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Logged In or Out, Facebook Is Watching You

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the damn-addictive-scrabulous-and-cute-iris-chang dept.

Social Networks 336

kaos07 links to this ZDNet story, according to which "Researchers at software vendor CA have discovered that social networking site Facebook is able to track the buying habits of its users on affiliated third-party sites even when they are logged out of their account or have opted out of its controversial 'Beacon' tracking service. Responding to privacy concerns, Facebook has since moved to reassure users that it only tracks and publishes data about their purchases if they are both logged in to Facebook and have opted-in to having this information listed on their profile. But in 'extremely disconcerting' findings that directly contradict these assurances, researchers at CA's Security Advisory service have found that data about these transactions are sent to Facebook regardless of a user's actions."

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Well (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24231719)

Only if you have a Facebook account.

Re:Well (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24231787)

How do these other sites know if you have a facebook account, and which one if you do? Or does facebook use an email address as its log in?

Re:Well (4, Informative)

SMacD (1140995) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231801)

facebook does use your email address as the login

Re:Well (4, Insightful)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231807)

Facebook uses an email address as your login, but I'm guessing they probably have some sort of cookie thing set up as well.

Addendum (0, Redundant)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232041)

TFA's source [asiscan.com] indicates FB gives their affiliates javascript to include in the page that connects to a FB server for cookie exchange. Pretty sneaky. I wonder if google does something like that with google analytics.

Eratum (4, Informative)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232149)

TFA's source [ca.com] [corrected] indicates FB gives their affiliates javascript to include in the page that connects to a FB server for cookie exchange. Pretty sneaky. I wonder if google does something like that with google analytics.

Corrected Link! [ca.com] This is why one should not slashdot before one's midday coffee. Please mod parent down, or something. That's a very small server and it will die.

What if it's an un-used email? (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232101)

My Facebook account is linked to my school email. I only use the school email for Facebook. I use different emails on the commercial sites.

Wonder if they can track me.

Re:What if it's an un-used email? (4, Informative)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232217)

They actually use your facebook cookie, which would contain your school email, to track you. So just delete your cookies and you should be OK.

Re:What if it's an un-used email? (5, Interesting)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232767)

With Facebook's protection of minors... I wonder if them tracking the habits of minors could get them in trouble...

Re:Well (1)

Theoboley (1226542) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232507)

Originally facebook was only available to kids with college email addresses (for instance, mine is boleytj@students.witc.edu) but since they opened it up to just about anyone with a pc, i imagine you could use any email you like.

Re:Well (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232153)

Well, not really offtopic, that was an accident on my part. But anyway, expectation of privacy in just about any online service these days is naive, alas. Particularly at a site like Facebook, they are bound to look at the huge amount of personalized information about users as a company resource to be exploited for maximal profit.

Shocked (5, Insightful)

Romancer (19668) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231739)

I'm shocked that you're shocked. Or even expect me to be mildly surprised that this is happening.

The only difference is that this is supposed to be a larger company and therefore better than the millions of smaller opt out pipe dreams out there?

Re:Shocked (5, Interesting)

Yold (473518) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232015)

I disabled my facebook account a few months ago because it occurred to me that someone is probably harvesting all the data that they can find off that site. Being someone who parties (too much ;-) ), I was constantly deleting tagged pictures of myself drinking off that website. I was damn glad that I did, because my BOSS at my uni went on looked at my facebook account before he hired me.

It would not suprise me if someone started offering money to purchase facebook accounts, just to harvest information, for say the price of $0.10 a friend w/ an account. I have a wild imagination, but with data mining being a really hot field, who knows what could be done with this information, it might even cost me a job in the future.

The future of privacy (or lack thereof), has me vigilant, even paranoid.

Re:Shocked (5, Insightful)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232167)

I'm constantly amazed about how people will post private information in a public place (thus making it public information), and then complain about how they are being robbed of their privacy.

Of course it also amazes me how popular these social networking sites are with adults. It's understandable that kids and teenagers want to climb a social ladder of sorts, since it is human nature to attempt to achieve more than your peers, and there is little available in the environments we provide to kids other than social hierarchy to climb... But when you grow up, generally people move on to trying to get ahead in other types of accomplishments. It seems things like MySpace and Facebook have extended High School into adulthood. When you place that much value on your social network, perhaps it shouldn't be too surprising that people are willing to give up their privacy to maintain it.

Re:Shocked (2, Insightful)

D Ninja (825055) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232281)

Ahhh...but, don't you know? High School Never Ends [sing365.com] .

Re:Shocked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232347)

It's also a very convenient way to stay in touch as an adult. It's not extended high school; I'm friends on Facebook with people that I shared a healthy mutual hatred with in high school. But we're both grown, living away from each other, and it's sometimes useful to know what's going on. It's just extending your antennae a bit.

Re:Shocked (5, Interesting)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232395)

What amazes me is that peple think that your prospective employer actually gives a crap if you party on the weekends.

Has it ever occurred to you that maybe you don't want to work somewhere who cares about that anyway? If an employer cares what an employee is doing in their off time then they have already crossed the line IMO.

Re:Shocked (4, Interesting)

Yold (473518) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232729)

In a perfect world, yes. But the ideal picture of a programmer/math-dude isn't being at the end of a beer bong.

I think that once you are employed, it doesn't matter what you do on the weekends. But at a job interview, I'd rather not have someone know how I spend my Friday nights.

Re:Shocked (4, Insightful)

unformed (225214) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232611)

A number of reasons:

1) I don't get spammed by email. I don't have to send everybody my new email when it gets changed.
2) It's far, far, far easier to get in touch with people you've long fallen out of touch with.
3) Adults are just as much social whores as kids are. We (as a race, excepting geeks) ARE a social creature, and we like talking and socializing with others, in whatever way possible.

Re:Shocked (1)

Bob The Cowboy (308954) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232821)

I think you're missing the point of Facebook for some people (some adults at least). For me it isn't some social ladder, or a way to keep score. I won't argue that some people do that, however.

I use it purely as a way to keep in contact with friends and family - especially those that live far away. I don't always have time to call (though I try), but I do like to see what they're up to, maybe send them a quick message.

Sorry you see it that way. I'd say you're missing out, but it seems to me you've already made up your mind.

Bill

Re:Shocked (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232849)

I'm constantly amazed about how people will post private information in a public place (thus making it public information), and then complain about how they are being robbed of their privacy.

I have friends who have their cell-phone numbers posted on there...

Re:Shocked (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232869)

I concur, the value of such sites finding their way into adults daily routines are a sad sign of things to come. It seems it is extending teen life into adult life, and more so apparent how how accepted it is to play video games at 30, while my Dad was 18 when he had me, and always had a games are a waste of time attitude. Keeping that in mind, Alexander the great by the age of 22 had amassed and army and conquered most of mesopotamia back in the day, I wonder how many people can say the same in today's society with their contributions? How many people you know that play video games, volunteer at the hospital etc..... it is a sign of the differences each generation has.

Re:Shocked (4, Interesting)

Firehed (942385) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232309)

I was damn glad that I did, because my BOSS at my uni went on looked at my facebook account before he hired me

This, good sir, is why you set privacy controls.

You're right about their data-mining though; Facebook's ads are really starting to concern me. "Single geek age 20? Visit eHarmony today!" Obviously my relationship status and age are right there in my profile, but them dynamically generating personality keywords based off of my interests and then proving them to advertisers... yeah, I should probably leave Facebook too.

Re:Shocked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232431)

Why the hell don't you install

a) Adblock
b) Greasemonkey with the "UnFuck Facebook" script.

You won't see any of that crap again.

Re:Shocked (1)

Otto (17870) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232421)

If my boss didn't want me to go out drinking, then I'd find a new boss.

Re:Shocked (4, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232441)

All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity. Keeps me from having to be too careful.

Make the decision, and separate yourself from your online identity. You can always claim it later if you want to, but you can disclaim it as well

Re:Shocked (4, Insightful)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232655)

All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity.

That won't help when someone else tags a photo (or whatever) with your real name.

Re:Shocked (5, Funny)

SleepyHappyDoc (813919) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232829)

There's a way around that. Kill your entire family, move to a different country, and insist all your new friends call you by your internet name.

Re:Shocked (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232845)

All you whippersnappers, I swear...Look me up by my real name, and you get nothing, nada, nihil, zip, because I made a very conscious decision to separate my online identity from my regular identity.

That won't help when someone else tags a photo (or whatever) with your real name.

And that is why I'm changing my real name to John Smith, making me a needle in a haystack. That and the Groucho glasses.

Re:Shocked (1)

dontPanik (1296779) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232835)

I've come to the same realization concerning my facebook account. There was an article previously (that I can't find) on your online appearance. Basically, what will someone see if they google your name?

My facebook account is number three on the results, so I made a resolution to clear my page of anything that an employer would object to. Also I'm facebook friends with a couple of my coworkers so that's another concern.

Re:Shocked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232199)

Pretty much the same sentiment here. I know of several companies who have intertwined registration and tracking systems throughout their affiliates and partner sites, and can pretty much tell what you eat for breakfast or what your dog's name is based on aggregating data from each site (as well as tracking your clicks of course)

Re:Shocked (1)

geogob (569250) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232569)

I'm shocked that someone could be surprised surprised by this, but not that someone is shocked by it. On the contrary, I'm more shocked that someone is not shocked by this questionable practice.

It's like if someone was following me in the stores I go to and taking pictures and records of all the pants I try on, all the fruits I buy, etc.

I do not think this is a legal thing to do outside of the internet. Spying, stalking, etc. Why would be legal (and moral) on the Internet?

Clear your cookies (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231815)

Or at least your Facebook cookies. Problem solved.

Re:Clear your cookies (1)

von_rick (944421) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232109)

You can clear the cookies when you have navigated away from Facebook, but you need to accept FB issued cookies if you want to browse their pages. So as long as you are a visiting Facebook you have consented to being tracked.

Re:Clear your cookies (1, Interesting)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232249)

To work around that, I'd visit Facebook pages in a separate browser installation (such as a FirefoxPortable installation) or alternatively stop all other browsing while on Facebook, and clear all cookies before and after browsing Facebook.

But that's just in theory. In practice, Facebook is a POS website, and if you use it you're probably not too bright and if you're posting all your personal info online, then this isn't high up on the list of your privacy concerns.

Re:Clear your cookies (1)

hostyle (773991) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232593)

But that's just in theory. In practice, Facebook is a POS website, and if you use it you're probably not too bright and if you're posting all your personal info online, then this isn't high up on the list of your privacy concerns.

I'm saddened to hear you say that. My facebook profile is under the pseudonym GameboyRMH. I though you totally supported my efforts at spreading your legendary sexual and binge drinking conquests online for the world at large. If that is indeed the case, I shall be happy to stop doing so once the appropriate discontinuation fee is paid in full. Oh, should I stop buying sex toys on amazon i your name aswell?

Re:Clear your cookies (4, Interesting)

Debased Manc (1313649) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232173)

Not quite, your email address also gets used as a foreign key between Facebook and it's affiliates.

Fry all your cookies, but if you share an email address between your Facebook account and someone else, say Amazon, they can connect the dots that way.

Thankfully I didn't register my Facebook account with my Hotmail only-for-the-porn account. That could've made for some interesting advertising though...

Re:Clear your cookies (3, Informative)

nimbius (983462) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232263)

I've found its easier to reject all cookies and establish a list of trusted sites (banks, etc...) for whom you accept cookies. as an added level of protection in firefox, you can force these cookies to be "session only."

Not too worried. (1)

billy901 (1158761) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231817)

I'm not too worried about this because I have never bought anything from their third party sites, and millions of people use Facebook. I don't think that it's likely that if you are going through this that you will find someone you were looking for and be able to spy on their habits.

Not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24231823)

Privacy policies and regulations are never taken seriously. State Farm, for example, releases clients' information to whoever asks for it.

http://statefarmwoes.blogspot.com/

Built-in (5, Funny)

von_rick (944421) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231827)

The title has a built-in "In Soviet Russia joke.

Re:Built-in (2, Insightful)

Ollabelle (980205) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231893)

So in Soviet Russia, the government would simply contact Facebook to watch you for them, or they would contact the telephone company.... oh, wait....

Re:Built-in (5, Funny)

von_rick (944421) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231935)

In_Soviet_Russia jokes are never so long.

Re:Built-in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232399)

In Soviet Russia, longs are never so joke

Re:Built-in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232579)

In Soviet Russia, shorts are a joke.

In Soviet Russia... (2, Informative)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232323)

You track information on Facebook!

Hehehe I love the ones that make more sense in Soviet Russia mode :)

Re:Built-in (1)

hostyle (773991) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232623)

In Soviet Russia better watch your Face!

Re:Built-in (1)

QRDeNameland (873957) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232671)

In Soviet Web 2.0, the product is YOU!!

Lawsuit? (0)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231835)

Can someone sue Facebook for this, considering they're doing exactly what they said they wouldn't do (or at least that's what it looks like)?

Re:Lawsuit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232185)

Facebook ins't doing anything they said that the wouldn't do, it's just that they don't have the magic powers to stop their code that has been placed on third party sites from loading. The javascript loads, sends data back to facebook, but that data isn't used if you opted out. This is how it has always been since day one. The question is do you trust Facebook to not secretly store and use your data. If you are that paranoid you have much bigger issues to worry about.

Re:Lawsuit? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232271)

That's... not particularly paranoid.

Re:Lawsuit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232509)

It's not being paranoid to be constantly worrying that every company is lying to you? Maybe it's not around these parts, but that can't be a healthy attitude. Very stressful it must be.

Re:Lawsuit? (1)

thedullroar (944296) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232775)

Can someone sue Facebook for this, considering they're doing exactly what they said they wouldn't do (or at least that's what it looks like)?

You can sue whether you have a case or not. But I would guess that you (and the rest of FB users) don't. I think you would need to show that that particular clause was material in your decision to accept the terms of service and that their violation caused actual damages. I seriously doubt that even one of those conditions is met for most users, if any.

People complain that lawyers are evil, but what is the first question they ask when something bad happens? Can I sue someone over this?

I don't understand... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24231871)

Why people continue to use services like this. They are riddled with bugs, security flaws, loopholes etc.

Besides, who cares what you ate for breakfast?

Re:I don't understand... (2, Insightful)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231971)

Hey, the moment /. starts getting flooded with eye-candy coeds ( and helping track down long-lost non-geeky friends, but it's 99% the coeds) I'm sure facebook will go out of business, but until then, they're pretty much the big dog of social networking.

Re:I don't understand... (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232355)

>Besides, who cares what you ate for breakfast?

Somebody might wonder why you needed all those 600 Watt Chrome Dome growing lamps.

Re:I don't understand... (1)

QRDeNameland (873957) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232719)

I grow orchids, you insensitive clod!!

Re:I don't understand... (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232577)

Maintaining an address book is hard work. Facebook does all that work for you. It's no surprise that something like Facebook became popular because it's extremely useful.

I should have guessed. (4, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231889)

"Facebook is able to track the buying habits of its users on affiliated third-party sites even when they are logged out of their account or have opted out of its controversial 'Beacon' tracking service."

I should have known there was a problem when I was signing up and saw this:

[ ] Opt out of Beacon(tm) on-line tracking when logged into Facebook; opt in to Lighthouse(tm) on-line tracking when logged out of Facebook.

The sins of marketing (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231895)

Venial - violating privacy
Mortal - lying about it
Crime against humanity - covering up the lie

Let's hope they stop before they get to the latter.

ah hem (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231899)

browse with telnet people - or use something close to it, like lynx or w3m. personally using opera here, but now that i'm aware of this i think i'll clean my cookies before buying anything.

Re:ah hem (3, Funny)

hostyle (773991) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232661)

telnet facebook.com 80
Trying 69.63.176.140...
Connected to facebook.com.
Escape character is '^]'.
GET stuffed!

400 Bad Request

Bad Request
Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Invalid URI in request GET stuffed!

Connection closed by foreign host.

How Dare They (5, Funny)

jareth780 (176411) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231901)

This is an outrage! How DARE they try and sell me things! This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me". Horsefeathers! The fact that the products I want are in stock at any given point is PROOF that they've been using my spending habits to PREDICT MY NEEDS, which goes against everything I believe in.

When I say I want a free social networking site, it's not good enough that I not be billed directly for using it. The company hosting it must be desperately trying to sustain the bandwidth and CPU time for my constant page refreshes. At no point should they be even breaking even, let alone PROFITING from their service. Information wants to be free! Down with Big Brother! Doublethink! Free as in beer! ...What else... Oh! And my cell phone bill is too high!

Re:How Dare They (5, Insightful)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232075)

Way to one-sidedly misrepresent wholesale privacy violation as innocent altruism.

Apparently the telecom domestic spying scandal has not reached your part of the world?

In these times, companies have as much or more assets and power available to them than many of the world's nations, and allowing the wholesale gathering of information on individuals by private firms under the red herring of "private property" will lead to the exact same kind of oppression as allowing the government to do it under the red herring of "national security".

There are other ways to better serve me without having to identify me personally. Inventory tracking has been done successfully at the branch level for a century in its current form, and if they don't carry something, speaking to a manager will often get results.

There is a difference between profiting from advertising, and profiteering from spying on me and selling that data to telemarketers, government agencies, and other shady organizations.

Re:How Dare They (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232111)

Oh! And my cell phone bill is too high!

Um, +1?

Re:How Dare They (5, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232269)

This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me". Horsefeathers! The fact that the products I want are in stock at any given point is PROOF that they've been using my spending habits to PREDICT MY NEEDS, which goes against everything I believe in.

That's clearly not true, because I've been to Safeway plenty of times and not ONCE have they offered me a blowjob.

Re:How Dare They (4, Insightful)

novakyu (636495) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232513)

This is almost as infuriating as Vons/Safeway and their "club card", tracking my purchases to try and "Better serve me".

Well, turning the sarcasm detector off, change that to "Vons/Safeway and their 'club card' tracking my purchases and all other purchases with the credit card that has ever been used with the club card through special deals with the credit card company ...." and you will be closer.

Facebook is welcome to track you on their own website (practically every website owner does this with log analysis) and even track your outgoing clicks with redirects, hidden or bare (even Google does this, and they are really tricky about it too, if you've noticed it on their search results). What they are not welcome to do is track you when you are not on their website through "special deals" with other websites. Such aggregation of data on you is a disaster waiting to happen.

"affiliated third-party sites" (2, Interesting)

InsaneMosquito (1067380) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231911)

So the article (yes, I read it) only mentions 3 affliated sites. Does anyone have a list of all Facebook Affliated sites? While I don't use (and never will use) facebook, other family members do have facebook accounts. I don't consent to have my information sent - could this be a liability for Facebook should someone decide to make it a large issue?

Here's the list: (4, Informative)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#24231987)

Facebook is currently affiliated with the following sites:

        * Art.com
        * Blockbuster
        * Bluefly
        * CBS Interactive
        * eBay
        * ExpoTV
        * Fandango
        * Gamefly.com
        * Kiva, Kongregate
        * LiveNation
        * Mercantila
        * NY Times
        * Overstock.com
        * Redlight Mgmt
        * Seamless Web
        * Six Apart
        * STA Travel
        * TheKnot
        * Travelocity
        * Viagogo

http://www.facebook.com/help.php?page=57 [facebook.com]

The first bloody Google result |: |

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&q=facebook-affiliated+sites&spell=1 [google.com]

Re:Here's the list: (1)

corychristison (951993) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232557)

Odd...

I've never dealt with any of these websites before.

Scab companies I tells ya!

Gamefly (2, Interesting)

dj245 (732906) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232843)

I got pretty nervous when stuff I rented from Gamefly was automatically posted to Facebook. I don't need "Don has rented BMX XXX" on my ticker. Not because of the nudity, but because its a horrible game in general.

orly? (3, Funny)

Tekninja_Hawk (961855) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232045)

Your friend has invited you to use the application "Big Brother", would you like to add this application?


Would you like to be a Vampire/Pirate/Zombie instead?

Re:orly? (1)

thrillseeker (518224) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232299)

Would you like to upload your contacts list, for your convenience?

User Account Control (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232531)

A program needs your permission to continue.

If you started this program, continue.

Big Brother 1.0
BigBrotherSoft Inc
C:\Downloads\BigBrotherSetup.msi

Continue / Cancel?

User Account Control helps stop unauthorized changes to your computer.

I wonder if a list of those vendors exists (0, Redundant)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232047)

It would be nice to have a well-publicized, up-to-date list of those affiliated third-party sites, so buyers could ensure that they shop elsewhere.

As for Facebook's lies...I wonder if their dishonesty amounts to fraud? I bet the right judge would allow substantial penalties for that kind of deception. It tends to make the sheep restless while they wait for their shearing.

Re:I wonder if a list of those vendors exists (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232467)

I'd be more interested in a list of hostnames that I can stick into my /etc/hosts file or DNS so any tracking attempt fails.

Life is Art.... and therefore protected..... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232107)

My life is performance art - I have not granted re-distribution rights to my artistic transactions.

These people are violation my copyrights.

Does ABP still block this? (0, Redundant)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232113)

Also, here's the actual CA article. [ca.com]

Amazon.com does something similar... (2, Interesting)

HouseOfMisterE (659953) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232117)

Amazon.com does something similar with their website ads. I search and buy a lot at Amazon.com, and their ads on other web sites (I've noticed it at crooksandliars.com, at least) apparently read my cookies and display item suggestions that are the same or similar to items that I've searched for or purchased at Amazon.com. It doesn't matter if I've logged out of my Amazon.com account, closed and restarted my browser to clear out any active cookies, etc, the targeted advertisement results still come.

Re:Amazon.com does something similar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232485)

That kinda sounds like Amazon set a flash cookie [ghacks.net] . Go into the ~/.macromedia/\#SharedObjects/(random name) directory and you'll probably see some cached flash objects from different websites. You probably have some under Amazon that C&L picks up via javascript. To clear them out, just remove the #SharedObjects directory. It's harmless to do since flash will recreate it the next time its run.

Unsubscribe (5, Informative)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232125)

I just wish I could delete my facebook account. It's actually close to impossible, first you have to delete all your information (wall posts, friends, etc.), and then they'll delete your account. Very, very time consuming. But I doubt any of that info is REALLY gone.

Re:Unsubscribe (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232339)

I just wish I could delete my facebook account. It's actually close to impossible, first you have to delete all your information (wall posts, friends, etc.), and then they'll delete your account. Very, very time consuming. But I doubt any of that info is REALLY gone.

Its easier if you change all your informations into junk, then when someone looks you up on Facebook they retrieve a completely wrong information.
I just suggest you don't upload information that would harm your future prospects for jobs and such.

Re:Unsubscribe (4, Funny)

gclef (96311) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232603)

Change your profile picture to goatse...they should take card of the rest.

Re:Unsubscribe (1)

lazycam (1007621) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232619)

I'm guessing the easiest way for you to have your account cancelled is to simply violate their terms. Just upload some porn or something. Anyway, they probably still keep your personal details. I guess that's the price we pay for being so careless about our personal information.

Re:Unsubscribe (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232823)

How to permanently delete your facebook account.
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=16929680703

Go to this page:
http://www.facebook.com/help/contact.php?show_form=delete_account

Select the checkbox and click "Submit".

Dupe! (4, Informative)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232197)

The CA article [ca.com] is the same one from 2007. Read the date at the bottom.

Published Nov 29 2007, 11:39 PM by Stefan Berteau

It was already posted on Slashdot. http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/12/03/0656205 [slashdot.org] That's two dupes in a row guys! Care to go for three?

Re:Dupe! (2, Informative)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232293)

correction: The Mac story [slashdot.org] isn't a dupe. The one before it is. [slashdot.org] Regardless, that's two dupes today. Start paying attention.

What shall we call this (4, Informative)

sjames (1099) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232213)

Let's see, what do we call it when someone follows someone around to see where they go, their tastes, who they know, etc, etc.

Yeah, that's right, it's STALKING!

When you restrict those activities to the internet, it's cyber-stalking.

Why is stalking suddenly OK if you're trying to sell stuff? It certainly doesn't feel any less creepy to the person being stalked.

The fact that these things are done in secret and too often in spite of public denials tells me that they know at some level what they're doing is unwelcome and wrong.

If they want to cyber-stalk in exchange for a free service, then it's not REALLY free, it just happens to have a non-monetary price. Let them be honest about the price and then the users can decide for themselves how acceptable the deal is.

Think of the masses (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232371)

If an online community is large enough, there will always be some huckster out there wanting to exploit the masses somehow. In this case, it sounds like consumer surveys administered for free, without consent and without knowledge. This is unethical on many levels.

Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232379)

This issue [slashdot.org] was discussed to death back when Beacon first lunched. It's impossible for the Facebook javascript on third party sites to know if you have opted out without communicating with Facebook's servers. Facebook is always going to have to receive data. The question is do you trust them to not store it? If you are that paranoid just block the facebook beacon URL from loading. Problem solved.

Re:Old news (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232499)

Look at the article you posted and the one above. They have something in common. I'll give you a hint, look at the date!

Our rights online (1)

pacroon (846604) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232409)

I find, that Facebook has gained a lot more attention, at least globally, than most other social sites has ever gotten, especially regarding privacy. Since major corporations have roasted on the lack of knowledge of their users regarding their own privacy for years, since I myself is a walking case of turbo-paranoia. I for one welcome this wide spread paranoia about the intentions and possibilities of Facebook and the people behind.

Prophesied (0)

pavon (30274) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232425)

If you want a vision of the future, imagine a book stamping on a human face - forever

Fight Back! (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232449)

Facebook Users have been very quiet of late. Where are the good old days of protest and people power? A year ago, a lot of teenagers with a strong sense of priorities and a social conscience would have fought Facebook to the death on this (rather than, you know, something trivial like Human Rights in China, or the UK). Where have you all gone, you Young Pioneers!

Was it like this when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? No!

Fight, the noble fight! Save Facebook for the rest of us! It's far too vital to our very existence to be allowed to be destroyed by cynical, shallow individuals!

Re:Fight Back! (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232581)

A year ago, a lot of teenagers with a strong sense of priorities and a social conscience would have fought Facebook to the death on this

You know why they aren't fighting Facebook right now? Because they already did and they won. TFA is from 2007.

Whew (0, Redundant)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232461)

Glad I don't have a facebook account

Mark Zuckerberg (5, Interesting)

NoPantsJim (1149003) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232463)

I've often thought about the various people who have made a fortune or are about to make a fortune from online properties.

Jason Calacanis, Kevin Rose, the Flickr people, etc.

Usually I think to myself, that's awesome that these people were able to work hard and see their vision to the end and make a living from it.

When I think of Zuckerberg, I think the exact opposite. Fuck that guy. I've always felt like he sleezed his way to where he is, and stories like this only reinforce that opinion.

(prepared to be modded troll...)

Web Beacons are the devil! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232723)

Fucking beacons I hate em!

CookieSafe Firefox Addon (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24232797)

Use CookieSafe. It's like NoScript for cookie management. https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/2497

Related (1)

TopSpin (753) | more than 6 years ago | (#24232851)

This morning I logged into a Gmail account that I use exclusively for certain Google alerts. The address has never been used otherwise. I found a bunch (20-30) of "new friend" notifications from Facebook.

Turns out someone tried to create a Facebook account for my Gmail address (the account name isn't terribly obscure.) Of course, they couldn't 'verify' the Facebook account for lack of access to the Gmail account. Nevertheless Facebook dutifully listed this new account such that random bozos could befriend it. So, you may go to Facebook and associate any public name with any email address you wish and Facebook will stick it out there for the world to see before any level verification has been performed.

I canceled the Facebook account (for some Facebook defined value of 'canceled') but nothing prevents someone from reestablishing it. I've had nothing to do with these dinks; they have no respect for your information or wishes. 'Eyeballs' is the only metric they measure and if exposing you and yours makes more eyeballs then you're getting put up.

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