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The Pirate Bay Blocked In Italy

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the not-giving-p2p-the-boot dept.

Communications 247

imhassan tips us to news that The Pirate Bay has been blocked in Italy. Other attempts to block the popular P2P site have been somewhat less than successful. From TorrentFreak: "Pirate Bay's IPs and the domain name are inaccessible, as they are blocked by ISPs all over the country. Whether these blocks will be very effective, however, is doubtful, since The Pirate Bay has already announced several countermeasures. An insider working at an Internet provider in Italy told TorrentFreak that all the relevant large access ISPs in Italy have complied with the request to block the popular BitTorrent tracker, which was sent out yesterday. Italy is taking a stand against BitTorrent sites, so it seems. Two weeks ago, the largest Italian torrent site, Columbo-BT, was shut down by the same prosecutor who is responsible for the Pirate Bay block."

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247 comments

Slashdotted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548799)

...or worse?

Pirate Bay (2, Funny)

Oscar Wilder (1341715) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548805)

The only thing worse than blocking Pirate Bay is not blocking Pirate Bay.

Re:Pirate Bay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24550077)

+1 - Mods are illiterate and need to read more. Or just listen to some Python, for fuck's sake...

Tor is the answer (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548809)

Tor is the answer to everything.
Use Tor to access the trackers. Problem solved.

Re:Tor is the answer (4, Interesting)

Moryath (553296) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548979)

I actually have a setup to do that already - I've seen a couple trackers "go down" due to core router / dns problems, and it was quite handy to use Tor to see if an alternate exit point had the same problems.

I'd suggest people get the Tor package installer on general principles, it's quite useful to be able to torbutton for a bit if you're having trouble getting somewhere.

Re:Tor is the answer (3, Interesting)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549197)

Indeed, my ISP (bethere.co.uk) had some serious routing issues just last night, I couldn't even access the likes of Google and OpenDNS was entirely unreachable. However, good ol' Tor saved the day and I was able to browse as normal (Albeit slowly and carefully, so as to not send any important cookies or passwords) for the 2 and a half hours or so it took for them to fix it.
Bollocks to privacy and all that, Tor has many applications and uses that I've come to rely on.

Better yet - get involved (5, Informative)

btarval (874919) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549897)

Go one step further beyond being a leech, by downloading and setting up a Tor exit node. [torproject.org]

And, since the usual RIAA fanbois usually pop up once you mention Tor, casting FUD to scare people away from it, here's the EFF's legal FAQ, [torproject.org] and here's the Tor FAQ [torproject.org].

Also note carefully what the parent said, namely, "Use Tor to access the trackers". Tor is, by default, set up to disable bittorrent transfers, since it heavily loads the Tor network. Here's one article which well explains Why you shouldn't run bittorrent over Tor [chrisbrunner.com].

And if you look at the default exit node policies (see section 4.16 of the Tor FAQ), the standard bittorrent ports are explicitly rejected. So you really don't want to run bittorrent over Tor.

Yeah, that will be effective. (4, Insightful)

bigtallmofo (695287) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548811)

Unless and until every system connected to the Internet needs a unique key of some sort before it's allowed to exchange packets, blocking anything will be completely ineffective.

The current net neutrality debate is the first line of defense toward preventing such a system.

Re:Yeah, that will be effective. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548885)

even when they finally force us to logon to the internet via retina scans nothing will change. i'll simply resort the methods I used during the mid 80's... placing free ads in a cheap national magazine requesting "Atari ST contacts - swap hints and tips" and trade items via post just like the good-old days.

"web of trust" (2, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549073)

Local groups sharing between themselves. Able to physically meet and verify each other.

At the borders of that group, individuals physically moving material between groups. Very easy now with portable hard drives of a terabyte or more.

So instead of material being available instantly ... it will be available in 7 days to anyone, anywhere. Because we all know that there are only 7 degrees of separation between any two people.

Re:"web of trust" (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549115)

Yeh, 7 days to everybody reading this, but Kevin Bacon will get it in 6, the bastard.

Re:"web of trust" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549393)

actually, i think it only works if Keven Bacon is actually cracking the stuff himself then distributing it onwards - and he pretty much lost it when star-force came out.

Re:"web of trust" (4, Interesting)

arth1 (260657) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549271)

Local groups sharing between themselves. Able to physically meet and verify each other.

It doesn't work, due to moles and snitches. Sooner or later someone is going to trust someone they shouldn't have -- it's human nature. And then the rest of the group inherits the trust, because that's also human nature.

The only reasonably safe way of organizing a network is through cells, where even if one cell is corrupted, it won't spread to others. This holds true for computer networks too, but few if any applications support such a model. Those that are vaguely similar fail by having the node belong to multiple cells, thus making the impact of subversion much higher.

Re:Yeah, that will be effective. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548937)

labaia.org is also much shorter to type.

Re:Yeah, that will be effective (1)

stevet_az (1262850) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549349)

They have got to be kidding. I can't believe that the "Government" of a country can't figure out or hire someone to explain to them it won't work. What passes for govenmental bodies now days is scary.

Re:Yeah, that will be effective (4, Insightful)

monsul (1342167) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549527)

It doesn't need to work. It's a gesture, you see.

Knowledgeable people in Italy will just use Tor or whatever to bypass the block. Less knowledgeable people will just move to the next big thing (mininova, kazaa, etc...)

The "Goverment" will look like it has made as much as possible to protect the interests of the artist lobby groups that are pushing this

...and everybody is happy :)

Re:Yeah, that will be effective. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549613)

Unless and until every system connected to the Internet needs a unique key of some sort before it's allowed to exchange packets, blocking anything will be completely ineffective.

The system doesn't need to block 100% of users for it to be effective. Although you or I may know countermeasures, I've no doubt this will stop all but the most dedicated of Italian Pirate Bay users.

Re:Yeah, that will be effective. (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549751)

Or if they just start requiring 'logging devices' on each PC that connects and if you try to access anything forbidden, your service is cut off and the local authorities are contacted.

Sure that wont stop the hard-core, but it will stop 99% of the average joes out there.

Wishful thinking (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549933)

I love these wishful thinking posts.

Here's a newsflash for you: the authorities and big business have way, way more control over the Internet than you appear to realise. Companies like Google have the resources to index the entire web. Every major international pipe is controlled by one of a pretty small group of major telecomms companies. Despite the grand redundancy claims, there are plenty of single points of failure that will disconnect, or at least seriously inhibit, flow of data to or from entire countries.

You can make defiant noises about how impractical it would be for the authorities to police everything and how important net neutrality is, but TPB is the enemy here, because by its very existence and public position on openly breaking the law in most countries, it provides all the evidence that politicians and their major contributors need to justify not fighting for net neutrality and pushing for ever more surveillance and control.

A few years ago, there was all this talk about the Internet being some new, special place. Sorry, but it's neither above international agreements nor above individual countries enforcing their own laws and cutting off anyone who doesn't play nicely with their efforts to do so.

The world will be a better place for most people if the freedom that generally exists on the Internet is preserved, but if that freedom is abused by a vocal minority, the rest of us will all get shafted by the consequences.

at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (5, Informative)

Essequemodeia (1030028) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548853)

Our fine Italian friends can still access TPB at labaia.org. Here's to hoping for as little irritation as possible.

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549233)

Perhaps I'm just too simple to get it, but is there a joke behind "labaia.org"? Does that mean something in italian or sweedish?

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (5, Informative)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549287)

La Baia
The Bay

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549325)

Ahh, of course. I am simple after all.
Still, cheers for that informative post and double cheers for not making a dick out of me!

Maybe not, however... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549321)

In English, it's extremely close to "labia", which I guess grandparent was joking about ("Hoping for as little irritation as possible").

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (1)

Adradis (1160201) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549479)

From The Pirate Bay's Blog:

"(La Baia means The Bay in Italian)"

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (2, Funny)

exley (221867) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549333)

Our fine Italian friends can still access TPB at labaia.org.

Except for the people who read that as "labia.org" and end up someplace completely different, although maybe not entirely disappointing to them...

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549487)

"Labia.org -- the official website of the Humanitarian Fund for Labias."

Re:at least TPB has a sense of humor about it (5, Funny)

bmo (77928) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549561)

I went to labia.com and labia.org and I was disappointed both times.

Both are parked domains.

I do this difficult task so you don't have to.

--
BMO

Common Carrier? (1, Insightful)

eggman9713 (714915) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548869)

I am just an ignorant American, but I believe if an ISP is now taking it on themselves to filter content, then they are possibly no longer a common carrier and as such can be subject to many other sanctions to block "bad" content. In Italy it may be entirely different, but either way, if the ISP does not say in their TOS they can block sites at their will, then they could be in big trouble for breach of contract, if such a thing flies in Italy.

Re:Common Carrier? (1, Offtopic)

propanol (1223344) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548923)

ISPs do not have common carrier status. This has been discussed before, but supposedly US law distinguishes between voice and data -- voice having common carrier status, data not.

Re:Common Carrier? (4, Insightful)

thermian (1267986) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548933)

Of what relevance is US law to Italy?

Re:Common Carrier? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549109)

Of what relevance is US law to Italy?

Mafia(a). Something being illegal usually makes it a strong possibility for a source of income. Likely, they don't want TPB in their territory. If everyone could get sex for free, look what that would do to the prostitution market. If everyone could grow their own marijuana the price would drop dramatically. If hard drugs were not illegal not only would the price drop but the related crime rates reducing trafficing in stolen merchandise as well as likely reducing the popularity of the drugs since it is no longer forbidden fruit.

US IP laws have been being force fed to other countries via political maneurvering. International corporations are also major pushers in this regard. They want to be the only dealers in town.

Re:Common Carrier? (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549245)

What's actually stopping people from growing their own Marijuana?

Re:Common Carrier? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549725)

Nancy Reagan?

Re:Common Carrier? (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549797)

Not much...
You need to grow it indoors, if you grow it outside where it can be seen expect a visit from the cops.
You need to give it lots of light to grow, which consumes a lot of power and generates heat, makes your electric bill abnormally high (which flags warning signs) and gives your house a large infrared footprint...

If you just grow a small amount i'm sure you could get away with it, the cops are more concerned with people who are producing and distributing large quantities than someone who has a small amount for their own use.

Re:Common Carrier? (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549815)

US IP laws have been being force fed to other countries via political maneurvering(sic).

I think it's a little disingenuous to say that these are cases of the US exporting their IP laws.

It's not so much the US government that is "forcing their laws" on other countries, as it is international corporations forcing these fascistic, protectionist laws down the throats of sovereign countries, just as they have done here in the US.

Would you say that the behavior of Sony Music or EMI are the fault of the US?

Those of you who still see the world as a game of Risk don't seem to realize that these multinational corporations see borders, and liberty, as damage and route around them.

So you've got these incredibly wealthy and powerful multinational corporations vs. a group of nerds who can't even agree on Net Neutrality laws. Who the fuck do you think is going to win that one?

Re:Common Carrier? (1)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549359)

<parody>
What do you mean? Italians have to obey the law, just as everyone else
</parody>

I think the US is infamous for imposing its laws on other countries, in particular those relevant to the movie and music business, through sanctions of one form or another; ISTR a story about the US using the WTO for this purpose.

Re:Common Carrier? (1)

orzetto (545509) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549769)

Because our current prime minister is a hysterically waggling lapdog of your president, I suppose. He's the only one that, when put beside Bush, makes him look like he's the smart one: check here [youtube.com].

Re:Common Carrier? (1)

eaman (710548) | more than 5 years ago | (#24550055)

I sould point your attention to the fact that Italy new Prime Minister is Silvio Berlusconi, who happens to own at least three television channels, plus some new "digital with fee" one for films and football. He also keeps very good relations with the public service as well (dig some "Berlusconi Sacca Bergamini RAI") just in case some one comes with a different point of view on same substantial matter...

So he is quite sensitive to the case, and he feels confortable to propone laws for is very own welth.

The TPB guys will do absolutely nothing about this (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548877)

... except possibly distribute information on why this has happened and who to blame as it is their belief (stated multiple times in interviews with Swedish press around the time when legislators figured they would sneak thepiratebay.org onto the list of websites distributing child porn, effectively cutting off access for a majority of Swedish Internet users) that the most effective measure against stuff like this is to have the affected apply pressure to those who are responsible for it happening.

Re:The TPB guys will do absolutely nothing about t (4, Informative)

HappySmileMan (1088123) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549025)

They've already changed their IP address and bought the domain name labaia.org for Italians to access the site. Seems very different from "absolutely nothing"

la baia ! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548879)

http://labaia.org/ [labaia.org] .

The italy government sucks. Someone really should to put a bullet through Berlusconi's fascisti face.

Re:la baia ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549081)

Actually all of this has little to do with the Italian government. The blocking order has been issued by a public prosecutor, which in Italy is part of the judicial system, which is independent from the government (the executive power).

Re:la baia ! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549107)

"independent" on paper only.

Official The Pirate Bay announcement for italians (4, Informative)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549159)

From the webpage:

Fascist state censors Pirate Bay

We're quite used to fascist countries not allowing freedom of speech. A lot of smaller nations that have dictators decide to block our site since we can help spread information that could be harmful to the dictators.

This time it's Italy. They suffer from a really bad background as one of the IFPIs was formed in Italy during the fascist years and now they have a fascist leader in the country, Silvio Berlusconi. Berlusconi is also the most powerful person in Italian media owning a lot of companies that compete with The Pirate Bay and he would like to stay that way - so one of his lackeys, Giancarlo Mancusi, ordered a shutdown of our domain name and IP in Italy to make it hard to not support Berlusconis empire.

We have had fights previously in Italy, recently with our successful art installation where we had to storm Fortezza in order to get our art done. And as usual, we won. We will also win this time.

We have already changed IP for the website - that makes it work for half the ISPs again. And we want you all to inform your italian friends to switch their DNS to OpenDNS so they can bypass their ISPs filters. This will also let them bypass the other filters installed by the Italian government, as a bonus. And for the meanwhile - http://labaia.org/ [labaia.org] works (La Baia means The Bay in Italian).

And please, everybody should also contact their ISP and tell them that this is not OK and that the ISPs should appeal. We don't want a censored internet! And the war starts here...

Re:Official The Pirate Bay announcement for italia (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549991)

That's just a glorified ad hominem attack. TPB's openly admitted purpose for existing is in violation of Italian law. When you break the law, you forfeit certain legal protections and certain freedoms. A public official blocking them from helping people to break the law isn't fascism or censorship, it's simply enforcing the law, and some random group of people who don't agree with the law do not get to decide what is the law for an entire country.

Torproject (-1, Troll)

xiando (770382) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548899)

Are the ruling elite in Italy afraid that the people there will learn that the European Union is a utterly corrupt fascist state by watching any of the many completely legal documentaries about it which are available there? Would they have the people in Italy believe that using BitTorrent is somehow illegal when it is perfectly clear that it is a LEGAL protocol? Yes, some sites do mix Copyright-restricted material with completely free content. The TorrentChannel does NOT, but it does have documentaries critical of the EU. Will they block that next? Why are Italy trying to censor the Internet? Good thing there's the https://www.torproject.org/ [torproject.org] which the poor people in Italy can and should use to access all the legal content at TPB. Other people should use it too, covert torture for spreading the "wrong" information is all too common within the NATO alliance these days.

Re:Torproject (3, Insightful)

thermian (1267986) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549131)

While I don't wish to distract from what is, in many respects, a premier example of the genus 'angry rant', I feel I should point out that no-one in Italy (or anywhere else that I know of) is actually blocking bittorrent.

They are blocking a website which serves bittorrent files. There's rather a lot of difference.
Also, lets get real, most of thepiratebays content links users to content which is being provided contrary to the laws of their countries.

Is this wrong? Well, the debate goes on, but we get nowhere by pretending that everything's lovely with downloading 'unauthorised' content, and get with the real problem, that copyright itself is very broken.

Tor/proxy (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548907)

That useless : use tor or another proxy to connect to the search engine/tracker (doesn't need high trafic).

Once you got the *.torrent you want and the ip of the peer that share the file, you can connect directly to them without needing to pass by a proxy...

Re:Tor/proxy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549021)

Distributed Hash Table ftw

This Reeks, But It's Still Not That Stinky Yet... (2, Interesting)

Kneo24 (688412) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548931)

While this certainly has a lot of terrible implications, those people could just use other torrent sites. The only reason TPB is being blocked here is because of their notoriety. I honestly can find my trackers easier using other bit torrent sites anyway. And what will Italy do once people get their TPB trackers from other sites?

Re:This Reeks, But It's Still Not That Stinky Yet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549861)

When they came for The Pirate Bay I did not complain, because I used Mininova. When they came for Mininova I did not complain, because I had a Demonoid invite. When they came for Demonoid...

Problem solved then... (1)

Sfing_ter (99478) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548941)

Then Italy has solved the problem right? Good thing there are no other trackers out there...

Perhaps someone should inform them tpb hosts no files, so the people actually hosting the files are unaffected as are those attempting to download.

The boat leaks from millions of places and you have put a patch on a hole well above the water line.

The Italians giving into authoritarian government? (2, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24548983)

Say it isn't so!

You know that Mussolini's party is still active in Italy right?

Re:The Italians giving into authoritarian governme (4, Informative)

badpazzword (991691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549063)

Had you said, "Mussolini's *daughter* is in politics", you would have been correct.

Re:The Italians giving into authoritarian governme (3, Informative)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549071)

They changed the name, but it was the same party, consisting of all the people who weren't hanging from lamp posts by the end of the war: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Social_Movement%E2%80%93National_Right [wikipedia.org]

Re:The Italians giving into authoritarian governme (2, Insightful)

badpazzword (991691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549173)

And how many seats do they currently hold in the parliament?

You're really beating the wrong cat. ;)

Seeing things as they are (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549659)

You know that Mussolini's party is still active in Italy right?
.

Mussolini had his own way of dealing with the petty thief - and that - stripped of all pretense - is what the downloader has become. Films like The Dark Knight aren't produced as a free gift to the geek with a network connection and a DVD burner.

And the theft of corporations from the PD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549909)

What should we do for that? They have no corporeal body and the government aren't stripping them of corporate status, so what should we do?

I know, take from them like they took from us.

Payback's a bitch, isn't it.

It's not blocked here... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24548989)

I am in Italy and I can surf to Pirate Bay right now. My ISP is Tiscali.

Re:It's not blocked here... (1)

badpazzword (991691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549051)

I can confirm the above.

Re:It's not blocked here... (and "aliased") (2, Informative)

GennarinoParsifalle (714027) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549087)

I can confirm I can access the site (I'm in Italy, my ISP is Fastweb). Just in case it is blocked by some Italian ISP, it seems that labaia.org is a new alias. ;-)

Re:It's not blocked here... (and "aliased") (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549137)

I can confirm I can access the site (I'm in Italy, my ISP is Fastweb).
Just in case it is blocked by some Italian ISP, it seems that labaia.org is a new alias. ;-)

Here the bay is still reachable too! I think the control may be in the DNS system (like for the *forbidden* betting sites)!

I'm happy with openDNS! :-)

wikileaks a target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549011)

Since wikileaks.org is operated by the same guys, I wonder if wikileaks.org has been blocked in Italy as well? If so, that's probably the real reason.

Proxy Server (4, Informative)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549015)

And have they managed to block every proxy server that can connect to every other proxy server that can see and connect to TPB? It just sounds like more press grandstanding to this observer.

And how about an ICQ that serves up torrent files? The file you need to get from TPB just isn't that big.

And how about IMBF (Information Must Be Free) people offering to e-mail in .tor files upon request? Got that blocked yet?

Strikes me that shutting down TPB countywide (unless you're China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, or the like) isn't easy, or likely.

Re:Proxy Server (2, Insightful)

javilon (99157) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549267)

They know that it is impossible to stop people from getting to it. But they also know that if they manage to reduce the amount of people that uses P2P down from what it is now (my guess is 80%~90%) to something like below 20%, then they will be able to say that this people are criminals.

Right now, they should send to jail the whole country.

Re:Proxy Server (1, Offtopic)

ciggieposeur (715798) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549885)

Does Obama really think he'll force us into Alternative Energy technologies by giving us no other choices?

No, I think he knows that we'll be forced into alternative energy technologies by the Lomonosov-Lavoisier law. Our only real choice is to either slowly adjust our lifestyles now (by developing the alternative energy technologies quickly enough to handle our energy needs) or rapidly adjust our lifestyles later (in an economically catastrophic way).

Did they get a court order? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549117)

If they didn't get a court order isn't this kind of blocking illegal harrassment and interfering with internet communications. It is severely outlawed at least here. Piratebay should file a criminal suit against them for running illegal interference.

Re:Did they get a court order? (2, Insightful)

devman (1163205) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549261)

I'm sure the owners of TBP don't want to step anywhere near a courtroom, even less for one not in their own country.

Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (4, Insightful)

dada21 (163177) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549119)

I've used TPB for legal torrents as well as the "illegal" ones. I taste movies before buying them, and TPB is a great way to try before I buy. I actually spend MORE money on DVDs purchased legally because of this method.

So the Italian prosecutor would call me a criminal. Fine. He's using public funding against what would be a "crime" between private parties. He's using the taxpayer's dollars to do the work the "harmed" party should be doing.

In reality, Italy has far larger problems than issues between two private parties. There is RAMPANT corruption that is costing REAL dollars to the taxpayer. The Italian government should be seeking out bad seeds amongst themselves as a priority. There is also massive amounts of theft and loss within their own body; maybe they should focus on those problems?

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (3, Insightful)

devman (1163205) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549319)

I've used TPB for legal torrents as well as the "illegal" ones. I taste movies before buying them, and TPB is a great way to try before I buy. I actually spend MORE money on DVDs purchased legally because of this method.

Unfortunately the purpose for the download of copyrighted material does not make it anymore legal, no matter how one rationalizes it, it's just simply not your right.

So the Italian prosecutor would call me a criminal. Fine. He's using public funding against what would be a "crime" between private parties. He's using the taxpayer's dollars to do the work the "harmed" party should be doing.

If I assault you or defraud you, that is also a crime between private parties, yet the state will still prosecute it. You need to define your terms more carefully. Should the state be handling what should ultimately be a civil matter, no not really, but private parties has little to do with it.

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (2, Insightful)

russotto (537200) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549469)

Unfortunately the purpose for the download of copyrighted material does not make it anymore legal, no matter how one rationalizes it, it's just simply not your right.

At which point we get into the question of "why should I accept that my rights are defined by who can pay the most money to the legislature"?

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (0)

Shados (741919) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549521)

If it was that simple, you wouldn't have the right to buy a used copy of copyrighted material, fair use clauses wouldn't exist, etc. Jeez, maybe there is ::gasps:: a balance to such things! And who would have thought... people making copyrighted work are... HUMANS TOO! Wow!

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (2, Interesting)

thealsir (927362) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549973)

Right. Like the extension of copyright terms into the stratosphere. Like the inability to copy parts of a DVD for fair usage. Like the current DRM'd media fiasco. That sure as heck sounds "balanced."

Then there are the issues of media sharing and how it has often benefited artists, but not middlemen. This is a complex issue, because it is technically illegal, but people have done it dating back to the 60's with sharing phonograph records and tapes, and recording things off radio, and I guarantee you certain bands would not be as popular if that were not the case.

How about this: Admit that the system is unbalanced in favor of one party instead of posting that "everything's fine" on Slashdot. "People making copyrighted work are humans too"...nice red herring that adds nothing to the discussion.

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 5 years ago | (#24550091)

How about this: Admit that the system is unbalanced in favor of one party instead of posting that "everything's fine" on Slashdot.

Could you please give a link to a comment in this discussion where someone who is generally not on TPB's side on this one claims that "everything's fine"?

I obviously can't speak for anyone but myself, but I am very careful not to claim such things, not least because I don't for an instant believe them. Today's intellectual property frameworks are clearly flawed in many ways, and unbalanced at times. But that doesn't excuse rampant violation of a reasonable basic principle, which is what TPB openly advocates.

Re:Instead of fighting obvious crimes... (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 5 years ago | (#24550057)

I've used TPB for legal torrents as well as the "illegal" ones.

I love the quotation marks there. Do they meant "I've decided that these laws don't apply to me"?

He's using public funding against what would be a "crime" between private parties. He's using the taxpayer's dollars to do the work the "harmed" party should be doing.

How is this any different to any police force and national prosecution authority taking action against someone who breaks any law? Certain aspects of copyright infringment have legally been criminal rather than civil issues for several years now in many jurisdictions, including the US and EU.

This prosecutor looks like a dedicated guy... (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549139)

I suspect he has a lucrative career ahead of him in the entertainment industry. Wouldn't be the first case of that happening.

Domain name or IP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549211)

thepiratebay.se resolves to 83.140.176.200 [83.140.176.200] in the free world, so what happens if you just open that IP address in Italy?

No this is not a rickroll, goatse, tubgirl or lemonparty.

PS: What, do I sound like I've been burned before?

Blocking and filtering will never work. (1)

Eternal Annoyance (815010) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549217)

Ok, so they want to block information on a tool that is designed to make sure information gets distributed (the internet)? GOOD LUCK!

If they want to make sure information doesn't get distributed, better make sure the people don't have access to the tools to do so (in other words: forbid access to the internet altogether).

Another solution (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549251)

OpenDNS.

Man. What a poor job they've done to block the website -- and still they can claim they did.

Suddenly, I love my country again!

Free Advertisement (2, Interesting)

fluch (126140) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549285)

What a great country which provides again free advertisement for the Piratebay! After the pitfall of Denmark trying the same impossible thing ... will they ever learn?

From the site itself (4, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549317)

http://thepiratebay.org/blog/123 [thepiratebay.org] or http://labaia.org/blog/123 [labaia.org] for people in Italy

Copty and paste
(I sure hope they don't sue me for copyright infringement)

Fascist state censors Pirate Bay

We're quite used to fascist countries not allowing freedom of speech. A lot of smaller nations that have dictators decide to block our site since we can help spread information that could be harmful to the dictators.

This time it's Italy. They suffer from a really bad background as one of the IFPIs was formed in Italy during the fascist years and now they have a fascist leader in the country, Silvio Berlusconi. Berlusconi is also the most powerful person in Italian media owning a lot of companies that compete with The Pirate Bay and he would like to stay that way - so one of his lackeys, Giancarlo Mancusi, ordered a shutdown of our domain name and IP in Italy to make it hard to not support Berlusconis empire.

We have had fights previously in Italy, recently with our successful art installation where we had to storm Fortezza in order to get our art done. And as usual, we won. We will also win this time.

We have already changed IP for the website - that makes it work for half the ISPs again. And we want you all to inform your italian friends to switch their DNS to OpenDNS [opendns.com] so they can bypass their ISPs filters. This will also let them bypass the other filters installed by the Italian government, as a bonus. And for the meanwhile - http://labaia.org [labaia.org] works (La Baia means The Bay in Italian).

And please, everybody should also contact their ISP and tell them that this is not OK and that the ISPs should appeal. We don't want a censored internet! And the war starts here...

Not true - now (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549327)

Works perfectly now here in Milan. Just downloaded a few torrent files to check.

Yesterday and the day before it was unaccessible though.

Perhaps the Polizia Postale (yes, it's the postal police who checks on the net here) is helpfully unblocking it on Sundays?

It's working from here (Apulia/Puglia) (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24549457)

I'm in the very heel of Italy, Puglia, and it's working swimmingly. Needless to say I am also on some random's open wifi connectiont too ;)

Still working for me (3, Interesting)

gigarello (892823) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549649)

I use the biggest italian ISP, Telecom Italia, and TPB is still reachable!!! I'm using opendns, maybe italan ISP just removed TPB form their dns...

Just the DNS A replies are squishy (4, Informative)

eaman (710548) | more than 5 years ago | (#24549963)

I semms like that Telecom, wich is italian n.1 priver, is just gibbering the DNS replay: A query for thepiratebay.org returns 127.0.0.1 .
So just a static record in you /etc/hosts should do:

# echo -e "83.140.176.200 thepiratebay.org\n83.140.176.156 torrents.thepiratebay.org" >> /etc/hosts

Or you (gentle italian reader) can just use a different DNS. Http is fine, so appears to be the peer to peer thing.

You know: it's not like I fell the need to download some copyrighted materials, it's just that _I_'m used to be the one who blocks things in my net, and I go mad when someone tricks my DNS (they did some other trash on those DNS some time ago as a sort of forwarder for mispelled domains: some one in there found a new toy and since then each day they play a new trick...).

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