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148 comments

Chrome Users: new security flaw found (-1, Offtopic)

teknopurge (199509) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892303)

Click here [http] to see how great google coders really are! :)

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (0, Offtopic)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892341)

Safari can't find the server.

Safari can't open the page "http:///" because it can't find the server "".

What is your URL supposed to do on Chrome?

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (1)

neuromanc3r (1119631) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892389)

Crash it, I guess. What's more puzzling to me is the question how this factoid is related to sun and mysql...

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (1)

teknopurge (199509) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892849)

In chrome the location ":%" apparently blows the thing up.

Has nothing to do with mysql, other then the fact that google is planning on putting a lite sql db into chrome to facilitate gears.

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (2, Informative)

lgw (121541) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895777)

That's already been fixed in the Chromium codebase [google.com], r1677, but the latest download seems to be r1583. If I were the Chrome team, I'd be in more of a hurry to get this particular fix out there.

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (-1, Offtopic)

Aphoxema (1088507) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892367)

I agree completely. I, Aphoxema, heartily endorse this product and/or service.

Re:Chrome Users: new security flaw found (0, Troll)

Aphoxema (1088507) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892429)

Awesome! I reply gibberish to something that already has nothing to do with the article and I get modded down for offtopic!

ALL HAIL SLASHDOT!

Please use this thread to do the following: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892343)

1. Tell us how great your database is, (ie. postgres, mssql server, oracle etc..)

2. Tell us how shitty mysql is in your eyes.

3. Tell us how mysql "sold out"

So everything under this thread can be modded as "redundant"

Thank You.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (5, Funny)

DanWS6 (1248650) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892531)

4. For extra credit tie into your rant how terrible you believe PHP is and how xyz is so much better.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (3, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892715)

Now now. PHP is a pain but a dang useful pain. Just like MySQL.

PHP and MySQL are both good but not great tools. What makes them useful is all the stuff that works with them.
I would drop MySQL in a second for Postgres except that too many CMS and other packages use it. The same is true of PHP.

There happy now?

And javascript (1)

microbox (704317) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894333)

PHP and MySQL are both good but not great tools. What makes them useful is all the stuff that works with them. I would drop MySQL in a second for Postgres except that too many CMS and other packages use it. The same is true of PHP.

And javascript. It's pretty flexible, but I think most people would prefer something saner, like smalltalk, java, c#, etc.

Re:And javascript (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24895805)

PHP and MySQL are both good but not great tools. What makes them useful is all the stuff that works with them.
I would drop MySQL in a second for Postgres except that too many CMS and other packages use it. The same is true of PHP.

And javascript. It's pretty flexible, but I think most people would prefer something saner, like smalltalk, java, c#, etc.

awk is the best.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (0)

neowolf (173735) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892547)

1. Tell us how great your database is, (ie. postgres, mssql server, oracle etc..)

2. Tell us how shitty mysql is in your eyes.

3. Tell us how mysql "sold out"

So everything under this thread can be modded as "redundant"

Thank You.

LOL! If I had mod-points, I'd be using them here! :)

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1, Redundant)

man_of_mr_e (217855) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892775)

My database is great, mysql is shitty in my eyes, and mysql has sold out.

Is there a prize?

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1, Funny)

danieltdp (1287734) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893111)

Yes. A 'reduntant' mod.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1)

danieltdp (1287734) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893473)

And for the record, when I posted the parent wasn't modded redundant yet...

Anyways, Montys getting out is not a surprise to me. Probably the guy got enough money on the deal and decided to go home

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892791)

Postgres is great. There is no question.

MySQL was shitty, but has been steadily getting better.

MySQL may have sold out, but SUN has the money and the balls to make it kick the crap out of nearly everything else out there.

Awesome thread, btw. :P

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892945)

Sun has the money, and the engineering, however their marketing people will surely screw it up big.

I imagine it going something like "All new versions will use a new and restrictive license" and "The new MySQL will be called Java Relational Database Engine and be pronounced "Drede"

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (4, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893265)

Tell us how great your database is, (ie. postgres, mssql server, oracle etc..)

I'd rather tell why I think databases in general suck: Lack of standardization. It's one thing if you could do like with browsers and make compatibility chart with ANSI SQL, but it's choking full of proprietary extensions. Hopefully they'll sooner or later get around to supporting SQL:2003 which takes care of the worst ones. Here's one example, creating an unique ID:

The standard specifies a column attribute of:
GENERATED ... AS IDENTITY (non-core feature ID T174+T175).

PostgreSQL doesn't support the standard's IDENTITY attribute.
DB2: Follows standard, albeit with some restrictions on how identity columns may (not) be added to an existing table, etc.
MSSQL offers IDENTITY as a column property, but with a different syntax (not as intuitive and with less options) than the standard's specification.
MySQL doesn't support the standard's IDENTITY attribute.
Oracle doesn't support the standard's IDENTITY attribute.

And they bloody well all have a way of doing it, it's just five different ways. That's what I hate about databases, you don't pick one for RDBMS features but because you need to pick a language. It's like picking a computer because of the compiler. They seriously need to get the standards *ahead* of the implementations, like for example browsers and HTML/CSS standards. Or at least get a reasonable subset standard so you can write a non-trivial database neutral application.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1)

OshEcho (971542) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893655)

I agree.
  There are mappers out there so you can write once and have it work fine on most databases. But they are a pain to use. Simply writing sql is much easier I think.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24894907)

I don't agree.

I see a point in a standardized data manipulation language. SQL serves this purpose quite good, allthough there are some stupid syntactic differences (like delimiting identifiers, quoting values and using parameters).

But what you are asking for is like saying there should be a standard for the syntax of C, Fortran and Pascal. They have different purposes, different features and different internals. But in the end after you compile there is a executable of that you don't have to know in which language it was written.
Compare that to databases. Surely you have to design the database differently. That is actually the reason why there are different databases. Because they do things differently. But after you have finished the definition phase (programming) you can use the database in a quite standard way with SQL (executing).

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895117)

But after you have finished the definition phase (programming) you can use the database in a quite standard way with SQL (executing).

Says someone that can barely have finished SQL for dummies. You can't even select the first ten rows in a standard way. FETCH FIRST 10 ROWS ONLY? ROW_NUMBER()? TOP 10? ROWNUM = 10? LIMIT 10? And if you're designing anything non-trivial you'll want things like triggers that can't be written in plain SQL (no, T-SQL, PL/SQL, pgSQL etc. are not plain SQL). Please tell me you don't design databases for anything. If you do please tell me which company, so I can stay the hell away from it.

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (3, Insightful)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 5 years ago | (#24896937)

Couldn't agree more. My other big pet peeve is applications that are database-specific (which obviously is related to the fact that app designers don't have much choice in the matter). I don't want to install my own MSSQL server for the sake of the one application that can't run on my company's enterprise scale server farm running some other RDBMS. I don't want to pick a different application that doesn't meet my user's needs simply because it handles the other RDBMS.

Oh, and if we actually had some standards perhaps there would also be a chance that every time Oracle releaes a new software releaes it wouldn't break half the applications I manage...

Re:Please use this thread to do the following: (1)

Ep0xi (1093943) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894155)

i'm responsible for what i've said i said that MySql is a mono-threaded service and that makes it run faster than common DB. after that Sun bought MySql. MySql is not shitty no way. it has the best profile for small and medium sized websites. so what's the deal? let me know.

Shoot (5, Insightful)

XanC (644172) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892351)

If I'd just made a billion-dollar deal for my company, I'd sure look long and hard at not working anymore.

Re:Shoot (-1, Flamebait)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892405)

Especially when you sold it to Sun. There's a pretty good chance Sun will be bankrupt or bought up for a ridiculously low price within 5 years.

Re:Shoot (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892475)

Does your crystal ball tell you that?

Re:Shoot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892877)

Does your crystal ball tell you that?

No, it's just twitter trolling again... Nothing to see here.

Re:Shoot (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892943)

Nah, twitter would have called them "$un".

Re:Shoot (5, Interesting)

lgw (121541) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895949)

No Crystal ball needed to see that Sun isn't long for this world.

Sun's market cap is down to $6.4 billion. Sun has over $2B in cash, $3B in receivables, and $1B in inventory and stock in other companies.

You could make a profit today (if you could buy the company for thet 6.4B, which you can't) by buying Sun, ceasing all sales and business activity beyond existing support contacts, and just gutting the company for the cash, real estate, etc.

If Sun falls much more, it *will* be profitable to buy and gut the company, as was done very frequently to companies in similar positions in the 80s. For any tech company that *wanted* Sun for some reason, it's nearly free to buy it today.

Heck, one of Suns few remaining large accounts might find it cheaper to buy Sun than to renew it's support contract!

I think the only reason why one of the big consulting companies (Accenture etc) hasn't bough Sun just for bragging right is that those are partnerships, and don't have the leverage.

Re:Shoot (1)

goose-incarnated (1145029) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894423)

Especially when you sold it to Sun. There's a pretty good chance Sun will be bankrupt or bought up for a ridiculously low price within 5 years.

--
Any resemblance to fact is purely co-incidental. -- twitter

Am I the only one who finds this comment strangely in synch with the sig?

Re:Shoot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892579)

If I'd just made a billion-dollar deal for my company, I'd sure look long and hard at not working anymore.

Long and hard some things may be, but certainly not my look at not working in such a situation. Short and sweet it would be.

Re:Shoot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892961)

He got a billion dollars in Sun stock, realized his mistake and said: "Later, bitches!"

Re:Shoot (1)

Sentry21 (8183) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893931)

Amen to that. MySQL has a huge user and developer community. After working that hard to get it to where it is from where it was, I'd seriously consider leaving it in someone else's capable hands and moving on to bigger and better things (like Fiji).

After that it's for fun (1)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894351)

Some people keep working after their first billion. Like Bill Gates who kept running Microsoft for several years after he was a billionaire.
But guys like Bill certainly don't need to keep working, so I guess they enjoy steering a big company.

Basic astronomy ! (5, Funny)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892445)

The sun destroys everything it touches. Eventually it will implode into a black hole and devour what little shareholder value is left.

Re:Basic astronomy ! (3, Insightful)

east coast (590680) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892623)

Actually, it's going to turn into a white dwarf in most likeliness.

But I understand where you're coming from.

Re:Basic astronomy ! (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895181)

Actually, it's going to turn into a white dwarf in most likeliness. But I understand where you're coming from.

The cult of LHC doomsday prophets?

Re:Basic astronomy ! (1)

db32 (862117) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892779)

Actually, basic astronomy says that our sun is nowhere near massive enough to collapse into a black hole. Even then, in a couple billion years the sun will have expanded and engulfed earth long before the whole collapse thing would happen.

In fact, with the exception of a few (H, and He most notably) the normal life cycle of the sun can create all of the elements up to and including iron!

Re:Basic astronomy ! (2, Funny)

bondjamesbond (99019) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893017)

Aw man... I'm dreading the day that the sun expands and engulfs us.

Re:Basic astronomy ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24893951)

Actually, as it expands and loses mass the Earth will drift far enough to be in a close orbit.

I have traveled into the future and have see this.

no golden handcuffs ? (5, Insightful)

KernelMuncher (989766) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892461)

I am surprised Sun didn't tie Monty to the company with golden handcuffs (deferred compensation). His departure could have a negative effect on customer loyalty. And it sure does look bad for the founder to be leaving so quickly.

Re:no golden handcuffs ? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892935)

I think he is going to fork the GPL version and start from there. That way he has the money and the control over MySQL.

Smart cookie, that Monty!

Re:no golden handcuffs ? (4, Insightful)

Jherek Carnelian (831679) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893101)

They probably had a 9-month contract to keep him around and now the 9 months are up.
It is extremely common for the previous owner/ceo to bail out in a year or so after their company is acquired.

Re:no golden handcuffs ? (2, Interesting)

swordgeek (112599) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894405)

Unless of course, you're a talentless, brainless, lying, two-faced, pony-tailed bastard with no future. Then you stay on until you get named CEO.

Oops, was that my outside voice again?

Re:no golden handcuffs ? (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 5 years ago | (#24896089)

There's always a time limit on those agreements. Presumably the time limit is up.

Please tell me... (4, Funny)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892463)

...he's leaving to work on Python.

I mean, the PSF needs good, experienced developers, and, um, that's all.

Re:Please tell me... (2, Funny)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894091)

I mean, the PSF needs good, experienced developers, and, um, that's all.

So you'd inflict them with the guy who congealed MySQL, of all things? What'd they ever do to you?

Well thats sad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892653)

Well that was just sad.

Is it still MySQL? (4, Funny)

peterdaly (123554) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892655)

With the founder leaving, the name MySQL no longer fits.

Next slashdot poll...

MySQL's new name should be:
1. TheirSQL
2. SunSQL
3. JavaSQL
4. CowboynealSQL

I vote for #4.

Re:Is it still MySQL? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892745)

Sun N1 iPlanet Java System ONE database Enterprise Edition (R)

Re:Is it still MySQL? (3, Interesting)

mr_mischief (456295) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892837)

You forgot the version 9 at the end, even though there was no 6, 7, or 8.

Re:Is it still MySQL? (1)

reidconti (219106) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895177)

You forgot the version 9 at the end, even though there was no 6, 7, or 8.

Sun N1 iPlanet Java System ONE database Enterprise EditionOS 2.9?

Drizzle an engineer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892693)

Brian Aker, who forked the Web 2.0-friendly Drizzle SQL database (and former Slashdot engineer!), remains at Sun."

I guess I can understand how you can fork a database and an engineer, I have no idea how a database actually was an engineer.

Why is this a surprise? (1)

mislam (755292) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892735)

Why is this a surprise to anyone? It was expected from day one of the announcement. Atleast from my perspective.

Well, I would do the same (4, Insightful)

eatfastnoodle (1303031) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892743)

isn't build a company, sell it to big guys and go into early retirement the ultimate dream of every nerd?

Re:Well, I would do the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892803)

Yes... after doing the most possible damage! To us, and to sun :-p

Re:Well, I would do the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24894887)

Carly Fiorina has an account on /.?

Re:Well, I would do the same (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892807)

Well no, the ultimate dream of every nerd is to have a threesome with Jessica Alba and Natalie Portman (petrified!) with hot grits down their pants, but I'm sure the retiring early thing is a close second.

Re:Well, I would do the same (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893367)

I'm pretty sure if I had a billion dollars, I could arrange something like that, and even throw Scarlet Johansen in for an extra couple of million. Damn I need to be a billionaire.

I think at this stage in her career (1)

toby (759) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893871)

She doesn't get out of bed for less than $2 million.

That's fine if it's your bed, I guess...

Re:Well, I would do the same (2, Funny)

mr_mischief (456295) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892855)

You mean besides hiring the guys who beat him up in high school to mow his 16-acre lawn?

Re:Well, I would do the same (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24893027)

Actually, no, if I wanted to identify a nerd then one of the first question I'd ask them is, "If you built a company, would you want to be able to sell it to the big guys so you could go into early retirement?" If they say "yes", they're absolutely not nerds.

This annoys me because there are so many people who just want money and who pretend to be in with the whole nerd idealism thing, especially those in the Free software / OSS movement. They might be talented coders, but their care is to advance their name, their salary, their standing, their employment prospects, whatever, and their love isn't actually for advancement of scholarship or engineering.

In fact, I know more people who have used OSS as a temporary CV builder than who stick with its ideals.

(Yes, I know OSS isn't the whole of software engineering; feel free to generalise my point to those who make excellent proprietary software - Mathematica is an obvious example for me, where Wolfram, despite being a self-whoring brat with delusions of grandeur, isn't floating nor selling his company; instead he's produced a package that's stuck consistently to some very basic but effective principles that make coding beautiful once you get to learn them.)

Re:Well, I would do the same (1)

chris_mahan (256577) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893789)

True nerds don't build billion-dollar companies.

True nerds learn embedded system languages so they can program their train set at home.

And sometimes, sometimes, help the rest of society with some of their pesky data problems.

As long as it doesn't cut into model train time much.

Substitute train set for 1/72 or 1/35 plastic-soldier painting and massive battles reenactments with a dog-eared battle rule book and battle tournament stats programs written in exotic languages.

Re:Well, I would do the same (4, Informative)

AlecC (512609) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895491)

Having slightly met Monty W, he is a true nerd. He didn't build a billion dollar company, he built a database that did what he thought databases should do. Many people do not exactly agree with him (see arguments on /. ad nauseam). But other people built a billion dollar company on that database. It deos not surprise me at all that he has taken his share of that billion dollars and walked off into the sunset. Maybe it is to Fiji, but even if it is, I would hazard a guess he will still be playing with databases on the beach.

Re:Well, I would do the same (2, Funny)

AioKits (1235070) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893389)

I'm still researching to see if my ultimate dream is even legal in this state.

interesting timing (4, Interesting)

toby (759) | more than 5 years ago | (#24892843)

Monty's been working on the interesting "Maria" transactional engine [mysql.com] (evolved from, and compatible with MyISAM), which is slated to become MySQL's future default engine.

Since they recently made a feature-complete ("no known bugs"!) release [blogspot.com] of Maria, I'm tempted to think that was his personal deadline to quit.

Josh Berkus [toolbox.com] (core PostgreSQL developer) also recently quit Sun. [toolbox.com]

I like Sun. I'm sad that they have lost these two brilliant database engineers, and I hope they go on and kick Oracle's (and that other company's) butt anyway.

Re:interesting timing (2, Funny)

Sun Chi (680938) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893427)

You can use "that other company's" name. I mean, we are talking about Microsoft here not Lord Voldemort, right?

Re:interesting timing (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24893481)

Actually, Maria isn't transactional. It was supposed to be, but it did't work out that way. Punting on transactions, they fell back to crash recoverable MyISAM. The next release is supposed to handle concurrent inserts. Other concurrent operations may follow someday. In the meantime, it doesn't support transaction backout, verb backout, two phase commit, transaction isolation, or any of the hard stuff.

MySQL went with InnoDB because MyISAM wasn't transactional. MySQL went with Falcon because Maria didn't have credible plan to become transactional. And that was almost three years ago.

Does Monty know how to write a transactional engine (or even think it's important)? Maybe, but so far, it's all smoke and no fire.

--JS

Falcon architect Starkey also gone (2, Interesting)

toby (759) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894103)

It's worth mentioning that Jim Starkey [wikipedia.org] (inventor of MVCC, etc) also quit recently. [firebirdnews.org] (He joined MySQL in 2006 [firebirdnews.org] to work on Falcon.)

So Sun has lost more database genius in 2008 than most companies ever had. :(

Re:Falcon architect Starkey also gone (4, Informative)

NimbusDB (1358605) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895289)

Yes and no. I'm not longer a Sun employee, but still involved with Falcon with both a consulting gig and a separate code collaboration agreement. My primary project is NimbusDB, a database designed from the ground up for the cloud platform. But I'm still involved in Falcon code and meet with the rest of the Falcon team regularly. The really big difference is that I don't have to participate in interminable conference calls. That in itself makes a job worth quiting. [The comment above on Maria is also from me. Slashdot was not at all happy that my MySQL email address had disappeared into the ether.]

quel faux pas (1)

toby (759) | more than 5 years ago | (#24895893)

If I had eyes sharp enough I'd have noticed your initials on the post, instead of telling you something you already knew. Thanks for the clarification, and it's good to know that you're still involved in Falcon. :)

Re:interesting timing (1)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 5 years ago | (#24896975)

I'll vote for the "doesn't think it is important" option. That was the one thing that always annoyed me about MySQL. Rather than apologize for taking a while to support transactions the party line seemed to be that MySQL was better because it could trash your data 10X faster than the competition.

Sure, I like having the option to speed things up by turning off transaction support. That is a wonderful feature to have. It is a horrible feature to require users to accept.

What I'm waiting for is transactional support at the filesystem level. Why can't I open a transaction, move a bunch of files around, edit configuration files to point to the new location, and commit the transaction? The best we can currently do is have a reasonable shot of having a single file in a somewhat consistent state after a crash. There really isn't any reason that file systems can't truly be transactional.

I wonder if Sarah Palin can spell tomato (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24892881)

Go ahead, mod me off-topic

Re:I wonder if Sarah Palin can spell tomato (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24893433)

You don't have the balls to mod me informative

FUD (no way) (1)

c0sine (959434) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893761)

It looks like BS, guys. According to the company LDAP DB this person is still here :-) Sounds like a typical case of FUD, which works as you can see from the comments...

Re:FUD (no way) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24893895)

Nobody is ever removed from namefinder. Their account access may be terminated, but their accounts themselves remain indefinitely.

Re:FUD (no way) (1)

c0sine (959434) | more than 5 years ago | (#24894651)

It's simply not true. LDAP (shown through namefinder) is updated very quickly. I have a number of proofs of this :-)

Re:FUD (no way) (2, Funny)

russotto (537200) | more than 5 years ago | (#24893983)

It looks like BS, guys. According to the company LDAP DB this person is still here :-) Sounds like a typical case of FUD, which works as you can see from the comments..

Did you refresh your cache?

what contradiction? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24894433)

The "contradiction" links to the Kaj Arno post....where's the contradiction?

Inventor? (2, Interesting)

konohitowa (220547) | more than 5 years ago | (#24896879)

Since when does someone who codes up a partial SQL implementation get promoted to inventor status? It reminds me of a guy at work (one of those self-promoter types) telling me how he and his team "invented an XML".

Perhaps Linux inventor Linus Torvalds and Melissa inventor David Smith could chime in with their thoughts on this.

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  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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