Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

BSOD Makes Appearance at Olympic Opening Ceremonies

CmdrTaco posted more than 6 years ago | from the beacuse-its-august dept.

It's funny.  Laugh. 521

Whiteox writes "A BSOD was projected onto the roof of the National Stadium during the grand finale to the four-hour spectacular at the Olympics. Lenovo chairman Yang Yuanqing chose to go with XP instead of Vista because of the complexity of the IT functions at the Games. His comment on Vista? 'If it's not stable, it could have some problems,' he said. Evidently Bill Gates attended the opening ceremony, so he must have witnessed it."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

well (5, Funny)

thermian (1267986) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568147)

They paid 40 billion for that ceremony. I can't see this improving their opinion of Microsoft much.

Re:well (5, Funny)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568171)

They paid 40 billion for that ceremony.

But was it a pirated copy of Windows?

Re:well (5, Funny)

mweather (1089505) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568229)

It's the Chinese Olympics. What do you think?

Re:well (1)

hostyle (773991) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568473)

A kung-fued copy then ?

Do You Know What Time It Is Children ?? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568515)

it's patch tuesday children - patch IMMEDIATELY children !! if not, you will be wishing for years to come that you had, or that you used linux !! PATCH, Dammit !! PATCH NOW !!

Re:well (4, Funny)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568791)

Perhaps it was shanghaid.

Re:well (4, Funny)

value_added (719364) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568817)

It's the Chinese Olympics. What do you think?

Actually, the reality is just as funny:

Microsoft is designated as an official supplier to the 2008 Olympic Games.

When you can't or don't need to "embrace, extend, and extinguish", sponsor!

My own opinion is that not anticipating a blue screen is like attending a Budweiser-sponsored sporting event and expecting to get real beer.

Re:well (3, Informative)

cyfer2000 (548592) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568801)

Those computers were sponsored by IB, sorry, Lenovo, and Lenovo bought license for all of their computers.

Re:well (5, Insightful)

mccalli (323026) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568183)

I can't see this improving their opinion of Microsoft much.

In fairness to Microsoft, blue screens are normally due to bad hardware drivers. Whatever that thing actually was, it certainly wasn't a normal monitor and I'll bet the drivers are rather specific. And the less people use them, the fewer bugs are found.

Cheers,
Ian

Re:well (5, Funny)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568263)

That's no excuse. No installation of Linux has ever crashed in the history of the universe. Microsoft should be held to no less a standard.

Re:well (5, Funny)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568713)

A Linux installation crashes if and only if it doesn't respect it's user.

Re:well (5, Funny)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568743)

exactly I hate this crap from Microsoft. It should be able to do like Linux and when there's a hardware problem it just reroutes power through the main deflector to fix it.

Re:well (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568375)

What I don't really understand, is by default for the NT line of Windows (as far back as I can remember it) was to dump a log and reboot on such an exception. And even if this wasn't the case, surely you would rather the computer be in an endless reboot cycle (remove the loading screen too) rather than have a projected blue screen for everyone to see you are having problems. That way it looks like the "machine is on the fritz" which people can accept more than "Look, they used Windows and look where it got them... fools!"

Re:well (2, Interesting)

DerWulf (782458) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568427)

there is an option to turn off rebooting on blue screen. It comes in handy if you actually want to see the error ...

Re:well (5, Funny)

omeomi (675045) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568917)

there is an option to turn off rebooting on blue screen. It comes in handy if you actually want to see the error ...

And you feel that this is one of those instances?

Re:well (5, Funny)

TechnoBunny (991156) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568377)

'In fairness to Microsoft'

What are you, some kind of shill?

Re:well (0, Offtopic)

supersnail (106701) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568417)

I get this screen when my old Dell expiron overheats.

Poor old thing can't manage a virus scan and a Web Page at the same time.

Given the ROCs forgiven and humanetarian nature I wonder which Sysadmin will be donating his internal organs to the Bill and Melissa marketing foundation?

Re:well (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568779)

err, it's quite unlikely the RoC government will punish anyone for mishaps at the Beijing Games...

Re:well (5, Informative)

timster (32400) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568895)

Just a heads-up... the ROC initials usually refer to the Republic of China, which is the government in control of Taiwan. The Chinese mainland is controlled by the People's Republic of China, initials PRC. This is a really, really big distiction.

In fairness to software engineering (1, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568523)

In fairness to Microsoft, blue screens are normally due to bad hardware drivers. Whatever that thing actually was, it certainly wasn't a normal monitor and I'll bet the drivers are rather specific. And the less people use them, the fewer bugs are found.

Cheers,
Ian

Jeez. MS apologists always trot out that one. Making bad engineering acceptable will probably be Bill Gates [amazon.com] ' largest "contribution" to society.

In fairness to software engineering, if the "bad" hardware driver can crash the system, then the system is not ready for production and has more than a few show-stopping (no pun intended) bugs. Take a look at basic kernel or micro-kernel design principles and stop spreading the view that catastrophically bad design is acceptable.

Re:In fairness to software engineering (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568705)

In fairness to software engineering, if the "bad" hardware driver can crash the system, then the system is not ready for production and has more than a few show-stopping (no pun intended) bugs. Take a look at basic kernel or micro-kernel design principles and stop spreading the view that catastrophically bad design is acceptable.

You're right. Linux sucks!!!

Re:In fairness to software engineering (5, Insightful)

jimicus (737525) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568839)

Jeez. MS apologists always trot out that one. Making bad engineering acceptable will probably be Bill Gates [amazon.com] ' largest "contribution" to society.

In fairness to software engineering, if the "bad" hardware driver can crash the system, then the system is not ready for production and has more than a few show-stopping (no pun intended) bugs. Take a look at basic kernel or micro-kernel design principles and stop spreading the view that catastrophically bad design is acceptable.

Linux puts most drivers in the kernel and a bad driver there can cause a panic, bringing the system down.

Most of the BSDs, AFAIK, have some drivers in the kernel and others in userland processes.

I'm not sure how it's architected in Mac OS X, but I've certainly seen kernel panics on my Mac Mini.

There may be an embedded OS which is less susceptible to being killed by a poor driver, but for something like this you probably wouldn't bother with an embedded OS because there's so much more in the way of off-the-shelf software available to do the job for Windows and Linux.

Re:In fairness to software engineering (2, Interesting)

bunratty (545641) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568919)

Back when Windows NT was being developed, I heard that device drivers had to communicate with hardware through the hardware abstraction layer (HAL), and this made Windows NT very stable. Then I heard that they decided to allow hardware drivers to connect directly to hardware because sometimes going through HAL had a performance hit. I can't find much information on the history, but these lecture notes [kent.edu] seem to confirm that drivers can now bypass HAL. Is this why bad drivers can still crash Windows?

Microsoft at least provides tools to verify that drivers work properly [microsoft.com] .

Re:In fairness to software engineering (5, Insightful)

hcmtnbiker (925661) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568949)

In fairness to software engineering, if the "bad" hardware driver can crash the system, then the system is not ready for production and has more than a few show-stopping (no pun intended) bugs. Take a look at basic kernel or micro-kernel design principles and stop spreading the view that catastrophically bad design is acceptable.

I'm sorry, do you know of an operating system where talking to hardware cannot cause a panic? Even microkernels such as Mach are prone to these problems. ANY time you touch hardware there can be a problem if it's coded wrong. Even microkernels have to allow DMA for certain hardware, and bad DMA can bring down a whole system without even trying. There's a basic design flaw in how normal computers operate that requires this sort of behavior from kernels, which leads to bad drivers affecting them. If you can name one system ready for general purpose for which this isn't true I would love to hear about it.

May not be the case as much any more. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568759)

Not sure whether that's true anymore about the blue screen errors being due to hardware issues. A lot of blue screen issues I've dealt with on peoples systems lately seem to be side effects of viruses, root kits, etc. rather than hardware issue. When re-installing windows eliminates the blue screen, it seems fairly clear the problem wasn't the hardware.

Re:well (1)

andy19 (1250844) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568873)

You'd think there'd be some testing before projecting it though. If the drivers are that specific/obscure, then chances are it would have happened prior to opening night.

Re:well (1)

kcelery (410487) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568199)

hardware failure also gives BSOD, would be premature to bill the Bill.

Re:well (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568355)

IIRC the commentators stated the amount spent on the ceremony was $30 million. The total renovation of Beijing to host the ceremony was $40 billion.

Either way it's quite sad that one of the only glitches in such a spectacular show was with a MS product.

Re:well (5, Insightful)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568491)

Be realistic for a second please, you think on show as grand as the opening ceremonies only had one glitch? Seriously?

There is no such thing as a show this big without multiple (read a lot) of glitches. They are covered up well, quickly fixed, or not noticed, but they are there. This one was just in the open for everyone to see.

Re:well (1)

Stooshie (993666) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568483)

Erm, dont you mean 40 billion for the games.

Bill was there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568153)

If bill was there, so what? He's gone from microsoft.

Re:Bill was there? (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568185)

Not just that, but people make it out like he is the sole coder on any of the Windows products.

Re:Bill was there? (3, Funny)

snoyberg (787126) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568449)

Please... no single human could code that much bloat.

Re:Bill was there? (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568685)

He coded something that coded bloat and bloated code

Re:Bill was there? (1)

wattrlz (1162603) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568639)

To be fair he is/was the public face of MS and he seems to have wanted it that way.

Re:Bill was there? (5, Funny)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568503)

He probably cackled maniacally and shouted over the top of the fireworks, "I made that screen blue! Bill Gates owns the Olympics! Maybe if you dirty pirates had bought a legitimate copy it would have worked better!"

FIRST NEGRO POST (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568169)

Negro powah!

hilarious (-1, Troll)

jacquesm (154384) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568173)

Really, way to go Microsoft, advertise your incompetence to the whole world in an even bigger setting than that famous keynote.

Oh, stop it! (2, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568175)

BSOD's are no longer a problem! They haven't been since Windows XP! BSOD's were only a problem in the Win 9x days! Windows today is wayyyy stable! My Windows box hasn't crashed ever!

*tongue firmly planted in cheek*

Re:Oh, stop it! (4, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568205)

*tongue firmly planted in cheek*

You're talking about BillG's asscheek, right? : p

Re:Oh, stop it! (2, Insightful)

DerWulf (782458) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568613)

If your windows XP crashes more then once in a blue moon you got serious issues with your hardware and/or device drivers. NT never had stability issues provided that hardware and drivers were sound.

That was on Stadium... (4, Funny)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568211)

... but for TV audience around the Globe, image was different, they used CG to convert BSOD into neato Compiz Cube animations.

Here's a game (5, Funny)

PJCRP (1314653) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568215)

10 points to the first person to can say what went wrong [livefilestore.com] :U

Re:Here's a game (1)

Corporate Troll (537873) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568295)

You get a maximum of 5 points here... modpoints that is ;-)

Re:Here's a game (1)

pipatron (966506) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568391)

Obviously you haven't had any modpoints in a long time! Last time I got 15.

Re:Here's a game (0, Offtopic)

Corporate Troll (537873) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568495)

Yes, I know.... It's been a very long time. I don't know why. It might have to do with my user name. (That said, my other user name doesn't get any modpoints either)

Oh, well... I'm not complaining.

I was also more hinting to the fact that you can't get modded past the 5 points for a post, but I should have formulated it differently.

Re:Here's a game (1)

InsaneMosquito (1067380) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568807)

I only get 5 :( I had mod points early this week.

Re:Here's a game (2)

houghi (78078) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568545)

What 5 points only? The last time I got 15 modpoints. Unfortunatly the time between them is too long and then the time to give them is too short.

I rather have less points more often, so that the total amount is the same, but I can actually use them all.

Re:Here's a game (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568369)

Last letter of the STOP hex code is an A, IRQ_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL perhaps?

Re:Here's a game (1)

PJCRP (1314653) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568465)

Dunno, looks more like an F4 to me :o

Re:Here's a game (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568499)

Could go both ways. Can't we get a better picture?

Re:Here's a game (2)

PJCRP (1314653) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568627)

Looking at both the websites that Gizmondo links, no. Although, F4 does give the same message and a link [microsoft.com] too :v

Might as well get used to it (4, Interesting)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568227)

Visible computer glitches pop up in the most unexpected places these days. I went to a 25th anniversay screening of Wargames at a local theater recently. I wasn't even aware that I was in a digital theater until about halfway through the movie their server lost connection to the host and the movie theater screen suddenly turned into a giant Windows desktop. It was a little unnerving (I had thought I was looking at an actual film).

I think it's something we will just get used to seeing in this increasingly digital age. I just hope I'm not driving down the street one day and see a "lost connection to server" message flashing on a stoplight.

Re:Might as well get used to it (5, Funny)

Swizec (978239) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568529)

I just hope someday I'm not driving down the street and see a "lost connection to server" message flashing instead of The Reality!

That would totally freak me out.

Re:Might as well get used to it (3, Funny)

JosKarith (757063) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568827)

Well then don't take the red pill...

Re:Might as well get used to it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568651)

You ever see a stoplight go just blinking the red signal all day?

Re:Might as well get used to it (1)

Rub1cnt (1159069) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568847)

You ever seen an intersection blue screen? :) (True story.) Bell at Main in downtown Houston, the light rail line installed new signal controllers at all the intersections...said controllers run a headless, hardened version of Windows NT4. One day the lights at the intersection were flashing and a metro tech came out, he plugs in this laptop to a network jack in the box and VNCs to the console. Low and behold, it's a windows NT4 workstation and its bluescreened. A quick reboot later and the lights were working... Scary thought that the traffic lights in a major metropolitan area are controlled by such arcane software.

Re:Might as well get used to it (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568707)

I just hope I'm not driving down the street one day and see a "lost connection to server" message flashing on a stoplight.

Just wait until your car screen turns blue. That will be a suprise! Anyway, after they have unplugged your brain, you won't remember it anymore, so no harm is done...

Eh, so what? (4, Insightful)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568267)

All computers crash - I've made Linux, BSD, OSX, and Solaris machines kernel panic. Hell, I've witnessed a newer zSeries mainframe crash.

The fact that it happened at an inopportune moment is unfortunate, but that's life.

Re:Eh, so what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568409)

I'm a zSeries systems programmer. I've seen some hardware failures that caused minor problems(eg, tape drive failed), but I've never seen an outright system failure comparable to a windows BSOD. What happened on your system? Jes2 locking up because the spool got full doesn't count. ;)

Re:Eh, so what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568605)

I once wiped everything from a DD except for the MBR, the system actually booted Linux until it tryed to mount root, then it couldn't and kernel paniced, the machine frooze dead.

That was my first and only kernel panic.

Re:Eh, so what? (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568875)

I once wiped everything from a DD except for the MBR, the system actually booted Linux until it tryed to mount root, then it couldn't and kernel paniced, the machine frooze dead.

That was my first and only kernel panic.

Easy enough. The MBR doesn't usually require a working filesystem because it just contains a pointer to a block on the disk which contains the bootloader which itself may only contain a pointer to the location of a kernel.

Re:Eh, so what? (1)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568915)

Actually, I have no idea what caused it - the systems folks were running around in a panic and I could never get a straight answer about it. There had been some recent maintenance (SAN expansions, a newer version of DB2, I think), but I was consulting in a different area of the company and wasn't directly involved.

I did hear someone say that it'd happened a year before, though, which made me wonder what the hell are their systems programmers doing wrong that the mainframe crashes, and that it's done it more than once in recent memory.

Re:Eh, so what? (4, Funny)

hey! (33014) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568457)

Actually, a zSeries mainframe crashing at an opportune moment would be more remarkable than it crashing at an inopportune one.

Re:Eh, so what? (5, Funny)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568489)

"All computers crash - I've made Linux, BSD, OSX, and Solaris machines kernel panic. Hell, I've witnessed a newer zSeries mainframe crash."

And you seem so proud of that. The goal is to make the systems function, not crash.

Re:Eh, so what? (5, Funny)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568933)

Not if you are in QA/testing...

Re:Eh, so what? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568509)

But life is also about the unexpected and how we deal with it. We can see the humor in embarrassing moments like these and laugh at them or we could take them too seriously. I chose to laugh about them.

Re:Eh, so what? (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568543)

Still, Windows XP is still a bit complex for what's needed for a job like this. On the other hand, is there even any FOSS/Linux solution available? It probably needs to at least display video, animation, receive/send timing, etc.

Re:Eh, so what? (-1, Flamebait)

Cajun Hell (725246) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568655)

The fact that Windows crashed yet again isn't what makes this so embarrassing. The embarrassing part is that the failure revealed their dirty little secret that they have Microsoft products deployed. What sort of weird legacy-compatibility requirement does the Olympics have, that imposed the we're-forced-into-using-Microsoft-stuff constraint? Because if you don't have that constraint, it simply doesn't make sense to use Windows. That's their niche, and it's hard to believe the Olympics got caught in it.

Combine that with the fact that Gates just happened to be there, and there's an implication that something dirty happened. Maybe they were paid to use Windows to publicize the platform, or used it because the Chinese are courting Gates over something.

The crash isn't the story. Everybody knows Windows crashes, so yet another example isn't really bad PR in itself. That they got caught using Windows, is. They were even arrogant enough to use it for some kind of public display, like they're untouchable or above accountability or something. The situation reeks.

Re:Eh, so what? (1)

Lobster Quadrille (965591) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568909)

Are you serious? Really?

It's not that hard to believe that they used a Windows system to show a video or slideshow or something. Lots of people do that. That's not news.

The fact that Gates happened to be there is no less normal. He's one of the richest guys on earth, newly retired, and there's a big to-do in China. Of course he wants to be there.

Lay off the conspiracy theories.

Re:Eh, so what? (5, Funny)

db32 (862117) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568697)

But so few fail in such a spectacular fashion. I have never seen a kernel panic delivered in anything other than terminal font on a black and white screen. The BSOD is called the BSOD because MS, in their infinite wisdom, opened themselves up to such a joke by deciding to deliver critical system messages with a "calming" blue background and white text. And then doing so very very frequently in the early days.

Honestly, they should just make it a black screen with some fireworks and a "Congratulations, You Crashed Windows Again!". You know, make it a more positive experience for the user.

omg! Proof! (5, Funny)

urcreepyneighbor (1171755) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568283)

We're living in the Matrix! And the Matrix runs Windows!

No wonder my life is a pile of shit. :)

Re:omg! Proof! (5, Funny)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568745)

You are about to bend a spoon.

Cancel or Allow?

Re:omg! Proof! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568877)

Wake up, Neo!

(Cancel | Allow)

Doesnt look like a BSOD... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568289)

It looks like a DOS/Shell bootup message....

Dont know, switched to MAC, dont have those issues anymore. I pay Apple alot of money to ensure no BSODs.

Re:Doesnt look like a BSOD... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568497)

Or you know, you could just download a *free* Linux ISO with no BSoDs and the same fundamental architecture as OS X but minus the expense.

Re:Doesnt look like a BSOD... (3, Informative)

Lobster Quadrille (965591) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568945)

Um... Mac still has them, they're just grey screens of death with an apple logo and an even-less-informative error message (in half a dozen languages).

Videos (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568303)

Are there any videos or news coverages of the incident?

Re:Videos (2, Funny)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568441)

From china? Good luck! They've long since taken any digital recording device that was present and "corrected" the images it captured before returning it to its owner (if they were lucky).

Where the haha tag? (2, Funny)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568361)

Nelson (points finger at Bill Gates): haha

Seriously where's the haha tag?

Email: drruth1@earthlink.net (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568387)

Email: drruth1@earthlink.net

Faked (4, Interesting)

squoozer (730327) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568407)

I wonder if this was faked like the fireworks?

Re:Faked (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568577)

The fireworks were simulated, not faked, yes?

Re:Faked (1)

cyfer2000 (548592) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568753)

The fireworks were real, only the video on your TV was CGI. I doubt if the picture is PSed anyway.

Re:Faked (1)

yanyan (302849) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568811)

I wouldn't be surprised if China had an axe to grind against m$ and faking an embarrassing incident such as this would serve as a slap to m$.

... Eh, so what? ... (3, Insightful)

ninjagin (631183) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568419)

Really, how big a deal is this? It's not uncommon to get a BSOD from time to time, and the number and power of the computing resources involved was probably pushing the limit. I'm not surprised and I don't think it's a big deal. The NBC people were practically falling all over themselves to find a flaw in the opening ceremonies, and if this is the biggest thing that surfaces, they went off flawlessly, imho. Who really cares about one little BSOD in such a huge spectacle, really?

making bad engineering acceptable (4, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568643)

...It's not uncommon to get a BSOD from time to time.

And unless you do something about it, like vote with your wallet, you are simply helping Bill and his minions make bad engineering acceptable.

Re:... Eh, so what? ... (3, Insightful)

Darfeld (1147131) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568767)

I bet the guy in charge and the Chinese government don't see it your way.

Glitch happens, but for ceremonies like this one, this isn't a little glitch. If people notice, it's bad, specially if you're trying to impress people.

Re:... Eh, so what? ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568851)

And that attitude is exactly why they still happen with the frequency they do - piss poor quality attitude of the majority of software programmers (not that I said majority, not all.)

I think it should be mandatory that every software engineer have exposure to embedded systems programming where failure is not an option. IMHO, all software quality would go up drastically because the programmers would then have at least half a clue as to what quality really means.

Re:... Eh, so what? ... (1)

Cajun Hell (725246) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568889)

It's not uncommon to get a BSOD from time to time

It's pretty damn uncommon if you don't run Windows!

I know the Olympics have been around for a long time, but they are so big-money, that it's hard to believe they are still paying for some mistake they made back in the 1980s, such that they have to run Windows. Getting a BSOD on a main display like that, is like seeing a videotape where a lobbyist gives your congressman a bag with a comical "$" on the side of it. It's a fuckup beyond obviousness, into over-the-top ridiculous territory.

Bad Memory (1)

tripmine (1160123) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568443)

Isn't that the broken RAM BSOD?

It was bound to happen (1)

cjh79 (754103) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568505)

It was probably hardware failure, and given the shear number of lights/projectors/lighted up people/people flying through air going on, something was bound to fail at some point during that ceremony. This seems pretty minor.

Pirated? (0, Redundant)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568527)

What's worse is the copy of Windows was pirated!

BSOD? Big deal! (4, Insightful)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568571)

The BSOD is just the icing on the cake of this story. The real interesting bit is the fact that Vista lost out again to the superiority of XP,...

big deal (1, Funny)

speedtux (1307149) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568591)

The copy of Windows probably wasn't licensed anyway. You can't expect unlicensed, unsupported Microsoft software not to crash :-)

They were Axon mediaservers running WinXP Embedded (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24568703)

They were Axon mediaservers running WinXP Embedded: http://www.windowsfordevices.com/news/NS4787005167.html [windowsfordevices.com]

Some of the video projectors (70 of about 160 if I recall correctly) connected to those mediaservers were equipped with HES Orbital Head ( http://www.highend.com/products/digital_lighting/orbitalhead.asp [highend.com] ), which can explain the odd positioning of BSOD.

Well.... (0, Offtopic)

jskline (301574) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568795)

ROTFLMAO....

Priceless! (2, Funny)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568805)

Olympic Ceremony - $40 Million
Tickets to Olympics - $??????
Windows Computer - $1000
Windows XP OS - $400

Being able to tap the president on the shoulder, then point up at the BSOD screen and say "I did that" - Fucking Priceless

BSOD was CGI! (4, Funny)

Coolhand2120 (1001761) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568823)

After a closer examination of the evidence it has come forth that the BSOD was actually CGI superimposed on the roof to make the U.S. audience viewing at home feel more familiar with Chinese technology. At selected venues around the world the BSOD was replaced with a kernel panic screen and even a Mac classic bomb.

I submitted it to FailBlog.org (1)

Nachos Nakamoto (1342775) | more than 6 years ago | (#24568921)

BSOD FAIL!
Worldwide Audience and XP fails it. Nice.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?