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Greek Hackers Target CERN's LHC

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the try-try-again dept.

Security 445

Doomsayers Delight writes "The Telegraph reports that Greek hackers were able to gain momentary access to a CERN computer system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) while the first particles were zipping around the particle accelerator on September 10th. 'Scientists working at CERN, the organization that runs the vast smasher, were worried about what the hackers could do because they were "one step away" from the computer control system of one of the huge detectors of the machine, a vast magnet that weighs 12,500 tons, measuring around 21 meters in length and 15 meters wide/high. If they had hacked into a second computer network, they could have turned off parts of the vast detector and, said the insider, "it is hard enough to make these things work if no one is messing with it."'"

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445 comments

Why is that even possible? (5, Insightful)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983627)

Why can anyone get to the control systems for a piece of equipment like that from the internet?

Re:Why is that even possible? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983671)

security updates?

Re:Why is that even possible? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983927)

Ummm... Its impossible for someone outside of physical access to hack a system if it isn't connected to the internet.

Re:Why is that even possible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983999)

Yes. That was the joke.

Re:Why is that even possible? (2, Insightful)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984049)

Make that "not connected to any network and they don't have physical access."

Grand parent: Probably so scientist at other locations can run and investigate the results and so on of their experiments on said equipment?

Sure they could like send a request to get something made and later returned the results but I guess for some tasks it's easier to control the equipment, see what's going on and change some parameters and so on yourself than having to ask someone else the whole time.

Sure if everyone had their own LHC this wouldn't be needed, but now I assume there is more users than there is LHCs ..

Re:Why is that even possible? (4, Interesting)

n dot l (1099033) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983695)

My understanding is they have the LHC linked to universities/research firms/supercomputers all over Europe simply in order to process the massive amount of data that thing generates. I might have read that wrong though. I've had nothing but trouble finding good information between the "BLACK HOLES, WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!", the idiot reporters doing "human interest" style pieces about it, and the incomprehensible (to me) physics-babble.

Re:Why is that even possible? (2, Interesting)

Bryansix (761547) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983767)

Then they can create a one way data warehouse dump of the data on a daily basis. Nobody needs the data faster then that. It can also be done via sneeker net. IE: Send it to an external hard drive and then move the HD over to a comp connected to the net and upload the data.

Re:Why is that even possible? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984019)

Hard to sneaker-net data to a > 1000 machine grid.

This system is a bit larger scale than you suspect.

Re:Why is that even possible? (2, Interesting)

NastyNate (398542) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983785)

Couldn't you use a sneakernet link to the outside world instead?

Re:Why is that even possible? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984121)

They expect to generate something like 27 Terabytes of data every day. All those ones and zeros weigh a ton!

Re:Why is that even possible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984013)

This is exactely the reason (you have not read it wrong - there are teams of scientists and etchnicians working on those experiments and detectors from all over the world; you have monitoring of operations [and preview of results] man staffed "shifts" being run from the US and elsewhere round the clock. All of this is internet based.

Typically, it uses secured protocols but at the end of the day, any cracks (a non encrypted chanel) would be found by hackers ...

Re:Why is that even possible? (2, Funny)

bothra (968330) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983717)

even scientists need to d/l pr0n while they wait for particles to fly around that thing....

Re:Why is that even possible? (5, Funny)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983737)

Vista needs to phone home for activation.

Re:Why is that even possible? (5, Funny)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983981)

Yeah, right, as if the LHC has enough horsepower to run Vista!

Re:Why is that even possible? (5, Informative)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984059)

I know you are being funny, but CERN uses Scientific Linux. [scientificlinux.org]

SL is a Linux release put together by Fermilab [fnal.gov], CERN [www.cern.ch], and various other labs and universities around the world. Its primary purpose is to reduce duplicated effort of the labs, and to have a common install base for the various experimenters.

Re:Why is that even possible? (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984069)

.. not to forget spore, or do you only want to play for a week?

Oh wait, a week is enough, sorry.

Re:Why is that even possible? (1)

Rayeth (1335201) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983777)

Convenience is the root of most such problems. Would it be safer to not have such machines connected to the internet? Sure, but it would be damn inconvenient if the scientists couldn't get to their Email.

Re:Why is that even possible? (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984087)

Yeah because they have to read their e-mails on the console of the LHC!! Only computer they have in the building!

Re:Why is that even possible? (3, Insightful)

Directrix1 (157787) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983883)

This is from telegraph.co.uk . It might as well be the National Enquirer, and placed up there with Aliens that impregnated Britney Spears. I wish slashdot had a bury button.

Re:Why is that even possible? (0, Troll)

collinstocks (1295204) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984023)

If you hadn't replied already, I would have said exactly the same thing. It shouldn't even have an IP address on a network connected to the wide world. Computers not attached to networks cannot be hacked into remotely. Also, they should be running a secure operating system, such as BSD. Linux probably wouldn't even do the trick for something as critical as this.

Re:Why is that even possible? (3, Funny)

alex4u2nv (869827) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984037)

Wonder how they broke in? Through the backdoor of course.

In other words: The Large Hadron Collider was Greeked

Why in the heck (1)

al0ha (1262684) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983643)

are the control systems for the collider Internet accessible? Holy smokes has nobody learned about best security practices over there?

Sheesh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983653)

What is this, pledge week?

This begs the question (-1, Redundant)

FooBarWidget (556006) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983665)

Why is the LHC connected to the Internet in the first place???

Re:This begs the question (3, Funny)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983681)

Windows updates.

Re:This begs the question (-1, Redundant)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984111)

I know you are being funny, but CERN uses Scientific Linux. [scientificlinux.org] [scientificlinux.org]

SL is a Linux release put together by Fermilab [fnal.gov], CERN [www.cern.ch], and various other labs and universities around the world. Its primary purpose is to reduce duplicated effort of the labs, and to have a common install base for the various experimenters.

Re:This begs the question (0)

Vectronic (1221470) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983783)

I suppose to allow access to the data for all sorts of colleagues and universities and such, maybe even to the point where they can input their desired settings into the LHC, thus, access to the internet, and control over parts of LHC.

After all this is almost a "world" experiment, not just a little lab doing its own thing.

Not that it makes it excusable, but its the obvious (easiest) way to link everyone together without spending millions in a private network (which they may have to do now).

Re:This begs the question (1)

Colonel Sponsz (768423) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983801)

For one thing (leaving the whole "begging the question" mistake aside), to send absolutely mind-bogglingly large amounts of data to the Grid [web.cern.ch]. The bandwidth required is massive, and they use a combination of private, dedicated links and regular Internet connections to do it.
(Read up on the LHC Grid; it's fascinating stuff!)

Re:This begs the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983905)

Oh come on guys, gives us a break..

this thing is generating PETABYTES of data daily (hourly maybe). HUGE amounts of data. Not a few gigs of porn you can backup on a USB harddisk. If there was an "air gap" you would need a team of 1000 trained monkeys running back and forth with harddisks trying to keep up.

Plus on the control site as has already been mentioned. Scientists from all over the world will be monitoring the systems and inputting commands. It needs a net connection to be useful.

Re:This begs the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983987)

Raises, not begs.

Hold on a second... (0, Redundant)

Millennium (2451) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983675)

You mean to tell me that the builders of the LHC didn't even have the foresight to air-gap the control system? Christ; you'd think they wanted people to shut it down.

Think about it, people. This will probably be the most-attacked computer system in the world for the next month or two, most of it coming from crazed doomsayers with delusions of Saving The World (tm). An air gap is the pretty much the least you can do against something like that.

Greek Hackers (5, Funny)

darth_MALL (657218) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983683)

Any chance they had a Trojan Horse at the ready?

Re:Greek Hackers (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983915)

Any chance they had a Trojan Horse at the ready?

No, but leave it to them to find a back door.

Re:Greek Hackers (2, Funny)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983961)

"Any chance they had a Trojan Horse at the ready?"

Maybe, but I think the prospect of penetrating a big, dark tunnel was too much of a temptation.

Are you sure they're Greek hackers? (2, Funny)

zalas (682627) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984131)

How can we be sure they were Greek hackers? What if they were agents of the TechnoCore [wikipedia.org] "performing experiments on farcasters" while pretending to be Greek hackers? <_<

Obviously.. (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983691)

[they] were worried about what the hackers could do because they were "one step away" from the computer control system of one of the huge detectors of the machine, a vast magnet that weighs 12,500 tons, measuring around 21 meters in length and 15 meters wide/high

quick, hide the 21x15 meter finger painting and the 21x15 meter refrigerator!

Well the world WOULDN'T have ended... (5, Funny)

KalvinB (205500) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983733)

but some jackasses decided to mess with things they knew nothing about.

I'll get my towel.

Re:Well the world WOULDN'T have ended... (1)

ronoholiv (1216262) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983923)

Hmm...epic fail isn't strong enough to describe those idiots...

How about "COSMIC FAIL"

Re:Well the world WOULDN'T have ended... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983983)

I'll get my towel.

LHC hacking is a rather strange fetish, but everyone has their turn-ons.

Air gap + Sneakernet (0, Troll)

fotbr (855184) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983735)

Seems like a separate network and portable harddrives to move the data would have been a pretty obvious thing to do.

Then again, I've worked with academic types, and not all of them are reasonable about the slightest perception of inconvenience.

Re:Air gap + Sneakernet (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983805)

Sneakernet? Yeah, because there are no pendrive viruses...

Re:Air gap + Sneakernet (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983963)

None that can survive a low-level reformat.

As far as I know, information flows out of CERN in high volume, and not in. There's no reason for CERN machines to be exposed to data contaminants from the wild.

Re:Air gap + Sneakernet (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983951)

Portable hard drives? With the amount of data this thing outputs? Are you SERIOUS?

Re:Air gap + Sneakernet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983995)

http://lcg.web.cern.ch/LCG/
I want so see you swapping those disks (hint: average throughput of several hundred MB/sec)

Genius! Lets move 15Petabytes on harddrives! (NOT) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984047)

LHC produces 15 Petabytes of data annually, to be analyzed around the world on over 150 Grid networks.

Think about that for a minute... I know you can.

How many hard drives is that?

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=how-lhc-may-change-internet

little greek troll here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983741)

"we were so close! except a particle hit the wire and blam! there went the connection!"

The correct term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983757)

sigh, I hate to be pedantic here but the term they were looking for isn't hackers. It's mother fsckers.

Re:The correct term (4, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983931)

I'm with you on the nomenclature issue. Such an important experiment and mankind in general offers far too many whack jobs who want to shut it down.

The logic of the 'we're all gonna die' crowd eludes me. If nothing happens, all is good. If the world ends, doesn't matter anyway. All those that think they will go to meet their maker should be happy either way, right? WTF?

Re:The correct term (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984141)

"If nothing happens, all is good. If the world ends, doesn't matter anyway."

Yeah, that's why I oppose having safety measures on nuclear weapons. I mean, if nobody abuses it, all is good. If we get a big nuclear war it doesn't matter anyway.

Computer security rocket science (5, Funny)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983763)

See? See? Computer security is harder than building 27km ring with enough precision to smash single protons!

Re:Computer security rocket science (1)

pegr (46683) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983823)

And I always thought the electrons did what the protons wanted them to...

Can't we all just get along? (4, Insightful)

mpoulton (689851) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983771)

Can't geeks just be happy for society's scientific accomplishments and not try to screw up a good thing just because it's possible? Like the guy says, it's hard enough to make these things work when everyone's working together. Assholes.

Ugh (1)

Rinisari (521266) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983789)

It won't be physicists that create a black hole at the LHC. It will be some idiot script kiddie from half the world away!

Pretty clear what's going to happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983797)

The Earth will soon be wormholed through higher dimensions Olympus, domain of Zeus. I've never been more sure of anything in my life.

Green Hackers, oh great. (0, Troll)

xpuppykickerx (1290760) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983811)

Why don't these wonderful human beings hack into nuclear power plants while they're at it. I'm sure that would result in some excellent "Saving the Planet" effects.

Re:Green Hackers, oh great. (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984039)

Reading is Fundamental - it's "Greek", NOT "Green".

One is a bunch of people that fuck others up the ass because it's fun.

The others live on a peninsula in the Mediterranean.

Re:Green Hackers, oh great. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984099)

*WHOOSH!*

Aliens Already Did This (1)

mfh (56) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983827)

The scientists behind the £4.4bn atom smasher had already received threatening emails and been besieged by telephone calls from worried members of the public concerned by speculation that the machine could trigger a black hole to swallow the earth, or earthquakes and tsunamis, despite endless reassurances to the contrary from the likes of Prof Stephen Hawking.

Why is it that wherever progress goes, controversy follows? [allvoices.com]

Re:Aliens Already Did This (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983919)

Why is it that wherever progress goes, controversy follows?

It's Newton's fault, now every action has equal and opposite reaction!

Brainiacs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983847)

That's great, you hack into a system that really smart people use. At my university, you really really don't want to mess with the Physics network. There are so many people that know so much about systems, that they will mess you up. Most of the grad students there know more than the system admins. When I was a grad student, I'd have taken it as a challenge to find them and screw them over. Given the resources I had access to, I don't think it'd be all that hard.

Epic FAIL (2, Funny)

davidwr (791652) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983853)

What could have been:

Cracker1: Cool, looks like we got into the outer network, let's try the inner one.
Cracker2: OK, try this...
Cracker1: What's this program "/staff/sfalken/games/Tictacto.exe [wikipedia.org]"
Cracker2: I don't know, let's try it.
Cracker1: OK.
*EARTH-SHATTERING BOOM*

God: It's the end of the world as I made it, and I feel fine.

Before anyone asks (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983895)

Yes, earth-shattering booms can be expected when you try to run a DOS [wikipedia.org] EXE [wikipedia.org] on a 25-year-old Unix box.

So I'm guessing the hackers read /. (1)

Chyeld (713439) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983879)

Given Wednesday's article [slashdot.org] on hacking industrial control machinery.

And given the number of astounded comments, I'm guessing no one else read it.

Why have it connected to the internet? Because the people who design the machinery for these things aren't IT, they are engineers. They don't think they NEED to worry about security. And when they do, it's physical, not electronic.

Wasn't the first go around of the internet being designed almost completely without any thought towards security a lesson to anyone? Haven't the warnings about how easy it would be to take down our whole electric grid due to the crappy security soaked into anyone's head?

This isn't exceptional, this is the norm.

Re:So I'm guessing the hackers read /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984003)

Had the original internet been designed with security as a top priority, it would not be NEARLY as successful. It was the ease and convenience of communicating that made the internet popular over its rivals (at the time), things like AOL and community BBS's. Adding complex layers of security would have kept the internet down.

Stop (1)

Bo'Bob'O (95398) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983891)

I don't know who you guys are, but stop this shit, seriously.

We don't need a Mark Chapman of the geek world.

Denial of Earth Attack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983911)

Part of the greater conspiracy to deny access to Earth, by bringing down the measures that keep the equipment in check.

I believe this will be also be known, briefly, as the Singularity of Death attack.

Did they use a Trojan? (4, Funny)

Gotung (571984) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983953)

Just wondering if they used a trojan to gain access.

Sneaky Greeks.

Re:Did they use a Trojan? (1)

Luyseyal (3154) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984137)

Just wondering if they used a trojan to gain access.

Only to your wife. :)

-l

We're suppose to trust these guys? (1)

thinktech (1278026) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983959)

We're suppose to trust that the LHC is perfectly safe ... but the same guys telling us this thought it was a good idea to make the controls accessible via the web? When the first black hole is created and becomes stable because it's not subject to the same gravitational and environmental instabilities as the SURFACE OF THE SUN... somehow "I told you so" isn't going to seem enough. Geeze... even in the cheesiest sci-fi novel, they make scientists perform these cool experiments outside the orbit of pluto.

Why? (0, Redundant)

Schnoogs (1087081) | more than 5 years ago | (#24983967)

Why are their computers even accessible via the Internet during execution? They should disable any access to the Internet during execution and re-enable it when finished. It's hard to hack into a network that isn't even on the Internet to begin with.

Hacking Greek style (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24983973)

I bet they went in through the backdoor.

James Gillies states obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984007)

James Gillies, spokesman for Cern. "It was quickly detected."

"We have several levels of network, a general access network and a much tighter network for sensitive things that operate the LHC," said Gillies.

What the bloody hell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984097)

.. was CERN doing with these machines open to the outside _at all?_

what retard put it online? (1)

eagl (86459) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984105)

What kind of idiot decided it would be a good idea to hook up that network to the outside world? Are they anticipating researchers waking up at 1am and thinking "hey, I want to run one more experiment from home before I go to bed..."?

Their internal network ought to be completely physically segregated, and results transferred via sneaker-net. Anything else is just inviting outsiders to break in and play with really large magnets and particle guns. It's no different than them securing the entry doors with those plastic child-proof doorknob covers... If the door exists, someone is going to look for a way through. Simple answer - don't provide ANY connection between the outside world and the control network. *duh*

Maybe we really *should* be taking out black-hole insurance...?

First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#24984107)

Let them destroy the world on their own...would you?

They wanted fame, I hope they get shame (1)

Aphoxema (1088507) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984109)

This is such a shame that people are so scared of this thing that they'll go this far. Maybe the reason it's so easy to convince people to be afraid of this thing is because it's so damn big, and I suspect that it being in a foreign country(ies) has a sour effect on some people. However, some people I've spoken with about it aren't even aware it's on the other side of the planet, one person thought it was in California.

This tool may solve some of the most incredible mysteries of our universe (and bring up more interesting questions), but I feel some terrible and tragic emotion that I know that, no matter how revolutionary the results may or may not be, ignorance is a powerful and destructive force.

I am damn near wishing the LHC destroys us all despite having no doubt that it won't, Humanity is really starting to disappoint me.

I used to not care about anything, even 9/11 didn't phase me, but the changes I've had in my life has taught me to respect life and individuals, but it's also given me insight into the nature of conflict in people.

The values people have are so different, and it's those differences that shape some of the best things in the world, but the people who lack values that's becoming distasteful.

What did these pricks think would happen? Oh, they upset some work. For a multibillion project like this, it's going to take big, intentional explosions and a lot of mindless people to stop it.

That's just me wishing for the strength of the project, though. I really will shed some tears if only a few squeaky wheels can halt the LHC in it's tracks.

Um, for all you jokers out there... (4, Insightful)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984115)

Wondering why the LHC is connected to the Internet 'at all'...

Why was the Web even developed? Why was HTTP even thought of? Why was a graphical browser of any interest?

CERN. Ask Mr. Berners-Lee. And then contemplate the irony of wondering this at all.

Sadly, it looks like CERN needs to work on the security more, but hey, that's in the spirit of the World-Wide Wild Web, eh?

OMG (1)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984123)

Please, can we stop the fucking hysteria over the LHC?
My girlfriend called me wednesday in hysterics because some ignorant bastard told her the world was ending. I explained to her that it's fine, and she's fine now, but for christ's sake, can these idiots perpetuating this fud just either a) shut the fuck or b) learn the facts?

I'm so sick of this...

Great, a Geek-induced Pepsi Syndrome (3, Funny)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984139)

Ross Denton: Hello, hello, I'm Ross Denton, head of public relations for the Two Mile nuclear facility. First, I'd like to welcome all members off the press to Two Mile Island. I hope you enjoy your stay here and that you'll come back again real soon. Now, there will be box lunches at air cooling tower #1 after the briefing, and later the buses will take you back to the motel for a special screening of the Jane Fonda film, "Barbarella".

Male Reporter #1: What about the accident here at the plant?

Ross Denton: That what? Oh yes, yes, the accident. Uh, let me give you a little uh, technical, uh, background here. [ shows a diagram of a nuclear reactor pointing to nuclear energy, pointing to a toaster. ] This is a nuclear reactor. Now, the nuclear fuel here is used to generate energy here, which is sent to your homes to make toast.

Male Reporter #2: But what about the accident?

Ross Denton: I was getting to that. Sometime yesterday afternoon we experienced what we like to call a surprise. And, well, we had to release some radioactive steam.

Female Reporter #1: Well, how much radiation are we being exposed to right now?

Ross Denton: Well, I'm sure all of us here have been to the doctor and had our chest x-ray, haven't we? Well, it's just like that, only it's as if the doctor had to give you the chest x-ray over, and over, and over again. Or, it's like falling asleep under a sun lamp for a week or two! Or, it's like drying your hair in a microwave oven! And to give you some idea of how little danger there actually is, President Carter will be here tomorrow. Now, gentlemen, I'm sorry, I'm sorry. Yes, I'm sorry I have to cut this press conference short, but now I'd like to hand the stage over to the Two Mile players! They're a pro-nuclear mime troope, and they're going to perform a little skit for you, kids!

*** Ross Denton: Good afternoon, good afternoon, ladies and gentleman of the press. First, as to the president's condition, let me say that the president is feeling certainly "stronger" than he's ever felt. And he would like to be with us right here, in this room if he could. I think now I'll just open the door to questions-

Female Reporter #1: Yes, is it true that the president is 100 feet tall?

Ross Denton: Nooooo! Absolutely not!

Male reporter #3: Is the president 90 feet tall?

Ross Denton: No comment.

Why does it need internet access (1)

Eravnrekaree (467752) | more than 5 years ago | (#24984145)

I am surprised such systems are directly connected to the Internet at all. Why does a particle collider need internet access?

With it seems every computer system on the planet hackable, one wonders how we got to this situation. Perhaps it is due to the overuse of C rather than better protected languages like Perl or Ruby for instance, and thus buffer overruns

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  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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