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China's First Spacewalk

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the hold-your-breath dept.

Space 148

Smivs writes "The BBC reports that China will launch its third manned space mission in late September, according to state-run news agency Xinhua. The Shenzhou VII flight will feature China's first-ever space walk, which will be broadcast live with cameras inside and outside the spacecraft. For the spacewalk, two crew members will go into the spacecraft's vacuum module. One yuhangyuan (astronaut) will carry out the spacewalk; the other is there to monitor the activity and assist in case of an emergency. Two types of spacesuits — one made in China, the other from Russia — will be carried up on the flight. It is unclear why China has opted for two different types of spacesuit. Spaceflight analyst Dr Morris Jones commented that China might want to test the suits against each other. Alternatively, he said, it might not be ready or willing to fly a mission exclusively with its own suits."

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148 comments

Ching Chong (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918335)

Ping wang me hung long dong.

China has its first spacewalk! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918341)

And I have my first post.

Re:China has its first spacewalk! (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918433)

And they both resulted in failure. Of course, you don't have the luxury of editing the story afterwards to reflect your "success".

I know what they're up to... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918343)

...and I can't stand by to let it happen! To arms, people, they're going to censor the IIS's wifi!

Re:I know what they're up to... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918909)

Don't worry, American's NSA is doing that already, as it does with American's citizens cell phones and everything else that is illegally wiretapped.
The only difference is that in the US, as our next barbie president says, "it is all God's will!!!"

Re:I know what they're up to... (2, Informative)

Evil Pete (73279) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919101)

You mean the ISS. Though an attack on IIS would probably be business as usual, after all doesn't it stand for It Isn't Secure ?

Congrats China! Welcome to the 1960s. (Golf clap) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919177)

Been there, done that. If you manage to put a permanently-manned base on the moon or Mars, then I'll be impressed.

OMG someone stop the Chinese right now (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918345)

before they build a sphere around the earth to keep us inside.

Re:OMG someone stop the Chinese right now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918669)

modded at -1? Go watch Spaceballs you idiot!

Re:OMG someone stop the Chinese right now (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919059)

The reference makes no sense if it's referring to Spaceballs. The bubble around Druidia (the air shield) was intended to keep the air in, not the people. The people could presumably come and go as they pleased as long as they knew the combination (which, coincidentally, is the same combination I have on my luggage).

Re:OMG someone stop the Chinese right now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919121)

Wall of China = bubble. One of the astronaut will be wearing a made in Russia suit.

Hence, "In Soviet China bubble keeps you IN."

Re:Whatwhatwhat? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918491)

CmdrTaco has Down's Syndrome. And a small penis.

Apache mod rewrite out of control (1)

burnitdown (1076427) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919965)

It's the way all the new Wordpress blogs are doing it. Isn't it much easier than some ugly url like http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/09/08/1212252 [slashdot.org] ?

Either you're for the new Apache mod/rewrite enabled Wordpress URLs, or you're against progress! Sort of...

State run media? (5, Insightful)

Tom90deg (1190691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918379)

Hmm..Well, while I wish the Chinese astronauts the best of luck and hope they get back safely, I doubt that the film is going to be "Live" More likely? A nice safe delay of, oh...a hour to make sure that nothing gets shown that's not supposed to be shown.

China has too much media control to trust something as unpredictable as live TV, especially in a situation where so many things could go wrong.

On that note, good luck! Maybe this'll get us off our asses and back up into space! A little competition never hurt nobody.

Re:State run media? (4, Informative)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918543)

Why not? Most live events have a delay, because sometimes bad shit happens. I don't think the Chinese state not making its own impromptu snuff film has anything to do with their censorship practices.

Re:State run media? (2, Interesting)

Tom90deg (1190691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918765)

True, most live events have a delay, I believe the moon mission had a 5 minute (about) delay. The difference was this delay was because of the ol' laws of physics. With China...It may be for a different reason. As an example, I believe that China's first manned mission was not shown until it had actually lifted off, then all the channels switched to the "Breaking news story!" to show it rocketing upwards. I recall something about that, but of course, I could be wrong.

Re:State run media? (3, Informative)

necro81 (917438) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918825)

Most live events have a delay

Yes, but in uncontrolled media markets, there is an incentive to keep that delay as short as possible. If you don't have it as close to live as possible, the next guy will, or some blogger. When the President comes on to give a live address, it has maybe a 5-second delay, not an hour. This is, in part, how some live shows occasionally get into trouble - remember the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" as the SuperBowl a few years back?

When Armstrong stepped onto the Moon, he was live to the entire world.

Re:State run media? (4, Insightful)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918675)

A little competition never hurt nobody.

Except the loser.

Re:State run media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24921245)

A little competition never hurt nobody.

Except the loser.

Make that plural: losers, as we are legion.

Re:State run media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918861)

Actually I read that it will not be shown live on television. Instead a CG version will be shown like they did for the Olympics - the article did not mention whether it will include fireworks as well though.

Re:State run media? (4, Informative)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920077)

Well on the manned Moon mission for the US. If something happened and they couldn't have returned to home, they would have turned off all contact with them and Nixon had a wonderful speech to give about their deaths preprepared to give in this case even if they were still alive but stranded on the moon.

Re:State run media? (4, Informative)

Lincolnshire Poacher (1205798) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920379)

> I doubt that the film is going to be "Live"

The Shenzhou 6 launch in October 2005 was the first to be broadcast live in China, so they may yet surprise you.

After all. if something does go wrong there is little that can be done to hide it. This isn't Leonov's era - telemetry and communications will be under constant scrutiny.

Descision making (4, Funny)

Hrshgn (595514) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918391)

I'm just asking myself how they decided which of the two astronauts will have the honor to try the Chinese spacesuit?

Re:Descision making (2, Insightful)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918473)

I'm not sure that would such an "honor". Judging by the quality of 90% of their other products, I think I'd take the "Made in Russia" suit, myself,... ;-)

Re:Descision making (0)

Hanyin (1301045) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918841)

I'm not sure that would such an "honor". Judging by the quality of 90% of their other products, I think I'd take the "Made in Russia" suit, myself,... ;-)

I mean yeah, that was really terrible when Bird's Nest Stadium collapsed on everyone. My point is that they're more than capable of making high quality products, the government knows what's being produced there so they obviously know how much control is needed in a case such as this. The problem is that no matter how bad the cheap products turn out westerners still buy them, which if you were a factory owner, would be a great motivation to increase your margins.

Re:Descision making (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24920103)

The Bird's Nest was designed by Western architechts. And don't worry, there's still plenty of time for it to collapse.

Re:Descision making (2, Funny)

phantomcircuit (938963) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919149)

WHOOOOOSH

Re:Descision making (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24920175)

WHOOOOOSH

...might well describe the failure mode of a cheaply produced spacesuit.

Good... (3, Insightful)

interactive_civilian (205158) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918393)

I realize that China isn't the moral leaders of the world, but I'm happy to see them playing catch-up when it comes to manned space-flight.

Because, given the way China tends to think, when I see them putting men in space, it makes me think they already have long term plans for trips to the moon, and perhaps even a permanent presence off-planet. And I say, it's about time.

Humans could do much worse than start making the steps to get us off this rock.

Re:Good... (0, Flamebait)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918523)

"Humans could do much worse than start making the steps to get us off this rock."

I just love rethoric like this. If you call Earth "this rock" you must be really happy that we are walking on "that pebble". This rock provides us with live, that pebble is a bunch of sand and stone and beyond some research, there is pretty much nothing that is of interest to us.

A permanent moonbase is like the war in Iraq: Sure, some profit off it but essentially you are throwing money away.

Re:Good... (2, Informative)

Swizec (978239) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918641)

A permanent moonbase has one significant advantage: low gravity.

It's much easier laucnhing stuff deep into space if it's built and launched in low gravity. You can build it larger, you waste less fuel for launch and a bunch of other useful stuff.

Re:Good... (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918737)

A permanent moonbase has one significant advantage: low gravity.

It's much easier laucnhing stuff deep into space if it's built and launched in low gravity

Launch what?

Re:Good... (1)

Swizec (978239) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918777)

Space ships of course.

Re:Good... (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919127)

And how do the spaceships get to the moon in the first place? If you are suggesting manufacturing there, then I think you have very little grasp of the complexity.

Re:Good... (1)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919217)

Well... this is where Kim Stanley-Robinson's ideas of a space elevator come into play.

Slow effecient transport to the moon, faster inter-planetary transport from the moon to say... Mars.

The same people that say the space program is a waste of time, money and effort are the same people who complain that technology doesn't move fast enough. A lot of fallout from space technologies end up helping the world - water recycling is a BIG one. If you spent more than 5 minutes glossing over space flight you'd realise this.

Re:Good... (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919325)

So... the moon has an advantage because of lower gravity. Then you propose a space-elevator (a fantasy at this point). So, then the Earth loses its disadvantage because you can now get stuff off cheaply. If you can do that, you would be better off transporting stuff up to a space station, building there and forget about the moon base.

The same people that say the space program is a waste of time, money and effort are the same people who complain that technology doesn't move fast enough. A lot of fallout from space technologies end up helping the world - water recycling is a BIG one. If you spent more than 5 minutes glossing over space flight you'd realise this.

And what in the hell did this have anything to do with what I posted? You blabbered about the big advantage of a moon base, and I asked you what it was. You still haven't made a case for one.

Re:Good... (2, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920305)

Which is why it needs to be done in baby steps:
  1. Manned moon base - supported by Earth with regular cargo shipments
  2. Self sustaining manned moon base - they can grow their own food, repair their own facilities and do not need support from Earth
  3. Basic mining and refining of ore with support from Earth - the initial tools to do the job are brought up from Earth
  4. Self sustaining basic mining - refined ore is used to produce replacement parts and new tools
  5. Advanced mining - could be self sustaining, might not be
  6. Basic large structure construction - possibly expanding the moonbase or building new vehicles for achieving lunar orbit
  7. Advanced large structure construction - building lunar orbit to earth transfer vehicles in lunar orbit

Once you have completed that last stage, you have the basic plans for going anywhere in the solar system at a fraction of the price of new build from Earth. Yes, its a fantastic idea now if you simply say 'use the moon to build space ships', but not if you break it down into logical steps.

Of course, the idea that anyone is actually going to finance this is fantasy in and of itself...

Re:Good... (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920239)

A permanent moonbase is like the war in Iraq: Sure, some profit off it but essentially you are throwing money away.

Yeah, just like the war in Iraq, except without the part about, you know, killing people.

The US is still a very rich country (not, granted, as rich relative to the rest of the world as we were in the 1960s, but still) and we can afford to do things that don't show an immediate profit. Speaking as someone who has seen war up close and personal -- and whose father was one of the people who made the moon landings happen -- I'd much rather have us spending money on space exploration than on wars of aggression.

Re:Good... (3, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918581)

Catch up? I would say that Shenzhou is at least comparable with other manned space flight systems. The shuttle is on its last legs and crippled with problems. Soyuz is also due to be retired.

As essentially a larger version of Soyuz, with an orbital module that can operate indepedently. The program might not be moving fast (although now the Chinese have finished with the olympics they might redirect more resources) they do have the most technically impressive craft currently flying.

Re:Good... (3, Insightful)

inhuman_4 (1294516) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919003)

I am afraid I must disagree. The Shenzhou is certianly newer, and probably better then the Soyuz. But it is far from the most impresive.

The big deal with the Space Shuttle is that it can carry seven people, a large chunk of cago, and the shuttle can be re-used (although not as well as was planned). It may be near the end of its life span, but as far as capabilities go it is still the best the world has.

For the Soyuz is claim to fame is its consistancy. The Soyuz design is the most tested manned flight system out there. So while yes it may be old and crappy, its got a solid reputation. Not to mention that it is cheap, and fast to launch.

Give the Shenzhou another decade and it could replace the Soyuz as the cheap way to get to space, but the Shuttle is still the king in terms of capabilities.

Re:Good... (3, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919109)

The ability to carry up cargo and passengers isn't that impressive when you look at the costs. Putting up the same quantity of people and cargo with 2 Soyuz launches and one Proton costs $180 million whilst a Shuttle launch costs over $400 million.

Reusability isn't all its cracked up to be for the Shuttle. It has made it more expensive than throw-away alternatives, and the thing has to be practically rebuilt every flight as well.

The only capability the Shuttle has which the Russian launchers do not is returning cargo, and that hasn't been used in a while.

Re:Good... (2, Insightful)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920643)

The Soyuz design is the most tested manned flight system out there.

Except for the Shuttle, of course. Which has flown more flights (123 as opposed to 99), with a higher success rate (two major failures as opposed to four).

Re:Good... (2, Informative)

jimdread (1089853) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918823)

Because, given the way China tends to think, when I see them putting men in space, it makes me think they already have long term plans for trips to the moon, and perhaps even a permanent presence off-planet. And I say, it's about time. Humans could do much worse than start making the steps to get us off this rock.

The first step would be to build a space station in Earth orbit. Okay, let's pretend that's done. Then we need to build a spaceship at the space station. This spaceship would be used to fly from the station out into space or the moon. It would never go to Earth, so it doesn't need to be streamlined. Then we can fly the fuel for it to the space station, where it can refuel. The advantage would be that we wouldn't need to launch the spaceship from Earth's surface every time. It can fly from earth orbit where the station is.

The spaceship would have to go find some fuel sources in space, and resources to build more ships and more space stations. Otherwise these materials would have to be flown up from Earth at great expense. They'd also have to build some space-greenhouses for growing plants for people to eat. And probably space-barns full of space-cows and space-chickens. And space-burger-joints selling squished-up space-cow burgers inna tube.

As for getting us off this planet, it might be possible. If we get some good advances in space travel, the cost of launching something into orbit might get down to $100/kg. That would be a cost of say $10,000 per person, so it's not completely unreasonable. We could launch the whole USA population into space for three trillion dollars! But they'd want somewhere to live, and stuff to eat. That's why we'd need the space stations, space barns, and space burger joints.

Then once we have people living in space for long enough, somebody can invent a hyperspace drive, or else we can build generation ships to fly to the next star over.

Smart testing (5, Interesting)

Chairboy (88841) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918417)

China is fast tracking their progress in space, and they're doing pretty good risk management to get it done. They used Russian experience when designing their capsule system (their spacecraft has a number of big similarities to the Soyuz capsule, very very big similarities, and now they're taking up a backup suit in case a design flaw appears during the test that would affect a rescuer. It's a fine idea and doesn't indicate some big uncertainty about their own design, it shows a clear headed decision to trade a possible nationalistic PR win for a measured, risk aware backup plan that puts the lives of their Taikonauts ahead of the usual spin goals.

I'm not a huge fan of PRC in general, but their space program has been well executed so far. They're making good use of available data while still innovating on their terms instead of having to build everything from scratch.

Re:Smart testing (1)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918633)

They look the same, but in the same way that Buran and the US shuttle looked the same. Aerodynamic principles mean there are only certain ways to do things. Looking the same doesn't mean it is old Russian technology with a Chinese flag stamed on it.

Shenzhou is home-grown Chinese technology. Had they simply wanted to smack a Soyuz on top of a Long March rocket they could've done that, and saved themselves the last 6 flights. The amount of testing alone should convince you that the systems of that spacecraft are previously untried.

Re:Smart testing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918755)

Buran was a copy of the shuttle. They stole the plans. http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/spacecraft/q0153.shtml

As an aerodynamics engineer, I appreciate your argument. It has been true previously - like for the F-15 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-15_Eagle and MiG-31 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MiG-31 aircraft.

In the Buran case, it was a copy with 1 major difference. The Russians made the landing gear automatic too. The Space Shuttle has been able to land via computer control for years, but lowering the landing gear has always been manual for some reason. I worked on the shuttle nose wheel steering software back in the early 1990s.

Re:Smart testing (4, Informative)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918991)

One major difference? You joke surely;

1. The engines were on the stack, not the orbiter. The stack could (and did) fly without the orbiter at all
2. There were four boosters instead of two.
3. The boosters were liquid, not solid fueled

Even the link you provided as alleged evidence that it was just stolen technology acknowledges these very major differences.

Re:Smart testing (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919247)

I thought plans for the US orbiter were public? Can't steal that, copy maybe but not steal.

Actually, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918715)

Russia sold them some things. But it appears that China has a great deal more tech than Russia sold them. In fact, they are showing up with loads of Russian AND American know-how on their crafts.

Re:Smart testing (3, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919155)

From the sound of it, this "vacuum module" is there so they can evacuate it slowly and check for leaks, and if a problem happens, re-pressurize it quickly. That's safer for lots of reasons. Firstly, you don't need to get the guinea pig back IN the ship before you can begin to re-pressurize them. Secondly no risk of a hose splitting and causing them to rocket away from the ship. (and break a tether)

The use of two suits is a good plan also. I'd expect them to have two people in the vacuum module, one in the russian suit and one in their new suit. If there's an emergency with the new suit, having someone in the module to help could make all the difference.

Does make me wonder though how much ground testing they've done. One would assume they've done a lot of vacuum testing on the ground already, but they sure are going about this slowly despite that. They should already know if their suit is OK before flying it up into space. The lack of gravity seems unlikely to change the behavior of the suit.

Nine comments... (5, Insightful)

tgd (2822) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918445)

All nine of you are totally busted for pretending you read the article, since the link doesn't work.

Re:Nine comments... (0, Offtopic)

Tom90deg (1190691) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918795)

But, I thought it went against everything /. STANDS for to actually RTFA. Don't you believe in Slashdot anymore?

An astronaut by any other name... (3, Interesting)

Dan East (318230) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918471)

Why does the media use foreign names for astronauts from other countries? We've got cosmonaut and now "yuhangyuan"? That's ridiculous. Is "astronaut" somehow reserved for only US spacefarers? I think this whole thing is a leftover from the cold war, where it was somehow insulting to use the same terminology for Soviet and US astronauts, probably because of the fierce competition.

On another note, if the astronauts don't leave the confines of their ship, and merely evacuate all the air, is that really a "space walk"?

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918665)

Is "astronaut" somehow reserved for only US spacefarers?

Yes. It's in the definition of the word astronaut.

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918683)

It was more retarded in the article. Obviously in Chinese they would be called yuhangyuan but when you translate the article to English why pick one word and put it in quotes and then translate it for us. Why not explain what all the other words mean.

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (1)

arkarumba (763047) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918759)

Why do we call Rome by that name. The locals call it Roma - you'd think they would know they proper name of the place they live.

Why do we call Spain by that name. The locals call it España. You'd think they would know the proper name.

Things can have multiple names. Its the spice of life.

They are not neccessarily "making up" new names for the heck of it. Its a bit of courtesy to call their yuhangyuan as they call themselves.

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919921)

Umm... so you've provided evidence for why we _would_ just call a cosmonaut an astronaut, since we're speaking english. The same reason we call Roma, Rome. Also the same reason we spell China as we do and not use native chinese characters.

I have to say I agree with the GP. However, the media seem to love using (and no doubt tremendously bastardizing) the name of 'astronauts' from their home country. It's mostly likely a bit of tradition now (with the common use of cosmonaut, astronaut and now taikonaut/ yuhangyuanaut).

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (1)

Sinbios (852437) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919955)

I think the point was because when we write about Rome, we don't write "Roma" (Rome), and therefore we shouldn't write "yuhangyuan" (astronaut) when we're writing about astronauts.

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918783)

On that note, why is the sports section so full of guys named "Jose'?" This is Amerkin news, they should call them all Joseph and be done with it. Yee-haw!

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (1)

necro81 (917438) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918891)

When China first got into space flight, their pilots were referred to as taikonauts ("taiko" meaning "space" in Chinese I presume) by Western media. What happened to that?

who cares... (1)

nimbius (983462) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919183)

let the politicians do the naming and drum-beating. scientists have more important things to do, like making sure they dont turn their first spacewalker into a floating corpse-cicle.

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (1)

hashax (1190057) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919231)

Well, the first 'space-man' was a cosmonaut, so by the 'i-was-there-first' rule all spacemen should now be called Cosmonauts. As an aside, both names are derived from Greek, somewhat embarassing given they were coined to assume national identities. On a further note, in all Chinese documentation written in English, 'astronaut' is used, while cosmonaut is used in chinese documentation written in Russian. Taikonaut was invented by the US media to distinguish Chinese astronauts. And on another topic, French space-men - Spationaute and for Indian spacemen, I propose: Apu-naut. Apu: Tonight Iâ(TM)m going to party like itâ(TM)s on sale for $19.99!

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (4, Informative)

barzok (26681) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919259)

As NASA has defined it, only US space-going individuals may claim the title "astronaut." Further, they cannot be civilians, at least according to an article in the latest Wired.

Aside from surviving the trip, Garriott has one more wish--to earn the title of astronaut. As a gamer, he cares deeply about the difference between character classes--whether a ninja, merchant, or citizen spaceman. But the moniker he has dreamed of all his life is not coming easily. NASA has strict rules about how it titles its explorers, and Garriott cannot qualify, no matter what he does, because he's a private citizen. Instead of an astronaut, they'll call him a space flight participant.

http://www.wired.com/techbiz/people/magazine/16-09/ff_starcity?currentPage=6 [wired.com]

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (1)

jimdread (1089853) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919339)

Why does the media use foreign names for astronauts from other countries? We've got cosmonaut and now "yuhangyuan"? That's ridiculous. Is "astronaut" somehow reserved for only US spacefarers?

You're right! We should all use the same word. The first person in space [wikipedia.org] was Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. Of course you will agree that since we all want to use the same word, and that cosmonauts were first, we should call all spacefarers by the original name: cosmonauts. Right?

Re:An astronaut by any other name... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24921017)

in France, they called US astronauts "spacionauts" for a while. Not sure if they still do that.

AC

man'kind' connects with the cosmos (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918483)

no gadgets required. greed, fear & ego are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of yOUR dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & the notion of prosperity, not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one. see you on the other side of it. the lights are coming up all over now. conspiracy theorists are being vindicated. some might choose a tin umbrella to go with their hats. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.google.com/?ncl=1216734813&hl=en&topic=n
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/world/29amnesty.html?hp
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/06/02/nasa.global.warming.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/05/severe.weather.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/02/honore.preparedness/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/opinion/01dowd.html?em&ex=1212638400&en=744b7cebc86723e5&ei=5087%0A
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/06/05/senate.iraq/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/17/washington/17contractor.html?hp
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/world/middleeast/03kurdistan.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080708/cheney_climate.html
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20080805/pl_politico/12308;_ylt=A0wNcxTPdJhILAYAVQms0NUE
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080903/ts_nm/environment_arctic_dc;_ylt=A0wNcwhhcb5It3EBoy2s0NUE

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=weather+manipulation&btnG=Search
http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

dictator style micro management has never worked (for very long). it's an illness. tie that with life0cidal aggression & softwar gangster style bullying, & what do we have? a greed/fear/ego based recipe for disaster. meanwhile, you can help to stop the bleeding (loss of life & limb);

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/28/vermont.banning.bush.ap/index.html

the bleeding must be stopped before any healing can begin. jailing a couple of corepirate nazi hired goons would send a clear message to the rest of the world from US. any truthful look at the 'scorecard' would reveal that we are a society in decline/deep doo-doo, despite all of the scriptdead pr ?firm? generated drum beating & flag waving propaganda that we are constantly bombarded with. is it time to get real yet? please consider carefully ALL of yOUR other 'options'. the creators will prevail. as it has always been.

corepirate nazi execrable costs outweigh benefits
(Score:-)mynuts won, the king is a fink)
by ourselves on everyday 24/7

as there are no benefits, just more&more death/debt & disruption. fortunately there's an 'army' of light bringers, coming yOUR way. the little ones/innocents must/will be protected. after the big flash, ALL of yOUR imaginary 'borders' may blur a bit? for each of the creators' innocents harmed in any way, there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/us, as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile, will not be available. 'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet, & by your behaviors. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi glowbull warmongering execrable. some of US should consider ourselves somewhat fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate. it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc.... as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis. concern about the course of events that will occur should the life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order. 'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

meanwhile, the life0cidal philistines continue on their path of death, debt, & disruption for most of US. gov. bush denies health care for the little ones;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/03/bush.veto/index.html

whilst demanding/extorting billions to paint more targets on the bigger kids;

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/12/12/bush.war.funding/index.html

& pretending that it isn't happening here;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3086937.ece
all is not lost/forgotten/forgiven

(yOUR elected) president al gore (deciding not to wait for the much anticipated 'lonesome al answers yOUR questions' interview here on /.) continues to attempt to shed some light on yOUR foibles. talk about reverse polarity;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3046116.ece

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918557)

I wonder if at the last second they will replace the astronaut with a better looking one, while still flying the uglier one in a storage compartment to do all the work.

While... (0, Offtopic)

WED Fan (911325) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919141)

I wonder if at the last second they will replace the astronaut with a better looking one, while still flying the uglier one in a storage compartment to do all the work.

While...

  • Adding extra flame to the take off
  • Adding extra stars to the sky
  • Claiming the YouHangOnForDearLife (astronaut) is really 2 years older than he really is
  • Claiming the people of Tibet are truly free, autonomous, and much more happy, and the Dalai Lama is perfectly safe to return to his homeland

Differing space suits (4, Funny)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918569)

It is unclear why China has opted for two different types of spacesuit.

Because the first type of suit doesn't come in child sizes

Re:Differing space suits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24920803)

i don't get it... b/c chinese ppl are small? or is it a joke because of the gymnasts?
the 1st one is the chinese suit, right? it doesn't come in child? then why even make the chinese suit? and who is the child being sent up?

Re:Differing space suits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24920809)

Who modded this Informative?!?!!?

Bizarre (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24918597)

America was one of the great nations in the space race. But we are about to be grounded. Again. This time, for 5 years. Why? Because Bush would not allow either NASA OR the airforce to complete the X-33. It sat in a hanger for 6 years and only last year was dismantled. The air force kept asking and cheney said no. Sad that Sick politics is what has grounded America. Even now, We could be up there in 2 years, by having congress and NASA authorize COTS-D as well as have NASA consider alternatives such as Direct. Nuts, simply moving orion or dragon to an eelv would keep us going, and that is doable within 2 years. But politicians and NASA are afraid that it might kill ares I. Personally, I would rather see the I killed and worked started on the IV and V. As long as have multiple launchers (EELVs, Falcon, Tarus), as welled a rated capsule, then we would be ok.

Bush and his admin will go down in history as the worst American presidency.

The reason for two types of suits (0, Troll)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918613)

They are testing the Chinese suit. And, testing with humans is easy if you don't care if the test subject dies.

Spacewalk... in Bird's Nest Stadium? (0, Offtopic)

ilovesymbian (1341639) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918745)

Since China is such a media-controlling country (apart from other kinds of control), they most likely would film their so-called spacewalk in Bird's Nest Stadium or somewhere similar.

In latest news, NASA returned the sets they borrowed from China in 1969 for their moon walk.

Re:Spacewalk... in Bird's Nest Stadium? (1)

Trent Hawkins (1093109) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919681)

Since China is such a media-controlling country (apart from other kinds of control), they most likely would film their so-called spacewalk in Bird's Nest Stadium or somewhere similar.

I bet their special effects will be better then the ones used to simulate the moon landing.

Made in Russia (0)

Mr_Icon (124425) | more than 5 years ago | (#24918747)

Wait... a Chinese guy will be wearing a "Made in Russia" suit?

Man, it's the first time someone will be a live embodiment of an inverted "Soviet Russia" joke.

Chinese is now a head of Japanese (1)

mucizeurunler (1321115) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919005)

lahana yaÄYı [lahanayagi.org] , talya lahana yaÄYı [lahanayagi.org] , lahana yaÄYı [lahanayagisatis.com] , naturel lahana yaÄYı [lahanayagisatis.com] , lida [orjinallida.biz] , orjinal lida [orjinallida.biz] , fucusulva [fucusulvasiparis.com] , fucus ulva [fucusulvasiparis.com] , botabella [botabella.biz] , bota bella [botabella.biz] , solea [soleakapsul.net] , solea zayıflama kapsülü [soleakapsul.net] ,

www.lahanayagi.org [lahanayagi.org] www.lahanayagisatis.com [lahanayagisatis.com] www.orjinallida.biz [orjinallida.biz] www.fucusulvasiparis.com [fucusulvasiparis.com] www.botabella.biz [botabella.biz] www.soleakapsul.net [soleakapsul.net]

Open Source Space? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919049)

When China starts exploring space and developing new technology for it (not just retracing the USA's pioneering steps), will China publish as much of its results for free consumption by the rest of the world as the USA has? Did Russia ever publish as much as the USA has?

Or will the capitalists just freely subsidize the (ex/) Communists' space industries without getting as much back?

Re:Open Source Space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919167)

Open Source journalism for sure:

BBC: The Shenzhou spacecraft closely resembles the Russian Soyuz capsules, but is substantially larger. Unlike the Soyuz, it has an orbital module that is equipped with its own propulsion, allowing autonomous flight.

Remarkably similar to this:

WIKIPEDIA: The Shenzhou spacecraft closely resembles Soyuz, although it is substantially larger, and unlike the Soyuz, it features a powered orbital module capable of autonomous flight.

As far as I can, the Wikipedia article came first.

Welcome to 50 years ago! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919085)

Spacewalks are old news these days.

Coincide with "Founders Day" Oct 1 (2, Informative)

peter303 (12292) | more than 5 years ago | (#24919597)

59th Anniversary of the founding of The Peoples Republic of China Oct 1, 1949. (If weather holds and no saftey glitches.) Originally they were considering tying this into the Olympics, but decided to spread 2008 events out.

Safety (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24919811)

They're dealing with human lives. And while China may not have the best rights records, they do realize that on a live broadcast of a spacewalk, if they lose their astronaut it isn't going to go well for them. Given they have the option of sending up extra suits that are well tested, why wouldn't they? (fuel/cost being the answer.)

Fuel/cost concerns versus the visibility of the disaster should make the final solution obvious.

Names of spacecraft. (1)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920277)

We used to call ships that sailed on water "Sailing Ships" and then when we moved to space we now call them "space ships"

The Chinese term for sailing vessel is "Junk" so does that mean they are going to contribute to the whole "Space Junk" problem, by sending out more pieces of Space Junk?

Spacewalk postponed (3, Informative)

Bobb Sledd (307434) | more than 5 years ago | (#24920717)

I heard they had to postpone the spacewalk until they found new astronauts... Turns out the ones they already had qualified were under-aged. :-)

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