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Japan To Get 1Gbps Home Fiber Connections

timothy posted about 6 years ago | from the yes-but-food-is-cheaper-elsewhere dept.

Networking 275

ashitaka writes "KDDI has announced that they will be launching a 1Gbps Internet service to single-family home and condo users in October. The service is supposedly synchronous, with 1Gbps in both directions, although the article implies that speeds will vary with location. Cost will be 5,985 yen/month (about US$56.50) for the basic Internet and IP phone service. This is intended to compete with NTT, who currently control over 70% of the Japanese FTTH market."

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Brilliant! (-1, Troll)

MrPerfekt (414248) | about 6 years ago | (#25178585)

Let's give more bandwidth to ordinary people that run super-secure Operating Systems and will undoubtedly never get any malicious trojans.

Seriously, 1Gbps is so insanely overboard. Many service providers don't even need that much bandwidth. That much can only be used for bad things.

The amusing part about it, is that it will be capped at 30GB transfer a month probably. AWESOME! You can reach your cap for the month in a matter of hours.

Re:Brilliant! (5, Funny)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about 6 years ago | (#25178605)

You're right 640 Kbps should be enough for anybody! I'll get off your lawn now.

Re:Brilliant! (3, Insightful)

Adambomb (118938) | about 6 years ago | (#25178647)

Actually, he has a very good point.

Imagine a botnet of 10000 zombied windows machines on 3.0Mbps up/down.

Now imagine a botnet of 10000 zombied windows machines on 1Gbps up/down.

Now if you're the target of the latter botnets DoS attack, i'm sure you'd be asking "what in the hell do they need that much upstream for to begin with!".

Some would have very good uses for that bandwidth but if their market is anything like what I see in north america, at least half or more will be people who get it because of shinyness or the myth of the best. Depending on the ToS, this could be quite the liability for the rest of the world at large unless enough of the worlds backbones are similarly upgraded to handle the home user market hitting 1Gbps+. Not saying it is a bad thing overall, simply that the concern is valid and that given time it will no longer be a problem. Right now, he has a point.

Doesn't really matter (4, Insightful)

TheLink (130905) | about 6 years ago | (#25178809)

If you don't have a 30Gbps link, it doesn't really matter whether you're getting hit by 10000 x 3Mbps (30 Gbps) or 10000 x 1Gbps.

It'll be hard for you to tell the difference :).

I think most sites don't even have a 1Gbps link.

Re:Doesn't really matter (1)

Adambomb (118938) | about 6 years ago | (#25178835)

It does for sites that have the lower total throughput but have a fair bit of redundancy in place for security sake. If your disaster recovery analysis is based on the average zombie having access to 3-10Mbit, then a sudden influx of zombied 1Gbps links would definitely pooch the whole deal and make your "redundancy" rather useless. THAT is where the difference would be seriously noticeable.

You're right though for cases of smaller providers using a single connection for the entirety of their service. In those cases, this issue is definitely moot (and obviously not involving a very large user base unless someone is being extremely stupid about their security).

Re:Brilliant! (1)

alisson (1040324) | about 6 years ago | (#25178859)

Maybe your hypothetical person under attack from botnets should move to Japan and get cheap broadband.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

Adambomb (118938) | about 6 years ago | (#25179133)

I suppose, if you want to pay for the 10000 concatenated links to withstand what I was describing.

Re:Brilliant! (5, Insightful)

Tuoqui (1091447) | about 6 years ago | (#25179269)

Only thing they'll be good for DoS attacking is something in Japan because they'll instantly hit a bottleneck of epic proportions the moment they try to touch the US Network with all its bandwidth problems :P

I think some ISP in Japan recently capped their users at like 250 GB A DAY... Whatever Japan is doing is what the US should be doing in terms of expanding their network. I understand theres alot more problems like distance and such but still.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

Adambomb (118938) | about 6 years ago | (#25179573)

Touche, i was not even thinking of the fact that all those users are squished at the under sea backbones. Reduces the point, but does not eliminate it COMPLETELY it as it still creates a situation where it becomes much easier for those bottlenecks to be maxed out. I suppose anyone reviewing this would just have to change their analysis to be based on the maximum throughput out of japan not the number of gigabit connections.

Wait. Does anyone have the figures of how much bandwidth is available when counting the backbone routes? All i can find (between cases at work) is some stodgy old article from 1999 thats useless. If it's a fat enough pipe the fact that its bottlenecked might be moot to begin with.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

aztektum (170569) | about 6 years ago | (#25179601)

I understand theres alot more problems like distance and such but still.

If Japan can be connected to the rest of the internet with multiple underwater cables, I see it as a lame excuse we can't connect our country to itself with cables on land.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

RulerOf (975607) | about 6 years ago | (#25179301)

Actually, he has a very good point.

No, he doesn't.

The real point is that the current disparity between commercial links and residential links should be reflected by any any potential target of his theoretical DoS attack.

In other words, if the average home has 3 MBps currently, and the average business has 3 GBps, then a move to 1 GBps in the home should be reflected by businesses acquiring 1 TBps links for the price of what they currently have.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | about 6 years ago | (#25179625)

nah, the thinking right now is 3 Mbps (burst) should be enough for everyone.

ISPs want consumers to conform their usage to the service provider's business model--overselling and artificially manipulate internet usage through bandwidth caps, packet shaping, etc.

those crazy Japanese actually think that supply should try to meet demand, rather than the other way around? what madness is this?

Re:Brilliant! (2, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about 6 years ago | (#25178615)

Woah, someone is totally jealous.

Re:Brilliant! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178623)

So how's life over in America MrPerfekt?

Re:Brilliant! (1)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | about 6 years ago | (#25178629)

I don't see much use for 1Gbps either, I rarely use the full capacity of my 100 Mbps. But there will probably come some use for 1 Gbps connections in the future, so it's always good to be ready. Who would have predicted 100 Mbps being (somewhat, here at least) common (or having a use) 10 years ago when we were waiting for DSL to get us out of the dial-up world.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

forkazoo (138186) | about 6 years ago | (#25178889)

I don't see much use for 1Gbps either, I rarely use the full capacity of my 100 Mbps. But there will probably come some use for 1 Gbps connections in the future, so it's always good to be ready. Who would have predicted 100 Mbps being (somewhat, here at least) common (or having a use) 10 years ago when we were waiting for DSL to get us out of the dial-up world.

Honestly, I'm sure that uses will naturally grow to fill the available pipe. It always happens. But, I'd have no idea what to do with that much bandwidth, either. I only have one machine with GigE capability right now, and no switches or routers that would handle it.

For web browsing, I think I'm more limited by latency right now than I am by raw bandwidth, and I only have 6 Mb down, and less than 1 Mb up. For big downloads like video, or ISO's, I think at a gigabit I'd probably be able to download a hell of a lot faster than I can watch it, or burn it, or whatever. Regardless, I'm sure it;d be fun trying to figure out a good use. :) I'd probably start doing absurd things like setting up a script to get every TV / movie torrent at my favorite sites, so I could watch a bit of something to decide if it is interesting, instead of looking it up and deciding if I want to download it.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | about 6 years ago | (#25179639)

At 1 gig/second you could download those things you want to try HD within 10seconds anyways, no need to store the internet on your computer.
 
I'm more curious what this will do to the p2p scene. Right now torrents will rarely cap my meager 600KB/s download. If there were a few people on the torrent seeding w/ 1Gb/s it would easily cap. Unfortunately Japan rarely uses torrents. I'm wondering if it would be easier at this point to switch services. Annoying to write fresh code to remote control the new p2p ap though. In case people are curious i believe a lot of these mega users will be migrating to japan's "perfect dark" application as it has a requirement of 100KB/s and a 40G allocation for hashes. I think i'll give it a whirl today.

Re:Brilliant! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178933)

Supposedly NHK will begin "broadcasting" streaming HDTV over the internet later this year or early next year. 1Gbps will allow this to happen without compressing the data into artifact hell.

Re:Brilliant! (4, Informative)

Yokaze (70883) | about 6 years ago | (#25179411)

Considering that blue-ray is 1080p, but limited to 54Mbps, I think one can safely assume, that 1Gbps is not entirely necessary for that kind of thing.

Super HiVision, on the other hand, would be a different matter.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178631)

Seriously, 1Gbps is so insanely overboard.

And 640K is enough for anyone.

The amusing part about it, is that it will be capped at 30GB transfer a month probably. AWESOME! You can reach your cap for the month in a matter of hours.

Try 4 minutes.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

Vectronic (1221470) | about 6 years ago | (#25178821)

"Try 4 minutes"

wouldnt it be 30 seconds? or even 15 seconds if you are downloading and uploading at cap.

Its 4 minutes if its 1024/8 which is a 1GB line, not 1GB Per Second

Not that it matters cause neither the 1Gbps nor the 30GB cap reality, or proven yet.

Re:Brilliant! (4, Insightful)

adamstew (909658) | about 6 years ago | (#25178967)

you're forgetting the difference between GB and Gb (bytes vs. bits). there are 8 Gb in 1 GB.

If the connection is 1Gbps: 30 GB * 8 GB/Gb = 240 Gb, which is 240 seconds. 240 seconds is 4 minutes.

Re:Brilliant! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179193)

Actually you are off by a little bit. Bytes are measured in powers of 1024, while bits are not. Thus you need to adjust by a factor of 2^30/10^9.

Or 30 GB * (1 S/Gb) * (Gb/10^9 b) * (8 b / B) * (2^30 B / GB) = 4 minutes 18 seconds

Re:Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179275)

Actually, bytes are not defined to be 8 bits. Their size is machine architecture dependent.

Re:Brilliant! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179335)

Actually I don't even give a shit anymore christ goddamn

Re:Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179523)

You dont know your math. There are 8 bits in a byte but 1000Gb in a GB.

Re:Brilliant! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178827)

I think 1 Gbps is faster than you even think. Theoretically, if you were using full bandwidth you would max out your 30GB transfer limit in less than 5 minutes (~258 seconds), not hours.

Re:Brilliant! (1)

heteromonomer (698504) | about 6 years ago | (#25179031)

Why the hell is the parent modded troll? He makes valid points. Although I very much like having that 1 Gbps too.

Hope they start using bittorrent (5, Funny)

ChienAndalu (1293930) | about 6 years ago | (#25178587)

I mean, they have to do *something* with the bandwidth

Re:Hope they start using bittorrent (3, Informative)

rale, the (659351) | about 6 years ago | (#25178879)

They're too busy using PD [wikipedia.org] (think freenet, but fast).

Re:Hope they start using bittorrent (1)

magus_melchior (262681) | about 6 years ago | (#25179473)

I wish they could, but the ISPs there agreed to monitor their users for P2P transmissions of copyrighted stuff.

Dunno if they will allow the content companies there to actually bully their customers, but given that they've taken to mimicking the US in a lot of ways...

Sweet! (4, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | about 6 years ago | (#25178589)

That makes it much more likely that Japanese slashdot users will get first post!

Re:Sweet! (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 6 years ago | (#25178965)

Wouldn't that be the one with a station wagon full of DVDs? Or are you confusing two concepts here...

Re:Sweet! (1)

e-Flex (1219042) | about 6 years ago | (#25179215)

I, for one, welcome our new ultra-responding low-latency overlords!

Re:Sweet! (2, Funny)

Starmengau (1367783) | about 6 years ago | (#25179621)

They have their own slashdot for that.
Ironically, this isn't a front page story on slashdot.jp.

Re:Sweet! (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | about 6 years ago | (#25179663)

It wouldn't give them first post that would be ping. It will just allow them to post a few trillion times an hour.

Wouldn't do us here in the US much good (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 6 years ago | (#25178599)

Just means we would reach our cap that much sooner. And of course, the ISP's would just go off and over sell that too.

Think of the Backbone (2, Insightful)

RichMan (8097) | about 6 years ago | (#25178637)

I thought the service providers were already complaining about individual users clogging up "the pipes".
Giving a bigger bandwidth to end users is just asking for more backend network congestion.

Unless they are expecting us to continue along the http: clicky traffic model with all this new bandwidth.

YouTube and movie on demand services look more usable with this increased bandwidth.

I suppose the service providers are drooling at the thought of pricing per gigabyte downloads along the lines of text-message pricing.

Re:Think of the Backbone (1)

Kneo24 (688412) | about 6 years ago | (#25178679)

Service providers in the USA, afaik. Those people in Sushi-land? They apparently love giving out lots of bandwidth at affordable prices.

Re:Think of the Backbone (2, Insightful)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | about 6 years ago | (#25178703)

Then upgrade the backbone. Instead of limiting the speed for end users, invest in the backbone and eliminate the clogging. I'm guessing Japan doesn't have that big of a problem with the backbone though. (neither does Sweden it would appear, I can easily reach 100 Mbps if I download directly from someone else on a 100 Mbps connection within Sweden)

Re:Think of the Backbone (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179183)

I work at tech support for one of swedens largest ISP:s (bredbandsbolaget). We're currently testing 1gbit-connections with a couple of hundred customers. I'm guessing we'll start selling to the general public within the next two years or so. ^^

Re:Think of the Backbone (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179279)

IIRC, Bredbandsbolaget has said that they will upgrade all their fiber customers to 1000/1000 by 2010.

Not in Japan (5, Informative)

RawsonDR (1029682) | about 6 years ago | (#25178931)

I thought the service providers were already complaining about individual users clogging up "the pipes". Giving a bigger bandwidth to end users is just asking for more backend network congestion.

Far from it, actually. Japan is the world leader in internet infrastructure.

See the recent study [google.com] that quantified this into a "bandwidth quality score" for 42 countries. Japan's score was basically double everyone else. USA scored 16th, UK 24th.

And their population is only a little less than half of the United States, but being spread out over an area 25 times smaller is really what makes adoption a bit easier for them.

GETTING fiber and GETTING bandwidth not the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178673)

It's one thing to get a fiber hookup but it's another to get the bandwidth. Do you believe every little Nipponese boy and girl - all 150 million of the tykes - get 1G? Come this way, I've some prime real-estate for you down on the bayou.

Re:GETTING fiber and GETTING bandwidth not the sam (1)

besalope (1186101) | about 6 years ago | (#25178885)

It's one thing to get a fiber hookup but it's another to get the bandwidth. Do you believe every little Nipponese boy and girl - all 150 million of the tykes - get 1G? Come this way, I've some prime real-estate for you down on the bayou.

You Sir apparently do not know the Japanese.

If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo... (4, Insightful)

bconway (63464) | about 6 years ago | (#25178677)

Chances are good the price you pay for your Internet access is largely irrelevant.

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178747)

While what you say is largely true, suburbs that are about an hour by train can be quite inexpensive. And most companies buy a monthly pass for you. And where I live in Osaka, the rent is lower compared to the place I was renting back in India.

On topic, this is awesome news indeed. I currently pay 5500 Yen for a 100Mbps from K-Opt/eonet(http://eonet.jp). But too bad that I am living in the western part of Japan.

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178801)

Americans are jealous, ha-ha! Your pathetic country is dying! Do you think we forgot Hiroshima and Nagasaki??? Keep thinking... Time of our revenge is about to come. The USA are going to pay for all the evil they did around the world...

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178947)

Shut the fuck up or we'll nuke you again. That non-nuclear policy [wikipedia.org] is a bitch, isn't it?

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0, Offtopic)

calidoscope (312571) | about 6 years ago | (#25178961)

Japan was working on using biological weapons in 1944 to repel the invasion of Saipan and retaking of Guam. Japan was also making preparations to use radiological weapons in 1945. Fortunately for Japan, the submarines carrying the materials were sunk en-route, as the retaliation for the attacks (especially the bio-warfare) would have been massive.

And you seem to be forgetting about Nanjing (Nanking).

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0, Offtopic)

mweather (1089505) | about 6 years ago | (#25179213)

"Fortunately for Japan, the submarines carrying the materials were sunk en-route, as the retaliation for the attacks (especially the bio-warfare) would have been massive." You mean worse than having their cities relentlessly firebombed, then using the world's entire supply of U-238 and Plutonium to vaporize two cities?

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179249)

Yes, It would have been worse.

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0, Offtopic)

Saffaya (702234) | about 6 years ago | (#25179327)

How is that any worse than the destruction of some german cities by allied bombers in WWII ?

You should really take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Dresden_in_World_War_II [wikipedia.org]
and educate yourself some more about the destruction waged on germany during that time.

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0, Offtopic)

freedom_india (780002) | about 6 years ago | (#25179291)

If japan had used those to retake saipan and Guam, they probably would not have succeeded. Because while the land troops would have been mauled, the ships would have pummeled the japs who tried to retake them.
Plus, Truman would have probably dropped both of the Big Boys on Tokyo, ending their emperor's reign in a blinding flash of light one wonderful morning.

Re:If you can afford a single-family home in Tokyo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179069)

What the sibling AC said. Central Tokyo is amazingly expensive, but while none of it is cheap, Tokyo is the size of Rhode Island, and a lot of it is affordable (else how would all those people live there?).

At that rate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178695)

They can use up Comcasts's 250GB monthly cap in 33 minutes.

Synchronous? (2)

lukpac (66596) | about 6 years ago | (#25178699)

"synchronous" = symmetric?

Re:Synchronous? (4, Funny)

dubl-u (51156) | about 6 years ago | (#25178811)

No, it's really synchronous. That's how they can afford to do it cheaply. It works like this:

Suppose you want to download a video. For every packet of the video you download, you need to upload one. Now naturally, you can't upload somebody else's copyrighted content. So you have to upload original video content that somebody else wants to watch.

The main sponsors of the rollout are porn companies, because that's the only kind of marketable content most people can create. Some camwhores will probably do all right, too. And if you live in an interesting neighborhood, you can put up some webcams to meet the synchronous data requirement.

Most people, though, won't be able to generate enough content, so they'll have to pay extra to get the synchronous requirement waved. It's sort of like how cellphone companies sell you a cheap plan, knowing they'll screw you on extras.

Re:Synchronous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179527)

/clap

Re:Synchronous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178819)

Amen. Had the very same thought.

Synchronous? (4, Informative)

680x0 (467210) | about 6 years ago | (#25178705)

What the heck is synchronous [wikipedia.org] about these connections? Don't you mean symmetric [wikipedia.org] ?

Slashdot, get your act together! (1)

Kent Recal (714863) | about 6 years ago | (#25179207)

My thoughts exactly.
I wish slashdot would finally hire some editors with a clue. It can't be so hard, can it?

Seriously, the way slashdot is headed I won't be surprised when it dies the death-by-fork, soon...

On behalf of everyone else... (-1, Troll)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about 6 years ago | (#25178721)

I think I speak for everyone else when I say F*** you Japan! We never liked you anyway!

Awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178723)

For legal things such as VNC (remote desktop type stuff), legal streaming video, video chat, etc. None of which is exactly feasible on 6 megabit service at "full" quality.

Not hard technology; it's the politics (5, Interesting)

rbrander (73222) | about 6 years ago | (#25178729)

It must be almost 10 years now since I wrote (Ethernet inventor) Bob Metcalfe when he was an Infoworld columnist, to ask why the hell North America was building an Internet system out of wires installed for completely different purposes: a 1930's POTS network and a 1970's cable-TV network. There was much talk about the "unaffordable" trillions it would take to run fiber to every home.

This begged the question of how we managed to run phone to every home with the much-smaller 1920's-1940's economy to draw on, then did it all again with more-expensive cable in a decade over the 1970's. And, you see, I work for a water and sewer utility and KNOW what it costs to run big, heavy, iron 6" diameter pipes both to and from your street and get payback on the capital out of the $40/month water bill, even after operating costs.

Metcalfe had no reply, he tossed it to his readers; none of whom had an answer either, save those who wrote me by E-mail to rail against telephone monopolies and lobbyist-ruined governance.

What's Japan going to DO with 1Gbps? By the time we find out, it'll take us over a decade to catch up, even if all the monopolies and lobbies are broken the next day. (In my business, we used to get a few gallons per day of water out of wells and have a shower once a week or so; now consumption can be a ton of water per day per person and we shower all we want, we have hot tubs and pools, kids in Nevada learn to swim, we irrigate gardens, and fill our cities with trees in arid climates: trust me, uses for bandwidth WILL arise, and our kids will wonder how we got by without.)

Americans might want to start getting advice from the British on how you handle it, psychologically, when you wake up a decade or so into a new century and realize that you just aren't the most important nation on Earth anymore.

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178753)

Uh, right, fiber, makes you important. It's good for you, but sure leaves a LOT of crap around.

What's Japan going to DO with 1Gbps? (2, Insightful)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 6 years ago | (#25178815)

Watch streaming video without having to hit 'pause' on the player to let it fully buffer before even starting to play?

Not have to shut down other applications because my 4 BitTorrent connections are making my email logon time out and my web browser not load images on the pages (assuming it can even load the page to begin with)?

Lots of possibilities for new applications, but just fixing the current problems would be marvelous.

Yeah, these problems won't be fixed without backbone upgrades, but I bet Japan doesn't have that problem to the degree those of us in the U.S. do.

Easy for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178871)

With the population density of japan, I figure they can get some good deals.

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178907)

A virtual-world/MMORPG with server-side photon/ray-tracing rendering(that scales well due to being able to reuse the results of those calculations among different camera positions), and simply streams audio, and JPEG-2000 compressed video , to clients?

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about 6 years ago | (#25179409)

Why do you think a server would be able to devote more resources to the game than a dedicated home system?

Photon/Ray-Tracing requires a LOT of horsepower. What makes you think that a server shared by thousands of people will be able to give you any more cycles than a dedicated high performance workstation?

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (0, Troll)

Yeorwned (1233604) | about 6 years ago | (#25179099)

America is still the most important right now but thanks anyway!

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179177)

>Americans might want to start getting advice from the British on how you handle it, psychologically, when you wake up a decade or so into a new century and realize that you just aren't the most important nation on Earth anymore.

Well said!

Re:Not hard technology; it's the politics (5, Funny)

OriginalArlen (726444) | about 6 years ago | (#25179399)

Americans might want to start getting advice from the British on how you handle it, psychologically, when you wake up a decade or so into a new century and realize that you just aren't the most important nation on Earth anymore

You become terribly bitter and unhappy, but you try really hard not to show it. Then you invent Monty Python.

Funny how we hear (3, Insightful)

joeflies (529536) | about 6 years ago | (#25178741)

that the world is getting more bandwidth capacity to individuals on new technology, whereas most of the US is on cable modem and we're getting new restrictions after years of unannounced restrictions placed on our bandwidth.

Economic crash=1gbps internet? (1)

ntwrkguy (578989) | about 6 years ago | (#25178777)

Maybe we need to not pass this bailout bill so our economy tanks, and then 10 years from now we'll all have 1Gbps Home Fiber connections just like Japan!

The reason is obvious. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178785)

Their appetite for tentacle rape porn is insatiable. I expect we'll see another bandwidth increase in about 6 months. Honestly, how much tentacle rape porn can there be in the world?!?!

Re:The reason is obvious. (1)

RelaxedTension (914174) | about 6 years ago | (#25178867)

Honestly, how much tentacle rape porn can there be in the world?!?!

There can never be enough.

No more excuses! (1)

ppolitop (870365) | about 6 years ago | (#25178823)

That proves that it *is* viable to have much better connectivity at an affordable price. Most of us around the world get ripped off by greedy telecom giants that instead of catching up with current tech, they invest on how to spy on us, sue us, or limit our already slow connections. Great! On the other hand, Tokyo is densely populated and has a lot better infrastructure than the average city, but still why don't we have access to equivalent services at large urban centers? Peter

how far does the 1Gbps go? in town only? in the lo (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 6 years ago | (#25178847)

how far does the 1Gbps go? in town only? in the local switch only?

Two words (1)

Beached (52204) | about 6 years ago | (#25178849)

No Fair!!

I wish I could get 1/10th of this at a decent price. Good for them though

Whats wrong in the U.S. (2, Insightful)

mcbutterbuns (1005301) | about 6 years ago | (#25178851)

This highlights exactly whats wrong in the U.S. Japan gets faster and faster speeds, the U.S. gets slower and slower. In my area, Comcast is now offering a SLOWER speed for less money (but not much less). 640 Kbps in 2008? Come on! 1/10th the speed for 1/2 the price. We're getting robbed.

Questionnaire for comparison (2, Interesting)

I cant believe its n (1103137) | about 6 years ago | (#25179377)

Please state price, speed (downstream and upstream) and country.
I pay $58/month for symetric 100Mbps in Sweden.

Re:Questionnaire for comparison (1)

erayd (1131355) | about 6 years ago | (#25179477)

$80/month for 10m down, 2m up. Cable internet with a 20GB cap. This is the best commonly available residential connection in New Zealand, and even then it's only in two cities (Wellington & Christchurch)...

Re:Questionnaire for comparison (1)

Ritchie70 (860516) | about 6 years ago | (#25179517)

Around $45 a month, Chicago suburb (USA), just tested at about 4.5Mbps down, 1.5 Mbps up, no other significant traffic on my connection.

Comcast.

Re:Questionnaire for comparison (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179615)

$40 a month for 24mbps down, 2mbps up.. In the UK (London). No bandwidth cap (fair usage is ~250GB/month I think, never hit it to find out).

Staying Competitive (1)

WiiVault (1039946) | about 6 years ago | (#25178861)

If the US hopes to stay competitive in the high tech sector we are really going to have to do something about broadband. Letting the companies run it the way they have has clearly slowed down the uptake and we can't let it happen any longer. Teleco monopolies are bad for America.

Too much (3, Insightful)

UnixUnix (1149659) | about 6 years ago | (#25178903)

You cannot be too rich, too thin, or have too much bandwidth :-P

1Gbps is more... (1)

onefriedrice (1171917) | about 6 years ago | (#25178905)

...than I get on my wired LAN.

Big Deal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25178957)

This is silly! Right silly! Its merely 2986.42966360856269113149 times as fast as my recently upgraded adsl connection (it used to be roughly half as fast), for $40 per month. I'm not bitter. No, dammit! Not a bit! So just shuddup about your gigabit ethernet, ok? I am not being taken by my ISP! Sniff.

Why don't we just use the telegraph? (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | about 6 years ago | (#25179171)

Fuck you Comcast. Fuck you AT&T.
Because of your greed and sloth, the US is laggard in online innovation and content delivery. Enjoy it while you can. We may have invented everything, but the Japanese are making it cooler, smaller, faster, cheaper, and more reliable than us. The snarling greed of US corporate enterprise has reared its ugly head for three decades. It has ruined our way of life and our safety and our nation. This really doesn't surprise me all that much. I pay the same price for 6Mbit of highly limited service over a line which can handle 16 times that. Imagine if they realized they could still make money by doing things for the benefit of everyone rather than the benefit of themselves.

Re:Why don't we just use the telegraph? (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | about 6 years ago | (#25179375)

High speed bandwidth without anything to put in it is useless. Remember, Congress is the opposite of progress in that the Senate has passed a restrictive 'IP protection' bill and sent it back to the House for another vote since they had to peel out the IP cops provision when the Justice Department told them it wouldn't fly cause it would cut into Defense's budget.

Of course we'll never see that kind of high speed internet here in the US. The Senator from Disney would have a fit if we could pirate their old tired 'product' in seconds and get offline before they could slap a warrant at our ISP to get our names.

yeah, right.... (1)

NerveGas (168686) | about 6 years ago | (#25179309)

The link (fiber) may be able to handle 1gbps, but users aren't going to get that much in reality. Why not? It's the routing. Call up your favorite router vendor, and ask what it would take to route 100 gigabits. Then consider that with the density of living in Japan, you could put one of those in every neighborhood, and still not be able to get even half of the people up to full gigabit speed.

Wish they had this here (1)

wmbetts (1306001) | about 6 years ago | (#25179353)

/me moves to Japan

I always watch others multiply (1)

poullos (1023935) | about 6 years ago | (#25179365)

hmm..I have 2mbs and I'm moving in 10-15 days to my new house, where I can only get 1mbs for now. I remember celebrating when I first upgraded to this new provider with 1.5mbs and then upgrading the speed to 2mbs. I won't be able to celebrate again when I think of japan users spending my country's bandwidth in a small area...

If the island of Japan can do this... (2, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about 6 years ago | (#25179429)

then why does the island of the UK have such slow broadband?

Some countries claim their size holds them back but the UK doesn't have that excuse. We're just getting screwed.

How many Libraries of Congress? (1)

crabboy.com (771982) | about 6 years ago | (#25179433)

How can an article about bandwidth, posted on /., not include a reference to how many Libraries of Congress can be downloaded in a given amount of time???

Fast PC, slow web (1)

EEPROMS (889169) | about 6 years ago | (#25179469)

Im on a 22mb/s (small b) and I havent seen a server yet that makes use of this bandwidth. The sad thing is most web services have a capped connection speed per IP/MAC address so you can have 2,000,000Gb/s and it wont make an difference.

Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25179659)

Like the article said, this is to compete with NTT. This kind of bandwidth has been widely available for many months already.

I'd open a torrent site (1)

dafradu (868234) | about 6 years ago | (#25179675)

only for uncompressed BluRay discs!!
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