Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Study Finds Video Games Are Not Bad for Kids

Soulskill posted about 6 years ago | from the paging-jack-thompson dept.

Education 220

mcgrew writes with news that a study done by the Pew Internet & American Life Project has found game playing is all but universal among teens, and it provides a "significant amount of social interaction and potential for civic engagement." 97% of teens responding to the survey said they played games (75% played weekly or more often), and roughly two-thirds of teens use games as a social experience. The full report (PDF) and the questionnaire with answer data (PDF) are both available for viewing. From the report: "Youth who take part in social interaction related to the game, such as commenting on websites or contributing to discussion boards, are more engaged civically and politically. Youth who play games where they are part of guilds are not more civically engaged than youth who play games alone."

cancel ×

220 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Based on their results (5, Funny)

427_ci_505 (1009677) | about 6 years ago | (#25032411)

Shouldn't they be called Pew-Pew Internet and American Life? :P

Re:Based on their results (1)

philspear (1142299) | about 6 years ago | (#25032441)

Or maybe P(e)wned 1N73RN3...

Re:Based on their results (2, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | about 6 years ago | (#25032589)

How dare this so-called study attempt to disparage the truthiness of teens being violent because of video games!

Re:Based on their results (4, Funny)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 6 years ago | (#25033531)

Video games don't influence young people.
Otherwise we'd all be listening to repetetive electronic music and eating pills all day ; )

AAPL tanking Wednesday (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032423)

Time to dust of those shares and cash out while the cashing is still acceptable. Otherwise, hold on because it's falling FAST !

Deterioration of language skills (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032469)

Commenting on website boards? Well, it certainly doesn't help their grammar, if YouTube comment sections are any indication.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (5, Insightful)

77Punker (673758) | about 6 years ago | (#25032649)

It's all about where they do the posting. I started posting on Slashdot many years ago when I was a teenager, as revealed by my handle. This website has shaped and developed my ability for written communication by providing both good and bad examples, and by providing me with feedback on the things I say.

Youtube is different; posting there is like throwing your words away. Discussion does not take place; people throw the words out and then turn their back on them. Here, people come back and see if their comments have scored well. In so doing, they notice replies and reenter the discussion that they had participated in earlier in the day.

Well, that's how it's worked for me.
Obviously, there's plenty of terrible comments here, but overall this is easily among the best forums on the internet.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (5, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25032951)

Exactly. Compared to most forums I've been to, Slashdot's trolls are better written than the admin's posts on other forums.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032957)

You realize of course that those who are opposed to kids being on the internet would just refer to the infinite monkey theorem. [wikipedia.org] They could use some of the posts we have seen on the internet starting with IRC through YouTube as being very similar to simian output on typewriters, thereby showing you to be the exception to the rule. Those that design statistical research inherently affect their results whether they intend to or not.

--signed
Slashdot monkey #666

We must evolve!

Re:Deterioration of language skills (5, Funny)

Grimbleton (1034446) | about 6 years ago | (#25032977)

your faverite band sux n u r a gay!!!!11!!

Re:Deterioration of language skills (4, Insightful)

Firehed (942385) | about 6 years ago | (#25033181)

You used the correct you{r|'re}, proving Darkness404's point.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033579)

But he also used "there's" when it should have been "there are".

Re:Deterioration of language skills (2, Funny)

Digital Believer (222483) | about 6 years ago | (#25033725)

You used the correct you{r|'re}, proving Darkness404's point.

Yes, but he should've said "there're plenty of terrible comments", not "there's ...". Sigh.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25034299)

Actually using the shorter "your" correctly doesn't prove anything. It's the longer "you're" that usually gets screwed up.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (2, Insightful)

Groggnrath (1089073) | about 6 years ago | (#25033061)

Well, that's how it's worked for me.

Well, that's the way it's worked for most people here on /. because peer review will always be better than a moderated forum.

Not that /. is perfect. It's communal shunning of MMOs, and video games in general, diminishes the title "News for nerds. Stuff that matters" in my opinion. But that's off topic, and a conversation for a different time.

To be on topic, and as it were "pertinent" to the subject, being a part of any community makes people want to be a productive part of society. Being in a guild, or being in an MMO is not enough. Reaching out, and talking with other players and gaining a reputation within the community; sharing you views and interacting with others, will always reflect better on you, making you a better person.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (2, Funny)

SkyDude (919251) | about 6 years ago | (#25033115)

Well, that's the way it's worked for most people here on /. because peer review will always be better than a moderated forum.

Peer review? Does this mean I have no peers if I don't wear a tinfoil hat?

Re:Deterioration of language skills (1)

Groggnrath (1089073) | about 6 years ago | (#25033187)

Does this mean I have no peers if I don't wear a tinfoil hat?

Are you insulting my tinfoil hat? How dare you good sir, how dare you. This hat protects me from the RIAA mind control beams.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | about 6 years ago | (#25033085)

I started posting on Slashdot many years ago when I was a teenager, as revealed by my handle.

You started posting on slashdot in 1977? Impressive!

Re:Deterioration of language skills (1)

77Punker (673758) | about 6 years ago | (#25033119)

I know that was a joke, but in case someone missed the point here, my handle is juvenile. I was not alive in 1977.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (2, Insightful)

Firehed (942385) | about 6 years ago | (#25033111)

Indeed, the slashdot.org/~username page is probably one of the most significant elements of Slashdot's success, for the reasons you've stated. On smaller forums you tend to discuss a specific topic not a piece of news so you'll naturally go back frequently; it's also a lot easier to find the thing again simply due to the size of most forums. On Digg, the discussions (at least in my experience) are read once, leave a couple comments, and never come back; the quality of the dicussions is reflective of this methodology. /. is somewhere in the middle, but it works well given the post frequency, the number of members, and the subscription model.

Hands up, everybody who has slashdot.org/~username in their bookmark bar. Come on now.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (5, Funny)

wastedlife (1319259) | about 6 years ago | (#25033557)

Indeed, the slashdot.org/~username page is probably one of the most significant elements of Slashdot's success, for the reasons you've stated.

Man, that guy hasn't made a post since October 21 2000 [slashdot.org] . I really doubt that is one of the most significant elements of Slashdot's success.

Re:Deterioration of language skills (1)

Jorophose (1062218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033145)

I'm in the same boat.

It's very useful, because if you ever do something "wrong" it'll get pointed out and you'll be all the smarter. You follow back, and check see if people find what you said interesting or stupid, you eventually pick up a whole bunch of terms, too...

Ask me three years ago what linux was I'd give you a o_O, now I understand a lot of the way it works... I know what a SoC is, I know about architectures, I know about frameworks, what's "the dream machine" for various situations, and know what my government and my neighbour's government is up to.

YouTube is more like "lol I overclocked my usb ports" or "lol look at me I'm sexy" or "here i am lighting my farts with an industrial-strenght flamethrower".

I used to have a '77Junker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033651)

Oh, 77Punker. I had one of those too.

political interests?! (0, Flamebait)

QuantumG (50515) | about 6 years ago | (#25032503)

Umm.. how exactly is kids being interested in politics a good thing?

Maybe I'm just old, but when I was a kid, we left grown up matters like politics to the adults. Being that children can't vote, and no-one cares about their political opinions, doesn't this survey say that they're basically worried about things they have no control over? Isn't that the definition of stress?

 

Re:political interests?! (5, Interesting)

caffeinemessiah (918089) | about 6 years ago | (#25032559)

Being that children can't vote, and no-one cares about their political opinions, doesn't this survey say that they're basically worried about things they have no control over?

Yes, but children do a funny thing...they grow up. It's better to get them engaged at ANY age so that when they're 18, they have a better chance of having better formed opinions than their peers. Bonus points if you can get them interested before the teen years and raging hormones REALLY set in.

Not meaning to troll, but this aversion to politics and world-affairs as "stress inducers" seems to be uniquely American. Elsewhere, children are subjected to things called "Geography" and "Civics" from very early on.

Re:political interests?! (2, Funny)

StellarFury (1058280) | about 6 years ago | (#25033033)

Nowhere else in the world is politics so uniquely American.

Re:political interests?! (4, Funny)

philspear (1142299) | about 6 years ago | (#25033263)

Not meaning to troll, but this aversion to politics and world-affairs as "stress inducers" seems to be uniquely American

Seems plausible to me that politics and world affairs are more stressful to americans because we feel responsible. "Oh crap, what has my country gone and done now?"

As an american, the answer is usually "I really don't want to know, it will only raise my blood pressure, I can only vote so many times each election."

If I were german, the answer might be "Well, probably nothing too bad compared to... you know..."

Re:political interests?! (1)

caffeinemessiah (918089) | about 6 years ago | (#25034005)

Seems plausible to me that politics and world affairs are more stressful to americans because we feel responsible.

Well then perhaps it's a good thing that you're feeling a little stressed -- if not for anything other than the fact that the repercussions of meddling (not mediating) in international politics are almost certainly going to be (and have been) felt in America. It's an unfortunate situation caused by rampant myopia, which reinforces the fact that educating kids about politics and the world is a Good Thing.

Re:political interests?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25034153)

...
It's better to get them engaged at ANY age so that when they're 18, they have a better chance of having better formed opinions than their peers. ...

Honestly, I don't think children having 'better formed opinions than their peers' is really what you want going on.

I think it would suffice to say being better informed than their elders, but indicating that by educating your children, they will have _better_ opinions than their peers is a rather un-educated mindset, frankly. You should hope that your children AND their peers will be more educated and hopefully at a similar level, such that the society can make much more intelligent decisions as a whole.

At the same time, however, we must learn to be more tolerant of others, and learn how to help others excel to their potential.

Re:political interests?! (4, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | about 6 years ago | (#25032569)

Maybe I'm just old, but when I was a kid, we left grown up matters like politics to the adults.

Well, that explains the ignorance of the modern voter. I kid... Mostly...

Re:political interests?! (1)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | about 6 years ago | (#25032571)

Umm.. how exactly is kids being interested in politics a good thing?

Exactly. Shouldn't we be teaching kids to avoid conflict, rather than create it? To seek peaceful solutions, and not rely on coercion?

Re:political interests?! (2, Insightful)

Wootery (1087023) | about 6 years ago | (#25032745)

Exactly. Shouldn't we be teaching kids to avoid conflict, rather than create it? To seek peaceful solutions, and not rely on coercion?

Then point them to the Libertarian Party. Ignorance and disinterest in just how your government is screwing everyone, and what they should be up to, isn't the way.

Re:political interests?! (1)

AceofSpades19 (1107875) | about 6 years ago | (#25032575)

is it really a bad thing that kids are being interested in politics? I would rather a kid be interested in politics then a kid doing drugs or getting involved in similar activities any day of the week

Re:political interests?! (5, Insightful)

ZwJGR (1014973) | about 6 years ago | (#25032707)

Whereas the average adult has control over politics...
Nope, didn't think so.

Whether or not a person can vote is frankly irrelevant to the issue.
In general: Knowledge is Power. Kids will grow up and later be able to vote, and are directly affected by various issues under the control of politicians.

I am frankly surprised that anybody is worried that kids are taking interest in their surrounding environment and it's social mechanisms, I personally am more concerned about kids *not* taking an interest in politics, but then again I'm from the UK and currently living in France, where things are done differently to the US (which I assume is where you're referring to).
Children are not illiterate and incompetent sheep up until the age of majority, whereupon they suddenly become intelligent voters who know all about politics.

Worrying about things which you have no control of is often justified if those things have significant and pervasive control over you.
Although the leap from "interested in" to "worried about" is somewhat tenuous IMO.

Given the current political climate and pre-election/leadership issues publicity in many parts of the world including the US and the UK, a child would inevitably be exposed to significant quantities of information on the subject (in a easily digestible and hype-enhanced format most likely, too).

Disclaimer: I am 18 and about to commence university studies in the UK.

Knowledge is knowledge, not power (2, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | about 6 years ago | (#25033007)

Hey Mr knowledgable, how much power do you think you really have to control the elections or any future government function?

Money is power. With money you can "lobby" the politicians for anything you want.

Re:Knowledge is knowledge, not power (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033125)

Protip: In some countries that's called bribery. In some countries, bribery is illegal both for the briber and the accepting bribee.

Perhaps America needs to stop playing semantics and think about that.

Re:political interests?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033019)

Disclaimer: I am 18 and about to commence university studies in the UK.

Get off my lawn!

Re:political interests?! (4, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | about 6 years ago | (#25032799)

Yes. Because adults are so much better at decision making. (sarcasm should be dripping off your screen by now)

Quite frankly, my experience is that people who were idiots in middle-school still were idiots in middle-age. They even had the same attitudes. This means that age has little to do with whether you're worth listening to. And any attempt to deride someone's interest based on their age is merely an attempt by someone older to keep the competition out.

Not to mention that it is only beneficial to develop and study interests early rather than late.

I'm not sure where you got this idea from, but I find it highly disturbing.

Re:political interests?! (4, Insightful)

Mr2001 (90979) | about 6 years ago | (#25032875)

Umm.. how exactly is kids being interested in politics a good thing?

Because we can't expect kids to suddenly pick up a full set of political knowledge and opinions on their 18th birthdays. If they start being interested sooner, they'll be better prepared when they're finally able to vote, and we'll hopefully see higher turnout among young adults.

It's the same reason that kids who start drinking at a younger age, with their parents' supervision, end up with healthier attitudes toward alcohol. The ones who have no experience with alcohol before turning 21 (or moving out of the house) are the ones who turn into binge drinkers as soon as they have the chance.

Being that children can't vote, and no-one cares about their political opinions,

It's unfortunate that no one cares about their political opinions, because minors are certainly affected by political decisions. Recall that one of the reasons the USA split away from Britain was that it was being affected by decisions it had no power over ("no taxation without representation").

Still, for the health of our democracy, we should encourage kids to think about political issues before they start voting. That way, when the time comes, they'll be more likely to make a decision based on substance instead of treating it like American Idol.

Re:political interests?! (1)

Jorophose (1062218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033231)

It's the same reason that kids who start drinking at a younger age, with their parents' supervision, end up with healthier attitudes toward alcohol. The ones who have no experience with alcohol before turning 21 (or moving out of the house) are the ones who turn into binge drinkers as soon as they have the chance.

Some of us don't drink and have no intentions to do so even if we "grow up" you insensitive clod. =/

However, point taken. Exposure now means understanding for later, for pretty much everything.

Re:political interests?! (1)

credd144az (1078167) | about 6 years ago | (#25033161)

QuantumG,

Your post prompted me to RTFA, at which point I came to the conclusion that you haven't.

To answer your post directly, the more civil/social capital (that the article says is increased by video games) a society has, the less power the government has over them. Definitely one of the founding principles of the US.

On the other hand, being an older person (I assume American), I imagine that you would desire a less educated/civic/political youth, so that the burgeoning retiring population will be able to control legislation to a greater extent than they already do. I congratulate you on your use of rhetorical propaganda to somehow get modded +1.

Re:political interests?! (1)

QuantumG (50515) | about 6 years ago | (#25033237)

I assume American

Why does everyone assume this? Do I sound like an American?

I've had people say they assume I'm an American in response to posts where I've spelt words "behaviour" and "colour" and "learnt" and "spelt" and rather than infer that I might not be an American, they assume I must be a young American.

The vast majority of people on this planet are not Americans (let alone seppos). There's less than 300 million of ya. Stop assuming everyone is one of you.

Oh, and if you really must know, I'm an Australian.

Re:political interests?! (1)

credd144az (1078167) | about 6 years ago | (#25033345)

Fair enough. I did actually draw it from the "when I was a young lad..." (misquoted) sounds American, and Australian apparently. My next assumption is that you still have not read the article.

Since you are around, what is a Seppo?

Nevermind

seppo [urbandictionary.com]
Slang for Americans - as septic tank rhymes with yank, but Americans are also full of shit like septic tanks

Nice

And here I thought that Ostriches [wikipedia.org] came from Africa

Re:political interests?! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033893)

Why does everyone assume this? Do I sound like an American?

Yes. You sound like a pompous, self-obsessed asshole.

Re:political interests?! (2, Insightful)

uhlume (597871) | about 6 years ago | (#25033229)

Jeezus. With an attitude like that, I hope you also choose to leave "grown up matters like politics" to others. The last thing this country's (or any's) politics needs is more people who didn't bother to contrive a political awareness until they were 18.

And who are you to assert no one cares about children's opinions, political or otherwise, asshole?

Re:political interests?! (1)

MagdJTK (1275470) | about 6 years ago | (#25033589)

Umm.. how exactly is kids being interested in politics a good thing?

Maybe I'm just old, but when I was a kid, we left grown up matters like politics to the adults. Being that children can't vote, and no-one cares about their political opinions, doesn't this survey say that they're basically worried about things they have no control over? Isn't that the definition of stress?

Wow. So you want kids to remain ignorant until they can vote. Yeah, that sounds like a great idea!

Ignoring just how stupid that point of view is, it's still not stupid to be interested in things you can't influence. I'm English and as such can't vote in the US. That doesn't mean I'm not going to be interested in who wins the next US election. What with one-sided extradition treaties, US torture flights flying through London and your military refusing to cooperate when your pilots kill our soldiers in Iraq (even when one of our papers leaks the tapes), I care very much about the result in November.

Re:political interests?! (2, Insightful)

omeomi (675045) | about 6 years ago | (#25033691)

Maybe I'm just old, but when I was a kid, we left grown up matters like politics to the adults.

And our politicians are still acting like children, so we can see how well that mentality worked out.

Re:political interests?! (2, Insightful)

lysergic.acid (845423) | about 6 years ago | (#25033825)

so until you turned 18 you never read the news or took any interest in current affairs? no wonder our democracy is in such sad state.

politics covers social issues that affect us all, regardless of one's age. it isn't just an abstract academic exercise to be left to professional politicians. public policy affects our daily lives and touches on issues of morality and justice--concepts which don't just suddenly become relevant only once you're eligible to vote.

personally, i've never considered being politically informed as stressful. forming my own views & opinions about the world i live in isn't a chore; it's my democratic prerogative. i know it's become trendy to act/be apathetic, but that has never appealed to me, not even as a kid. i've always found intellectual pursuits to be very exhilarating, and i like challenging my own assumptions to improve my understanding of the world.

long before i turned 18 i was already involved in community service and social & political activism in my local community. you don't have to be able to vote to understand poverty and social injustice. raising money for charities or working at a soup kitchen aren't just activities for adults. and it's not at all stressful. if anything it's spiritually uplifting and gives one a sense of empowerment.

Re:political interests?! (1)

pxc (938367) | about 6 years ago | (#25034171)

If I'm old enough to be contacted in order to register for the Selective Service, I'm old enough to be politically active. In American schools, we're taught to love our country, to pledge our allegiance to it for the freedoms it gives us. The least we could do is learn what it means to exercise those rights.

Also consider that if kids learn to deal with politics as something they have no control over, they risk forming a very dangerous habit of political apathy. If you can manage to get kids angry about the status quo, eager for their chance to vote and anxious to earn the respect that will get their voice heard, then you can bet they'll actually do something with their vote when they get it.

Also consider that politics exists on many levels, and on some of those levels the opinions of kids can be very relevant. One example I can think of in my personal life is high school students and the district governing board. Although students do not have the final say in what goes on within the district, neither do the parents. Learning to tactfully but forcefully construct an argument can help these sway many people who have direct influence over their lives.

Kids love cpu power (0, Offtopic)

partowel (469956) | about 6 years ago | (#25032509)

Give a kid a hammer.

He is happy.

Give a kid a pencil.

He is happy.

Give a kid a computer.

He is happy.

Kids can do anything.

And so can I.

hee hee.

The Standard Statistical Fallacy (5, Informative)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | about 6 years ago | (#25032543)

This "study" is about as worthless as they get. They ask a bunch of questions to both parents and teens and attempt to create a correlation to the questions they stuck in there. The parents are asked about their community involvement, and knowledge of current events. Teens are asked if they think communication is a good thing (paraphrased).

There's three numbers of any interest to me: ~70% of teens have high speed Internet at home. ~60% of them use the Internet daily. Finally, ~60% of parents think that their teen's gaming has no positive or negative effect on them.Overall, the study certainly doesn't make any quantifiable findings about the effect of video games on kids.

It does, however, show that kids today have a lot better access to the Internet than 10 years ago (surprise!) and that many of them use it on a regular basis (again, surprise!). I'd say that this study shows a stronger correlation between using the Internet regularly and civic involvement than anything to do with video games. In the end, however, it's still just correlation.

Re:The Standard Statistical Fallacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032781)

I'd say that this study shows a stronger correlation between using the Internet regularly and civic involvement than anything to do with video games. In the end, however, it's still just correlation.

Damnit, I was all revved up for a post and you had to go and be not only quicker but more concise.

Totally ruined the end of my day here. Kudos, Douche =)

Re:The Standard Statistical Fallacy (1)

kmac06 (608921) | about 6 years ago | (#25033083)

Yes but the reason this is not (entirely) insignificant is that there is a big lobby out there saying video games/Internet use correlate with "bad" behavioral traits in children, such as violence. So now we can refute those bad statistics with more bad statistics. Yay!

Re:The Standard Statistical Fallacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033159)

If you're doing a survey where 70% percent of respondents have high speed internet at home you have a biased sample population.

High speed internet at home is a hallmark of the middle and upper classes, which are by association generally -though not exclusively - white.

Hey, I'm one of those white guys who use internet daily, but... What I'd be more worried about is whether lack of access to internet for minorities (and the second and third world) is giving them reduced access to things like unbiased information (or differing opinions) and osmotic education that we take for granted in making our (voting) decisions.

The same old rule applies (3, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | about 6 years ago | (#25032547)

Moderation in everything you do. I believe these words of wisdom are mentioned in the Psalms as well.

Re:The same old rule applies (5, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | about 6 years ago | (#25033071)

Moderation in everything you do. I believe these words of wisdom are mentioned in the Psalms as well.

Yeah, I tried that. My wife modded all our sexy time as (-1, overrated).

So I modded her (-1, troll)...

Didn't work out so well, I'm sleeping in the garage nowadays.

Re:The same old rule applies (1)

brit74 (831798) | about 6 years ago | (#25034127)

Moderation in everything you do. I believe these words of wisdom are mentioned in the Psalms as well.

Actually, it was Aristotle or Andria Terence who first came up with this idea, and it was paraphrased two hundred years later in the New Testament. (I point this out only to help religious people understand that there is wisdom outside of their holy books.)
http://www.blueletterbible.org/faq/sayings.html#moderation [blueletterbible.org]
http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/24302.html [quotationspage.com]

I want to see a simcity with alot more road contro (0, Offtopic)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 6 years ago | (#25032549)

I want to see a simcity with a lot more road control simcity 4 RH dose not cut it. The NAT mod helps but still Why can't there be a road building game?

Not enough margin (1)

SleptThroughClass (1127287) | about 6 years ago | (#25032615)

I have a thorough and complete response, but there is not enough time to complete it before my matchmaking session is complete.

So tired of this debate... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032641)

Every study hides and undisputable fact of life:

"People (and groups) are self-interested first and foremost."

Games aren't a public service -- there is a profit motive behind them whether or not they're bad for children. Likewise, studies that claim the opposite (in lieu of other child-vices) have the same root -- a profit motive.

Here is a study I'd like to see:

    1. Which is better for children: Throwing rocks at my neighbor's window or playing GTA?

    2. Which is better for children: Attending a public school or playing Age of Conan.

At the end of the day, I'm the parent and I'll decide what's good or bad for my children -- I don't need some pointy-head-pencil-pusher to feed me agenda-ized information.

Re:So tired of this debate... (1)

credd144az (1078167) | about 6 years ago | (#25033233)

Throwing rocks, Age of Conan, respectively.

Re:So tired of this debate... (1)

return_of_ffalcon (803789) | about 6 years ago | (#25033901)

possibly the worst +5 modded comment I've ever seen.

yes, but please... (1)

Rui Lopes (599077) | about 6 years ago | (#25032703)

... think of the children!

I agree with the study overall, however, (5, Insightful)

DragonTHC (208439) | about 6 years ago | (#25032711)

overly aggressive video games like manhunt and GTAx can be very bad for children who have not developed proper conflict resolution skills.

I certainly don't agree with banning games like that since they provide many hours of enjoyment to me.

I will not let my son play them until he's mature enough to demonstrate the ability to choose something other than aggression.

I do support game ratings and I wish retailers would enforce them. I don't agree with government regulation of games or movies. That would be censorship.

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25032971)

I do support game ratings and I wish retailers would enforce them. I don't agree with government regulation of games or movies. That would be censorship.

So you are ok with censorship so long as it isn't the government censoring content?

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25033501)

I don't think that's what the poster meant. I think he meant he wished that the ratings system held more sway at the retailers who are selling the games. I know it was only until recently, and not everywhere, that someone who was 13 or younger couldn't buy an MA game - most places you still can. I believe that's what the poster meant, and I know I certainly support that.

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, (1)

Trogre (513942) | about 6 years ago | (#25033785)

Absolutely yes.

Do you really want *extremely* impressionable young minds exposed to hard-core pornography and gratuitous violence? Do you have *any* idea how the human mind develops?

And before you say parents should take the responsibility to monitor what their kids watch, that would also be censorship, wouldn't it?

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033845)

Absolutely yes. Do you really want *extremely* impressionable young minds exposed to hard-core pornography and gratuitous violence? Do you have *any* idea how the human mind develops?

Harmful for children soon becomes harmful to the state. Have you noticed how censorship works? It rarely starts with the banning of free speech, it always, always starts with what is harmful for young minds.

And before you say parents should take the responsibility to monitor what their kids watch, that would also be censorship, wouldn't it?

No, because it is simply voluntarily choosing not to do something as the law gives minors very, very, very few rights.

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, - more (1)

Haoie (1277294) | about 6 years ago | (#25033029)

And don't forget those children [and adults too, come to think of it] who have difficulty distinguising right from wrong, fantasy from reality.

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, - more (1)

credd144az (1078167) | about 6 years ago | (#25033249)

Those were around before video games.

Re:I agree with the study overall, however, (1)

potat0man (724766) | about 6 years ago | (#25033985)

overly aggressive video games like manhunt and GTAx can be very bad for children who have not developed proper conflict resolution skills.

How do you know?

don't go too far with this (1)

anarchy_man3 (768249) | about 6 years ago | (#25032751)

This of course is only about video games in general, and only the social aspect. I think many people will extend this to the argument over violent video games, which is a whole different topic entirely. It also has nothing to do with fat kids who don't get any exercise because they're sitting on their ass all day. Just something to keep in mind before people start making conclusions about everything video game related.

So-called "educational" games. (4, Insightful)

nobodyman (90587) | about 6 years ago | (#25032769)

I've never been a huge fan "educational" games. I do think there are some good titles, but I think that the majority of educational games fail because they think that the emphasis is on being "educational". The underlying game has to be fun or the kid will throw it aside.

That said, I think that *all* games are educational. When my daughter was three she picked up my wife's Animal Crossing game and fell in love with it. I sat down and played with her and read all dialogue. Eventually I had to read to her less and less as she was increasingly able to recognize words. Today she's five and reads at a 3rd-grade level. Obviously it's not solely due to games like Animal Crossing, but I think it certainly helped.

Re:So-called "educational" games. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032997)

Top marks for good fatherhood. Let me recant a story.

Ok, i was born a bit early for computer games but I can see the effect and congratulations are in order. I read war and peace at the age of 9, but the school still made me read johnny appleseed because I was supposed to. I hate that book.

However I didn't really fall in love with books until I real frederich pohl and stephen baxter.

I am a librarian now, and work in the field of human/computer interaction

If I never was shown the right book way back in 1997 I would be a welder right now. Thank you awesome librarians of stafford in the UK

Re:So-called "educational" games. (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | about 6 years ago | (#25033643)

Librarians are the keepers of knowledge and should be more highly respected and given the accolades we give to football players.

Re:So-called "educational" games. (1)

77Punker (673758) | about 6 years ago | (#25033795)

I think we give accolades to professional athletes because whenever one of them turns out not to be a total asshole, it comes as a surprise to everyone.

When a librarian turns out to be a decent person, it's business as usual.

No problem (1)

Locke2005 (849178) | about 6 years ago | (#25032825)

My daughter has been playing computer games ever since see was 3. This weekend she was locked in the computer room playing The Sims with Aerosmith Classics blaring on the other computer... in other words, she turned out just like her daddy. Of course, she's only 7... wonder what she will be like when she's a teenager!

selective hatin (2)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | about 6 years ago | (#25032827)

Whenever someone plays GTA and then shoots someone, they make that the news headline, ignoring the real fact. Oh wait, the kids had divorced parents and were abused when they were younger and were off their meds. But it must have been the GTA! GTA is corrupting every normal, healthy kid in the world! It's just stupid old people hating on something they don't understand. Good thing there's real studies like this.

And next week... (4, Insightful)

Secret Rabbit (914973) | about 6 years ago | (#25032831)

... a study will find that Video Games *Are* Bad for Kids.

Re:And next week... (1)

Ortega-Starfire (930563) | about 6 years ago | (#25032917)

Actually, a study will show that parents who base their parenting habits off all these "studies" are bad for children. Including this study.

spiritual starvation bad for all, no study needed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032877)

the results are obvious & getting worse by the day.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."

greed, fear & ego are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of yOUR dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & the notion of prosperity, not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one. see you on the other side of it. the lights are coming up all over now. conspiracy theorists are being vindicated. some might choose a tin umbrella to go with their hats. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.google.com/?ncl=1216734813&hl=en&topic=n
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/world/29amnesty.html?hp
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/06/02/nasa.global.warming.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/05/severe.weather.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/02/honore.preparedness/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/opinion/01dowd.html?em&ex=1212638400&en=744b7cebc86723e5&ei=5087%0A
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/06/05/senate.iraq/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/17/washington/17contractor.html?hp
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/world/middleeast/03kurdistan.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080708/cheney_climate.html
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20080805/pl_politico/12308;_ylt=A0wNcxTPdJhILAYAVQms0NUE
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080903/ts_nm/environment_arctic_dc;_ylt=A0wNcwhhcb5It3EBoy2s0NUE

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=weather+manipulation&btnG=Search
http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

'The current rate of extinction is around 10 to 100 times the usual background level, and has been elevated above the background level since the Pleistocene. The current extinction rate is more rapid than in any other extinction event in earth history, and 50% of species could be extinct by the end of this century. While the role of humans is unclear in the longer-term extinction pattern, it is clear that factors such as deforestation, habitat destruction, hunting, the introduction of non-native species, pollution and climate change have reduced biodiversity profoundly.' (wiki)

What about physical impact? (1)

eggfoolr (999317) | about 6 years ago | (#25032901)

Repetitive strain injuries (RSI, OOS whatever you want to call it) and obesity are not mentioned. Other than the over weight dude in the picture.

Games are definitely a social activity for my children which is positive, but we limit their access simply because it is physically unhealthy.

Re:What about physical impact? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033001)

Repetitive strain injuries (RSI, OOS whatever you want to call it) and obesity are not mentioned.

Could it be that a lot of people simply don't eat and play video games all the time? Honestly, very few hardcore gamers are fat because they don't want the orange powder from Cheetos to be on their keyboard/controller. Also RSI isn't a huge deal with kids because they heal fast and most of the time have very short attention spans. One moment they will want to play Final Fantasy X all day, the next they want to bake cookies. Go figure.

Re:What about physical impact? (1)

eggfoolr (999317) | about 6 years ago | (#25033599)

The point is that it would be good if there was a study that was more comprehensive. What do you base your comments on?

I certainly don't know if there is a tie up between obesity and gaming, or what the long term effects are on tendon injuries. I could postulate that there is something worth investigating though. There is nothing wrong with long periods of rest if you also have regular intensive physical activity, that's basically how the body is designed to work, how muscles grow and strengthen. But is sitting at a keyboard, mouse, game controller etc a healthy type of resting?

What I do know is that my children have the attention span to be able to play video games almost all day if you let them, and that they can get sore wrists in a matter of a few hours. I know other families that do not put limits on their children and they do play for what I consider far too long. I have taught my children to take micro breaks and are limited to only a couple of hours a week, but this is based purely on my experience with computers as an adult.

I agree that children recover from such injuries far quicker, but I don't know if anyone has considered the long term exposure to such injuries for later life.

I do know that tendon injuries such as micro tears caused by over use are complex. When a tendon repairs itself, it does not do as good a job as say a broken bone.

Seriously, the long term implication of what we are exposing our children to is simply not understood.

Re:What about physical impact? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033873)

What I do know is that my children have the attention span to be able to play video games almost all day if you let them, and that they can get sore wrists in a matter of a few hours.

Like a lot of /.ers I am on the computer constantly, on laptops too. And usually for recreation I play video games, and I can say that I never had a sore wrist from playing games and or typing. My eyes occasionally hurt but other than that there have been little ill effects. And I have been playing video games since I was a child back in the days of the monochrome Game Boys, the NES and SNES, and never had a sore wrist nor any other symptoms save for some eye strain.

I agree that children recover from such injuries far quicker, but I don't know if anyone has considered the long term exposure to such injuries for later life.

Since the 2600 came out in the late '70s children growing up with it would be about 30 years old, and about 20 for the NES and the home computer fad. I think if it was a major issue we would have heard a lot more about it.

Re:What about physical impact? (1)

eggfoolr (999317) | about 6 years ago | (#25034093)

Its all to do with susceptibility. I know people who's lives have been severely impacted and yet others like you who damn near live and breath computers with no ill effect.

I believe there will be people who have had early exposure to poor ergonomics and repetitive type injuries that will be far worse off.

It is more of a silent epidemic. I have family members who are limited in what they can do in their jobs and I am aware of a lot more people in computer related work that are affected. But 30+ years ago these types of injuries were unheard of.

So wait... (1)

Mr. Flibble (12943) | about 6 years ago | (#25032903)

So wait, Jack Thompson was wrong?

I am shocked, just simply shocked at this news.

prove a negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25032907)

How did they manage to prove that negative?

the art of the gank? (3, Funny)

Krater76 (810350) | about 6 years ago | (#25032945)

For instance, you can play a mayor in âoeSimCity,â and get a close-up look at what it takes to build and maintain a community. Helping a newbie get his sea legs in a game simulates the real-world experience of volunteering.

So what does mercilessly ganking a low-level player in Thousand Needles simulate?

But seriously, did they check how social these kids were before playing the games? Just because someone is being more civic in their gameplay doesn't mean that they got that way from playing games, they could've been that way in the first place.

Hrm, I say shitcock to that (1)

e2d2 (115622) | about 6 years ago | (#25033035)

significant amount of social interaction and potential for civic engagement.

Keyword potential. In the wise words of penny arcade: SHITCOCK!

http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2004/03/19/ [penny-arcade.com]

Screw this study (1)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | about 6 years ago | (#25033049)

Online videogames are terribly dangerous!

Ban everyone under the age of 18 from playing online. That way, I can finally play online without some prepubescent screaming in my ear about how much of a n00b I am for not playing 16 hours a day.

I mean... err... so the kids won't get exposed to violence and sex and become criminals...

Re:Screw this study (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 6 years ago | (#25033225)

I suggest you get a Wii... Not only do you not have to play hardly any games online, but you also only communicate with about 15 pre-determined phrases!

Wait a minute... (1)

bistromath007 (1253428) | about 6 years ago | (#25033063)

You're telling me that the kind of people you see on Gamefaqs are more engaged civically and politically than their peers?

Our nation is doomed. :(

Racial slurs and politics (1)

Klobbersaurus (796024) | about 6 years ago | (#25033265)

those kids yelling racial slurs over xbox-live are the leaders of tomorrow

Aging slashdotters and other offtopic statistics (1)

1 a bee (817783) | about 6 years ago | (#25033511)

Offtopic observation: posts in this page, and other slashdot stories concerning children are a good statistical sample for tracking and/or estimating slashdot user demographics concerning age and number of children in household.

I'm the parent, and I'll decide... (1)

throatmonster (147275) | about 6 years ago | (#25033555)

You got that right. I think Roblox has helped my son (poor social skills, just like me) learn a little bit about conflict resolution. It's almost funny to watch: the first thing any of them do to anyone else new is frag them. Then comes the "you @#$#@ n00b" phase. After awhile they realize there's no winning, so they find some common ground, make up, and invite each other to be friends.

Dealing with my workplace IT staff is just like this, BTW: the first time I deal with someone I don't already know, I get the buzz-saw treatment. Then comes the short word war, and finally we figure out how to deal with each other and can work together after that.

Yes, but.... (1)

eccenthink (1312043) | about 6 years ago | (#25033965)

Just today I read on /. that plastics cause heart disease and diabetes so the more time they spend touching anything plastic (including playing video games) the worse off they are unless they wrap the keyboard or controller in tinfoil I suppose...

violence solves problems (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25034089)

tha is the primary message of most 'games', and it is stupid to think this is 'harmless'.

hello iraq.

Study defines kids as ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 6 years ago | (#25034301)

... 30 something year olds living in their parents basement?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>