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UK PM's Aide Loses BlackBerry In Chinese Honeytrap

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the my-envy-exceeds-his-chagrin dept.

Security 260

longacre writes "The Times of London is today reporting a January incident in which a top aide to Prime Minister Gordon Brown discovered his BlackBerry missing from his hotel room after spending the night with an attractive woman who approached him in a Shanghai disco. Seems this was a run-of-the-mill BlackBerry without any encryption, only a simple password lock. The greatest fear is that, even if the device did not contain any sensitive messages at the time, there was likely enough information on board for a hostile intelligence service to snake its way deep into Downing Street's email servers. The aide was 'informally reprimanded.'"

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260 comments

Had it been a slashdotter... (4, Funny)

nacturation (646836) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260319)

Would he have reported the loss of his virginity?
 

Re:Had it been a slashdotter... (3, Funny)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260509)

Ha! He actually tried, but the lameness filter prevented it...

There ain't no sense to bitch about it (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260821)

It seems I've been fighting since the day I was born but I know that I can move on
And it looks like I'll be fighting til the day that I die but I don't let it bring me down




There ain't no sense to bitch about it 'cause you all know what's gone wrong
When it's late at night, and you're in your bed, the bad don't seem so wrong








Penny for your thoughts
Mister, penny for your thoughts
You look so far away
It must be nice to drift that way

If you can lose a blackberry... (5, Funny)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260545)

Ew, if you could lose a blackberry in that
Chinese Honeypot, I wouldn't stick around.

-AI

Re:If you can lose a blackberry... (2, Funny)

bobdotorg (598873) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260803)

Ew, if you could lose a blackberry in that
Chinese Honeypot, I wouldn't stick around.

Use your Blackberry's light to find our way out?

Hell, let's use your Blackberry's light to find my keys, and we'll drive our way out.

Re:If you can lose a blackberry... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24261079)

There's no such thing as a BlackBerry without encryption. All data to and from a BlackBerry is TripleDES or AES encrypted, regardless if you're on a BES or using your carrier webmail.

If he's on a BES the problem is non-existent, the Admin can remotely wipe the BlackBerry with a single command.

Plus, if someone enters the password wrong ten times, the device wipes itself

The only security issue here is if the guy used a really easy password. And even that can be avoided because the admin can specify password complexity so users can't enter stuf like, '1234'

Re:Had it been a slashdotter... (1)

AndGodSed (968378) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260861)

Hey Mr Bond...

Is that a Blackberry in your pocket or are you excited to see me?

This seems to be a recurring problem. (1, Interesting)

zach_d (782013) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260341)

The level of espionage out of China is pretty ridiculous. I wonder how long this goes on before the trade advantage of dealing with them is over weighed by their rampant spying.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (5, Insightful)

x_MeRLiN_x (935994) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260371)

What makes you think the UK/US is any different?

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (3, Insightful)

zach_d (782013) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260455)

a valid point I suppose, I'm not certain their not, but they're on my side(ish). Clearly a double standard, but I'm OK with that.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (3, Insightful)

Admiral Ag (829695) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260607)

Look up Echelon. You can't make an international phone call without the bastards snooping in on it. Our Lords and Masters have no understanding of what "privacy" means.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (2, Insightful)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260725)

Our Lords and Masters have no understanding of what "privacy" means.

Funny, they feel the same way about you. "Those silly citizens have no idea what the word 'privacy' means anymore. Like it's something that we can't snoop into."

You fuckin retard (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260931)

Shove your double standard up your faggot ass

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (3, Insightful)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260465)

The level of espionage out of China is pretty ridiculous. I wonder how long this goes on before the trade advantage of dealing with them is over weighed by their rampant spying.

I don't know what country you are from, but I can almost be sure that your country is making the same efforts against other countries.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (5, Funny)

zach_d (782013) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260493)

My country doesn't have the budget, frankly. I'm Canadian.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (5, Funny)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260735)

My country doesn't have the attractive women, frankly. I'm Canadian.

There, fixed that for you.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (2, Funny)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260781)

Members of the British Government will now be expecting an increased amount of spam and unsolicited phone salesmen calling to offer V1agra and other products.

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (5, Funny)

MPAB (1074440) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260817)

Members of the British Government will now be expecting an increased amount of spam and unsolicited phone salesmen calling to offer V1agra and other products.

Will that be because of the data inside the phone or because of the chinese lady's detailed report?

Re:This seems to be a recurring problem. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 5 years ago | (#24261027)

Don't mix up "spying" with "copying" and "copyright infringement". For businesses the second and third are more of a direct problem than the first; especially when looking at China. The spying part is probably not seriously worse in China than in other parts of the developed world. It's just that they may be not as good at hiding it.

That said, it is not mentioned in tfs (and of course I did not rtfa) whether this girl was targeting him for being an important government official, or just for being a rich westerner that can be robbed of valuable stuff. If she were a spy, she would be a poor one, as a good spy would not leave a trace of spying, i.e. doesn't take things. A spy would just copy the information.

What they aren't telling us (4, Funny)

davidwr (791652) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260361)

They aren't telling us that Scotland Yard did this deliberately just to see how the Chinese would react.

What the Chinese aren't telling us is they knew this was a trap and reacted accordingly.

What Scotland Yard also isn't telling us is that they knew the Chinese would see the trap and were counting on them to react accordingly.

What the Chinese also aren't telling us ....

oooh my head hurts.

Re:What they aren't telling us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260755)

What they aren't telling us are the juicy details of that steamy night.

Come on! I need details! A picture would be nice...

Re:What they aren't telling us (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24261001)

[quote]What the Chinese also aren't telling us ....[/quote] ...is that they know we've seen the Princess Bride too?

certs connection? (2, Interesting)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260373)

I was just posting in the article about ways of making certs work, and I see this.

Am I the only one who sees a connection between this and the problems we have getting certificates to actually mean what they are supposed to mean?

Actually, I see several connections.

Re:certs connection? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260761)

I was just posting in the article about ways of making certs work, and I see this.

Am I the only one who sees a connection between this and the problems we have getting certificates to actually mean what they are supposed to mean?

Actually, I see several connections.

Actually, I am not certain if I'm answering to you or going offtopic but from what I understood from your post...

No, not really. I have worked in the ministry of foreign affairs in a country that started using PKI to encrypt communications to all embassies around the world. The public and private keys (the chip cards on which they were) were delivered in diplomatic mail to the people around the world. When they had gotten them, the pin codes required to use them would be delivered in separate mail.

No way for both certificates to get lost. The only possible way for that would be if the people would write the pin codes down and keep them with them alongside their cards.

This is prevented by normal psychology. While low ranked officials might do that, anyone who is high enough in ranks to actually have access to something very important and secret (noting that anything actually classified as "secret" or above isn't accessible by internet, at all) will be so full of himself and think of himself as so important that he will follow all security precautions very closely. "Everyone must be after the data I have access to!"

How foolish (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260375)

China is in a cold war with the west, even if they do not want to admit. China is basically using Capitalism as their weapon by fixing the Yuen to the Dollar. Only a fool would think that an attractive chinese women in chinese disco is going to go to bed the first night with a westerner.

Re:How foolish (4, Informative)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260397)

China is basically using Capitalism as their weapon by fixing the Yuen to the Dollar.

2005 just called, they want their now-outdated [cnn.com] analysis back

Re:How foolish (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260587)

Logic called. They said that you need a lesson. The yuan is in a "basket", that is supposedly pegged to a number of moneys. Only problem is, there is no formula that has been given and more importantly, none that can be found. The yuan against the dollar has gone up just a bit, even though the dollar has plummeted against ALL other western moneies AND the chinese accumulate loads of dollars. IOW, it is still fixed. The only difference is that China has pulled a scam for fools like you.
Dollar to yuan [yahoo.com]
Dollar to Euro. [yahoo.com]
Euro to Yuan. [yahoo.com]
The Yuan has gone up 20% over 5 years against the dollar, while the euro has gone up more than 60%. By the same token, the euro to yuan is roughly fixed. Do the same for other western monies and you find the same result. Basically, if China were to allow a true floating money, it would more than double. Even now, the EU is considering this a problem. They are currently asking China to keep their earlier promises to open their borders as well as allow the yuan to float. So far, China is resisting. The good news is that EU is about to do something about this (unlike America).

Your data seem to contradict yourself (3, Informative)

The_Hun (693418) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260863)

The Euro to Yuan is not fixed: according to the data linked by you it seems to have gone up from cca 9,3 to cca 10.7 - by about 15 percent.
Also the Dollar to Euro rate decreased by about 30 percent (and not 60).
Now, those are just rough calculations and IANASoros - so correct me if i'm wrong.

Re:How foolish (4, Interesting)

korean.ian (1264578) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260501)

Only a fool would think that an attractive chinese women in chinese disco is going to go to bed the first night with a westerner.

You've clearly never been to Asia. Rest assured you can see many examples of exactly this happening all over Asia.

Now send in 007 to get that Blackberry!

Re:How foolish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260661)

All over Asia, yes. Korean and Japanese women, yes. But Chinese women? Still slow to go.

Re:How foolish (0)

MPAB (1074440) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260835)

Now send in 007 to get that Blackberry!

007 with chinese woman? Already been done. Bring yet another race from the PC vault.

Re:How foolish (4, Funny)

slashmojo (818930) | more than 5 years ago | (#24261081)

You've clearly never been to Asia. Rest assured you can see many examples of exactly this happening all over Asia

And so begins the great stampede of slashdot readers heading for asia.. ;)

Re:How foolish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260749)

> Only a fool would think that an attractive chinese women in chinese disco > is going to go to bed the first night with a westerner. They do, but they all say "give me 200 dorrar, suckyfucky love you long time!"

Does PM Brown have any open positions? (4, Funny)

johannesg (664142) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260413)

I promise not to carry anything sensitive, and I'll distract the attractive Chinese women for him so his secrets will remain safe!

Re:Does PM Brown have any open positions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260475)

Personally, I'm more concerned with thinking about the Chinese woman's openings than Gordon Brown's. And I doubt you can keep your promise not to carry anything sensitive.

Re:Does PM Brown have any open positions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260751)

In capitalist China, attractive women distract YOU!

Re:Does PM Brown have any open positions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260831)

I promise not to carry anything sensitive, and I'll distract the attractive Chinese women for him so his secrets will remain safe!

Ah,
but to get the attractive Chinese women, you *have* to be packing something worth their while...'sensitive' or otherwise (pause for the groans at the obvious 'Carry On' style joke)

Btw, for any Chinese Secret Service types reading, here's a heads-up, I'll be visiting sometime in the next six months, and I work for a super-secret branch of the military, plus I'll have a PDA full of interesting stuff...

Re:Does PM Brown have any open positions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260949)

I'd say, the PM's aide was "informally" in the greased up and aim for penetration position after the incident, his sphincter was probably well open after that one.

Honeytrap? Proof? (5, Insightful)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260437)

The only facts given are the guy picked up a girl (or vice versa) at a disco, and the next morning his Blackberry was gone.

"Honeytrap"? Bullshit. What leads anyone to think it was anymore than the guy lost in in a taxi, or if the girl did take it, she sold it on to a second hand phone dealer for a few dollars.

I think if it was really a "vast Communist conspiracy" as the article implies, the agents would have copied the data from the phone and returned it later in the evening, leaving him none the wiser.

Much more important to consider is if the guy used the phone while he was in Beijing, there is an excellent chance that every keystroke, including passwords, was captured en route.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (4, Insightful)

mewsenews (251487) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260511)

intelligence gathering doesn't have to be subtle to be effective.

whether or not his phone ended up in the hands of a foreign service he was foolish to have it stolen so obviously.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (4, Interesting)

LS (57954) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260665)

you may be right, but as someone living in Beijing I can tell you that if you ever leave your bike or phone unguarded for one minute, there's a strong chance it will be gone the next time you look for it....

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (1)

mewsenews (251487) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260787)

i just meant to say that as an aide to the PM he may not have been able to keep his penis out of the hands of the chinese but he could've been a bit more careful with government property.

he was only informally reprimanded so we're not discussing whether he should get his job back.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (3, Funny)

pallmall1 (882819) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260873)

...he may not have been able to keep his penis out of the hands of the chinese...

Yeah, he should have just kept it in his own hands.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (1)

YourExperiment (1081089) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260711)

he was foolish to have it stolen so obviously

No he wasn't. You can't completely guard against the possibility of loss or theft of small items like cellphones. What you can do, however, is always store sensitive data in a securely encrypted device. Anything less is tantamount to publishing the information in the public domain.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (5, Insightful)

smallfries (601545) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260905)

No. The parent hit the nail squarely on the end. If they had stolen his passwords and returned the device then they would have had access to his official email without him being any the wiser. Then they could have gathered intelligence on anything he had access to for the foreseeable future.

Stealing the device would just make Downing Street close the account and issue him a fresh one. Intelligence gathering does have to be subtle to be effective.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260517)

I think in this case "honeytrap" refers specifically to the girl - i.e., he lost his Blackberry in her. Sometimes a night goes so well, and things go places you didn't expect. You know how it is.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260569)

I think if it was really a "vast Communist conspiracy" as the article implies, the agents would have copied the data from the phone and returned it later in the evening, leaving him none the wiser.
Had it been Hilary in Shanghai, she'd nearly have a cardiac arrest after the "vast Right-wing conspiracy" stole her BlackBerry. But the Conspirators would thus return her BlackBerry after reviewing the content, none the wiser either.

Because it sells (5, Insightful)

khchung (462899) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260647)

"News" have long ago lost any purpose of informing, assume it ever has that in the beginning. Nowadays, "news" is just baits used to catch your attention to advertisers, who are the real customer of any "news" organization, be it newspaper, TV or web site.

Which headline do you think catches more attention (thus earn more profit)? "Some guy lost his Blackberry?" or "Chinese spys strikes again"?

Re:Because it sells (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24261051)

mod parent up. that's the reality of the situation.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (4, Insightful)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260669)

The only facts given are the guy picked up a girl (or vice versa) at a disco, and the next morning his Blackberry was gone.

Exactly. Occams Razor. In the UK, the New Labour Regime has a substantial history of losing important documents in large numbers. The Party and its employees are not generally known for their intelligence (as in brains, not spying). He's also British, thus at night he's most certainly drunk.

Q.E.D. He lost the Blackberry. He then lied to make himself seem like a more glamorous victim.

Most probably he's just a drunken, incompetent, liar. Like most everyone else in his Party.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (2, Insightful)

MythMoth (73648) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260997)

Whereas the Tories will no doubt be a shining beacon of moral rectitude when they finally claw their way back into power?

What a load of crap; I detest this partisan bollocks. Politicians of all colours are for the most part honest with a lot of dissembling forced upon them by the spin that the media will put upon any straight and honest answers that they give.

There are bad apples (just as an example a Tory cabinet minister [wikipedia.org] went to prison for perjuring himself in a libel action) but this "oh the government is a monster" crap obscures any real debate about their actual policies. We get the politicians we deserve. Unfortunately.

An aide losing his blackberry is not proof, or even an indicator, of anything at all about the government as a whole. Particularly not the version of the story reported by a right wing newspaper about the left wing government.

When the Tories get in, they will do an adequate job of running the country. Then their lustre will fade and much the same people who complain now will switch allegiance and hail Labour as the new hope for honesty in governance.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260783)

You are so prejudiced. The Chinese don't just copy everything.

Re:Honeytrap? Proof? (1)

itsthebin (725864) | more than 5 years ago | (#24261047)

exactly.

the real story probably goes like this

Bloke picked up a hooker in Shanghai
she stole his phone
end of story - happens in every fcuking city on the planet , every night

let that be a lesson grasshopper

How do we know that honey was a trap? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260449)

Has General Ackbar been consulted on this matter of international intrigue?

Govt fault, not the aide (5, Insightful)

nighty5 (615965) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260485)

The fault has to lie with the government and not the aide.

This comes down to just bad security governance, even my blackberry is encrypted and our BES servers enforce security down to the handset so that you can't install any unauthorised applications.

These devices of course are prone to loss, and given the confidential information potentially held on these devices should be reason enough to enforce the appropriate security measures on the devices.

And the cover up (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260489)

The woman was not really attractive, he was just desperate.

Seriously, is the woman's attractiveness really pertinent to what happened, and was her attractiveness fact-checked? Or is "attractive Shanghai woman" a British idiom for "prostitute"?

Re:And the cover up (2, Funny)

pallmall1 (882819) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260893)

The woman was not really attractive, he was just desperate.

Maybe she came into the club as a 2, and he drank her up to an 8.

Oh no! (2, Funny)

dbIII (701233) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260527)

a top aide to Prime Minister Gordon Brown discovered his BlackBerry missing from his hotel room

Brown trouser time!

snake its way deep into Downing Street's email servers

So the article is trouser snake meets honeypot - but it's a trap! Snap! Ow, Blackberries.

Re:Oh no! (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260753)

Brown trouser time!

Well, it makes a change from Brown Shirt time. Something Gordon is trying to develop at the expense of the freedom of the UK.

technology savvy should be a job requirement (1)

simplerThanPossible (1056682) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260529)

With technology being so important today, they should be hiring proper geeks for their top aides.

Then they wouldn't have this kind of security lapse.

Re:technology savvy should be a job requirement (5, Funny)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260585)

Of course. Then the aide will be so busy playing with his blackberry that he won't notice the attractive woman. Of course if he did notice her he'd still be too shy to talk to her.

I like your plan; it's sound.

passwords? (4, Insightful)

speedtux (1307149) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260531)

likely enough information on board for a hostile intelligence service to snake its way deep into Downing Street's email servers.

So, in addition to stupid aides that fall for Chinese spy-whores, the British government is incapable of changing the passwords on its mail servers?

Re:passwords? (2, Insightful)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260579)

The MPs who have their own websites might be able to change their own passwords, but the Civil Service? C'mon, these are the guys that use "Yes, Prime Minister" as training material.

Re:passwords? (5, Insightful)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260649)

Let's see:

You are a chinese honeytrap now in possession of an aide's blackberry. It is 1am. The aide has passed out drunk three steps inside the front door of his flat, and won't be in any fit capacity until about 8am, when he realises his blackberry is missing and goes looking for it. The IT boys cancel his password at 9am.

That gives you 8 hours to:

- Read all his recent email, for starters. If they're doing IMAP, then god knows how many personal IMAP folders there are to browse through on the server. Look for the good folders like "Foreign Policy". "Sent Items" and "Drafts" can also be fascinating.

- Get his contact list, recent callers,etc, allowing you to analyse and see where this particular cog fits in the Government Machine. If he turns out to be a well-connected individual, it might pay in the future to keep an eye on him. If he's not well-connected, that's one more person you cross off the list.

- Possibly fire off a few trojans to a few "inside" email accounts on that list, who might accept them from a known,"trusted" source. Doesn't hurt to try something like "Revision to yesterday's document -- URGENT".

So you see, there's plenty of scope for mischief.

Re:passwords? (4, Insightful)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260663)


The final logical step of course, would be to put it back where you found it before he wakes up. Now that would be far better "spying" than just nicking the thing. So maybe it was just stolen.

Counter-arguments would be that if a woman was going to seduce a guy just to steal from him, you'd have seen more things go missing than just a blackberry. And even if the "spy" did want to take the blackberry, stealing other things as a cover would be better. This story is either incomplete or there is some inept work being done here.

Re:passwords? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260779)

You are a chinese honeytrap now in possession of an aide's blackberry. It is 1am.

You peer down the dark Shanghai street. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

Re:passwords? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260785)

You forgot the final two steps

- ? ? ?
- profit!

What was not reported..... (2, Funny)

runlevelfour (1329235) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260577)

...... the 'woman' picked up ended up being a dude in drag and that aide ended up losing more than his blackberry that night. *Always* remember the package check guys!

Aide?? - Sebastian? (3, Funny)

kramulous (977841) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260963)

My guess was that the aide's name was Sebastian and after the recent bi-election there was call for a celebration! *clap hands* Champaign!

Fair trade (1)

ThoreauHD (213527) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260637)

I dunno about you, but I'd trade my blackberry for a hot backstabbing chinese girl. Seems alright to me. If she was his wife, he'd have lost everything except for 40 dollars a week in lunch money. And then it would really get bad.

The Times of London (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260701)

It's not 'The Times of London'. It's 'The Times'. It happens to based in London, but it's not 'of London'. Here in the UK we have very few papers carrying national/international news that aren't national in and of themselves.

He forgot to secure the client-side (5, Funny)

arcade (16638) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260703)

Tsktsk.

He should get instructions on how to safely do Penetration Testing of the Chinese secret service. Clearly he forgot to secure the client side properly. Except for that, the article is a tad vague on whether the testing itself went smoothly and he found some holes.

*Ahem*

xenophobia (1, Insightful)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260715)

More xenophobic rubbish from the /. crowd.

What will it take for you guys to realise that China is not your enemy?

Re:xenophobia (1)

Wanon (808109) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260759)

Maybe if they stopped carrying out Humint [wikipedia.org] operations and CNE operations we would be more open to a higher level of friendship.

Re:xenophobia (2, Insightful)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260805)

Every country does that, and yet some manage to still consider other countries friendly.

Anyway, in the case of the usa, I severly doubt it would make any difference at all. The usa seems to be stuck in this anti-communism era, even though China has little to do with that any more. With the USSR gone, the usa has few left to demonise, so China is the obvious target.

Still, not everyone on /. is from the usa, and yet these adsurd articles keep getting posted.

Re:xenophobia (1)

pallmall1 (882819) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260967)

Still, not everyone on /. is from the usa, and yet these adsurd articles keep getting posted.

Don't worry, the Chinese will just block Slashdot like they did SourceForge [slashdot.org].

I can read both here in the USA.

Re:xenophobia (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260769)

What will it take for you guys to realise that China is not your enemy?

That's true -- at least China doesn't have 5 million security cameras. Which is the free country again?

Re:xenophobia (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260813)

I strongly suspect they do have that many....but they're a lot bigger than the UK, which I assumed you're referring to.

Re:xenophobia (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260911)

What will it take for you guys to realise that China is not your enemy?

That's true -- at least China doesn't have 5 million security cameras. Which is the free country again?

Do you need 5 million security cameras when you can rely on good old-fashioned human intelligence?

Re:xenophobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260833)

Wait, what's it going to take for the Chinese Communist Party to realize the USA is not the enemy?

Re:xenophobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260845)

What will it take for you guys to realise that China is not your enemy?

Stop censoring the Internet, stop trying to convince people that the Internet is being censored "for their own good", and stop lying to the public about the Tiananmen Square massacre among other things. For starters.

Re:xenophobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260853)

Respect for human rights.

Re:xenophobia (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260855)

Maybe they're not our enemy. But they most certainly are our competitor in several areas, like natural resources and intellectual capital. We almost certainly won't go to war with them, but that doesn't mean they're our allies either.

Re:xenophobia (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24261011)

What will it take for you guys to realise that China is not your enemy?

China is a noted opponent of human rights. As a human, that makes them my enemy.

And yes, this applies equally to the United States and other countries.

Re:xenophobia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24261063)

Well, perhaps the government there could

a) stop paying network hackers to break into our government computers

b) stop paying industrial hackers to break into our corporations

c) Sign me up for the next "honeypot" ... please! Not too skinny on the bait tho.

I had a Blackberry for over 10 years, but don't carry one anymore. My Nokia N800 is AES encrypted, however.

Blackberry = CIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260739)

Aren't Blackberries what CIA gives these days to their recruits?

Agents Smagents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24260747)

I grow tired from hearing all the smear about China in the press lately, suggesting a sting operation either means the reporter has watched to many Bond movies lately, or the source wants to create an athmosphere of danger and excitement around the whole thing to make up for the dull life he/she lives.

I call your bluff!

It's been a while (0, Redundant)

krkhan (1071096) | more than 5 years ago | (#24260879)

[blah blah blah] spending the night with an attractive woman who approached him in a Shanghai disco [blah blah blah]

Finally, news for nerds, stuff that matters.

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