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A Quasi-Quasicrystal

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the fractional-quasiness dept.

Math 121

An anonymous reader sends along a link to a mindbending article in Science News on quasicrystals — odd materials with a structure partway between order and disorder. Now researchers have found something even odder: a material that's partway between a quasicrystal and a regular crystal. The order in the new structure is provided by the Fibonacci sequence. It was constructed with plastic beads and laser beams, so no new materials science inventions are on the horizon. "'We are absolutely sure that this structure should have properties that are not usual,' Mikhael says, because materials with odd structures almost always do. Now they just have to figure out what those properties are."

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121 comments

Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (5, Insightful)

haltenfrauden27 (1338125) | more than 5 years ago | (#24476943)

"'We are absolutely sure that this structure should have properties that are not usual,' Mikhael says, because materials with odd structures almost always do."

Sounds like something out of a Monty Python sketch.

Seriously, though, I'd rather hear about what interesting/new discoveries come out of this strange material than just hear about the possibility of its existence.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (4, Insightful)

Paradigm_Complex (968558) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477023)

Seriously, though, I'd rather hear about what interesting/new discoveries come out of this strange material than just hear about the possibility of its existence.

When that's announced people will complain that the information is pretty useless and would rather hear about practical applications found for it.
When that's announced people will complain about why they haven't heard about this before. Others will complain about how it was on digg years ago and how slashdot is slow.

So shut up and discuss the interesting stuff we have know now :D
Or get high and stare at the trippy pictures :D
Or make an off topic meme-based joke :(

New meme (3, Funny)

Misanthrope (49269) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477225)

Almost but not entirely unlike crystal?

Re:New meme (1)

Paradigm_Complex (968558) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477253)

Psh, that meme is almost but not entirely unlike crystal.

Hmmm... Psh, that meme is almost but not entirely unlike crystal.

There we go. If you follow the line above the one you were referring to in my previous post first, it works a lot better.

Impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477423)

Diamonds are the hardest material known the man!

Re:Impossible! (1, Funny)

dmbasso (1052166) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477987)

The women that know me think otherwise... they ever say the hardest material known to them is my... head! :\

cheap shot (2, Funny)

arkarumba (763047) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479093)

Thats almost but not entirely unlike a meme.

Re:New meme (4, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477735)

It can be used to build a machine making something almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (3, Funny)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477271)

"Or make an off topic meme-based joke"

You mean, like teaching sharks with lasers on their heads to swim in formation so they could generate quasi-crystals as they went about their nefarious business? I am above such childish antics!

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (5, Funny)

Artuir (1226648) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478665)

I for one welcome our shark-toting Fibonacci based Hitler laser fiends, you insensitive clod!

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (4, Funny)

Firehed (942385) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479157)

In Soviet Russia, insensitive sharks tote Fibonacci, you Hitler-based laser crystal!

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

Artuir (1226648) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479691)

If it would ever be possible to kill people over the internet, this thread would do it. :D

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (3, Funny)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477539)

So shut up and discuss the interesting stuff we have know now :D

Is that what they call quasi quasi moderation?

That's cwazsy.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

tobiasly (524456) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478229)

Meanwhile, a lone humanoid soldier from the year 2215 is being sent back through time to the day before yesterday, in a desperate attempt to kill the inventor of these quasi-quasicrystals, destroy all his work, and utterly wipe all knowledge of their existence from human memory (including this Slashdot article). But it may already be too late. "Goddamn quasi-quasicrystals and their unusual properties... If only we knew", he thinks as he enters the chronopod. "If only we knew!!"

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (3, Funny)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478767)

And it would have worked too, if it weren't for the dupes (on Slashdot).

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

bytesex (112972) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479603)

In Korea, only old people will complain about these things.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24479961)

Hey, I would like to discuss with Slashdot about this ground-breaking idea I just had about creating a new nanomaterial based on the number 42.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 5 years ago | (#24481247)

So shut up and discuss the interesting stuff we have know now :D
Or get high and stare at the trippy pictures :D

Can't I do both?

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477035)

Seriously, though, I'd rather hear about what interesting/new discoveries come out of this strange material than just hear about the possibility of its existence.

... Then you should try a news site that deals with less than the latest science news.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477077)

"Nobody expects the unusual properties!"

In the old days... (3, Funny)

Moryath (553296) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477123)

we used to just split hairs.

Now we split crystals. And get quasicrystals. Which were supposed to be unusual.

And now we have quasi-quasicrystals. And then they're "not usual."

And next we can get something somewhere between a quasicrystal and a quasiquasicrystal.

I'd rather hear about what interesting/new discoveries come out of this strange material than just hear about the possibility of its existence.

In 10 years' time you'll be hearing about the quasiquasiquasiquasiquasiquasiquasiquasiquasicrystal, but we still won't know what the heck to do with them.

"We are absolutely sure that this structure should have properties that are not usual," Mikhael says, because materials with odd structures almost always do. Now they just have to figure out what those properties are.

Property #1: the ability to endow a grad student with his PhD and a sizable chunk of grant money.

Re:In the old days... (1)

tubapro12 (896596) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477217)

The trend seems to be leading to us getting quasi-quasi-quasicrystals, which will be not unusual.

Re:In the old days... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477229)

For an example of a practical use, Teflon is a quasicrystal. I read somewhere that they tend to be slippery.

Re:In the old days... (2, Funny)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478719)

For an example of a practical use, Teflon is a quasicrystal. I read somewhere that they tend to be slippery.

So these Quasi-Quasi-Crystals (TM) will send us down a slippery slope?

Re:In the old days... (1)

Kingrames (858416) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478953)

Let's not jump to conclusions here.

Re:In the old days... (1)

kootsoop (809311) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479551)

Let's not jump to conclusions here.

You're new here, aren't you?

Re:In the old days... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477455)

And next we can get something somewhere between a quasicrystal and a quasiquasicrystal.

So if I'm building a database about materials, I ought to make the crystallynessosity field a float, instead of a boolean?

Re:In the old days... (1)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478019)

I've already got a quasiquasicrystal, partway between crystal and not-crystal, in my garage. See, I accidentally mixed a bunch of salt into this big tub of vaseline...

Re:In the old days... (1)

Blublu (647618) | more than 5 years ago | (#24481387)

What were you doing with a tub full of vaseline? Actually, nevermind. I don't want to know.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (3, Informative)

dontmakemethink (1186169) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477219)

"'We are absolutely sure that this structure should have properties that are not usual,' Mikhael says, because materials with odd structures almost always do."

Sounds like George Dubya Bush paraphrasing Yoda.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (5, Insightful)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477731)

"We are absolutely sure that this structure should have properties that are not usual,' Mikhael says, because materials with odd structures almost always do."

Right. What kind of logic does this guy use?

"We are absolutely sure it should have 'something'... because ... others almost always do..."

"We're...100%....80%....60%..." Add a few more even 'less certain' words, like "surely", "perhaps", "maybe" and the confidence in his assertion would have dropped from 100% certainty all the way to 0% certainty in a single sentence.

I mean, hedging your bets or what? This guy should be a politician.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

IceCreamGuy (904648) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478313)

Yes, well, you see, they inductively deduced this concusion...

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

Blitz22 (1122015) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478345)

60% of the time, it works every time....

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478709)

What's the problem? The answer to the question wether these structures have remarkable properties is definitely 'Maybe'.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478817)

Are you sure?

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24480293)

Yes. Very sure.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24479059)

I liked the quote, but had to read it twice. The logic is perfect. Given that "others almost always do" it follows that this one "should" too, and being "sure" adds nothing to the statement. It is like being sure that the ball doesn't usually land on black in roulette. The word "absolutely" is redundant when used before the word sure, but it somehow makes the odd sentence more interesting. If a sentence is going to be an odd one, I suppose it should at least be interesting.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

Bob-taro (996889) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479351)

"We're...100%....80%....60%..." Add a few more even 'less certain' words, like "surely", "perhaps", "maybe" and the confidence in his assertion would have dropped from 100% certainty all the way to 0% certainty in a single sentence.

I think what they're trying to say is that 60% of the time, it works every time.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479461)

> I think what they're trying to say is that 60% of the time, it works every time. ...and they're certain of that because in the past it has worked most of the time.

Re:Anyone else find that quote hilarious? (2, Interesting)

crovira (10242) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479911)

No.

But the Fibonacci sequence is fascinating.

This material is definitely odd. (Lets hope it can be related down atomic scale.)

The reason it makes a good insulator is the Fibonacci gaps. They make for discrete jumps like quantum jumps because there is no smooth path for electron 'energy bands' to follow.

A truckload of beads for your stock options! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24476951)

Hey, it has worked before...

Re:A truckload of beads for your stock options! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477051)

Only with your mother's anal beads. I hear your sister used to sneak 'em out without washing them.

Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477019)

Remember the comic from XKCD about the spork cross breeds? This could apply to Quasy-Quasycrystals too. They could breed hybrids in proportions corresponding to every binary fraction in the whole spectrum between Crystal and Quasy-Crystal. Fear the powerful forces!

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (2, Funny)

SilentBob0727 (974090) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477031)

That was the first thing I thought of too.

quasiquasicrystals, then quasiquasicrystalcrystals, then quasicrystalcrystalquasicrystalquasis...

You're dealing with forces beyond your understanding....

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (2, Funny)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477099)

Apparently... that would be ALL forces then ? :p

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (1)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478611)

You're clever young man, very clever, but it's quasy all the way down.

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (1)

ratbag (65209) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477635)

Any reason for the perverse spelling of quasi?

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (2, Funny)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478071)

Uh, mi fyngers hyt the wrong kei whyle tipyng!

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24479179)

You seem to have your own unique way with English. Here's the comic [xkcd.com] .

Re:Quasy-quasycrossbreeds (1)

Sciryl Llort (1160727) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479277)

# from the ice age to the dole age,
  there is but one concern -
  I have just discovered:
  Some crystals are more crystalline than others,
  Some crystals are more crystalline than others
  Other crystals are intermediate in crystallinity between the first... /#

Possibilities (3, Funny)

moteyalpha (1228680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477135)

I could be a random resistance element that could be used as a random number seed. Or it could be the mythical room temperature non-conductor.

Re:Possibilities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477371)

It most probably tastes purple as all strange substances do.

Re:Possibilities (1)

Quantus347 (1220456) | more than 5 years ago | (#24480233)

The secret to the Flux Capacitor perhaps?

First one is easy! (2, Funny)

yellowstone (62484) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477141)

Now they just have to figure out what those properties are.

1) Does it taste like chicken?

Re:First one is easy! (1)

gmby (205626) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477573)

"Or make an off topic meme-based joke"

"1) Does it taste like chicken?"

2) Does it run linux?

3) Does it have a girl friend?

4) Does it live in it's Mothers Basement?

5) Does it Profit?

6) Profit!

Ops.. I think we missed a step!

Re:First one is easy! (1)

GroeFaZ (850443) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477757)

Everything more or less tastes like chicken.

Re:First one is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24478191)

Everything more or less tastes like chicken.

except chicken

Re:First one is easy! (1)

daveime (1253762) | more than 5 years ago | (#24480441)

And I don't think they could work out what chicken tastes like, which is why chicken tastes like everything else.

Shut up Mouse !

"found" or "constructed" (3, Insightful)

ulash (1266140) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477159)

Which one is it? The summary needs to make up its mind. Either it is something that occurs naturally (and TFA seems to suggest otherwise) in which case it would be "found" or it is something cooked up in a lab which would make it "constructed".

definitely "found" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477215)

Much like LSD, it was found while trying to cook up something else in a lab. Who knows, someday we might identify naturally-occuring examples of this quasi-quasi crystalline structure... for now it's just a lab phenomenon.

Re:"found" or "constructed" (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477411)

Indeed. If it is naturally occurring, it should be called a quasi-quasicrystal, but if it is manmade, it should be called a pseudo-quasicrystal :D

Re:"found" or "constructed" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477551)

I wouldn't say something like that around pseudopods or you might find a non-man-made foot in your ass. Thankfully, it'll be really small (but don't let it get all the way up into your digestive tract.)

Re:"found" or "constructed" (2, Insightful)

renoX (11677) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477955)

Both!

Maybe you should read TFA: it was both found and constructed, found because they didn't expect it, constructed because it's not something which occurs naturally.

Re:"found" or "constructed" (2, Funny)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478783)

Both!

Maybe you should read TFA: it was both found and constructed, found because they didn't expect it, constructed because it's not something which occurs naturally.

Isn't the word for that "dumbfound"?

I have (2, Funny)

Konster (252488) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477165)

I have isolated a compound in my lab. I call it the Politiquasicrystal. I have determined that it can bend the truth with no expenditure of energy.

Plastic beads, like you make a necklace out of? (2, Informative)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477257)

Well, for those that didn't RTFA, I did for
you... and no... they didn't go to a piece
goods shop and buy a sack of necklace beads.

FTA:
To simplify matters, the team set out to create a quasicrystal from micron-sized plastic beads called colloidal particles.

For those unfamiliar with colloidals, it is
from the Greek work kolla, meaning glue as the
first colloids were just that. Particulate size
is such that surface area is greater than volume
thus the particulates tend not to settle from
gravity.

They're pretty useful in everyday life. Some
common items would be some aerosol sprays,
shotcrete for your pool out back and the yummy
emulsion, mayonnaise!

These in TFA however are just micron sized beads
of plastic.

-AI

Re:Plastic beads, like you make a necklace out of? (1)

XSpud (801834) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477819)

For those unfamiliar with colloidals, it is from the Greek work kolla, meaning glue as the first colloids were just that. Particulate size is such that surface area is greater than volume thus the particulates tend not to settle from gravity.

And for those unfamiliar with mathematics, the bit relating surface area to volume does not make any sense.

Re:Plastic beads, like you make a necklace out of? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477991)

I guess maybe this would be a realm for
chemists and physicists and not the realm
of a mathematician.

Since it seems to be a concept that a
mathematician might not be able to grasp.

I believe the concept is better stated as
a large surface area per unit volume.

Re:Plastic beads, like you make a necklace out of? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24479619)

Could we please
not press enter after
every three or
maybe four words?

Re:I have (2, Funny)

Exitar (809068) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477415)

It's nothing compared to my iQuasicrystal and its Reality Distortion Field.

Re:I have (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477437)

Yes, Apple has 100,000 on order

Re:I have (1)

Bastard of Subhumani (827601) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477531)

I have isolated a compound in my lab.

So have I, but unfortunately the margin is too small to write its chemical formula in.

Penrose tiling? (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477211)

Why is there no mention of Penrose tiling in TFA?

Re:Penrose tiling? (5, Funny)

whyloginwhysubscribe (993688) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477267)

They don't exist anymore - they got bought out by Hawking's Bathrooms in 2004.

Re:Penrose tiling? (1)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477277)

I was wondering that myself... first
thing I thought when I saw the graphics
was, 'hey... wasn't that my old AfterDark95
screensaver?'
[ http://afterdarksaver.blogspot.com/2007/11/penrose.html [blogspot.com] ]

That and good ole satori...
[ http://telcontar.net/DesktopPics/satori.php [telcontar.net] ]

-AI

Re:Penrose tiling? (2, Interesting)

feranick (858651) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477301)

Because it's one of the several possible tiling, and it's not exclusive. In other words, there are other tilings that fit specific type of quasicrystals. There is no reason to pick Penrose's one. What has been found in TFA, is more general. In fact the tiling in this system is very different from any other, since it is somewhat an hybrid between a conventional quasicrystal and a crystal. Why are you all so obsessed with Penrose's tiling?

Re:Penrose tiling? (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478879)

Why are you all so obsessed with Penrose's tiling?

To quote Wikipedia:

A Penrose tiling has many remarkable properties, most notably:

  • It is nonperiodic which means that it lacks any translational symmetry. More informally, a shifted copy will never match the original exactly.
  • Any finite region in a tiling appears infinitely many times in that tiling and, in fact, in any other tiling. This property would be trivially true of a tiling with translational symmetry but is non-trivial when applied to the non-periodic Penrose tilings.
  • It is a quasicrystal: implemented as a physical structure a Penrose tiling will produce Bragg diffraction; the diffractogram reveals both the underlying fivefold symmetry and the long range order. This order reflects the fact that the tilings are organized, not through translational symmetry, but rather through a process sometimes called "deflation" or "inflation." (My emphasis)

But mostly because they're cool.

Re:Penrose tiling? (1)

albyrne5 (893494) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479097)

Don't know, but I got my bathroom done in Penrose tiling and it looks pretty cool. (Quite expensive though).

Re:Penrose tiling? (1)

Siquo (1259368) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479347)

My first association with those pictures was with the 500 years older Girih tiling [wikipedia.org] ...

mindbending crystals? (1)

DohnJoe (900898) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477221)

Zlorfik!

Paraphrasing TFA (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477299)

We'd like to study these crystals, but we require more vespene gas!

Name? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477377)

Quasiquasicrystal doesn't roll of the tongue...

Quasi is roughly the same as almost, right?

What is the latin equivalent of "Barely"?

Re:Name? (1)

Arimus (198136) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477869)

Quasi is 'as-if' or 'sort-of'

Fere is 'almost' - which rolls of the tongue slightly easier...

So think these new crystals could be called Fere quassi crystallinus (almost sort-of crystals) instead ;)

Re:Name? (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477907)

How about "irregularly ordered aperiodic crystals"?

quasi-quasicrystal beads?? (0, Offtopic)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477515)

What the hell? What's next, psychedelic furs? Why not resurrect Marley, Hendrix, and Morrison and some Woodstockes and give them algea and foil and an audience in Stonehenge? Wait Wait, Don't tell me. the whirled will come stoned and UNhinged and unable to compute the motions to drink an conjugate swerves...

Not new, really. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477853)

In the 90s, I was a PhD student in theorethical physics. One of the paper I read showed a crystal with a structure based on the fibonacci sequence. Such structures were also realised in superlattices at LinkÃping University, Sweden, in a cooperation between the theoretical physics group and the thin film group. You could contact Dr. Rolf Riklund for the details, his PhD student did the study.
 

Meh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24477877)

They had this ages ago, Kryptonite.

ANKOS? (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#24477935)

I realize someone is going to mod me flamebait or troll, but I just wanted to say the images remind me of the cellular automata simulations from Wolfram's "A New Kind of Science" in that they are semi-ordered but non-predictable. Neat stuff regardless.

Re:ANKOS? (1)

albyrne5 (893494) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479107)

Why would you expect to be modded flamebait or troll for such a comment? I don't understand?

Re:ANKOS? (2, Informative)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479501)

Every other reference to Wolfram on /. seems to be rather derogatory. He's seen as stealing others' ideas and shamelessly self-promoting. His "A New Kind of Science", at 1200 pages, was self-published and unedited. For these reasons and others, he doesn't seem to have the highest reputation, though despite it all I found ANKOS pretty amazing.

It's the Omega molecule! (1)

Crock23A (1124275) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478009)

Perfection is always just out of reach.

Slashdot.. (-1, Flamebait)

intothemiddle (1142025) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478119)

Stuff that matters, to people who don't think. Instead of posting "news" stories like this anymore, lets all have a giant game of twister and shout out memes while waiting our turn. This isn't even close to news, this is like me stating "well theres evidence that there may well once of been a God, or someone named something like God, perhaps it wasn't exactly the right name, but it's close, or perhaps quite far away from what I believe. But I'm definitely sure that I'm considering what I'm saying to be potentially true and if it isn't it could have a consequence regardless.". In other news, STUFF MAY HAPPEN! THINGS MAY EXIST! THINGS, WONDERFUL THINGS I CAN IMAGINE!!

Re:Slashdot.. (1)

urcreepyneighbor (1171755) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478239)

Stuff that matters, to people who don't think.

PhysOrg [physorg.com] and Science Daily [sciencedaily.com] will fill your need for hard news. :)

Re:Slashdot.. (1)

intothemiddle (1142025) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478299)

Hard news? As opposed to this soft news? Or as we call it in the trade B--lsh-t.

So I should just come to slashdot for rumours and gossip? What is this, a knitting circle of nerds?

Re:Slashdot.. (1)

rugatero (1292060) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479259)

What is this, a knitting circle of nerds?

No, that's what you end up with when someone confuses Perl and purl.

Bill and Ted-ism's (2, Funny)

Reecie (1030330) | more than 5 years ago | (#24478529)

"That was non- non-non non-heinous!"

Fractal Quasiness? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24478983)

Shouldn't this be from the fractal-quasiness dept instead of fractional-quasiness? :-)

A quasi-quasicrystal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24479307)

A quasi-quasicrystal, also known as "crystal"...

you're only quasi-evil. (1)

einsteingroovin (1339071) | more than 5 years ago | (#24479715)

now is this an evil... quasi-quasi crystal?
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