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AMD Employee Charged With Stealing Intel Secrets

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the great-now-make-them-all-compatible dept.

AMD 212

IWonderWhatICanPutInThisFieldWithoutBeingDeleted writes "A man who once worked for Intel and then jumped ship to join AMD has been accused of stealing his erstwhile employer's chip secrets. Federal detectives allege they discovered 19 CAD designs and more than 100 pages of confidential Intel documentation."

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Ironically (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025637)

this substantiates allegations made here [adequacy.org] which were widely mocked at the time.

Unfortunately (5, Funny)

bugeaterr (836984) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025657)

It was the design of the Pentium Pro's floating point processor.

Re:Unfortunately (-1)

deezy (1365083) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026131)

I check out that processor but it doesn't sound like its something big but still. He shouldn't have taken the information.

Re:Unfortunately (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026295)

I check out that processor but it doesn't sound like its something big but still. He shouldn't have taken the information.

whoooosh! Right over your head.

Re:Unfortunately (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026319)

Whoosh...

Re:Unfortunately (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026423)

exactly, the only way amd could compete with intel was to fix it's fpu problems
since the cirix chips.. seems fate has caught up with amd, if they sync the docs to
amd overcoming the fpu probelm, that's a match.. amd is finished if this is true.

Re:Unfortunately (4, Informative)

operagost (62405) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026641)

The Pentium P54 had the FP bug, not the PPro. Your geek card has been revoked.

Let him go (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025663)

Information wants to be free.

Re:Let him go (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025813)

Idiot.

Re:Let him go (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026117)

Obvious paid M$ shill.

Zomg... (1, Redundant)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025669)

Industries still compete the "old fashioned" way.

News at 11.

Re:Zomg... (3, Informative)

Prefader (1072814) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026093)

This has nothing to do with AMD competing with Intel. It appears that AMD didn't use the documents, and the employee made the copies on his own, "out of curiosity".

Re:Zomg... (1)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026439)

Indeed. Post-RTFA, of course.

Still though, this kind of stuff is one of those things that, as a business, where the ability to compete directly affects your bottom line, I have to imagine that many people/companies in this situation would be differently inclined in the event that use of such information would never be leaked. Something that could stay with the one person who has the capability to use it to his advantage, or amongst the inner circles of a board room.

... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (5, Interesting)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025675)

The irony is that his new employer (AMD) would never touch the stolen info with a 10-foot pole. The company I work with (also in the IT sector but not hardware) has very, very clear policies around competitive information. They know just how badly it would go for them if they made use of stolen information brought in by a new (or even existing) employee.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025711)

"AMD" wouldn't touch it but it's quite possible lower level employees would look at it to gain valuable insights. Sure they wouldn't directly clone a design but just seeing how it's done can be invaluable.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (5, Insightful)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025713)

(AMD) would never touch the stolen info with a 10-foot pole.

Even if they couldn't directly plagiarize the information to enhance their current architecture (I understand there are a lot of very fundamental differences between them), it would be valuable to AMD if they could determine, for example, how fast Intel's next gen chip is going to be in order to make a product that would be able to compete better, even if it meant sacrificing margins.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

Geek-tan (1195223) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025739)

Said person could possibly suggest things familiar to Intel, marking them as his own.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026341)

They'd have to be out of their minds to do that either. Pani is (allegedly) an idiot if he thought he could score points with this.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (4, Insightful)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026697)

[..] it would be valuable to AMD if they could determine, for example, how fast Intel's next gen chip is going to be in order to make a product that would be able to compete better, even if it meant sacrificing margins.

Help me explain your theory here. What you are suggesting is that AMD is working at less than full capacity because they don't know what Intel is prepping in the future? These two companies are bittersweet rivals and knowing that your opponent's product will be 200% faster than the previous one is not going to make AMD's scientists think harder.

Ignorance is bliss, I guess.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (5, Interesting)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025855)

The irony is that his new employer (AMD) would never touch the stolen info with a 10-foot pole.

It's not unlike the disgruntled Coca-Cola employees who took the Coke Zero formula to Pepsi. Pepsi wouldn't touch it with Dr. Pepper's 10-foot pole. They turned the disgruntled employees into the appropriate authorities, notified Coke and sent the formula back without breaking the seal.

Duh. The legal hassles alone aren't worth it.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (4, Insightful)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026169)

And generally they want to promote a culture of honesty and integrity. If Pepsi employees think it's okay to steal from Coke, they'll think it's okay to steal from Pepsi.

Certain political radicals would claim that capitalism is inherently dishonest and corrupt. Although there is plenty of that, they would be amazed at the degree of integrity required to run a successful business.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (0)

amilo100 (1345883) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026185)

Coke Zero does not really have a formula - it is just a bunch of Aspartame (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspartame_controversy).

Coke Zero (at least in my country) tastes exactly the same as Pepsi Max - same ingredients.

I am not sure that secrets such as this counts for anything, because the ingredients are known and it is trivial to determine the quantities.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

vslashg (209560) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026377)

I am not sure that secrets such as this counts for anything, because the ingredients are known and it is trivial to determine the quantities.

Yeah, the big mystery of "natural flavors" on the ingredients lists is just how much natural flavors to use.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026679)

Pepsi Max contains ginseng, while Coke Zero does not. Both products also contain acesulfame potassium in addition to the aspartame. Also, can you tell me what the "natural and artificial flavors" are?

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

fyrewulff (702920) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026285)

That and it's not the formula, it's the brand name. Pepsi would gain nothing from selling a pop that tastes like Coca Cola, because people would just continue to buy Coca Cola.

If I want a Pepsi, I buy them. Coke, I buy them. (I'm one of those weird people that drinks both.)

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

RiotingPacifist (1228016) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026745)

everybody knows the secret ingredient is lavender. what amuses me are the adverts that claim the ingredients for coke have never changed, despite the fact it used to contain coke.

crimes like this will have to become legal soon (4, Interesting)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026267)

The sad thing is that such laws are only respected in countries like the US and UK.

Soon countries like China will be able to have much better technologies because they can take the best from all sides and create a super product. Even if the US and UK forbid the importation of such products, companies in the US and UK would be at a disadvantage selling inferior product to other countries.

Patents and copyrights will prove to be our downfall since they no longer encourage progress but prevent it.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (1)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026437)

Stolen Practices are a whole different ball of wax.

Re:... and AMD wouldn't even touch the info (3, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026551)

The irony is that his new employer (AMD) would never touch the stolen info with a 10-foot pole. The company I work with (also in the IT sector but not hardware) has very, very clear policies around competitive information. They know just how badly it would go for them if they made use of stolen information brought in by a new (or even existing) employee.

Only a complete and utter moron would come in with a stack of papers stolen from a competitor, I'd have him locked out of every system and escorted out the door before he could steal anything from our company. The problem is more if he's coming up with many great ideas, great analysis and great solutions - either you've scored one of those brilliant employees that drive a department or even division or he's using inside information, but there's no easy way to tell which. Or more likely, to suspect but just turn a blind eye and play completely surprised if shit hits the fan. I don't think the manager would go to legal unless it's so blatant he's sure the shit will hit the fan here and people would question why he didn't see the signs. As for legal, is that any surprise? Any lawyer that gave any other legal advice would probably be fired, disbarred and in jail.

AMD and Intel? (4, Informative)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025683)

Toyota and Ferrari?

Re:AMD and Intel? (2, Insightful)

blindd0t (855876) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025735)

Toyota and Ferrari?

Which would you buy?

Re:AMD and Intel? (2, Insightful)

blindd0t (855876) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025843)

Yeah, I'm replying to myself here, but seriously, I'd sooner buy a twin-turbo Toyota Supra (even if it requires a little work on my part) before buying a Ferrari. I have an idea of what GP was trying to get at here, but I don't know that comparing motor companies had the intended (and likely abrasive toward AMD) effect. Perhaps comparing specific models would have though. ^_^ That said, I have no problems with having second best for far less, so AMD is a good option to me, personally (especially with Video cards).

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025871)

Based on sales counts, I'd say AMD is Ferrari in that example.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026197)

AMD sponsors the Ferrari Formula-1 racing team, but I doubt Intel is sponsoring the Toyota team.

Re:AMD and Intel? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025749)

A young nigger walked into the local welfare office, marched straight up to the counter and said, "Hi, I'm tired of handouts, I want a job."

The man behind the counter replied, "Your timing is amazing. We've just got a listing from a very wealthy man who wants a chauffeur/bodyguard for his nympho daughter. You'll have to drive around in a big white Mercedes, but the suits, shirts, and ties are provided. Because of the long hours of this job, meals will also be provided and you will also be required to escort the young lady on her overseas holidays. The salary package is $200,000 a year."

The nigger said, "Ah c'mon, you're bullshitting me!"

The man behind the counter said, "Well, you started it!"

Re:AMD and Intel? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025827)

Replace 'nigger' with anything else, and this is a perfectly fine story. Ass.

Re:AMD and Intel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026675)

Hahaha. That's great.

Re:AMD and Intel? (0, Offtopic)

superskippy (772852) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025767)

Do you mean McLaren and Ferrari, or do I not understand this post?

Re:AMD and Intel? (3, Informative)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025887)

Toyota engineers were found guilty of stealing industrial secrets from the Ferrari F1 team. Not so off-topic, nor alegory for AMD and Intel respectively. Just a similar situation.

Re:AMD and Intel? (4, Funny)

BitterOldGUy (1330491) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025943)

Toyota engineers were found guilty of stealing industrial secrets from the Ferrari F1 team.

I don't get it. Toyota drivers don't have to compensate for small penises like Ferrari drivers.

Re:AMD and Intel? (0, Flamebait)

krakelohm (830589) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026083)

Keep telling yourself that.

It doesn't matter for me. (4, Funny)

BitterOldGUy (1330491) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026277)

I'm married. My wife keeps my penis in a mason jar under the sink. It only comes out when she wants it.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026213)

compensate for small penises like Ferrari drivers

A friend of mine owned a Porsche for several years. Now and then he used to get some friendly (and sometimes not-so-friendly) ribbing about how guys who drive a Porsche are "compensating" for something else.

His response was "even if you're right, my Porsche never says no, and it always puts a smile on my face. And if I want to I can drive it five, six, or ten times a day."

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026457)

Wow, is Porsche really that reliable now?

My friend had a Porsche, and it said "no" plenty of times.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026755)

That's because Toyota drivers are eunuchs.

Coke Cola and Pepsi (1, Redundant)

Khemisty (1246418) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026209)

Here's another case that's fairly similar. An employee at one of Coke Cola's offices tried selling the recipe [timesonline.co.uk] to Pepsi, except Pepsi informed Coke of what had happened.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

hashax (1190057) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026587)

what?! Toyota as well? As far as I know, Mclaren was found guilty of stealing ferrari secrets. Of all the places, the mclaren guy went to photocopy the files in a shop whose owner was (groan) a Ferrari fan.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

ravenshrike (808508) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026751)

If you're going to steal sensitive files, it's better to shell out for a scanner and scan them on your own.

Re:AMD and Intel? (3, Informative)

martinw89 (1229324) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026601)

I have no idea about anything regarding Toyota and Ferrari. I can tell you, however, that McLaren and Ferrari [wired.com] were involved in a huge scandal just this past year. This was a big deal.

Jaguar and Ferrari (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025889)

LeMans and Rheims, 1950-1960.

BTW - if you ar egoing to do car analogies people, THOSE are cars!

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

computerman413 (1122419) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025897)

Actually, both are true, and this is probably more similar to the Toyota-Ferrari situation a few years ago. A couple of Ferrari-turned-Toyota engineers took some Ferrari IP with them, and were arrested for it. I don't think the data was on the scale of what the Ferrari guy leaked to the McLaren guy last year.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025769)

No, more like Toyota and Nissan.

Re:AMD and Intel? (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025945)

'Zactly.

Any one else notice that this story was submitted by Putin?

Surprised? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025699)

Well, not really.

Eh? (1)

Khemisty (1246418) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025717)

Pani's alleged motive: to impress his new employer, say the Feds. They added that there is no evidence that AMD condoned or was even aware of Pani's alleged actions, which the FBI said the engineer admitted to during a interview in late July.

Wait, so does this mean he was going to pass off intel's technology as his own - which he would undoubtedly be caught out on - or is AMD lying about this? It's not like he was only hired a week ago. I'm just wondering how he could impress his new employer without actually giving anything away.

couldn't help it (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025725)

He took the "Intel Inside" campaign too far.

Re:couldn't help it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026483)

He took the "Intel Inside" campaign too far.

Or was it "Idiot Outside"??

Alleged motive: to impress his new employer (4, Insightful)

rickkas7 (983760) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025727)

Poaching the dumb employees from your competitor is probably not the most sound business plan, either.

Re:Alleged motive: to impress his new employer (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025777)

I doubt "dumb" or "thief" was on his resumee.

Re:Alleged motive: to impress his new employer (3, Funny)

Sobrique (543255) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025917)

Damnit, that's where I've been going wrong!

His resume (3, Insightful)

BitterOldGUy (1330491) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025979)

I doubt "dumb" or "thief" was on his resumee.

No it was this:

  • Leveraged competitor's technology in projects.
  • Saved employer millions of dollars in R&D costs
  • Discovered new and improved technologies for employer that was later found in competitor's products.

Re:Alleged motive: to impress his new employer (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026081)

"Pani's alleged motive: to impress his new employer" ... because it would impress me to have a potential new hire admit he stole proprietary information from his prior employer...

I'd thank him, and not make an offer - because he's pretty much admitted if you hire him and he leaves your company, he'll take *your* proprietary information with him too!! LOL

Usefulness? (2, Interesting)

AscianBound (1359727) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025757)

I really have to wonder how significant the information that Intel could get out of these documents is. It seems to me that a few CAD designs and some "confidential" documentation wouldn't be enough to actually give AMD an edge in the market. Even if this information did include Intel "secrets" would they really be things that AMD could implement?

The guy says he copied of the documents "out of curiosity", which doesn't actually strike me as that implausible. I know I have copies of software packages being licensed for $500,000+ to my previous employer. It's not like I'm going to try to use it to make a profit, I just find it interesting stuff and want to be able to keep it.

Re:Usefulness? (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026339)

something that's labeled "confidential" or "top secret" will always pique people's curiosity. i remember when i was in high school or junior high my dad brought home some confidential Intel schematics that he was working with. they were just drawings of a CPU cooling unit or fan funnel or something. it was of no use to me, and i really didn't understand what i was looking at, but the fact that it was marked as confidential and watermarked to identify leaked documents just made it that much more tantalizing. so naturally i scanned all of the schematics and posted them up on my blog with the watermarks and document numbers blurred out.

probably wasn't the smartest thing to do. but there certainly wasn't any malicious intention behind it. i really just wanted to show off to my friends.

On the plus side... (1)

JCSoRocks (1142053) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025775)

He obviously won't be getting a job anywhere else in the industry again. No one's going to hire a guy that's going to steal your IP when he leaves.

Re:On the plus side... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025861)

We all steal IP when we leave. Most of us do it in our heads however.

Re:On the plus side... (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026453)

don't worry, once we gain a better understanding of human neurology i'm sure there will be devices designed specifically for wiping ex-employees' memories to protect a company's IP and trade secrets.

it may even prove useful for resolving sexual harassment charges brought against the CEO.

Re:On the plus side... (5, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026089)

Oh holy spagetti monster, every IT person and CS person absolutely rapes the IP when they leave.

In my boxes that I used to clean out my desk is at least 30 confidential documents that were packed there by the moving company, (I got to keep my desk! that was cool!) and I know I have copies of all the code I wrote when I was there as well as all the SQL queries I wrote.

I have yet to meet someone that says, "I just left company X, no I don't have anything from my old job..." or " I cant fix that, I fixed that at company Y and they own the IP to that fix."

All of you rape and pillage IP when you leave. Accidentally or on purpose, you do it. Being a moron and trying to SELL that or taking it with malicious intent? that is the kicker. if he had it because that is how his desk was packed up for him then it's not his fault, nor is he liable for anything.

Re:On the plus side... (1)

Bovius (1243040) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026435)

I have yet to meet someone that says, "I just left company X, no I don't have anything from my old job..." or " I cant fix that, I fixed that at company Y and they own the IP to that fix."

All of you rape and pillage IP when you leave. Accidentally or on purpose, you do it.

Now hold on a second. I think you're including too much under the intellectual property / trade secrets umbrella. There are plenty of concepts and methods in most tech fields that are far too general to be considered a competetive threat if other people get their hands on them. If I learned to write SQL at my current company, that doesn't mean I can't write queries for anyone else, ever, nor would showing someone else a query I wrote for the company necessarily be a breach of IP, assuming I changed table/column names sufficiently to hide proprietary business models.

And no, I haven't shown other companies code I've written in my current or previous jobs. There's almost always an alternative way to demonstrate your abilities.

Re:On the plus side... (4, Funny)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026463)

During the course of my career I've signed enough Non-Disclosure agreements that it's illegal for me to think; Anecdotes often result in law suits.

Re:On the plus side... (4, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026513)

Oh holy spagetti monster, every IT person and CS person absolutely rapes the IP when they leave.

In my boxes that I used to clean out my desk is at least 30 confidential documents that were packed there by the moving company, (I got to keep my desk! that was cool!) and I know I have copies of all the code I wrote when I was there as well as all the SQL queries I wrote.

I have yet to meet someone that says, "I just left company X, no I don't have anything from my old job..." or " I cant fix that, I fixed that at company Y and they own the IP to that fix."

All of you rape and pillage IP when you leave. Accidentally or on purpose, you do it. Being a moron and trying to SELL that or taking it with malicious intent? that is the kicker. if he had it because that is how his desk was packed up for him then it's not his fault, nor is he liable for anything.

Except, in this case, he joined AMD while still employed at Intel. He joined AMD June 2. He gave Intel his resignation JUne 11 (and used vacation instead of working through the 2 weeks). Thus he was under the employment of both companies (who we all know are competitors) for a period of time. This goes beyond innocent "rape and pillage" of IP. At least that's part of your cleanup of your stuff, which you do before you start employment at your new employer. And anything you take is covered under NDA or other confidentiality agreeement. But this guy could not only have taken stuff from Intel and gave them to AMD, he could've (unlikely, but possible) taken stuff from AMD given them to Intel, too, and done it quite surreptitiously.

AMD would have to fire this guy because this would "taint" him, and by association, AMD, who then might have to battle Intel in some lawsuit alleging they used some of those designs in their next processor. AMD might not have, but because this guy has been working at both companies, it's very hard to tell, and AMD really has to do some house cleaning on anything this guy touched to make sure it's clean, and even then, it's hard to tell (the irony is, they can't tell if they're using that stolen IP without knowing what the stolen IP is...

Re:On the plus side... (1)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026633)

I have yet to meet someone that says, "I just left company X, no I don't have anything from my old job..." or " I cant fix that, I fixed that at company Y and they own the IP to that fix."

Really? Cause if I were being asked that by a new employer, that's exactly what I'd say. It would very likely be a lie, but I wouldn't cop to it because 1) it might make them paranoid about me, and 2) they paid me for my skills, not for stealing shit from elsewhere.

Most of the code I have from previous workplaces is completely useless, too. Some of it's just too old to be useful (though they're some very well written FoxPro for Unix apps), most of it just doesn't fit my current job and will be useless when I get a new one, and a few choice bits are so astoundingly shitty, I just keep around to amuse myself periodically (KenM, I'm talking about your evil abortion).

intels suxors (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025803)

he had the plans for Intel's newest chip, codenamed "Titanic"

Re:intels suxors (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025905)

*Golf clap*

and you think all that poaching Google do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025811)

And you think all that poaching Google do, especially from MS and other top tech firms, is purely for the "talent"? At a peer-driven firm, you don't need to make plagiarism official policy, you just create an environment of "trust" where that sort of thing'll get talked about at lunchtime and you're sorted.

STUNNING non-story (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025817)

Is this the best you've got, Slashdot? This isn't even digg-worthy (no "top 5").

Dual-Core similarity (1)

ilovesymbian (1341639) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025837)

Ah, thats why we have AMD's X2 and Intel's Dual-Core which are *so* similar.

Oh No! (2, Funny)

yttrstein (891553) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025847)

NINTEEN Computer Aided Design Designs? We should have never approved that New Technology Technology.

Re:Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025869)

Intel should have secured their proprietary material with PIN numbers.

Re:Oh No! (3, Informative)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026043)

You're trying to be funny, but "CAD designs" isn't redundant. The two instances of the word "design" refer to different definitions of the word (design = plan, vs design = process of making a design), so they aren't redundant.

Re:Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026251)

Redundancy is the same thing.

Re:Oh No! (1)

yttrstein (891553) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026549)

I know you're trying to be helpful, but the boys at Microsoft gave the same reason for "NT Technology" not being redundant.

But rest easy, dear reader. The comedy isn't in the redundancy, it's in the repetition.

Re:Oh No! (2, Informative)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026353)

*cough*Computer aided DRAFTING*cough*. Drafting is "process of drawing", while design tells me... well, it is a finished design. Fully qualified, "CAD design" becomes "Computer aided process of drawing design".

Re:Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026477)

Computer Aided Drafting Design. Get it right, fool.

Redundant (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25025929)

CAD = Computer-aided design

CAD designs = Computer-aided design designs

Curious... (1)

Veetox (931340) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025933)

Pani (Alleged Thief) may have been involved in partial involvement in the design, and therefore wanted to keep a record of the end product of his work. Of course, he told authorities it was because he was "curious".

The part you missed... (2, Insightful)

gentimjs (930934) | more than 5 years ago | (#25025977)

What isnt mentioned is that he took the goods from intel because the guys at AMD needed a laugh!

*ducks*

Re:The part you missed... (1)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026489)

mandatory Monty reference: No really that net burst architecture was fine when I sold it to you....
Sir it has left the land of the living, turned it's toes up to the daises...

Pay attention to the article (0, Offtopic)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026189)

There's an amazing thing done by HP in the article. It seems their advertising department contacted Gerry Anderson about providing digital supermarionation effects for their online ads. You can see what can only be described as one of the Thunderbirds plugging energy-efficient desktops.

Old News (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026225)

Didn't this come out days ago?

IWonderWhatICanPutInThisFieldWithoutBeingDeleted (0, Troll)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026383)

IWonderWhatICanStealFromMyPreviousEmployerWithoutBeingCaught?

oops (1)

darrenkopp (981266) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026391)

doesn't matter, no one can help amd now (except for intel chip designs, of course... oh perfect!)

One thing that has always irked me... (3, Interesting)

gillbates (106458) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026393)

Is that I frequently have ideas at home. And write them down. And later use them at work.

Would the discovery of these documents in my home constitute evidence of "stealing trade secrets" in the eyes of my employer? If I decided to leave my current employer and work for the competition, would those hobby projects of mine be a liability?

I'm just curious, because I do quite a bit of independent development, and from time to time, it becomes valuable at work.

Re:One thing that has always irked me... (1)

stickytar (96286) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026493)

Depends on your contract with work. If you are truly "working" on the clock when you are at home (e.g., dabbling in some work whilst inventing things) then it could be construed as company intellectual property. Clean lines. Make them.

Re:One thing that has always irked me... (3, Informative)

faloi (738831) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026503)

It depends on your contract. Some employers have, essentially, an "all your ideas are belong to us" type clause. Anything you work on, on or off the clock, is their property. At one company I worked for, even if it was something that wasn't related to the industry, you submitted it to their lawyers and applied for leave to pursue it on your own if the company wasn't interested. Essentially, they give you your IP back.

Such a foolish crime... (3, Insightful)

east coast (590680) | more than 5 years ago | (#25026403)

How do people think that they're going to pass this along and not get caught by some method?

Hell, after the Coca Cola incident [cnn.com] I would be fearful of having my new employer even know I have such information, let alone use it in some manner.

Like Mac Truck stealing roller skate designs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026413)

Intel's "newest" processors are Pentium III's with AMD64 extensions, and multiple cores talking across the front-side bus, what exactly can AMD gain from robbing the 90's?

This is bad.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25026741)

..very bad. I hope AMD doesn't catch too much shit for this guys actions.

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