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Google Earth Used To Predict Electrical Problems

samzenpus posted more than 6 years ago | from the what-can't-it-do dept.

The Internet 91

coondoggie writes "What do you get when you combine images from Google Earth and the brainpower from researchers at Oak Ridge National Labs? Well in this case you get a tool that enables real-time status of the national electric grid that federal state and local agencies can use to coordinate and respond to major problems such as wide-area power outages, natural disasters and other catastrophic events. The Visualizing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth (VERDE) system, announced this week, mashes together images and stats of everything from real-time status of the electric grid and weather information to power grid behavior modeling and simulation."

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I am African-American (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506371)

Does that make me a nigger?

Re:I am African-American (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506379)

You aren't homosexual by any chance, are you?

I have a suggestion for a group you may want to join.

Re:I am African-American (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506423)

Definition of New York Minute: The time it takes for a post containing the word "nigger" to be modded down to -1.

Re:I am African-American (-1, Offtopic)

odiroot (1331479) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507249)

It always remind me of Chris Rock and his Nigga Please cereals :).

I predict... (4, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506381)

...that posting such a story will inspire lots of slashdotters to go download or access Google Earth, and cause electrical problems.

Next project? (5, Funny)

VoltageX (845249) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506413)

Managing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth (MERDE).

Oui oui!

Re:Next project? (1)

drseuk (824707) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507373)

Tracking Unplanned Redmond Downtime in Seattle (TURDS)

Re:Next project? (2, Funny)

aproposofwhat (1019098) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508163)

Something Happening In The Electrics (SHITE)

Re:I predict... (5, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506523)

that Google Earth will be declared a threat to Homeland Security, and taken offline. :-(

Re:I predict... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24508599)

*cough* GCCS-I3 Uses Google Earth *cough*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Command_and_Control_System

Re:I predict... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24520997)

... Google will use this application to help justify a redundant power grid feed for one of the mega-centers.

Re:I predict... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506733)

I hope medibuntu repos are ready for us!

Re:I predict... (1)

Xupa (1313669) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506799)

DING!

CHILE VERDE, much better acronym (1)

Misanthrope (49269) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506457)

Computer Heuristic Internet Longitudinal Environment for VERDE

Wha? (5, Insightful)

ejdmoo (193585) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506469)

How exactly does Google Earth predict *anything* at all?

What it seems is someone wrote software to analyze the electrical grid, and they use the Google Maps API to visualize the geographic data.

Yay.

Re:Wha? (3, Interesting)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506665)

It's definitely a dubious title, especially since TFA says almost nothing about Google. I suppose, though, that they are technically using Google Earth in their predictions, because without it they'd have to write their own/use Mapquest. I'm sure a big part of it is getting to attach Google's name to something no one outside the department and government is really interested by, and I bet Google's happy to step in. Besides, GE is probably really nice to visualize their data with. Distance from major cities or energy producers, weather, temperature, terrain, etc.

Re:Wha? (2, Interesting)

Atario (673917) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506947)

Where does anything say Google Earth is predicting anything? All I see is "...used to predict...".

Don't let that stop you from ostentatiously acting bored, though.

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24507803)

I'm sure a fortune teller uses a table to lay tarot cards on, but that doesn't mean that the table "is used to predict" the future; foo.

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24507853)

I concur. It's a sensationalist headline. Out of date photos from above don't even allow YOU to predict things...

Re:Wha? (4, Funny)

houghi (78078) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507987)

It sounds less sexy then Maps used to show location

Re:Wha? (1)

ozphx (1061292) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508219)

Google: "We are going to put a huge datacenter down.... mmmm..here. We predict electrical problems in...mmm.. this 50 mile radius.. mmm.. here."

Google, sucking up all your electricity with their huge horse nostrils.

Re:Wha? (-1, Flamebait)

AmberBlackCat (829689) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508469)

My guess is Google is paying some money to Slashdot as an advertiser, unless slashdotters really are this interested in Google every week. Maybe they are. I also think the energy people have their own systems to predict electrical problems. Maybe they don't. Either way, I just can't imagine a bunch of government officials being excited that because Google exists, they finally have a way to get weather information and maps of their area. Maybe they are.

Re:Wha? (1)

ASBands (1087159) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508823)

You're absolutely right. My company uses Google Earth to manage the construction of transmission lines, which lets people know when and where the towers are going to be put up and helps our clients keep track of how close we are to schedule.

  • Google Earth Used to Construct Power Lines
  • Google Earth Used to Cure Cancer
  • Google Earth Used to Find the Closest White Castle

Re:Wha? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#24520639)

I can see Google Earth photos used to evaluate the condition of overhead lines, the amount of encroachment by trees, etc. But, as someone pointed out, G.E. can be years out of date. So the 'latest' photos will show you where you should have concentrated tree trimming efforts years ago.

I was involved in a project that used aerial photography to evaluate power line right-of-way conditions. Up to date satellite photography could be used as well. In fact, some good multi-spectral imaging can tell quite a bit about foliage conditions. But to get the good stuff, you've got to pay. G.E. may be OK for some R&D proof of concept work, but probably not in production.

shoulv'e called it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506491)

the Macroscopic Energy Resources Dynamic Earth system. Then it'd be the shit.

simple google (4, Insightful)

twotailakitsune (1229480) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506507)

This is what, the 100th idea using Google Maps/Earth? they are just using the Google Maps API. Google is more open with people using Maps without paying some big Usage fee.

What this is really about is the VERDE program. Now if Google was doing a real time status program I would have it sit on my screen all day.

Re:simple google (5, Funny)

jaminJay (1198469) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506777)

Now if Google was doing a real time status program I would have it sit on my screen all day.

That way, when the screen goes black, you'd know the power went out?

Re:simple google (4, Funny)

SimonGhent (57578) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507927)

That way, when the screen goes black, you'd know the power went out?

Or that the sun went down. There's just no way to tell.

Re:simple google (1)

ericspinder (146776) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508141)

What this is really about is the VERDE program.

But if the subject didn't mention Google and the article didn't feature the maps, would it be news worth distributing?

Certainly Google maps and it's API is one of the best internet tools of this decade, but I suspect that the database work and real time collection and analysis of this data, must have taken a tremendous effort. It's too bad that the pretty picture generated from the end result seems to get top billing.

Re:simple google (2, Insightful)

Homer's Donuts (838704) | more than 6 years ago | (#24509121)

When the lights get dimmer, the voltage is going down.

They watch meters real time, predict load based on averages. This weeks load, time of day, last years load,etc. Oh, and they watch the Weather Channel.

Failure prediction? They know what loads have caused failure before. Believe it or not, higher temps and loads (i squared r) cause the wires to stretch. They fail when they come in contact with earth(tree branches,etc) that causes a huge load swing. At 345,000 volts, wood is a conductor.

So a prediction model is new. That is if someone buys and uses it. I've seen multi-floor knife switches that look like they belong in a Frankenstein movie, and an operating turbine with a swastika on the cover.

So this should be in widespread use by what? 2020? Or about a month after someone in Illinois sells power to someone in New Jersey and puts his generator online even though the system operator tells him not to. And the grid goes down. Again.

So I have a prediction: The utilities will fail to fix what is really wrong, a lack of infrastructure to deliver power, until the grid fails again.

I can also predict who is going to pay for it.

Re:simple google (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508161)

>This is what, the 100th idea using Google Maps/Earth? they are just using the Google Maps API.

Real time data with 10 year old satellite photos, what could possibly go wrong.

Re:simple google (1)

silentsteel (1116795) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508721)

What many seem to forget is that the entity using this is a part of the U. S. Government. Should they need anything newer than a 10 year old satellite photo, they can have them, easily. Given the people working at Oak Ridge, it should not be that difficult to incorporate the newer imagery. Of course, you and I will not see it. If something requires posting images publicly they will revert to those 10 year old photos.

just a question (3, Insightful)

silentphate (1245152) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506509)

If this is such a major development, why is it just now being created? Haven't we had the technology to do something like this for decades?

Re:just a question (1)

moteyalpha (1228680) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506575)

The concept of a simple common way to deal with data models is a process that seems to be heading towards standards which would be nice. Something like the openGL standards or blender file formats. If there were a standard way to represent complex interactive systems as even a bot script for a 3D world that could easily be shared like a language of systems interaction. I have been looking at littleb and that may evolve into a standard which can represent systems so that problems and solutions drift to the top so they can be dealt with. The vast amount of data available seems to be the problem today. There is more information than there are people trained to interpret it.

I am skeptical... (3, Insightful)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506515)

You know why? It is because data and images from Google Earth are not that up-to-date. In fact, several [new] roads in my county are not shown on Google Earth and Google Maps! So I am skeptical. Am I alone?

Re:I am skeptical... (4, Funny)

cencithomas (721581) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506607)

I believe you can get more up-to-date information by purchasing Google Earth Plus or Google Earth Pro. Not positive though and the comparison page [google.com] doesn't seem to specify.

...in retrospect, this comment is not nearly as helpful as I'd hoped.

Re:I am skeptical... (5, Informative)

alextmqazwsx (1124255) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506803)

Referenced from here: Google Earth [google.com]

*Note: While Google Earth Plus has additional capabilities, the underlying imagery is the same for all versions of Google Earth.

Re:I am skeptical... (0, Redundant)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506807)

I believe you can get more up-to-date information by purchasing Google Earth Plus or Google Earth Pro.

You can't.

You can't, but.... (1)

gbutler69 (910166) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507139)

You can if you are the U.S. government.

Re:I am skeptical... (2, Insightful)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507591)

For this application, I suspect it doesn't need to be. They want to have a general idea of which area an event takes place in. Full accuracy (e.g. the street address of the affected transformer) is only needed at lower level, and they should have mechanisms in place for that already.

Sim City Stats (5, Interesting)

neostorm (462848) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506539)

I am still waiting for Google Earth to fully encompass the feedback offered in games like Sim City, where I can search regions around the world for such things as Crime Statistics, Pollution, Economy, etc.

There are plenty of other areas we can display information as well. They've already got traffic, terrain and now this. I am currently relocating to a new area as well, and actually tried to get crime stats on potential areas I'd be living in (thinking they may have already achieved that ability), they haven't got them yet, but I hope my wish list is not too far away.

Re:Sim City Stats (5, Interesting)

littlerubberfeet (453565) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506581)

I was researching crime before a move as well. I was stuck using an absolutely horrible web-enabled wannabe GIS thing. Having used ArcGIS, I know what a decent GIS is capable of. Google Earth is well on its way to being able to display information the way ArcView does. A buffer wizard type tool would be a wonderful thing in Google Earth...The analytical side of things is not really suitable for the Google Earth architecture though.

Yeah, Google would do well to integrate even census data (which includes some crime, pollution and economic data) into Google Earth.

Re:Sim City Stats (1)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506693)

I haven't updated Google Earth in a while, mostly because I haven't used it in a while, but last I saw it definitely had Crime Statistics. Pollution and Economy are both a little more ethereal, but moreover, they're for a much broader locale. I may wonder the crime stats in Manhattan versus Brooklyn, but what's it gonna say for Pollution, or Economy? Good and good? Corporate and yuppie? Those terms really apply to large areas, much greater than cities. As far as small towns are concerned, all the cities have the same economy and pollution. You're just more likely to get killed in NYC than Seattle.

Re:Sim City Stats (1)

SimonGhent (57578) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507943)

I am still waiting for Google Earth to fully encompass the feedback offered in games like Sim City

Sod that!

I am still waiting for Google Earth to fully encompass the natural disasters offered in games like Sim City.

Go Godzilla!

Re:Sim City Stats (1)

Comtraya (1306593) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508801)

Then you can also have x-ray vision and see the status of the water main infrastructure.

Re:Sim City Stats (1)

MartinB (51897) | more than 6 years ago | (#24509389)

I am currently relocating to a new area as well, and actually tried to get crime stats on potential areas I'd be living in (thinking they may have already achieved that ability), they haven't got them yet, but I hope my wish list is not too far away.

If you're moving to the UK, then go take a look at these guys [upmystreet.com] , who have bought CACI's ACORN geodemographic dataset, and combined with publically available datasets on education, crime etc, to produce a view on what that area is like.

Example [upmystreet.com] (where I used to live)

Other than that, you're calling 1-800-CACI [caci.com] and asking for their geodemographic solutions.

Crime stat methodologies vary ... (2, Informative)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 6 years ago | (#24514423)

I am still waiting for Google Earth to fully encompass the feedback offered in games like Sim City, where I can search regions around the world for such things as Crime Statistics, Pollution, Economy, etc.

The method of collection of such statistics varies by country, so they are not easily comparable.

One that I'm familiar with (from activism related to gun laws): Murder, accident, and suicide statistics. For instance:

  - Britain counts it as a murder when they have a conviction. US when they have a body in suspicious circumstances.

  - Father kills his three kids, wife, and himself: US: Four murders one suicide. Japan: Five suicides.

  - In many places in the US a suicide, especially of a youth, will usually be reported as an accident (to avoid placing a stigma on the bereaved family).

I could go on. (Especially about Japan and variations on so-called "family suicide".) But I think the above examples show how directly comparing published rates for the US, England, and Japan can yield some very bogus impressions.

HUH??? (3, Informative)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506547)

Okay, I can see "recent" data... but anybody who really thinks that Google Earth is "realtime" is a serious candidate for the Happy Home.

Some of the pictures are over 6 YEARS old...

Re:HUH??? (5, Informative)

kerashi (917149) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506571)

The google earth maps may not be updated, but the maps are just a backdrop upon which the data is displayed.

Re:HUH??? (0)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506813)

Which accomplishes what beyond looking kewl and l33t? Seriously, if you are looking at a display showing the status of the power system background images are just noise that add nothing useful.

Re:HUH??? (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507333)

Maybe that's how the "prediction" part works. They'll overlay the current electrical power grid and status over maps showing no development to account for the power usage displayed.

Re:HUH??? (1)

brunokummel (664267) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508103)

Some of the pictures are over 6 YEARS old...

You can say that again...My etire neighboorhood seen through Google Earth is nothing but a huge construction site...

Re:HUH??? (1)

edsousa (1201831) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508967)

While the images may be outdated, Google Earth used to show a road that is yet to be built. I think that after all Google Earth can do predictions.

Google Used To... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506689)

Google Earth Used To Predict Electrical Problems

Too bad they don't anymore!

Google Earth Used To Predict Electrical Problems.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506695)

...but not anymore.

Maybe Obama will win then (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506717)

After all, Bush stole the last two elections do to problems with the electrical collage.

How do I view it without electricity? (4, Funny)

Xoc-S (645831) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506743)

If there is a power outage, how am I going to fire up my desktop machine and view Google Earth?

Re:How do I view it without electricity? (1)

tubapro12 (896596) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506869)

Use your wireless laptop on a UPS'ed network, and pray your ISP has UPS/backup power plans.

Re:How do I view it without electricity? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 6 years ago | (#24510425)

If you have DSL or a T-* line you are basically guaranteed to have a UPS'd and generator powered internet connection since the telco's are required to have emergency power. Sure if you use an ilec they may not have an agreement to hook their DSLAM to the telco power plant and remote shelfs don't all have generators, but the chances are pretty good. The cable companies are also pretty good about it since they are now offering voice service (though it's definitely not to the level of the telco's).

Re:How do I view it without electricity? (1)

freakxx (987620) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508431)

Listen, I suggest you something logical. Forget that Oak-people. They are simply misleading people by creating false sensations in media.

Ask google to display real-time usage statistics on GoogleEarth in different regions (more usage = brighter area). In this way, you just have to look for dark regions in the GUI to locate where the power outage is actually taking place. So simple.

To Google People: If you are going to implement this idea in ur product, you must mention my name. Otherwise, I am going to save URL of this particular post as a reference if I need it in future sometime in court.

Re:How do I view it without electricity? (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 6 years ago | (#24510607)

Now, wasn't that a good enough prediction then? It's in fact a "real-time prediction system".

Dr Shaffer (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506765)

Somewhere my alma mater's Dr Shaffer's enjoying this :)

too late (3, Funny)

Digitus1337 (671442) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506905)

The LHC goes online in just under a day; Google Earth is going to be obsolete, so how is this newsworthy?

Re:too late (2, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506979)

The LHC goes online in just under a day; Google Earth is going to be obsolete

Google Earth is an interactive map & the LHC is a particle accelerator. Frankly, I don't see wtf one has to do with the other (or how one could obsolete the other)...

Re:too late (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24507191)

The LHC goes online in just under a day; Google Earth is going to be obsolete

Google Earth is an interactive map & the LHC is a particle accelerator. Frankly, I don't see wtf one has to do with the other (or how one could obsolete the other)...

*whoosh*

Re:too late (1)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507529)

Wooosh indeed.

Clearly my joke-a-meter needs recalibrating.

Oh well, I am a mac fanboy - we're renowned for our humourlessness & obliviousness in the face of sarcasm ;-)

Re:too late (1)

initialE (758110) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507651)

Just to be pedantic, some people believe that the startup of the LHC will be a universe-ending event. Or in any case, something that will make a huge dent in the european part of the globe.

Re:too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24508353)

Not to spoil the joke or anything, but the LHC goes on line, sucks up all the power everywhere, therefore no need for Google Earth to predict the rampaging power outage...

Re:too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24509937)

It's when the LHC turns the Earth into a black hole that Google Earth becomes obsolete.

Re:too late (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506989)

no problem, they'll just change the name to Google Strangelet-Star

SPOF (1)

richardtallent (309050) | more than 6 years ago | (#24506933)

So what happens when said outages or disasters take out ORNL's Internet access or Google's servers?

Corporate-enabled mash-ups are *SO* 2007. Time to focus on open clouds of massively-distributed computing resources and cached storage. /soapbox

Re:SPOF (1)

Jellybob (597204) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508985)

Something tells me the agency responsible for monitoring power outages might (and I'm just guessing here) have backup power and connectivity.

Anyone else misread the title as (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24506983)

Google Earth Used To Predict Electoral Problems?

And I'm not even American...

VERDE (1)

amnezick (1253408) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507181)

VERDE == green  (in Romanian)

Re:VERDE (1)

rampant poodle (258173) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507607)

De asemenea, în spaniola.

mod d06wn (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24507187)

another troub7ed Steadily fucking the above is far forwards we must

The real news (3, Insightful)

hcdejong (561314) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507449)

is that this is news at all:

Major power outages in the United States over the past decade have a recurring theme - the lack of wide-area situational understanding was a key factor that contributed to blackouts.

(emphasis mine)

How can you expect to manage something as complex as a continental power grid without having the data you need? It's not like this capability has only recently become available.

Re:The real news (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#24520871)

You send someone out in a truck with a spotlight when the lights go out.

Anecdote:

Many years ago (~20) I worked for a local utility. Back then, we started a program that involved locating all of the system's facilities with a GPS grid position, tied together in a database. The idea was that a customer id was tied to a transformer, which was connected to a particular lateral, fed by a feeder, from a substation. Trouble calls from customers or interrogation of the automated metering grid would reveal the geographic area and circuit location of the problem. Except that the field engineers who were responsible for entering the data just typed in any old crap, so as not to get a bad performance score on their data entry duties. The data entered was useless.

About 20 years later, I had the opportunity to call in and report a problem in that utilities service area. The clerk (probably in a call center overseas) informed me that my location, based upon their database, was many miles from where I was, thereby crediting my outage call to the wrong circuit. In 20 years, nothing had improved.

Oak Ridge might have a neato idea. But if it costs any money, the utilities aren't going to buy it. Until regulators hold their feet to the fire w.r.t. maintenance. There's also a culture of the heroic lineman showing up after a week without power to put the wires back up. Nobody wants to spend money (or trim any precious trees) after the lights are back on.

what machine is it running on? (1)

tatermonkey (1199435) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507523)

ORNL is just down the road from me. Actually one of my neighbors is a programmer there. Are they running it on a pc or thier Cray XT3 system?

Re:what machine is it running on? (1)

tatermonkey (1199435) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507543)

My bad. Its an XT4 now.

Re:what machine is it running on? (1)

Jellybob (597204) | more than 6 years ago | (#24509017)

Why don't you ask your neighbour?

Homeland Security (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 6 years ago | (#24507745)

I wonder how long it will take Homeland Security to pay these guys a visit to discuss classification of their work?

Re:Homeland Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24509699)

Oak Ridge is basically a Department of Energy lab. I think Homeland already knows about the project.

Links, video, and a follow-up program? (2, Funny)

martyb (196687) | more than 6 years ago | (#24508197)

Here's a bit more detail from the ORNL web site: http://www.ornl.gov/info/ornlreview/v40_3_07/article13.shtml [ornl.gov] and http://www.ornl.gov/sci/electricdelivery/vis_VERDE.html [ornl.gov] where there are links to: VERDE video (WMV 81.2MB) [ornl.gov] (13m 54s)

In the first-listed link above, I found this:

"Major power outages in the United States over the past decade have a recurring theme--the lack of wide-area situational understanding," says Tom King, manager of electric transmission and distribution technologies for ORNL's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program. (emphasis added)

As a follow-up, I hear they are planning a "Wide-Area Situational Understanding Program", aka WASUP! :)

Re:Links, video, and a follow-up program? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 6 years ago | (#24520715)

"Wide Area System Situational Understanding Program"

Wassup!

VERDE equals GREEN Power (1)

codemaster2b (901536) | more than 6 years ago | (#24509041)

Man, that is one bad pun. I mean, everybody wants green energy, right? You think it coincidence that they used the Spanish word for green (Verde) to describe the power grid???

Alternatively, if anyone has had the opportunity to sing or hear the performance of Verde's Requiem, you may "rest" knowing that in the event of a disaster, the internet will still be working and that power problems can be diagnosed quickly and efficiently.

Two years behind the DOE and NASA WorldWind.. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24509193)

(Posting Anon as I helped on the project) The DOE has been using WorldWind Java [nasa.gov] for over a year to already do this and a lot more. But of course, that is not public use. This could easily have been done with any web based map or any virtual globe.

should have a different acronym (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 6 years ago | (#24512421)

I might suggest Managing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth (MERDE,) because as soon as somebody starts relying on that system, we're going to be deep in it.

There are google overlays for hurricanes hitting (1)

nutznboltz (473437) | more than 6 years ago | (#24519513)

oil fields too now.

http://hurricane.methaz.org/tracking/

I don't get it (1)

DrChandra (82180) | more than 6 years ago | (#24523613)

So I can use google earth to find out why my power is out?

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