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Liquid Metal CPU Heatsink Beats Water Cooling

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the but-as-a-beverage-it-sucks dept.

Power 218

unassimilatible writes "Bios Magazine is reporting that the world's first commercially available liquid-metal based CPU cooler is about to ship. Danamics, a Danish company, claims that its LM-10 outperforms standard air-cooled heatsinks and most watercooled systems with a mere 1W power draw. 'The liquid metal is a key component in Danamics cooling systems. Liquid metal has two major advantages when cooling high power density heat sources: Firstly it has superior thermo physical properties that decrease temperature — and temperature non-uniformity — on die and across chips. Secondly, the electrical properties of the liquid metal enables efficient, reliable and ultra compact electromagnetic pumping without the use of moving parts, shafts, seals, etc.' Awesome technology, if it actually works and is affordable. The submitter requests that the moderators terminate all T-1000 jokes."

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Toxicity? (5, Interesting)

i_ate_god (899684) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267891)

And just how good for the environment is this liquid metal? Or for your health?

Re:Toxicity? (5, Informative)

strelitsa (724743) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267935)

There was a nice discussion about this in Firehose before this made it to the Big Page. A couple of the candidates for the liquid metal that might be used in this thing are environmentally neutral (bismuth, tin, etc.).

Re:Toxicity? (5, Informative)

Sangui5 (12317) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267997)

From my Firehose post:

It's mostly likely using Field's metal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field%27s_metal), Rose's metal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_metal), Galinstan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galinstan), or one of the other low-melting point low toxicity alloys, NOT mercury.

Re:Toxicity? (1)

strelitsa (724743) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268021)

That's the one. It set me to Googling for almost an hour. Thanks for posting.

Re:Toxicity? (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268029)

It remains a pretty useless article for not specifying. I understand if it's a proprietary alloy or something, but how hard is it to say "it's a proprietary alloy"? It's hard to really say anything without something more specific than "liquid metal." Aside from the obvious T-1000 jokes.

Re:Toxicity? (5, Funny)

MdotCpDeltaT (744490) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268111)

I think the liquid metal is their server.

Re:Toxicity? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268163)

You know, this is the internet. And you can use Slashdot's URL 'tag' to autolinkify the URLs you enter. For those without the Firefox extension that autolinkifies plain text URLs, I give you: Field's metal [wikipedia.org] , Rose metal [wikipedia.org] and Galinstan [wikipedia.org]

Re:Toxicity? (1)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268171)

The metal alloys you cite have melting points too high to be of any practical use for semiconductor cooling. They have to be a liquid throughout the entire system to provide fluid flow to allow the liquid to be circulated within the system.

Re:Toxicity? (5, Informative)

Sangui5 (12317) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268193)

Galistan is liquid to -19 degrees C....

Re:Toxicity? (5, Informative)

jlarocco (851450) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268179)

For the lazy:

Field's metal [wikipedia.org]
Rose metal [wikipedia.org]
Galinstan [wikipedia.org]

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Sangui5 (12317) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268209)

Oh, why does everyone insist on making things easy for the lazy? Especially since I was too lazy to linkify them earlier....

Karma link whoring (-1, Redundant)

lawpoop (604919) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268205)

For the lazy among us:

Field's metal [wikipedia.org] , Rose's metal [wikipedia.org] , Galinstan [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Klaus_1250 (987230) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268207)

Galistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galinstan [wikipedia.org] ) seems the only one usable, the others have a melting point of around 70 degrees Celcius. Which won't work if they cool better than air or water (which usually keeps the temps below 50 degrees celcius).

Re:Toxicity? (4, Informative)

dhovis (303725) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268243)

I doubt they're using any of those. Rose's metal uses lead, and the other two contain large percentages of indium and gallium, both of which are getting pretty expensive. Much of the world's gallium goes into GaAs and GaN, whereas the indium goes into indium tin oxide (or ITO), which is a transparent conductor that goes into all LCD screens.

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268259)

Needing to be 62 C just to stay liquid, Field's metal probably wouldn't work. Maybe Galinstan would work, but the article doesn't discuss cost, maybe it's not so bad.

Re:Toxicity? (5, Interesting)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268301)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_metal_embrittlement [wikipedia.org]

Hope they figured this out or mitigate it somehow.

Re:Toxicity? (4, Informative)

Kazymyr (190114) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268691)

Mod parent up - I was about to post on the same lines. Looks like all the likely candidates contain gallium, and gallium is not known to play nice to other metals - corrodes them etc.

Re:Toxicity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268437)

No. No. No.

The metal isn't liquid. The name refers to its glassy properties. See this:

http://www.liquidmetal.com/

Re:Toxicity? (4, Interesting)

WolfWithoutAClause (162946) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268633)

NaK melts at -13 C. It could be that in principle. It would burn if released, but in the intended use it should be safe enough.

Re:Toxicity? (1, Troll)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268647)

Fields metal is good stuff - it's used as a mimetic polyalloy in several weapons related programs. Fields also won a medal for it [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Toxicity? (1)

dermoth666 (1019892) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268959)

Field's metal and Rose metal boiling points are too high.

Galinstan is probably very expensive... There are some more here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusible_alloy [wikipedia.org]

Re:Toxicity? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24267953)

this "liquid metal" wouldn't be Mercury or something like it, would it? Minute parts of mercury can contaminate large water bodies by being ingested into the food chain...

Re:Toxicity? (0)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268815)

Sucks to be you, human. Luckily I'm made out of a mimetic polyalloy not water. Enjoy your large water body!

Depends... (4, Interesting)

ArchieBunker (132337) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267959)

Too much of anything can kill you. Water, salt, mercury, oxygen etc etc. They probably use some alloy with an extremely low melting temperature. The article is a bit short on the specifics.

Re:Depends... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268039)

Yes indeed. Anything can kill you. Just consider how much much mercury it would take to accomplish that feat when compared to the amount (and the effort involved in the act) of water it would take.

Either way, it would be nice to know what they're slipping into those things (especially since they operate on a single watt).

On another note, wouldn't it be interesting if your computer literally "froze" because temperatures dropped and the alloy solidified?

Re:Depends... (2, Interesting)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268133)

If your computer was that cold, wouldn't the purpose of the heat sink be pretty much negated until it thawed?

Re:Depends... (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268517)

One glass of water can kill you, if inhaled... and one ton of mercury will not kill you, if it's sealed in containers.

Schmoo Schmoo (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268065)

Too much of anything can kill you. Water, salt, mercury, oxygen etc etc. They probably use some alloy with an extremely low melting temperature. The article is a bit short on the specifics.

Lets test your theory. I demand you pay several women to sleep with me until I die. We'll see who laughs last!

Re:Schmoo Schmoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268187)

Snuu Snuu, actually.

Re:Schmoo Schmoo (5, Funny)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268583)

Yeah alright how about her [wikipedia.org] ?
Interestingly wikipedia claims she was born aged 55, which explains a lot.

Re:Schmoo Schmoo (2, Funny)

Whiteox (919863) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268665)

How many do you consider to be "several"?
I remember some kind of Sci-Fi movie? show/book? where a group of men were used by the female inhabitants of a planet for sex and pro-creation.
The men aged prematurely, were a husk of their former selves and begged to be released from their ordeal.
Is that what you want?

Re:Schmoo Schmoo (1)

omnipresentbob (858376) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268903)

They told me I could keep my cash =\

Re:Toxicity? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24267991)

Yeah, does it say anywhere what metal they are using? Mercury would be too large of a hazard I would think, although there are a few metals that are liquid just above room temperature.

Re:Toxicity? (0, Offtopic)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268593)

Yeah, does it say anywhere what metal they are using? Mercury would be too large of a hazard I would think, although there are a few metals that are liquid just above room temperature.

Well... its not a liquid metal, but chocolate is meant to be liquid at room temperature, and not only can you take relatively large quantities without overly harmful effects, but it tastes great too!

Re:Toxicity? (4, Informative)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268045)

I expect it's a metal related to these, http://www.indium.com/TIM/solutions/liquidmetal.php [indium.com] which are used as thermal interface materials in machines like Apple's 8 core Mac Pros. The heatsinks on those are wetted with a little of the liquid metal in place of stuff like arctic silver. While working on Mac Pros I found it's like mercury, but sticks to the processor heatspreader and heatsink base. It's liquid even in a cold room. There's toxicity info on that site somewhere, but I'm in a rush at the moment. No doubt someone else will find it and post.

Re:Toxicity? (0)

nimbius (983462) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268289)

Perfectly safe....provided your name isnt John Connor. sorry, couldnt resist.

Superconductors even better (0)

partowel (469956) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267893)

If this becomes publicly available, no heat will be produced. These heat sink technologies are funny.

They will be obsolete soon.

Poor T-1000 (1, Funny)

NoobixCube (1133473) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267915)

He got like 3 lines in that whole movie, and now he's left out of the fun of being ribbed on Slashdot. Probably has something to do with having no ribs... Sorry, had to :P

Reads like an ad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24267941)

Reads like an ad...

Re:Reads like an ad... (2, Insightful)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267975)

It's a true slashdot story then.

No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (4, Funny)

realmolo (574068) | more than 6 years ago | (#24267947)

Slashdot: Remember, Subby, when I promised to kill you last? Subby: That's right, Slashdot. You did. Slashdot: I lied.

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (0)

Todd Fisher (680265) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268011)

Firstly it has superior thermo physical properties that decrease temperature - and it's not a tooomor!

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (2, Informative)

Zencyde (850968) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268027)

For the love of God, Slashdot has a markup system!

Please use <br> to create breaks.

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (5, Insightful)

realmolo (574068) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268383)

Yeah, I know. I forgot to put in the breaks. I do that a lot. I'm used to EVERY OTHER FORUM SOFTWARE IN THE WORLD, where the breaks are inserted for you.

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (3, Informative)

Shados (741919) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268609)

Actually, infoq.com does it this way too. Drives me wacko (fortunately, if you select plain old text as the option before posting in slashdot, it behaves normally. I just wish I didnt have to select it every fucking time)

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (1)

n dot l (1099033) | more than 6 years ago | (#24269061)

I just wish I didnt have to select it every fucking time)

You don't. There's a setting for that.

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (4, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#24269171)

http://slashdot.org/my/comments [slashdot.org]
(skip down most of the way towards the bottom)

Comment Post Mode
Select: Plain Old Text

I really don't understand why it isn't the /. default

Re:No T-1000 jokes, huh, submitter? (2, Informative)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268625)

Put your posts in 'Plain old text' mode, and they're done for you.
Like this!
And you can still use html tags
like that br

Moderators? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24267965)

Uh, the submitter does realize this is Slashdot, right? There are no moderators here, especially not any with the power to terminate jokes.

Banned in California? (5, Funny)

kaos07 (1113443) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268001)

I can see the Governator imposing a ban on the import of this product...

Re:Banned in California? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268139)

I can see the Governator imposing a ban on the import of this product...

Warning:
This product contains chemicals known by the State of California to cause cancer and/or the rise of cyborg assassins bent on enslaving mankind.

That's nice and all, but (-1, Redundant)

davidwr (791652) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268023)

Does it run Linux? *groan*

Obligatory: Imagine a beowulf cluster cooled by these babies!

The obvious choice... (0, Troll)

Monkey_Genius (669908) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268041)

for the coolant metal is Mercury [wikipedia.org] -a very dangerous material- because Bromine [wikipedia.org] would be a far worse choice. So what does a company that produces a product that uses a highly toxic material do to limit its liability when some dumbass decides to 'mod' the LMC?

The real obvious choice (2, Informative)

Sangui5 (12317) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268075)

is a fusible alloy [wikipedia.org] of some sort. The one's without cadmium or potassium are relatively safe, and galistan doesn't even have any lead in it.

Re:The obvious choice... (4, Insightful)

Deadstick (535032) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268355)

some dumbass

As opposed to a person who (a) thinks mercury and bromine are the only two liquid metals and (b) thinks bromine is a metal at all?

rj

Re:The obvious choice... (4, Funny)

Whiteox (919863) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268723)

lol Every stick Bromine+Al?
Your typical Aluminium (Aluminum) heatsink will burn ferociously, spitting white hot molten Al during assembly! hahahahahaha!

No T-1000 jokes? (4, Funny)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268067)

Chill out. Dickwad.

Liquid metal (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268069)

is what ends being your CPU if your cooler fails.

Assuming that we are speaking here of room temperature liquid metal, which one? Some are rare, other are not liquid at normal room temperature, but could be when the cpu starts to get hot, or could be an alloy, but aren't so much choices afaik (or they don't specify as any will work).

Re:Liquid metal (4, Informative)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268771)

Sillicon isnt a metal. :)

What metal? (3, Interesting)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268081)

How odd that the article doesn't even hint at what the metal is. I wonder why not?

Re:What metal? (1)

dermoth666 (1019892) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268229)

Possibly because adding that much mercury (assuming they use that) to every computer on earth is the worse thing you could ever do against the environment. Even China refusing to lower their greenhouse gas emissions is nothing compared to it!

Re:What metal? (1, Insightful)

Detritus (11846) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268503)

Has mercury replaced plutonium as the most feared element by the "Let's all run around in circles, and scream and shout" wing of the environmental movement?

Re:What metal? (3, Informative)

frostband (970712) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268807)

I'm not sure what the metal is either. At first I though they were talking about Liquidmetal(TM) [wikipedia.org]

But they don't mention that it is those trademarked alloys. I still suspect it's another amorphous alloy (bulk metallic glass) even though that's not mentioned in the article and I haven't seen any other posts that mention that might be what it is. In any case, the Zirconium based Liquidmetal(TM) uses Zr, Be, Ti, Cu, and Ni. Here's the wikipedia article on Liquidmetal [wikipedia.org]

I've done a bit of research on AA/BMG's but nothing with the thermal properties though

Re:What metal? (2, Interesting)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 6 years ago | (#24269021)

a mimetic poly-alloy

Sodium cooling (5, Informative)

bmo (77928) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268105)

" Awesome technology, if it actually works and is affordable."

It works. It's worked for decades under the sea cooling nuclear reactors and in piston aircraft engines.

http://www.enginehistory.org/air-cooled_cylinders_3.htm [enginehistory.org]

" During his early years at McCook Field the ever-ingenious Sam Heron had observed the characteristics of various sodium compounds which are normally used in heat-treating operations. These materials are solid at room temperature and become liquid at engine operating temperatures. He observed that since these compounds wet the surface of steel alloys readily and transfer heat very well, their use should be effective in extending the life of exhaust valves. The ancestor of our present-day sodium-cooled valves had arrived, thanks to Mr. Heron, and almost ninety years later we are still enjoying the benefits of his ingenuity though even today such valves are not completely fault free."

Also, it's not terribly expensive. Just don't go hacking into the reservoir or any of the tubes with a saw, mmmkay?

--
BMO

Re:Sodium cooling (3, Informative)

Cal Paterson (881180) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268225)

Some supercomputers already use liquid metal to supercool them (and, AFAIK, have done for a while). I believe it's normally some kind of gallium alloy, but I'm not chemist enough to say more than that.

Re:Sodium cooling (2, Interesting)

icegreentea (974342) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268267)

Sodium only works because nuclear reactors put out a lot of heat. You won't be able to sodium cool your computers. That's where the uncertainty comes in. What metal/metal-alloy is liquid below 100C, is relatively cheap, and safe. Mercury (the obvious answer for one and two) is almost certainly a nono for number three.

Just add som potassium (3, Informative)

viking80 (697716) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268345)

An alloy of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) is liquid from 12.6 to 785 C

it is cheap and wets most metals (good heat transfer)

it is a little reactive, so recycling would need some special handling.

Re:Just add som potassium (3, Informative)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268411)

it is a little reactive, so recycling would need some special handling.

A little reactive? It would burn pretty violently if simply exposed to air, and EXPLODE if it came in contact with water. And either event would produce highly corrosive byproducts.

Re: A little reactive? (2, Funny)

Ken_g6 (775014) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268561)

Could be worse. Could be cesium [theodoregray.com] .

Re: A little reactive? (2, Funny)

Firehed (942385) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268767)

Yes indeed. That website triggered positively explosive reactions in my retinas. :(

I'll be sending you a bill.

Re:Just add som potassium (2, Funny)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268653)

A little reactive? It would burn pretty violently if simply exposed to air, and EXPLODE if it came in contact with water. And either event would produce highly corrosive byproducts.

Where do I sign up?!

Re:Sodium cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268827)

Was he a hardy guy ?

Re:Sodium cooling (3, Insightful)

Chryana (708485) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268895)

I can't speak for the piston aircraft engine cooling part, but the advantages of sodium weren't sufficient to keep using it in submarines [wikipedia.org] . Basically, if the reactor had to be shut down, it was impossible to restart, since the coolant would have by that time frozen solid. Not so desirable in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. So, as far as I know, cooling with liquid sodium is not used in any currently running nuclear submarine. Anyways, I am quite skeptical of the bold claims made in this press release. We see the usual patent pending technology, which has broken some unknown thus far barrier to the widespread use of this technology in the PC cooling area, putting the company ahead of the competition. I'll believe it when I see it. Until then, it looks like a potentially very effective venture capital sink for clueless investors with money to burn.

What is liquid metal? (4, Informative)

dacut (243842) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268107)

Google is being of limited help here. The main link I'm finding is to Liquidmetal Technologies [liquidmetal.com] , which is producing Liquidmetal and Vitreloy -- zirconium-based alloys which are amorphous in structure (hence the "liquid" in the name) but are otherwise solid in appearance and use (and much stronger than stainless steel or titanium). This is not something one would be pumping through heat tubes to cool a CPU.

Obviously, mercury is out due to its toxicity. My initial thought was they're using metal bits in a suspension, but I have doubts as to whether this would actually do anything useful. Deeper searching yields this page [scitoys.com] , which describes a gallium/indium/tin alloy which is liquid at room temperature. Wikipedia'a entry for gallium [wikipedia.org] concurs, saying, "It has been suggested that a liquid gallium-tin alloy could be used to cool computer chips in place of water."

Any materials experts out there care to comment?

No liquid metal jokes? (4, Funny)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268109)

Fair enough. How about mimetic poly alloy jokes?

"That's not liquid metal, that's a mimetic poly alloy!"

"It's as if millions of nano cpus suddenly cried out in terror and were silenced"

"Mime or mime not. There is no try."

"T-1000, I am your mould."

Re:No liquid metal jokes? (1)

|/|/||| (179020) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268841)

"Mimed and failed?"
"Mimed and died."

coc!k (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268245)

Keep unnecessary butts are expose3 They're gone Came

Magnetic pump? (3, Interesting)

lawpoop (604919) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268273)

The article mentions that this device uses an electromagnetic pump to move the heat around. In my naivete, I suggested a similar thing [halfbakery.com] , without a pump. I imagined a sort of metal lava-lamp, where at the base, next to the CPU, blobs of molten metal would rise up towards the top of the heat sink. As they rose, they would cool off ( with the help of the fan) , and then sink again to collect more heat. So, the outside of the heat sink would be copper or aluminum or something, and the inside would be some low-temperature metal like tin. Traditional fin architecture would assist in dispersing the heat.

Re:Magnetic pump? (2, Insightful)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268671)

Isn't that exactly what a heat pipe does?

cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268307)

and i can cure cancer by mixing saliva and boiling urine... IF IT WORKS AND IS AFFORDABLE.

We, Denmark (5, Funny)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268313)

We give you funny cartoons and heatsinks.

You give us Bush, Microsoft and Michael Jackson.

Bad deal, Denmark thinks.

Been there, done that (4, Funny)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268325)

Actually, back in my sophomore year in college, my roommates and I built a liquid-metal-cooled 6-node cluster into the back seat of an old Fiero.

The cool thing was, power was so cheap (via government subsidies called "grants") that we eventually upgraded the cluster to run a realtime terrain modeling system that was supposed to identify a path through a network of roads that allowed for the highest average speed, given speed limits and road lengths. The terrain modeling part would determine a way to maximize the time spent going downhill.

DARPA initially supported us, and were going to upgrade our status, give us clearances, etc. but they eventually killed our funding after Ford found out we were using a Fiero and complained about our physical safety while operating the system. But man, DARPA know of some *way* cool ghost towns and low-traffic road networks.



The preceding is a work of fiction written by an easily-distracted procrastinator in a severe time crunch

Re:Been there, done that (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268465)

Back in the day, I would have been happy with a 2-node cluster in the backseat of my Fiero.

Jokes aside, I did have a Fiero and it was a two-seater like a 'vette. There was no backseat.

Re:Been there, done that (1)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268525)

Did I say seat? I meant "shelf." ;-)

Re:Been there, done that (3, Informative)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268539)

Actually, the Fiero was put out by Pontiac (GM) and not Ford.

Re:Been there, done that (1)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 6 years ago | (#24269033)

Right, and it's just like Ford to complain about GM getting special treatment...anyway, nevermind, not a big deal :D

Why not just use freons. (1)

Lewrker (749844) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268333)

They work. I need a nice suntan.

Obligatory Terminator 2 quotage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268369)

"So this other guy, he's a Terminator like you, right?"

"Not like me. A T-1000, advanced prototype."

"More advanced than you are?"

"Yes. A mimetic poly-alloy."

"What the hell does that mean?"

"Liquid metal."

T-1000 isn't made out of metal (2, Funny)

bigplrbear (1179259) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268579)

He's made out of a "mimetic poly-alloy" you insensitive clod! Evil governator killing robots have feelings too ya know!

Let me say that I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268615)

will be the first to welcome our new liquid metal overlords. Hey, that would be just like that Terminator guy!!!!

coolless cpu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24268687)

What if a CPU were made this way...

take a flourescent lightbulb tube, and two radio transmitters... transmit a signal into the lightbulb to make a lightshow and find the lightshow to play to how the signals are sent.

so figure out what signal to send for how the lightshow goes, then figure out how to send a signal with a math function where the lightshow is the answer.

Pricing? (1)

X (1235) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268695)

Supposedly it is reasonably priced, but I couldn't find any information on price anywhere.

Im just asking (2, Interesting)

meeya (1152133) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268697)

cant it be sodium? or something of the class?

Re:Im just asking (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268819)

Yep. Fun and games when your sodium conduit breaks at the same time as the conduit on your water cooling system.

Re:Im just asking (1)

icegreentea (974342) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268931)

It can't be pure sodium. Pure sodium becomes liquid at like 95 degrees or so. Getting your CPU to run that fast to begin with would be quite a feat. I also imagine if you get a hole in the piping, then your screwed. Sodium reacts violently with water (including water vapour in the air). It cannot end well.

"Moderators terminate all T-1000 jokes" (2, Funny)

Nova Express (100383) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268729)

Don't worry. They'll be back.

Not a joke. (4, Funny)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268805)

"The submitter requests that the moderators terminate all T-1000 jokes."

The only way to do that would be to wait until the thread becomes stale, assess people who made the jokes, and then send back a cybernetic soldier to kill their mothers.

T-1000 (0)

wozzinator (1079319) | more than 6 years ago | (#24268883)

It cant form complex machines, guns and explosives have chemicals, moving parts, it doesn't work that way, but it can form solid metal shapes.

ya babe (0, Troll)

LogicallyGenius (916669) | more than 6 years ago | (#24269189)

Oh ya baby, lets screw up the environment for cooling our dicks.
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