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US Broadband Won't Catch Up With Japan's For 101 Years

timothy posted more than 6 years ago | from the all-other-things-being-equal-which-they-never-are dept.

Networking 708

An anonymous reader writes "Internet speeds of users nationwide shows that the United States has not made significant improvements in deploying high-speed broadband networks in the past year, and if the average US Internet speed continues to improve only at the same rate it did from 2007 to 2008, the country won't catch up with Japan's current download speed for another 100 years, according to findings released by the Communications Workers of America's (CWA's) Speed Matters campaign." With enough statistical mangling, nearly anything can be presented as plausible, but that's not enough to cover up my envy of Asian broadband speeds.

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oook (5, Insightful)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585931)

Yes, because we all know upgrade paths are all completely linear...

Re:oook (5, Funny)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586053)

Yes, because we all know upgrade paths are all completely linear...

Yeah, and the US is next in line... so we should get it sometime next year!

Re:oook (0, Flamebait)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586109)

The United States is going through a transition period. They used to be the center of an empire, with all the wealth in the world flowing to their shores. Soon, they will be just another nation. The inward flow of wealth will stop, and a portion of their domestic wealth will be flowing out to the next empire. Being that they're a grey haired nation already due to a baby boom followed by multiple baby busts, they'll be significantly depopulated in relatively short order, further reducing their productivity.

The United States is not going to be doing shit in this area, any more than the British, the French, the Spanish or the Romans are. The United States is history. I would be very surprised if they even manage to hold themselves together as a nation at all once everything pans out.

Re:oook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586251)

There's plenty of underage minority teens and unemployed excons having children in America. Your cynicism is unpatriotic!

Re:oook (3, Insightful)

daveatneowindotnet (1309197) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586385)

Not sure how this is on topic, but to bring it so. Japan is having this problem while the US is not, thanks largely to brain gain from places like India and immigration from Mexico providing a robust blue collar work force. Sure that pisses off Lou Dobbs but it will keep America afloat. In all likelihood there will just be an evaporation of the native American middle class (no not Cherokee). America has been declared dead due to worse things then outsourcing, a momentary credit crunch, and ill advised war (read: moneysink) and survived handsomely. For better or worse the American Hegemony will survive for sometime longer if only for the fact there isn't a clear successor yet.

Re:oook (0, Troll)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586471)

The United States is not going to be doing shit in this area, any more than the British, the French, the Spanish or the Romans are.

I have a gweat fwiend in WOME named.... Biggus................... DICKUS.

Re:oook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586475)

And from which third world shithole do you hail?

Re:oook (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586571)

Building out broadband is considered complicated, expensive and time-consuming, but actually most of us could do it in our spare time, if we put our minds to it and got the necessary permits. Who here paid someone else to build the home network? And why would we? It's not hard. The only reason I'm not out digging trenches for fiber is that I'd be caught up in red tape in no time. Bureaucracy is holding us back, not anyone's status in the nation circus.

Re:oook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586301)

ofcourse, it's linear! Also Japan is the same size as the United States.

Thats ok... (1)

clonan (64380) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585935)

In a hundred years I plan on living on Mars and the US broadband speed is WAY better than the one on Mars...

GO US!

Re:Thats ok... (4, Funny)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585955)

The speed might be good on Mars, but the latency to most websites is going to be horrible.

Two words (2, Funny)

sckeener (137243) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586117)

Proxy Servers.....big freakin' proxy servers...

Heck I bet they'll be owned by Google because instead of just cataloging the internet, Google will be cashing the internet.

Re:Thats ok... (1)

Anonymous Monkey (795756) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586185)

Yeah, well in 100 years I plan on living on a space station with an ultra fast internal network and supply high speed satellite service to any one below me for free. Cables (and gravity) begone!

Re:Thats ok... (5, Funny)

Convector (897502) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586193)

Wow, simply to plan on living in a hundred years is a fairly ambitious goal.

Oh good... (1)

bond_ionic_bond (1344071) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585945)

We still have time to catch up with the books then.

Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (0, Troll)

Buran (150348) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585965)

It seems to me like a lot of people have the attitude that somehow everything is better in Europe or Japan. Enough already. There's more to life than how fast you can download porn, illegal torrents, and other pointless stuff.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (4, Insightful)

Greg_D (138979) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586007)

Yeah, like shorter work weeks, better insurance coverage, universal health care, more vacation time.

Really, people, lighten up!

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586113)

God yeah, here I am in London, my boss is pushing me to take another two weeks holiday because I'm not using it up quickly enough. Might have done all my work by Thursday so can have a three day weekend. I'm annoyed that I pay nearly 2% of my gross wage (about average for programming in London) on insurance each year - car, buildings, contents, health, travel of course. Maybe I should buy a less powerful car...

Or I could work in the US, get like 2 hours holiday a year, get fired for turning up 1 minute late, pay all my money on health insurance.

Or maybe if you have skills in the US, you can bargain for better deals like 25 days holiday + national days, free healthcare, dental, etc. Maybe the US system encourages people to work hard, whereas laziness is often seen to be rewarded in the UK.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (5, Funny)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586435)

the US system encourages people to work hard, whereas laziness is often seen to be rewarded in the UK.

I am so totally moving to the UK.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (4, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586561)

You say that, but I'll be you're too lazy to follow through with it.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (2, Informative)

flanksteak (69032) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586195)

The Japanese do have universal health care, but compared to Americans they don't work fewer hours or get more vacation time. But the public transport sure is better.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (4, Informative)

Fallen Kell (165468) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586457)

Actually according to the International Labour Organization and the Japan Productivity Center for Socio-Economic Development, Americans work on average almost 100 hours more per year than Japanese. Mostly due to the fact that Japanese get 7 more vacation days per year on average.
Report on Productivity and Vacation [gaebler.com]

Go read the numbers before spouting off about things like this.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (0, Flamebait)

TofuMatt (1105351) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586035)

Yeah, there's also nationalized healthcare and less backwater religious nuts. Things are better in Europe, Japan, and even Canada.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (1)

BlowHole666 (1152399) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586055)

Yeah like higher taxes.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (4, Informative)

mweather (1089505) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586363)

Japan's taxes are about the same as ours, and half of Europe and Canada pay less than 10% more than the US does. If that's the downside to working less and having access to healthcare, I'll take it.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (5, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586469)

I live in Canada, and from talking to a couple Americans, my taxes seem to be right on pay with what they are paying, possibly a little higher. Once I count in all the benefits my government provides me, like free health care, I would probably say I pay less taxes than many Americans. Americans think they have less taxes, but if you really look into it, you'll find that logic flawed. They pay a little less, but get a lot less out of their government.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (1)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586079)

Are you talking about poor leaders, a growing economy crisis and unnecessary wars?

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (1, Informative)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586091)

Indeed. Yeah, so they have fast broadband. Turns out it's easy to build that type of infrastructure when you have a high population density, and theirs is so high that people live with their parents until they are in their 30s.

In the meantime, we've got areas with Fios, and 50/50Mbit symmetrical fiber connections to the 'net. So instead of moving to Japan, you can move to Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, or Texas... Or quit twisting statistics into lies and wait until the fiber gets run to where you are. Which probably won't take anywhere near 100 years.

Or keep believing the grass is greener somewhere else, and move. We're still waiting for all those people who said they were moving to Canada if Bush won in 2004 to make good though, so I won't hold my breath on that one.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (5, Informative)

krull (48492) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586495)

I live in Boston and can't get anything more than 8 down 768 up from Comcast or 3.0 down (something slow up) DSL. No other options. (No Fios in Boston proper).

Even if Fios were available I don't think there are any options that will give 63mbps download speeds. And that's the apparently the Japanese average...

What's the excuse here?

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (1)

IdleTime (561841) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586553)

Really?

Are there any New Yorkers here with a 200Mbs/$20 per month unlimited connection?

The problem is that high population density areas here in the US are inferior to similar density areas in other countries. The US infrastructure is not keeping up due to the capitalistic way of looking at the infrastructure. It's a failed policy and it becomes more and more evident for each yer that passes.

Re:Euro/Japan envy is getting stupid (2, Insightful)

Target Practice (79470) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586097)

Or like better beer, a rich regional culture and history, better cuisine, better wine.

Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1, Interesting)

bigtallmofo (695287) | more than 6 years ago | (#24585985)

Of course the United States could do better but in all fairness, the land area and population density are completely different:

United States:
9.8M square kilometers

Japan:
377K square kilometers

When you're running physical cable, this makes a huge difference.

Of course, I'm probably not the one to compare to because I have FIOS (up to 45 M/bps) and Cable (up to 16 M/bps) available to me. Currently I have FIOS @ 15 M/bps downstream and 2 M/bps upstream.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1)

Hsensei (1055922) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586077)

Your getting jiped. They are offereing 20/5 service in all the areas they service with FIOS at the price the 15/3 service is. I personally splurged on the 20/20 symetrical service. give them a call its the same price and they won't upgrade you automatically.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1, Informative)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586431)

The word is "gypped." It's a racist slur meant to evoke images of conniving gypsies tricking you out of your treasure.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (3, Insightful)

Swizec (978239) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586149)

I have a 20/20 fiber connection available to me for cheaper than what I'm currently paying for 1/0.25 ... how lame is that?

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (2, Interesting)

Cid Highwind (9258) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586171)

Well, that goes a long way toward explaining why you can't get Asian-style symmetric 100mbit broadband out in the sticks, but there ARE densely populated cities in the US. I could throw rocks from my apartment and hit 3 AT&T buildings. Why can't (won't) they provide better than 16mbit/512kbit ADSL to subscribers who are literally across the street from their switch? Because they don't have to. We don't have the regulation to make them, and thanks to the high cost of running new copper we will never have the competition to force them to offer more than lackluster speed at high prices. Hooray for deregulation and free markets...

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586341)

I don't live in the sticks. I live in Los Angeles. Specifically the San Fernando Valley.

I have no fiber. DSL is limited to 768K because I'm 18000 feet from the CO. Time Warner is the only other option.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586429)

The basic monopolies that cable and DSL providers have will never result in better service. Cable takes care of higher priced, higher speed connections while DSL takes care of lower tiers. AT&T just *raised* my DSL price by $5 a month only 6 months after I signed up. This would never happen if they knew people had another choice.

I could switch to cable but it costs more for speed I don't use. I'm also required to get cable TV service to get Internet service. At least now I have dry loop DSL that AT&T started offering a short time ago. Speed and price will not improve until the lines are required to be shared, and a single owner isn't allowed to charge what they determine to be "at-cost" wholesale access to competing providers.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (5, Informative)

bestinshow (985111) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586225)

Even then when you compare with Finland or Sweden, which have a similar population density, the US compares badly. Saying that the US is larger isn't a worthwhile response, the $/potential customer is the same regardless of the scale of the operation. It's just that clearly one single company for the US is far worse than the dozens across Europe, and there isn't real competition or universal service requirements.

Then again the UK is pretty dire in my opinion, following the US model of cheap crappy DSL and lacking upstream bandwidth, rather than the Swedish model of fast fibre to the home. Virgin Media like to claim they're fibre to the cabinet, but it's still arse-slow on DSL if you're unfortunate to be stuck with them.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586245)

I have a 1.5mbps dsl line. Thats the fastest DSL I can get. It costs me 25 dollars a month. I can move up to a 4 mbps cable line for 70 dollars a month. That's a rip-off as far as Im concerned. These studies need to take municipal monopoly pricing into account. You cant brag about speed if you're paying through the nose for it, or if you offer in poor areas and only a few can afford it.

That's like how to the soviets would brag about luxury automobile production but only party loyalists and high-level government kleptocrats could ever afford one.

I'd like to see a metric like "3-4mbps for under 30 a month" and "4-8 for under 50 a month" and "8+ for under 60" a month.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (4, Insightful)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586285)

It's a nice argument, but kind of falls apart when you figure that even places like New York, which has some of the highest population densities in the world, have crap internet. If the free market and unregulated business practices was going to provide good internet at competitive rates it would have already materialized, at least in select markets.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586499)

Isn't this in part that telecom companies have deals with the government to only allow a company to work in the state if they give access to both rural and city areas?

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (2, Insightful)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586585)

you know, it could simply be that there isn't a demand for it. Premium services are offered, and mayhaps the ISPs simply don't see an actual demand.

I know that it might seem like a silly argument that you don't want to deal with, but really...why would 99% of the population care about anything higher than the 16Mps that is already pretty commonly available (with 45Mbps in some areas)? My content is already not waiting on the pipe between me and the provider, it is waiting on my client (at least, when I'm using my old laptop), or the server trying to generate the dynamic page.

That being said, the convo has been heavy on residential connections...the place I work would love 10x the speed, business rates are just horrible and it would be too expensive. That's a different ball of wax, though.

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586613)

Internet seems fine to me. Why the obsession with 'higher speed internet'?

Re:Japan is a lot smaller than the U.S. (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586289)

This old argument.

No one is demanding 1Gb/s fibre to every house in Nowheresville. Just everywhere in Chicago.

So what? (4, Funny)

LibertineR (591918) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586011)

Porn is better... ...in slow-motion.

Re:So what? (1)

bond_ionic_bond (1344071) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586147)

Now, you wouldn't want a nice romantic high definition shot stopping for a reload every 10 seconds because of lack of bandwidth...

That really doesn't surprise me (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586015)

it's hard to keep up with those gookers these days. I do like Japanese porn though, so I'd say it's a reasonable compromise: they take the lead in broadband Internet, we download their porn movies. Love that Japanese poon.

Spin This So Action is Taken! (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586045)

US Broadband Won't Catch Up With Japan's for 101 Years

Uh, could you somehow spin (regardless of truth) this as related to war and/or military prowess so our administration will mindlessly throw money at it instead of mindlessly ignoring it?

Like:

US Cyber Attacking Infrastructure Embarrassingly Lags Japan's

Japanese Identify US Broadband as "Ripe for the Pickin'"

Cyber Pearl Harbor Imminent

US President's Netflix Downloads 1/10 as Fast as Japanese President's

US Administration Idles as US-Japanese Broadband Gap Widens

Come on, these things basically write themselves! Turn it into a dick measuring contest or it's meaningless.

Re:Spin This So Action is Taken! (1)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586319)

You could make the argument that wars are better for infrastructure, but probably not in the way you would like.

Basically, if your infrastructure is totally decimated by war, you're going to have to rebuild it, and you'll probably rebuild it with modern technology rather than putting in the old crap that got blown up. So, the fact that many Japanese and European cities were reduced to rubble around 60 years ago allowed them to be rebuilt with modern (for the day) construction and planning.

So, our best bet for our crumbling infrastructure is to get involved in a war on our own soil and lose. After our cities and major roads and railways are completely destroyed, they'll get rebuilt good as new!

There might be some minor negative side effects to this plan, but I'm sure you'll agree the up side is tremendous!

Re:Spin This So Action is Taken! (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586373)

Uh, could you somehow spin (regardless of truth) this as related to war and/or military prowess so our administration will mindlessly throw money at it instead of mindlessly ignoring it?

The best quote of the month, and it's only the 13th!

Re:Spin This So Action is Taken! (1)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586555)

Well, the Internet does have its roots at DARPA...

- RG>

That's not all (5, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586051)

The Japanese are also at least a hundred years ahead of us in cartoon porn, particularly tentacle rape porn. This "tentacle gap", as I call it, cannot be allowed to continue.

Re:That's not all (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586199)

when American's eat squid and octopus daily, perhaps the tentacle gap will lessen.

while we're at it don't forget the all important gay/lesbian or yaoi/yuri gap!

Re:That's not all (1)

unfasten (1335957) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586485)

No, for heaven's sake, please let it continue.

Japanese Internet Minister (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586057)

After reading this summary and feeling a sense of outrage rising in my stomach, I felt obliged to call the Japanese Internet Minister and set the story straight once and for all. After many hours of argument regarding relative price structures, exchange rates, and international broadband infrastructure, he assured me that I had a very large penis. He used such words to describe it such as 'gargantuan', 'mammoth', and 'really freakin huge', and that in comparison, his penis was microscopic. I for one applaud the Minister for his honesty. That is all.

Better Comparison. (1, Insightful)

gurps_npc (621217) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586065)

Japan is a relatively small island, with little space for farming and herding.

And you wish to compare the entire USA, with it's HUGE wilderness areas to Japan?

You are surprised that a country that includes Alaska, a place so wild they have to pay people to live there, has a lower average broadband connection than a small, civilized, advanced Island nation.

Let me make this clear: It is a GOOD thing that the US is not moronic enough to wire our large, open country to the same extent that a small, island country can.

Next thing, someone will complain that Japan eats more fish per capita than the US does.

Re:Better Comparison. (1)

faloi (738831) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586135)

Next thing, someone will complain that Japan eats more fish per capita than the US does.

And our game shows lag behind their in sheer craziness. Sure, we're making inroads with Fear Factor and Hurl...but we've got much further to go!

Re:Better Comparison. (2)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586201)

Still, you'd think that we could at least get most of our larger cities wired at comparable speeds to the rest of the civilized world...

Red Herring Comparison (5, Insightful)

Scudsucker (17617) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586203)

Not the old "but America is rural!" chestnut again. Scandinavian countries have lower population densities than we do yet have much better access. And the "rural" argument might make sense for why you can't get good access on a farm in Kansas, but then why don't we have 100 Mbps consumer connections in San Francisco or Manhattan?

Re:Red Herring Comparison (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586305)

There are a lot *more" rural areas in the U.S. Look at the physical size. Population density is only half of the problem, physical size is the other.

Thanks.

Re:Better Comparison. (4, Interesting)

p0tat03 (985078) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586217)

It is a GOOD thing that the US is not moronic enough to wire our large, open country to the same extent that a small, island country can.

And what about your major cities? Does it strike you as odd that the supposed hub of all technology, in California, has shitty internet access?

Re:Better Comparison. (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586347)

Actually it strikes me as odd that people see this as some sort of dick measuring contest. It's so very unimportant and the nerdrage surrounding it is so palpable that I can do nothing but scratch my head and thank god i'm not one of the bent-out-of-shape jackasses.

Re:Better Comparison. (1)

Chandon Seldon (43083) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586449)

Yea, basic communication infrastructure is unimportant and anyone who wants it must be a huge nerd.

Oh wait. Only a loser would say that.

Re:Better Comparison. (1)

p0tat03 (985078) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586483)

It's so very unimportant and the nerdrage surrounding it is so palpable that I can do nothing but scratch my head and thank god i'm not one of the bent-out-of-shape jackasses.

There is a certain amount of importance to the amount of bandwidth that's available.

It limits what you can and cannot do. For example, there's a whole market for video on demand that's just waiting to explode. Unfortunately, as the likes of Hulu are finding out very quickly, the average internet connection *sucks balls*. The *only* reason we don't yet have streaming DVDs is because of sheer lack of bandwidth. 10Mbps is absolutely nothing when you're building a heavy media app. The lack of bandwidth is stifling innovation.

I mean, take it from me. I'm up here in Canada, where the average internet connection is

Re:Better Comparison. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586259)

We wired it with power, why not communications?

To be fair, our power grid is full of flaws and needs some serious updating anyway. Industrializing earlier means you have to phase out old infrastructure and build new at tremendous cost while nations that developed more recently learn from your mistakes and run circles around you.

Re:Better Comparison. (5, Informative)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586409)

Manhattan is a relatively small island with an extremely dense population. Logically, it should be even better than Japan for broadband (since Japan has to run cable to comparatively lightly populated areas like Hokkaido). The fastest affordable broadband here is:

  • DSL: 3 Mbps/768 Mbps (close to that in practice)
  • Cable: 10 Mbps/512 Mbps (less in practice)

FiOS is apparently available in a small amount of downtown, but not in most of the island, and even that was only introduced within the past year.

According to the article, average broadband speed in Japan is 63 Mbps down. So in 5-10 years when Verizon finishes wiring Manhattan, we'll be up to consumer speeds *almost* one third that of Japan's *now*.

Re:Better Comparison. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586433)

As has been said before, it's not about wiring up everyone to the internet at high speeds. Most of the US population lives in cities or relatively dense suburbs; we generally don't have comperably fast (and cheap) service even in areas with similar population density.

What I would like to see is the ease (or difficulty) of getting "good" service in various countries. By "good", I mean fewer restrictions - net neutrality, symmetric upload/download rates, minimal port blocking, no protocol censorship.

Oh Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586069)

I have to agree with Linus on this point.

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586071)

Hentai Drawers of America's Tentacles Matter campaign claims U.S. porno industry will take 1001 years to catch up.

Is it 100 or 101 years? (1)

boguslinks (1117203) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586083)

The headline says 101, but the story says 100. Someone please clarify this critical discrepancy.

Re:Is it 100 or 101 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586143)

100 years = hyperbole

101 years = hyperbole + 1

Any questions?

Re:Is it 100 or 101 years? (1)

TypoNAM (695420) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586353)

The anonymous reader who submitted the article figured it would take slashdot's editors that long to post it. ;)

Geography (4, Insightful)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586089)

I didn't take the time to check Google maps, but I'm fairly sure that Japan!=Asia. If you look at all of Asia, I would guess that it has quite a ways to go to catch up to Japan as well.

Re:Geography (2, Interesting)

kesuki (321456) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586303)

not south korea, though.

why is it countries that have US troops in them have better internet than the mainland USA.

other than size, that is, i know size makes a huge difference, but fiber optics lines, without being dug up at all, have increased bandwidth year after year for more than a decade now. america has more dark fiber than anyone else, personally my wager is on greed, being the single biggest factor in holding back high speed internet.

The reason is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586105)

Japan is much more advanced in Adult Videos that US will never catch up with.

Bu-Bu-But the free market rules! (1, Interesting)

Scudsucker (17617) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586115)

Internet access and health care are two perfect examples of why government can do good things, contrary to Republican dogma.

Re:Bu-Bu-But the free market rules! (1)

Hokie06 (986634) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586357)

Not sure where you live.
But the cable and phone industries are hardly free markets.
I would love to dump Charter today, but I can't.

Re:Bu-Bu-But the free market rules! (5, Insightful)

Chandon Seldon (43083) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586519)

You're blaming government-granted monopolies on the free market?

You have such a large penis. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586159)

I spoke with Mr. Hirohito this morning, and he assured me that I have a very large penis. He said it was mammoth, dinosauric, and absolutely dwarfed his penis, which, he assured me, was nearly microscopic in size. My penis, he said, was most likely one of the biggest on the planet. I applaud Mr. Hirohito in his honesty. Thank you.

Not comparing like with like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586183)

Does this comparison take into account the different population distributions between the US and Japan? The urban population density in Japan is (I believe) much greater than in US, making it more economically viable to supply higher speed lines to the populace in Japan.

Future headline on "The Register"... (4, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586223)

With enough statistical mangling, nearly anything can be presented as plausible, but that's not enough to cover up my envy of Asian broadband speed.

"Asian Pipe Envy"

Why? (5, Insightful)

illegalcortex (1007791) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586281)

Whether or not the prediciton is statistically shaky, the fact remains that there is a huge gap between the US and many other, quite dissimilar countries. The big question is "Why?" Japan and Korea aren't the only ones that far outclass American broadband speed, though they do have quite a speed lead.

Chart of Broadband Speeds by Country [worldpoliticsreview.com]

And sure, in the US you can get FiOS at 30Mbps, but it will cost you $200/month and you have to live in a very limited area. You can get 50Mbps from Comcast only if you live in the Twin Cities (right now), but it's still $150/month.

I could point to the geography of the US, saying how its a much bigger area than the smaller countries at the top of those charts. Sure, Japan and Korea have an incredible population density. But not Finland, Sweden, France, etc. They have population densities several orders of magnitude smaller than even cities like Houston, Miami, Phoenix, or Chicago. Why aren't these cities more like those countries?

I could also try it from the angle of regulation/free market/competition. But I'm pretty sure those countries at the top aren't all the same in that regard.

Is it because our companies tend to each have local monopolies over large areas? That seems less likely considering how just about everyone in a metro area can get cable. So they have two companies, phone and cable, to compete with each other.

Is there something unique about our infrastructure? Did we make some horrible mistake that seemed like a good idea at the time but is now haunting us?

Is the US just in a perfect storm of craptitude where all these factors come into play?

Huh? Wah? (1)

Cnik70 (571147) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586299)

Why would I need a faster connection to read 4chan?

Because 1 year's worth of data can predict.... (1)

raymansean (1115689) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586315)

what is going to happen for the next 100 or 101, depending on how you count. Give me a break and maybe you could use data from the last 20 to infer about what may happen in the next 100. Don't RTFA, all they want is advertising money, and getting a server /.'ed for the fame of it all. Wake me up when there is news that matters!

101 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586323)

I say we can do it 97 years.

Why do you need the speed? (1)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586327)

Most people use the internet for email and websurfing. The difference between 6mbps and 60mbps doesn't make a difference to the human. It's still all in the blink of an eye. Then there is the 1/3(?) of the US that doesn't even want to upgrade from their modems that was mentioned on /. earlier.

Re:Why do you need the speed? (1)

BitterOldGUy (1330491) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586417)

I....'....m.....s...t...i..l..l...o...n..1...2...0...0..bd....di..a...l...u..p a...n....d...I....h..a..v..e...n.o..pr...p.b.l.e.m..ss!..>$$#>>>$$%%

12Mbps std in 2002, then 18Mbps in 2005... (5, Interesting)

zooblethorpe (686757) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586335)

I lived in Japan for three years, and when I got there in 2002, the *basic* package offered by Yahoo! Japan was 12Mbps DSL for an intro rate of ¥2000 a month (about US $20), bumping up to ¥3500 a month later on. By the time I left in 2005, the *basic* package cost the same, but the *lowest* speed available was 18Mbps -- something that still doesn't even *exist* at the consumer level anywhere in the US (that I'm aware of) in 2008.

The US broadband market is suffocating under the rank hypocrisy and greed of the telcos, and the bald corruption and bribeability of the congress. Somehow the Japanese broadband market has a heck of a lot more internal competition, yet the companies there can still make a profit offering much higher speeds for relatively lower rates.

Frustratedly,

Baby boomer theory (0)

liegeofmelkor (978577) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586361)

Once again, I believe the old farts (sorry all/any of you elder readers) might be holding us back. Loosely, rate of new technology adoption is inversely correlated with age (i.e. the elderly of any generation have a higher percentage of Luddites). America has a spike in the age distribution of people over 50, thanks to the baby boomers. Europe (excepting Britain) and Asia never had a baby boom and a more typical proportion of elderly citizens.

Now, I've never actually crunched the numbers to see exactly how much less the elevated elderly population could conceivably drag down our average, and its very possible that this effect is dwarfed by other factors, but I've always been suspicious that baby boomers play a part. Does anyone have some more concrete, numerical insight into this?

Regardless, I moved to Germany last month and can attest to the broadband difference. Everyone has broadband, and my current 4Mbps DSL connection costs the same as my old 768kbps DSL connection in the states. What's up with that, SBC?!

Re:Baby boomer theory (2, Insightful)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586599)

Ahem... 46 years and counting, just manually compiled and dropped in a new 2.6.26 kernel on my Linux server, now off to smash teenager butt on "World Of Padman".

Anyway, sonny, your music is rubbish!

Scarcity (2, Insightful)

Gallenod (84385) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586391)

The answer to why we don't have faster broadband speeds is simple: scarcity pays.

It is not in the interests of U.S. telecom providers to roll out high-speed bandwidth all at once. Thus we have a tiered service model, with people paying a little for 1Mb connections and substantially more to get higher speeds, regardless of what the telecom carriers' networks can handle.

Granted, some of the scarcity may be real and based on telecom companies dragging their feet on upgrading, but even if they could carry 100 times the traffic the can now it still would be in their corporate interest to artificially create a bandwidth scarcity to keep prices high.

In other, important news, (0, Offtopic)

Frosty-B-Bad (259317) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586393)

Japans freedoms Won't Catch Up With US's for 101 Years

but hey why talk about important crap! maybe we should start OIPC, "One Internet Per Child" so that our poor children in the US can have internets too! mmmm I love the smell of sarcasm in the morning.

Telco Infrastructure in Japan is more cost effecti (1)

Tragedy4u (690579) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586399)

Enhancing the telco infrastructure, I would imagine, is more cost effective than in the US. There you have a few densely populated cities with a lot less geographical distance between them, which keeps your physical archetecture costs lower. The states (Canada even more so) you have densely populated cities with fewer people per square foot than in Japan and those cities are divided by longer distances, making the cost of laying all that cable higher.

First Post!!! (2, Funny)

cleatsupkeep (1132585) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586427)

I would have gotten it, but I'm posting from the damn slow U.S Broadband.

Extrapolation is fun (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586455)

Fortunately, extrapolation also shows us the solution. The number of Americans incarcerated in jails and prisons is doubling every decade. So in 80 years or so, we'll all be in jail. This makes broadband wiring much easier -- forget everywhere else and just wire up jails!

Sponsored by the Unions... of course... (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586467)

At least, give them credit, that the CWA at least recognizes the need to have more communications product to get more communications workers.

Bad News For Streamed Anime Fans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586501)

...but for the rest of us with girlfriends, wives, zero personality problems & no desire to watch cartoons of Japanese schoolgirls being fornicated by huge alien tentacles, "up to 8MB" will be just fine and dandy.

Once again, potential DL speed means nothing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#24586541)

...if the server is doling out that interracial BBW midget tentacle rape anime at 5kbps.

think. (1, Redundant)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | more than 6 years ago | (#24586543)

Perhaps one should try looking at a map. Japan is small, habitable areas even smaller. That means wires can be short and cheap. Japan's people are well-trained to pay any amount for whatever biz and govt say they should buy. So you end up with lots of wideband tubes, perhaps not being used to anywhere near capacity.

The USA however, is a BIG place. Expensive to wire up Montana and Texas and the rest. And consumers here while still mildly hypnotized by advertising, occasionally want a choice in speeds and costs.

You decide which regime you want to live under.

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