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Google Has All My Data – How Do I Back It Up?

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the widespread-problem dept.

Communications 215

shadeshope writes "Slowly but surely Google has taken over my computing life. How can I back it up? Bit by bit with their mantra, hip image and brilliant services, Google has gained my trust and all my data. I am doing almost all of my computing in the cloud. Google Reader, Calender, Email, Docs and Notes have become my tools of choice; even to the point where my day book, research notes, etc., are all on Google's servers. It was just so easy, enabling me to effortlessly work from multiple computers, operating systems and locations. I know, I know, this is foolish — all my eggs are firmly in one basket. It has crept up on me. As a long-time computer user and committed pessimist, I have used many schemes over the years to ensure my data is safe. Now I have ceded all control to Google. How can I regain some control and back this all up? Is there a one-touch solution that will take all my data from the various online apps and archive it on my home server?"

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frothy piss (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539259)

but i poop from there!

Re:frothy piss (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539375)

Calender? WTF do the "editors" do around here anyways?

Re:frothy piss (-1, Offtopic)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539397)

butt fuck.

MEEPT!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539739)

Aahhhmmmmmmmmmmmm.

[The drug acts, and seeps through every ancillary network within meept's body. Where once meept's head pounded with noise, now everything was quiet. ]

Meept's poem to asprin
Asprin, you are snow like,
and indeed people go skiing in you,
and houses in you cost millions

[cut to inside a moderator's head]
Uh that's ASPEN. Better delete , uh.. huh huh.. I mean moderate that (how yo say in zis country) comment.

Suddenly and without warning, the moderator ejaculates.

MEEPT!!

Re:frothy piss (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540445)

Not right now you don't!

Kill Somebody (5, Funny)

LearnToSpell (694184) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539269)

Then the gov't will back it all up for you! Easy.

You, sir, are an idiot !! Google is NOT to trust ! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540453)

You, sir, are an idiot !! Google is NOT somethign to entrust with your life's dreams, hopes, and aspirations !! Oh, wait, you are an idiot !! Nevermind.

Easy! (5, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539271)

Once you get all your data back, buy a Mac, subscribe to MobileMe and be safe, knowing that all your data is in the safe hands of a single compa...

Oh wait.

Re:Easy! (5, Funny)

Divebus (860563) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539365)

Idunno, Sergey. Ask Larry what he does.

Re:Easy! (4, Insightful)

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539529)

Once you get all your data back, buy a Mac, subscribe to MobileMe and be safe, knowing that all your data is in the safe hands of a single compa...

You chose a poor example. Pretty much all the Mobile Me services store the data both on Apple's servers and on the local machine, by default.

I know you meant this as a joke, but your suggestion actually would allow a user to regain control of their data, albeit probably not in the most flexible way.

Re:Easy! (4, Informative)

me at werk (836328) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539553)

There's also notMac [notmacchallenge.com] , which replaces .Mac.

Re:Easy! (4, Interesting)

mpe (36238) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539757)

I know you meant this as a joke, but your suggestion actually would allow a user to regain control of their data, albeit probably not in the most flexible way.

It might enable them to regain control of their future data. But they have almost certainly lost control of their current data.
About the only way of retaining control over your data whilst having a third party store it would be if you encrypt in such a way that that party will never have access to anything other than the cyphertext. Which has the side effect that you can't process that data with web based apps.

Re:Easy! (1)

Redfeather (1033680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539887)

What are we talking about here, true control (ie limiting third-party access) or backup for archive and easier editing? If we're talking about no-outside-control then options are, unfortunately limited. I don't think the question of who owns data on colo servers has been answered yet, but the possibility that encryting your data without google having some kind of backup against failure is pretty slim at this point.

If we're talking backup for propensity's sake, there have to be a whole whack of options - straight down to word-for-word copy-and-paste, depending on your determination and the tools at hand. Local and remote backups are never a bad idea, even if it's only control theatre.

Re:Easy! (2)

Kreisler (992371) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539865)

This is exactly why I went with MobileMe, and since I also use Apple's Backup software, I have my data in three places - the MobileMe server, my Mac, and my personal backup. The biggest problem I see is with large amounts of data. Some of the work I do is audio, and MobileMe isn't a great solution for lots of Logic files - that just stays on my external, but for the average user's personal and light work stuff, MobileMe seems fine. (Until Google adds backup to Google Desktop, which I wouldn't be surprised to see at some point.)

Re:Easy! (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540103)

Actually I have a free MobileMe trial, just really didn't have the time to really try it out yet. My backups are done via Time Machine, on a Time Capsule, with monthly backups to CD-Rs (my code isn't big enough for DVD-Rs, yet).

Re:Easy! (2, Insightful)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540133)

Yeah I mean that as a joke (since a lot of people here think Apple is as evil as Google).

Any sane person using Leopard will also have Time Machine enabled, on an external hard drive, meaning a local and external backup for most people, and three backups for those also using MobileMe.

You're right, using a Mac as an example was the worst possible choice.

Re:Easy! (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540063)

.mac, does serve one important function of a data retention plan. It provides multiple multiple and offsite backups of data. I can say it works pretty well. I have not lost much data since using it. I have data stored on my computer, on my phone, and on Apple servers. I am not sure what changes with Mobileme, though my suspicion is that data might become more susceptible to loss. This is because Apple does not provide a system to insure data integrity. I have lost individual files and bits of data over the years. Apple will warn you if whole swaths of data is to be deleted, but that does not prevent the occasional missing bit. If you catch it, or have local backup, the data can be maintained. But noticing a obscure bit of data is gone is a challenge.

Which means that a paranoid keeps really critical stuff backed up another way. I have chosen to move to text based solutions, and then keep a off site SVN repository. This maintain a somewhat audit-able trail for data integrity. Since I assume that Google is backing data, and it that part of it probably more secure than the single local copy most people maintain, the issue would be data integrity. I wonder if there is something in the API that might allow an version control type solution so that changes made would be stored to another site. Of course, such a solution might costs money, and the beauty of google is that it allows users to trade privacy and control for free-to-them services, so such a solution may be out of the domain.

Re:Easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540373)

Once you get all your data back, buy a Mac, subscribe to MobileMe and be safe, knowing that all your data is in the safe hands of a single compa...

Oh wait.

No he meant something that would work. Come on Apple get it together, if I wanted products that didn't work as advertised I'd go M$. ;)

backup (1)

mudgie (1337761) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539279)

I guess you could rely on third-party apps that sync it locally...

Uh, Google? (4, Informative)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539283)

Gbackup, of course! Well OK, not yer, but apparently coming soon [wordpress.com] . If you need it now, um, Google is your friend [lifehacker.com] . And there's more, if you check Google [google.com] .
And BTW, web apps != "the cloud".

Re:Uh, Google? (3, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539335)

And BTW, web apps != "the cloud".

Huh? Google web apps, at the very least, can be considered "the cloud", unless you are arguing that the term "cloud computing" has no meaning.

Re:Uh, Google? (4, Insightful)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539483)

unless you are arguing that the term "cloud computing" has no meaning.

Correct, it's an unnecessary buzzword (is that an oxymoron?) to cover something that's existed since the days of mainframes and dumb terminals. You know, that limiting, ancient paradigm that led to the microcomputer revolution because it sucked so bad? :)

Re:Uh, Google? (5, Informative)

chunk08 (1229574) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539507)

(is that an oxymoron?)

No, it's needlessly redundant.
Necessarily redundant is an oxymoron.

(And so are many people when burnt.)/jokealert

Re:Uh, Google? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539547)

whooooooooooooosh!

Re:Uh, Google? (0, Flamebait)

x_MeRLiN_x (935994) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539669)

Please share the joke we (me and chunk08) both missed.

Re:Uh, Google? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540073)

I'm not going to explore your tasteless joke, but redundancy is often necessary. Think of a brake or a nuclear power plant.

Re:Uh, Google? (2, Informative)

SoVeryTired (967875) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539619)

You're confusing an oxymoron with a tautology.

Re:Uh, Google? (0, Troll)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539685)

Duh, it is an oxymoron -- unless you know of a good paying job in IT one can get and keep without having to learn any buzzwords?

Re:Uh, Google? (2, Informative)

Bob The Magic Camel (1213434) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539621)

is that an oxymoron?

No, it's rhetorical tautology.

I am not a pedofork, YOU DORKS! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539385)

Re:Uh, Google? (5, Funny)

pitchpipe (708843) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539429)

"Slowly but surely [Meth] has taken over my [...] life. How can I [get it back]? Bit by bit with [its seductiveness], hip image and brilliant [highs]. [Meth] has gained my trust and all my [money]. I am doing almost all of my [living] in the cloud. [Meth Labs and narco-traffickers] have become my tools of choice. Even to the point where my [home, business] etc are all [Meth labs].It was just so easy, enabling me to effortlessly work from multiple computers, operating systems and locations. I know, I know, this is foolish -- all my eggs are firmly in one [drug]. It has crept up on me. As a long-time [cocaine] user, and committed pessimist, I have used many [drugs] over the years to ensure my [highs] are safe. Now I have ceded all control to [Meth]. How can I regain some control and back this all up? Is there a one-touch solution that will take [] my [life] from the various [drugs] and [recover] it[]?"

Um.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539299)

Nope!

P.T. Barnum (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539303)

>>Bit by bit with their mantra, hip image and brilliant services.

There's a sucker born every minute.

why bother? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539305)

google's redundancy is legendary. why bother?

i can see if they maybe canceled a service or somesuch, but that's highly unlikely, especially for their more popular stuff. (spreadsheets, email, pictures)

i can understand the urge to keep it all local, but with their diversity, it's much more safe in their "cloud" than it would be at my house...

Re:why bother? (5, Insightful)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539377)

That would work, unless Google itself deletes your account [blogspot.com] or all of your email [techcrunch.com] .

Backups are meant to cover more than just hard drive failures, otherwise RAID 1/5 would be sufficient.

Also, if you can't backup your data from Google, you can't switch from Google to anyone else, so you are locked in.

Re:why bother? (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539503)

both of those cases are over 2 years ago, when gmail was "truly" in beta.

and every single app i've seen from google allows for personal backup of one type or another.

there is no single solution, but every individual file is accessible and usually in useful non-locked formats that are easily manipulated.

i agree this feature would be nice to have, but it's not really good business sense to do that... your not making it easy for your customer to leave you? (duh)

but with google it's at least possible.

Re:why bother? (2, Interesting)

aaarrrgggh (9205) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539833)

Maybe a better argument is for company-level control of user information rather than just user-level backups. If an employee deletes all of their e-mail, the company can't comply with document retention requirements. Likewise, deleting a user eliminates all of their data with no backup recourse.

For e-mail, I imagine what you have to do is migrate service from gmail to positini (google subsidiary) to get the added functionality.

Re:why bother? (2, Interesting)

hedwards (940851) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539515)

Right, and not to mention that time that they had an error and a lot of people really did lose messages.

Personally, I don't keep anything vital on google services except email. The email gets backed up via imap periodically.

This works fine for me because I don't usually have items that I'd be upset about losing, most of the things I do have are not sent over email or are easily backed up individually.

Re:why bother? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539891)

Also, if you can't backup your data from Google, you can't switch from Google to anyone else, so you are locked in.

Switch!? What is this crazy talk!

* shrugs shoulders * (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539307)

I don't know ... Google it

Not sure about one-touch... (4, Informative)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539319)

But Google solutions tend to at least support established open standards.

That is: You can archive your Gmail account via IMAP. You can probably download your Google Calendar appointments as an iCal file. While I'm not sure of the best way to automate it, all of your documents in Google Docs are available in OpenDocument.

Still, these are all "some assembly required".

Re:Not sure about one-touch... (4, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540131)

But Google solutions tend to at least support established open standards.

That is: You can archive your Gmail account via IMAP.

You might have to rejigger some of your tags to end up with a folder structure in your IMAP archive
Otherwise it'll just be all your mail in one folder.

http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2007/10/nested-folders-in-gmail.html [blogspot.com]
 
/Unless Gmail has changed something since that was written.
//Personally, I don't consider tags a replacement for folders

Not one solution (5, Informative)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539327)

Thunderbird can back up gmail, and the Zindus extension will back up you address book. Lifehacker had a story in the past month about using wget to backup your del.icio.us bookmarks; I presume it can be adapted to Googlepages and your blog. Finally, if you install Google Gears, a lot of content will be cached on your laptop. I don't know how you'd retrieve it, but at least you'd know where it was.

Re:Not one solution (5, Informative)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539403)

You are so.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539333)

..fucked. Seriously. You have been indexed, Sir.

So... (1)

Warll (1211492) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539337)

You're asking if there is yet another Google service to do this for you? Or are you planing on trusting a third party with your "sensitive"[1] data?

[1] Just confese to your wife, I'm sure whe'll understand. Worst case she makes you see a shrink.

Spelling, please. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539339)

It's Calendar, not Calender.

Back it up (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539341)

Back it up

It's simple! (4, Funny)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539343)

File -> "Save As..."

why back up (1, Troll)

Edmund Blackadder (559735) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539359)

Google has their own backups I am sure. So the only way your data would be lost is if the entire Google company goes under. And would you really want to live in a world without Google?

Re:why back up (4, Insightful)

jsebrech (525647) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539457)

Google does NOT have your backups. They have redundancy in their data storage, but when their servers get the command to delete something, it gets deleted everywhere, permanently!

See their own faq: http://mail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=50208 [google.com]

Re:why back up (1, Informative)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539735)

That's not true and you know it. It'd be a waste to do that on their end. I highly doubt it gets securely wiped, and I'm guessing it's only a few references that get set to NULL or somesuch and the data still exists. And if they have tape backups, well, obviously they're not going to pull those out and wipe those every time you delete an old email.

So completely gone? No, getting rid of something permanently on the internet (not just on Google) is hard, close to impossible. What Google is basically saying is that when you delete something, don't cry to them to get it back, it's as much an effort to truly delete all traces of something as it is to actually restore it. If they aren't going to pull out tapes to delete your emails, they won't do it to recover them. If they aren't going to waste CPU/IO on deleting every single disparate copy of your email, they aren't going to waste CPU/IO trying to recover it.

Re:why back up (1)

ckthorp (1255134) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539747)

Except I wish deleting things from Google was that easy. Google has a nasty habit of archiving anything that has ever touched their servers for an indefinite period of time.

Re:why back up (1)

jopsen (885607) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539913)

Google doesn't delete it... They move it to a new datacenter where the european privacy advocates can't reach your data... And then they mine it for decades to come... :)
- Or not, how would I know...

Re:why back up (1)

Yaa 101 (664725) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539459)

Yes please... Besides I did before too. :-)

Re:why back up (3, Interesting)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539471)

> Google has their own backups I am sure.

What makes you think that they back up the users' data? (Note: users, not customers.)

Re:why back up (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539841)

What makes you think that they back up the users' data? (Note: users, not customers.)

Not being able to restore a "user's" data, for the benefit of that user dosn't mean that they don't back it up for the benefit of someone else...

Back away, slowly... (4, Insightful)

mnslinky (1105103) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539367)

Use the Google services only where necessary. We've been doing this for a company I've started, but we only put documents and information on Google's services while we need it there. Not only is all our data on our backup server, but we only put data on their servers while it's needed. Visiting customer sites, etc.

In addition, isn't this the kind of thing that makes laptops so great? Bring it with you! There are tons of sharing apps about for various uses. Use a VPN and sshfs for remote file access. Use iCal/whatever to sync with your google calendar. That sort of thing.

In short, slowly migrate to a safer solution you're in more control of. You may lose a bit of your convenience, but safe data is worth it, in my opinion.

Re:Back away, slowly... (2)

silanea (1241518) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539719)

[...] we only put data on their servers while it's needed. Visiting customer sites, etc. [...]

I do hope you don't put any sensitive data there, like any kind of customer data? At least at my current employer we'd grill you for good if we found out about something like this. We already have quite a hard time keeping our employees from storing company data anywhere outside approved locations. Contractors are required to sign an agreement that forbids them from doing such a thing under penalty (along with requiring them to encrypt all data they receive from us).

stupid question (-1)

pootypeople (212497) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539369)

This question seems ill-informed. Due to the stringent requirements of Sarbanes-Oxley, Google is required to keep backups of their data, and are far better-equipped to do so. The writer seems to want to backup simply to say they're doing it -- not to actually protect data from loss.

Re:stupid question (5, Insightful)

mnslinky (1105103) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539407)

What part of Sarbanes-Oxley requires they backup data that has nothing to do with their finances? I think you don't know what you're talking about. SOx is very much misinterpreted, and you're only continuing the trend.

Re:stupid question (4, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539501)

The only data S-O requires Google to back up is their own financial data. They have no legal obligation whatsoever to the users of their free services. They could delete all of the OP's data right now for any reason or none and he would have no recourse.

Re:stupid question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539983)

So which section in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act explicitly requires data backups?

PEBKAC (1, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539401)

First step would be to not give Google all your data. I have no problem with the company (as yet), but I understand that all they are is a for-profit company. If Google has all your data to the point you need to make this post, I think you may have other more pressing things to worry about... like the fact that it may no longer really be your data any more.

Re:PEBKAC (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539801)

First step would be to not give Google all your data. I have no problem with the company (as yet), but I understand that all they are is a for-profit company.

As well as being a company in a part of the world with very few data protection laws. Whilst not perfect such laws do restrict your risk of access to governments and criminals :)

If Google has all your data to the point you need to make this post, I think you may have other more pressing things to worry about... like the fact that it may no longer really be your data any more.

It technically still belongs to them. In the same way that the MPAA/RIAA's "content" still belongs to them...

Cloud Addiction (5, Interesting)

daveime (1253762) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539409)

As a long-time computer user, and committed pessimist, I'd have hoped you'd think about backups long before you placed all your trust in the cloud.

This is exactly the model that all clouds will eventually mutate into ... once enough people become dependent on the cloud, they will announce it will become a paid service the following week.

Your eggs, Google's basket.

Cat got your tongue? (something important seems to be missing from your comment ... like the body or the subject!) Erm, you mean you can't detect which it is ???

Ask Slashdot Troll ? (4, Insightful)

vic-traill (1038742) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539413)

Does This 'Ask Slashdot' have the air of a troll to anyone else? It's like the questioner is serving it up so that every Google-hating/privacy-loving/I-told-you-so'er can go *apeshit* on it.

Re:Ask Slashdot Troll ? (3, Interesting)

Nymz (905908) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539601)

While /. management might encourage /. editors to troll in order to drive page views and profits, I imagine there are a number of people out there, that one day woke up and realized 'the Google has you Neo'. Not that Google is the only bad guy, or that they must be demonized. But each person or company needs at some point to take some responsibility for themselves. Asking /. readers for a little advice seems reasonable.

Mod parent up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539609)

You are wise, grasshopper. Wise and perceptive.

Re:Ask Slashdot Troll ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540443)

I agree, and I am firmly in that group. However, I don't fault Google for this at all; this guy has nobody but himself to blame. If you want to keep control over your data, KEEP CONTROL OVER YOUR DATA. It's that fucking simple.

The solution is irrelevant (0)

Duncan Blackthorne (1095849) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539523)

The real problem is that you allowed this to happen in the first place. Get your data back, and don't let anyone have it again. It's bad enough that more or less any government agency likely has access to ALL your data right now, that any talented hacker likely can GET access to it, and that Google could be SELLING your very personal data to the highest bidder. Put in on a secure USB flash drive or something.

And thus we discover the wonder of the web... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539525)

Yes, cloud computing. Web apps. Kids are such a trusting lot, but that'll change soon.

Really, you can believe me, can't you? :)

Ahem (1)

archont (1215492) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539531)

When google's servers go down, in first order, you'll be looking for an atomic shelter. Data backup - somewhere down the road.

Backing up email (2, Interesting)

betelgeuse68 (230611) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539543)

Use Outlook and connect to GMAIL through IMAP, then save off your email to a .PST file via the Import/Export tool.

-M

Re:Backing up email (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539585)

Ewww... Outlook? PST file?! I think you're on the wrong site.

No problem (1)

djupedal (584558) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539579)

Use Acrobat to crawl your Google content. If you need to extract from that, there are several options. But hey - part of buying into the Google cloud is letting them worry about backups. I'm fairly sure they are much more concerned and adept than you will ever be :)

Customer Service? (1)

Vyx (984288) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539597)

Has anyone ever tried calling them? I've never dealt with Google's customer service, but they may be helpful. If nothing else, you'll get a good idea about their policies reguarding customer data and what they allow said customers to do with it.

Re:Customer Service? (2, Interesting)

brian_tanner (1022773) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539857)

My friend tried to get special permission to publish a figure that had a Google Map screenshot in his Ph.D thesis. If you read the T&C on maps you're not technically allowed to publish such things.

Anyways, the result that he found was that Google doesn't *have* a phone number. Their buildings and offices do, their sales people do, but I can almost guarantee that there is no "getting to a person" for any query you might have from a technical or legal standpoint.

I guess.. on that note, have you tried posting in the relevant Google groups?

Re:Customer Service? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540151)

> Has anyone ever tried calling them? I've never dealt with Google's customer service,
> but they may be helpful.

I'm sure they are, for customers. This guy, however, is not a customer. He is a user of a free service.

What the heck happened? (1)

tsa (15680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539627)

I remember not so many years ago people would say here that they would never ever trust their data with an online storage company. Far too dangerous: they can read your data, what if they go bankrupt or something goes wrong and you loose your subscription, etc etc. Now suddenly people don't make local backups anymore. I wonder whose RDF is larger: Google's or Steve's?

Conduit (1)

thesaurus (1220706) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539697)

Conduit (http://www.conduit-project.org/) is aiming to be what you what. Currently it supports some two-way syncing between Google contacts and GCal. It only has one-way to GDocs so far. Lifehacker reviews it here: http://lifehacker.com/398775/sync-and-back-up-your-data-with-conduit-for-linux [lifehacker.com]

backup in case google is gone tomorrow? (0, Redundant)

thc4k (951561) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539701)

Seriously, what should happen to google? If you think google will lose your data soon, bet on that on your local stock market. You'll be so rich when that happens that you wouldnt care anymore.

one-touch solution? (3, Informative)

Noke (8971) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539705)

Is there a one-touch solution that will take all my data from the various online apps and archive it on my home server?"

no.

Easy scripted Backup for Gmail at least (3, Informative)

carpediem55 (157989) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539729)

I use http://www.gmail-backup.com/ [gmail-backup.com] to backup my gmail accounts. It works with regular gmail and google apps gmail. It has a click and backup view, but I use the cmd line interface to automate a daily backup of all my mail and labels to a folder as .eml files. It also lets you restore to gmail if needed. It has a few quirks, but over all is very useful.

POP3 (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539737)

One thing you can at least back up for sure is all your emails from gmail, since you can download it all through POP3. I don't know about the other services.

Store it on the network (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539751)

It worked for the Bastard...
If your employer has a bunch of gigabit ethernet lying around, use that. Just get the files stored on the network so they're shooting around the lines, then pull them off as needed. It's gotta work.
-Hammer

Has anyone asked Google for a restore? (2, Interesting)

Bazman (4849) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539753)

If I delete something at work, and then six months later think 'whatever happened to that file?', there's a chance it'll be on our backup archive and I can get it back. Or I can roll back to any of the last week's daily backups. Can Google do that? Has anyone tried? Does it keep versions?

They seem to encourage you to not delete anything, but that doesn't help with undoing several revisions of a document, does it?

I'm not a big google docs user, so I might have missed this somewhere.

are you serious?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539761)

This reads like some pathetic love novel reduced to "I hate you google, why are you so great, you know I can never say no to you". If you do not care about your information (work or private) and never plan to work on anything of consequence then sure go ahead, share your info with some company (with potential future use by other companies or governments). And if this is simply some google marketing stunt to fill the web with "I hate google because they are so awesome" then go away, this does not belong on /. Please, stop with all the free google advertising, give me something of substance or novel to waste my time on.

Re:are you serious?! (1)

idiocracy (1140065) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540149)

agreed. This sounds like some Jobs/Apple RDF nonsense where the user has drank the kool-aid. 1) I hope the /. community has not lost ALL perspective on the use of keeping their vast sums of information private. 2) currently, google services are not as good as the software I am already using (and when my web connection goes down I do not care)

Just a few thoughts... (5, Insightful)

CaptainTux (658655) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539837)

First, Google did not 'take over' your life or your data. You willingly gave it to them and, now that you find yourself a bit worried about the implications of one company having all of your data, you are trying to paint them as some sort of evil entity that cajoled and nearly forced you to turn over your data to them.

They didn't.

Take responsibility for your decision to hand over your data. Just because a service or company is cool and sexy doesn't give them any special powers to make you do anything. Google included.

Now, as to backing up your data, I'm not sure what the problem is. Google isn't holding your data hostage at all. With the exception of maybe Notes, you can get your data from Google to your local machine pretty easy:

Email: setup a POP3 client and download all your mail to your machine from GMail.

Documents: Go to FILE->DOWNLOAD AS and export each document to a file on your hard disk.

Reader: Spend some time looking at each feeds URL and bring them into a desktop feed reader.

Calendar: Find a tool (and there are some, I just can't think of the name now) that will allow you to bring Google Calendar data off of the server and into a local app.

The truth is you are not a slave to Google. You can leave anytime you want. That doesn't mean it's not going to take a little work on your end to do so but, then, why shouldn't it? YOU chose to go 100% with Google (as many of us have including me) and it isn't Googles responsibility to make it super simple for you to up and leave.

Hacker Backup Services . . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539861)

Sounds like a sound business opportunity to me. You have your data hosted, but kinda sorta don't really trust the host service. Hire a hacker service that hacks your host service, and backs up your data, without the host service knowing. That way, if you and your host service get in a huff, you still have your data from your hacker service.

But IBM has probably patented this already.

Re:stupid answer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24539867)

Except maybe people with stock options from the google company?

What does Google owe you? (3, Insightful)

beaststwo (806402) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539875)

I wonder precisely what promises Google has made and what responsibilities have they disclaimed themselves of? As any business school graduate knows, one of the keys to keeping customers is to make it easy to start with them but tough to leave.

Does Google owe any level of data integrity and privacy? Do they owe return of user data without claiming rights to use it otherwise? Do they make any promise of data protection and disaster recovery? What due diligence does the use owe in the process?

As we move to an environment where more and more people simply 'trust" corporations to hold and protect their (potentially personal) data, I fear that we're way ahead of the law in defining the rights and responsibilities of both users and providers. In the absence of law, providers, such as Google, will write naturally terms of use that mostly benefit themselves. Users will simply lose.

Re:What does Google owe you? (4, Insightful)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540319)

> In the absence of law, providers, such as Google, will write naturally terms of use that
> mostly benefit themselves.

Real providers with whom you have a contract are obligated by law to do whatever the contract says they have to do (assuming that you hold up your end by paying the bill). Advertising agencies such as Google that provide free services for promotional purposes have no legal obligations to their "users" whatever. Nor should they.

Conduit or other synchronization software (2, Interesting)

MrvFD (711808) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539885)

I'm personally excepting to Conduit [conduit-project.org] to fulfill my needs in backing up from different sites. Of course synchronizing is different from backing up, but when I have all the data on my local machine I can backup those easily.

I'm not very keen in using Google or any other services for my calendar, contacts, photos etc. data. If I'll think I'll need on-the-fly syncing, I'll rather just setup a sync server on my home server.

Gah! (1)

strawberryutopia (1301435) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539919)

This sounds worryingly like me!

But anyway, as far as I'm aware, many if not all of Google's services let you export all the data. For example, Reader lets you export the list of feeds you're subscribed to. Notebook lets you export each notebook.

It's all a bit tedious though, but it wouldn't be too hard to code something to do it all for you. I don't think anyone's done one yet, but if you have a look round sourceforge you might find something interesting.

Re:Gah! (1)

baydat (803771) | more than 5 years ago | (#24539971)

WOW I'm a bit shocked too...i can congatulate you on keeping your hard drive clean but now that google and the govt have all your data...most if not all of their apps allow you to extract into some other flavor of app $MS, Mozilla , or something better... don't trust others with your data, they could pull the plug at any time whether their own choice or someone elses.

simple... (1)

Johnny Chinpo (1340653) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540117)

Don't trust anybody with your data. ImO you were stupid to do so in the first place.

movemydata.org (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24540327)

...is an ongoing project to provide exactly this sort of functionality; no deliverables yet though

re hip image (0, Troll)

cinnamon colbert (732724) | more than 5 years ago | (#24540385)

soon, google will finally be recognized as the evil empire it is
When will goo$le bashing overtake M$ bashing ?
my bet, August 12, 2010
anybody else wanna get in on the betting pool ?

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