4, Funny)

cptnapalm (120276) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214225)

Stephen Hawking changed his mind about what he wanted to eat for lunch.

"At first I thought I wanted fish," said Mr. Hawkings, "but then I decided I did not want fish. I eventually went with spaghetti."

There is much debate in science-related blogs as well as in academia about the significance of this change.

Re:In other news... (2, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214397)

He was very obvously toughed by His Noodly Appendage.

New voicebox. (3, Funny)

IllGetYouAToe (1303241) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214287)

Hawking will have his venerable voicebox replaced by one of Canadian manufacture, based on an amalgamation of Geddy Lee and Alex Trebek's voice, which automatically interjects "eh" every 8th word.

Re:New voicebox. (2, Funny)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214899)

Hawking will have his venerable voicebox replaced by one of Canadian manufacture, based on an amalgamation of Geddy Lee and Alex Trebek's voice, which automatically interjects "eh" every 8th word.

Meh, everybody's raising this possibility.... While it is a very real possibility, I think you're all missing the bigger picture here.

What do they make in Canada? Beer, Mounties, snow... oh, and the frikkin Canadarm [wikipedia.org] ! The chair is bound to receive upgrades based on this technology - probably a quadrupedal locomotion system and two massive manipulators, all Canadarm-based...

Perimeter Institute? (2, Funny)

Trespass (225077) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214343)

That sounds like a front organization for Aperture Science.

Re:Perimeter Institute? (1)

Alpha Whisky (1264174) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214633)

Are you suggesting they promised him cake?

Re:Perimeter Institute? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214913)

No, a big effin' cock up his arsehole.

Public Lectures (5, Informative)

necro81 (917438) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214371)

One of the coolest things about the Perimeter Institute is that they have a public lecture series. The lecturers are a mix of eminent scientists from inside and outside the Institute. The topics are mostly drawn from the edges of physics and cosmology. Some are more accessible to lay people than other.

The Institute has most of them available for offline viewing and reading [perimeterinstitute.ca] . Maybe they could get Stephen Hawking one day.

Heavy Duty Keyboard On Order For Speeches... (4, Funny)

FrankDrebin (238464) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214383)

... at least the 'A' key, eh?

OOoh...think of it: (1)

WheelDweller (108946) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214561)

Going to Canada in October. Oh, yeah...the rustle of big autumn leaves, rustling in the snow.

Sounds like someone only able to pose a $15M argument asking for $40M, so he's taking his toys and going home.

I'm reminded of the Baldwins (not Adam) who, every time a Republican is elected claiming they're moving to France. If only they'd follow through.

Isn't it Steve Hawking that's trying to suggest that all of reality came from *nothing* instead of coming from light/energy? Nothing comes from nothing; nothing ever could. But maybe the Canadians can be convinced.

Take your heavy clothes, Steven- appreciate the scenery, 'cause that's what they have the most of. (Can't wait to get there for a vacation, myself!)

Waterloo is getting there... (4, Insightful)

technienerd (1121385) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214579)

As a Computer Science major at the University of Waterloo, I'm proud to hear that the Waterloo region and it's research and higher education institutes are attracting top minds to the area. Arguably, the university is already the top undergrad tech school in Canada and competitive with the top in the U.S. as well, but currently only on the undergraduate level. However, huge amounts of funding have been recently pouring into UW's graduate programs, and associated research institutes. Some Waterloo folks like to label the university "MIT of the north" but unfortunately, I'd argue that's currently only true on the undergraduate level. Its co-op program makes Waterloo grads among the most employable new grads in the world. With this kind of exposure I'm sure Waterloo will reach its goal of being competitive with the top U.S. tech schools in all areas within the next 5 to 10 years. Maybe they'll start making movies with references to Waterloo as well.:P Then again, most movies are made/produced in the U.S...

Re:Waterloo is getting there... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214627)

There's lots of movies with references to Waterloo, though they generally deal with this Napoleon guy, I guess he was a bigshot there.

Re:Waterloo is getting there... (1)

waterwingz (68802) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214851)

I never seem to have mod points when a funny comment like this comes along. Somebody please mod it up ?

Re:Waterloo is getting there... (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214921)

There's lots of movies with references to Waterloo, though they generally deal with this Napoleon guy, I guess he was a bigshot there.

Oh, yeah - like Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure! I love waterslides!

Anyone Free Sunday? (0, Offtopic)

Herkum01 (592704) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214655)

FYI, if not doing anything I can use some helping packing and moving. I will splurge for Pizza.

S.H.

Uh oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214663)

Blackburn warned that Hawking was "obviously a man of few words, so the first we would probably know of it is when he packs his bags."

That could take some time then.

"steVen"? (5, Informative)

elecmahm (1194167) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214685)

Is anyone else irked by the apparent misspelling? Steven != Stephen

I heard him speak (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214713)

I guess that gig he has with the Cable Weather Satellite channel was just a temporary gig. I heard him on there the other day:

Tomorrow's weather, partly cloudy with little temperature change.

On an unrelated note... Anyone know how Canada got its name?

They placed a bunch of letters in a hat and drew them out. The one doing the drawing picked out the first letter, "C, Eh". then "N, Eh" and finally "D, Eh." (if you didn't get it, say it out loud).

Re:I heard him speak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24214901)

You heard Stephen Hawking speak? It's a miracle!

Plentiful ellipsis suggest... (1)

DirtySouthAfrican (984664) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214725)

...that the submitter was under the influence of a central inverse-square force.

Black holes (1)

shady2 (1321923) | more than 6 years ago | (#24214817)

Perhaps the Perimeter Institute can find the singularity where all those Blackberry messages went

In the New Civilization: Revolutions (1)

rjschwarz (945384) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215049)

I have to use spy's to steal great thinkers, either that or conquer the city they are based in. Is there even an option to just bribe them to move like this? That would be too easy.

When will the day come... (1)

Scotteh (885130) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215077)

...when scientists from all countries can collaborate with each other for the benefit of humanity in general? Imagine how much scientific advance could be made!

Hot damn! (2, Interesting)

InstinctVsLogic (920001) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215081)

I'm a Physics Undergrad student at the University of Waterloo, and I am definitely excited. This will add a lot of value to my degree, and reputation for the physics department in general.

He'll never get used to (1)

Tragedy4u (690579) | more than 6 years ago | (#24215083)

He'll have too much trouble adjusting here, he'll never get used to driving his wheelchair on the right side of the road.

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