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New Jersey's Cablevision Hijacks DNS Error Pages

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the fine-line-between-service-and-serviced dept.

Security 200

Selikoff writes "I just noticed Cablevision's Optimum Online service has begun hijacking DNS Error pages with, you guessed it, ad-supported results. Aside from hurting the underlying stability of the Internet, there have been instances where hackers have used such tools against customers. I know Road Runner customers have had to deal with this for a couple months now, although at least they have an outlet to turn it off." Update: 09/30 13:18 GMT by T : Note, as several readers have pointed out, this hijacking is of DNS errors rather than 404 errors as originally presented.

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Give me a break... (5, Informative)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203493)

Even on slashdot, we have people who don't know a DNS error (and yes, TFA gets it right) from a 404 (which can't be hijacked without modifying the stream itself)

Re:Give me a break... (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203541)

Thanks. I saw the summary headline and was pretty confused ;)

Re:Give me a break... (1)

Smelly Jeffrey (583520) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203811)

I thought immediately of VeriSign's Site Finder [wikipedia.org] "service" which came and went around this time of the year in 2003. Perhaps ICANN should send a strong letter to Cablevision and wait for the frivolous suit to ensue.

"Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it." - G. Santayana

Re:Give me a break... (5, Interesting)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204013)

Site finder was slightly different from this, in its scope. I doubt ICANN will get involved

Verisign abused it's stewardship of the DNS Root servers (i.e. the Nameserver's nameservers, those servers that every(?) nameserver contacts to find out who to query...etc...).

In other words, if your ISP is doing something douchy like this, you can use another nameserver/run your own. That was not really an option with sitefinder

Re:Give me a break... (2, Informative)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204335)

Not the root servers.

The .com, .net, whatever they had level ones - one below the root, still ones you have to use if you want DNS to work...

Re:Give me a break... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203685)

I'm just glad the mob wasn't behind it (if such a thing as "the mob" did, in fact, exist).

Re:Give me a break... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204121)

I'm just glad the mob wasn't behind it

You sure about that? Afterall, this was a New Jersey ISP.

Re:Give me a break... (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204185)

You didn't see nuthin', got it?

Re:Give me a break... (1)

Grendel_Prime (178874) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204047)

This has been submitted many times. Must be a slow news day for this to finally make it over the transom.

Re:Give me a break... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204269)

Even on slashdot, we have people who don't know a DNS error (and yes, TFA gets it right) from a 404 (which can't be hijacked without modifying the stream itself)

And Cablevision's Optimum Online is available not only in New Jersey. Cablevision has about 5 million customers in the New York Metro Area.

FIRST! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203497)

Hehehe

hey (-1, Redundant)

RadioactiveRussian (1362907) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203499)

I'm the first to comment. I PWN!

Anyway, I wish I thought of doing that.. I'm sure someone is making ALOT of money off hijacked 404 pages. Question is, how exactly do they impliment this..? ISP redirects or hacking the WWW server itself..?

Re:hey (2, Interesting)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203521)

They probably use a transparent web proxy between the user PC and the web server.

When the web server sends a standard 404 error page, it goes via the proxy which puts its page in place of it.

Re:hey (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203809)

See my post above and the others below. They are not hijacking 404s. They are hijacking DNS errors, same as earthlink et al have been doing forever.

Re:hey (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203921)

They're hijacking DNS errors. When there is a DNS error, they send a response claiming that the requested domain resolves to their own IP address.

IOW, if you type in nonexistentdomain.com you get their ad page rather than an error.

Sounds to me like a great way to increase revenue while degrading service.

NXDOMAIN != 404 (1)

FliesLikeABrick (943848) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203517)

I was actually scared that they were doing DPI for a minute, then I realized the OP just didn't know what they're talking about.

The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (5, Informative)

thetorpedodog (750359) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203523)

The Cablevision and Road Runner services both only hijack DNS no-such-domain errors, not HTTP 404s. Neither is a good thing, but hijacking DNS is much less insidious than the deep-packet inspection or mandatory proxying required to hijack 404 errors.

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203709)

Except DNS errors are critical and important for non-HTTP apps too.

Mail, for instance. Now I'll send my mail to the wrong server instead of getting a host unknown error.

SSH to that server and type your password! (although SSH does to host key checking)

I can't see how you think it's *less* insidious -- never mind much less insidious.

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204075)

Mail, for instance. Now I'll send my mail to the wrong server instead of getting a host unknown error.

Or instead of being told straight away that the domain is invalid it'll be days before your MTA gives up...

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (1)

Tassach (137772) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203837)

Verizon DSL also hijacks DSN errors.

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (3, Informative)

basscomm (122302) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204019)

Insight Communications in Indiana and Kentucky have been doing this [dslreports.com] for a while now.

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204037)

The Cablevision and Road Runner services both only hijack DNS no-such-domain errors, not HTTP 404s. Neither is a good thing, but hijacking DNS is much less insidious than the deep-packet inspection or mandatory proxying required to hijack 404 errors.

The problem is that there is no reason to assume that just because a machine is making a DNS query it intends opening a TCP connection to port 80 (or 443). The people doing this had better have made sure that the machine serving these ads can cope with being bombarded with random IP traffic :)

Re:The submitter confuses DNS and HTTP errors (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204343)

IIRC Verizon Online also did this for a while. i was really upset when instead of a DNS error my browser automatically went to Verizon's (ad supported) search portal. i think i either changed the DNS setting on my router or it just went away. but in any case, i haven't seen it happen in a long time.

it's absolute BS that ISPs think they can just hijack the users' DNS error page. they already make money from subscription fees, but now they're hijacking subscribers' DNS errors to get ad views/clicks? not only is this unethical, but it undermines the HTTP protocol and screws with applications that require correct server responses.

this kind of abuse of power is exactly why we need communications infrastructure reform.

No, they didn't (5, Informative)

schon (31600) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203527)

New Jersey's Cablevision Hijacks 404 Error Pages

No, they didn't.

If the submitter had read the summary, they would know that it's DNS errors that are being hijacked, not 404s.

It's an important difference - 404 means that they are transparently proxying your connections, which can cause problems with various sites (and that they are recording every URL you visit.)

For example: http://slashdot.org/akasjdflkasdjfl;kajsdl;aksdjfkdjkfdjlkjsdf [slashdot.org] would not be affected by this, whereas http://sslashhdot.org/ [sslashhdot.org] would.

Is it *too* much to ask that a technical news site present technical articles correctly?

Re:No, they didn't (4, Insightful)

zerocool^ (112121) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203597)

Right, and while it might seem repulsive to some to have them proxy your web connections, I honestly find it more repulsive to hijack failed DNS queries, because this affects spam. Maybe it's just because I work for a professional email hosting company, but come on now. Failed dns lookup = drop mail as spam. Maybe not as critical because it's an ISP with mostly end users, but what if they're doing this to their small business customers, too?

~Wx

Re:No, they didn't (1)

foobsr (693224) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203653)

Is it *too* much to ask that a technical news site present technical articles correctly?

Then there would be much less news.

Quote [theinquirer.net] : "ICANN up in arms at Verisign DNS hijacking" (as happened 2003)

CC.

Re:No, they didn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203661)

I'm sure that before the day is out, sslashhdot.org will be registered, and probably host something eye-searingly awful.

Re:No, they didn't (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203667)

FiOS has really nice service in most of New Jersey...

Re:No, they didn't (1)

hal9000(jr) (316943) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203715)

Verizon does the same thing ...

Re:No, they didn't (4, Insightful)

Tim C (15259) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203725)

It's an important difference - 404 means that they are transparently proxying your connections

And inspecting the packet contents looking for HTTP 404 error code returns, and either modifying the returned HTML to insert their own ads or else (and much, much simpler and more practicable) discarding the rest of the data stream and substituting their own.

Hijacking DNS errors is wrong; hijacking HTTP 404 returns would be Evil.

Re:No, they didn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204221)

hijacking dns could make them obtain an illegal copy of all my email traffic. not every mx is 24h/7d up

Ok summary of bad article headline (1)

Reality Master 201 (578873) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203529)

It's not a 404 page that's getting hijacked. It's DNS resolution failures.

It's a pretty big difference.

404? (1)

RT Alec (608475) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203531)

What exactly does "Hijacks 404 Error Pages" mean? Does it mean error pages were hijacked 404 times? It certainly does not mean what the headline implied (to me). Even a cursory glance at TFA makes that clear.

Re:404? (2, Informative)

Constantine XVI (880691) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203609)

404 == HTTP error code for "page not found". And the summary's wrong, they're actually hijacking 502 (bad gateway/no such domain) pages, which is a major difference. Hijacking 502s only requires their DNS servers to redirect nonexistent domains to the ad page, while hijacking 404s would require them to sniff every page you visit.

Re:404? (1)

alexhard (778254) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203775)

Hand in your geek card on your way out please..

Re:404? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203993)

Look here [google.com]

Bad Summary (2, Informative)

pdragon04 (801577) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203535)

How about the editors actually read the article and correct glaring mistakes for a change? Even before this made it out of the Firehose, there were responses that it was DNS failures and not 404 messages.

What's next ? (3, Funny)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203537)

The blue screen of russian women 4 U? BSORW4U!
or
Buy Vi4GR@ now! By the way: Syntax error.

Solution for ISPs mucking with DNS results (3, Insightful)

hakr89 (719001) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203543)

Don't use your ISP's DNS servers.
Find another public server or run your own.

Re:Solution for ISPs mucking with DNS results (2, Informative)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203789)

That's a good thought and a viable one. I do the same thing myself. The problem is that my dollars are still going to support the ISP's DNS servers, which still warrants complaint.

file not found? (1)

zehaeva (1136559) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203555)

Corrrect me if i'm wrong but the domain does not exist error page isn't a 404 error right? I thought 404 was the error for when a web server couldn't find the page you requested for it, not for the dns error.

when i first read TFS I thought, wth? what if i have a custom 404 page on my website?

I actually had to RTFA to figure out if they were honest to god hijacking web servers 404 pages.

thankfully it seems they are not.

Possible solution? (4, Interesting)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203559)

They're returning adverts for failed DNS lookups, not 404 pages, as others have helpfully pointed out.

How about a script that hammers suitably random fake domain names continuously (different ones every time)? If the scammers^W advertisers are paying per impression this will majorly hurt their pockets.

Re:Possible solution? (3, Interesting)

hal9000(jr) (316943) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203637)

How about a script that hammers suitably random fake domain names continuously (different ones every time)? If the scammers^W advertisers are paying per impression this will majorly hurt their pockets.

Wouldn't that actually help. The impression revenue is probably tied to ad's that are *presented*. If you simply did a bunch of look-ups on fake names, all you would get are A records to the ad page. You would then have hit the web server, download the page and any elements. Then the advertisers would be paying per impression.

Re:Possible solution? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203769)

Curl is your friend for this.

Re:Possible solution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204063)

Or wget with the output written to /dev/null. Very easily scriptable.

Re:Possible solution? (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204173)

Curl is your friend for this.

Yes, sorry, that was what I meant. Not just lookups, but a recursive GET to /dev/null...

Re:Possible solution? (2, Interesting)

Suzuran (163234) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204297)

And when your service is shut off for excessive downloading?

Re:Possible solution? (3, Interesting)

Piranhaa (672441) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203781)

As much as I hate dns being hijacked (I don't have the issue as I run my own), I'm sure these ISPs view it in a different light. Their argument will be that it's a 'feature' rather than being intrusive on people's browsing: "Helping our customers get to the proper website" or that it helps keep the price of the internet service low so you don't have to pay as much per month. Also, if you start hammering this, I'm sure a flag will rise (if they're at least half smart) and they'll send a nice email out to you stating that you're abusing your service, yada yada..

Not that any of this is a good thing, but you gotta see it from another prospective...

Re:Possible solution? (2, Interesting)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204215)

That's the great thing about DNS servers-- just like a customer of the ISP doesn't need to use the ISP-provided servers, you don't need to a customer of the ISP to use the ISP provided servers.

The OP can still use their plan to hammer the servers without violating their terms of service. Just get a bunch of non-customers to switch their DNS to EvilCorp. Write a script to throw out DNS-error requests. Scoop up all the ad-crap that sluices down the tubes, and poison the results. Once you have all the data you need, you can forge your own "impression" requests. Slap them as background "pixel" requests onto the webpage of your choice, throw a LoLCat on it, and let the teeming millions do the rest of the work for you.

Re:Possible solution? (1)

lonester23 (1123115) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203861)

I have AT&T and for some odd reason I get hijacked by RoadRunner when I type in the wrong url. I think there is something shady happening here.

Re:Possible solution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204243)

Are you using RoadRunner DNS servers?

You can opt out here... (4, Informative)

profet (263203) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203573)

Re:You can opt out here... (1)

leadgold (1375335) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203843)

I noticed this error the other day. The DNS error page even has a link to this opt-out page. Granted it's via a bubble that says "What is this?" It's not all that scary, IMHO. They don't have this DNS error page for their lightpath (business) service.

Re:You can opt out here... (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204201)

Anyone know if this opt-out is cookie-based? If so, it's useless for non-browser DNS lookups. And annoying for multiple-browser situations. (Sometimes I feel like running FF, sometimes I feel like Opera. Sometimes, I get a wild hare and feel like running Konqueror. If opt-out is a cookie, I'd have to opt out three times. And when I flush cookies, I'll have to opt out again. And it still won't help for DNS-based non-web session authentication, such as SMTP inbound verification of HELO addresses.)

I'm also getting this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203581)

...from Verizon (NY, NY). Sometimes even when I don't misspell the url, I get "Sorry, we couldn't find it (...) Please se relevant searches below:"

Nasty :/

Greed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203607)

I just signed up with optimum because they are the only game in town (even though there is a huge verizon building 2 blocks away from me). Setting this all up was horrible, and I was lied to several times by several different people over the phone.

This 404 thing is not at all surprising from a company so greedy, they actually peddle TV's and phones to their customers: http://www.optimum.com/store/index.jsp

(And yes, I didn't just come across this site - there was a commercial for it)

Charter Communications (1)

duplicate-nickname (87112) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203645)

We started seeing this with Charter in the midwest. Not the 404 errors, but with invalid domain names. The biggest problem for us has been with our VPN software. When our employees are working from home, Charter always returns a valid IP for our internal DNS zones so the DNS lookups are never forwarded over the VPN.

I hope their additional advertising revenue makes up for the lost customers.

Re:Charter Communications (3, Informative)

carambola5 (456983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204351)

A laughable example of how poorly implemented the Charter DNS error is:

http://flickr.com/photos/listrophy/2194252038/ [flickr.com]

Things to note:

  • This is an image of the opt-out result.
  • The browser running is Flock on OS X.
  • The result is a fake IE DNS error page with a "Manage Opt-in/Out Settings" link appended.
  • Charter was too lazy to even fix the image src attributes. (they point to res://...)
  • It's not a true opt-out, because it still returns a 200 OK rather than a DNS Lookup error.

For this and many other things, I have since stopped using Charter. My soul feels so much cleaner now that I'm not giving them money.

OpenDNS does this (3, Interesting)

fprintf (82740) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203659)

I just redirected my DNS queries to OpenDNS, mostly because of the content/phishing filtering they offer but also some of the statistics on my connection. They make their money, or propose to, by doing this very thing... redirecting Domain Not Found error messages to ad supported pages.

Re:OpenDNS does this (2, Interesting)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203863)

They make their money, or propose to, by doing this very thing... redirecting Domain Not Found error messages to ad supported pages.

If that's the case then, regardless of how ethical or up-front they may be about it, then they are unsuitable for certain uses. Ran into this when earthlink started doing this crap and I was running a dnsbl for my own mail server, with forwarding set to one of ELN's DNS servers. Suddenly nothing came through. It was because everything was coming back as a hit.

Re:OpenDNS does this (1)

JustinOpinion (1246824) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203899)

A crucial difference is that OpenDNS is opt-in, whereas when an ISP does it, it becomes an opt-out situation (or, more likely, a "deal with it" situation).

OpenDNS provides a service (robust lookup, filtering, etc.), with a well-established downside (ads on DNS lookup errors). If you like the deal, you can use OpenDNS. If you don't like the deal (e.g. you rely on proper DNS failures), then you don't use it.

The real problem occurs when all the default DNS servers do ad-redirecting. Then it will become impossible to actually check for lookup errors. Part of an ISP's job (in my opinion) is to provide unfiltered DNS access. (OpenDNS is not an ISP).

Re:OpenDNS does this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203937)

The difference is you opt into OpenDNS, you don't into Comcast.

Verizon has been doing the same for awhile now too. For those who don't know you can opt out of it by changing the last digits of the DNS servers to 14.

   

Re:OpenDNS does this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204077)

Odd. I have Verizon. No such issue. Or are you full of shit?

Re:OpenDNS does this (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203947)

Except that OpenDNS gives you an invalid page that is actually useful,because right at the top is a nice Google style "did you mean ---?" which a good 90% of the time is where you were trying to go but you spelled it too wrong for it to guess. Compare that to these bunches which is worse than using MSN in the old days. Example-Deus Exx--'Oh you are looking for dogfood!' "No,I am looking for.." 'Dalmatians,Dig Dug,Dobey Gillis!' "AHHHHHH!".

And of course their incredibly wrong answer to what you are looking for is buried at the bottom of a pile of spam links for crap you would never buy,like herbal viagra and fly by night online casinos. So I'll take the OpenDNS error page any day of the week,thank you very much.

Re:OpenDNS does this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204073)

The differences being that OpenDNS:

1) require one to opt-in to their service,
2) are open and honest about the practise, and,
3) offer other valuable DNS service at no cost, with no source of revenue besides ads on the hijacked page.

OpenDNS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203663)

I had this problem with hijacked pages with Comcast. The real pain was it was often a typo in the URL, but the hijacked page URL is not what I typed in, so I can't easily just edit it and get on with my day.

I changed by DNS servers to OpenDNS and this cured the problem.

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220

Re:OpenDNS (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204275)

Um... you /do/ realize that openDNS does the exact same thing, don't you?

Okay, just checking.

Thanks for the heads up. (1)

enigma32 (128601) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203705)

I'm glad someone pointed this out.
I opted out of roadrunner's "feature" and I just opted out of this new cablevision "feature".

Why can't these companies leave well-enough alone? I pay for this internet connection- I don't see why they need to skim extra money off the top with advertising revenue.

Pfft. As if it wasn't enough that network advertisements on Fox take up 25% of the screen when I'm watching House!

Chrome hijacks 404s (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203711)

Since the article is technically wrong (though the actual problem - redirecting failed DNS lookups - is still unsatisfactory), let's instead consider something that really does hijack 404s: Google Chrome [google.cn] (nice to see google.cn doesn't censor criticism of Google too, eh?).

But this is Slashdot, and Google does no evil, so everyone please put your defences as responses to this thread. Oh, and "it doesn't do it for long 404 pages" isn't any more a defence than "oh he only punches short people".

TDS started recently too (1)

bitty (91794) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203713)

The DNS error hijacking, that is. I was going to consider switching to Charter, but I see someone has posted that they've started doing this as well.

Are there any free DNS services out there that happily return valid results instead of redirecting you?

Re:TDS started recently too (1)

incripshin (580256) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203851)

I don't think so. I have Charter, and I have my own DNS caching server that I set up with djbdns. I was pretty happy, but then I discovered to my horror that Charter was hijacking all my DNS requests. I bet if I sent out a DNS request to a nonexistent domain, I would get a response. I'll have to test that.

But then you have a different ISP, so you might be okay. Try using OpenDNS and then navigate to some nonexistent domain.

Re:TDS started recently too (1)

incripshin (580256) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203869)

Scratch that, I need to test more. It seems my DNS requests aren't being hijacked now. OpenDNS is probably a good option then?

Re:TDS started recently too (1)

deAtog (987710) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203959)

Sure, install Bind/Named or any other free DNS server and do the look-ups yourself. Having your own DNS server dramatically improves look-up times. It also prevents the unfortunate situation where you're unable to resolve any sites simply because your ISP's DNS servers have failed.

Re:TDS started recently too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25204067)

The one that you setup yourself.

Frontier of Rochester also did this... (1)

Manax (41161) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203717)

I'm not sure if they've stopped, but it was a fucking disaster for us. My company's sites and our self-hosted DNS are colo-ed with frontier, and they had a network failure not too long ago. When people tried to get to our sites, they were redirected to their crap search page. Seriously, EPIC FAIL! That wasn't acceptable at all.

This sort of behavior just isn't okay anywhere... some business people really should be bonked on the head for implementing this anywhere.

Re:Frontier of Rochester also did this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203757)

I wouldn't expect anything to be done correctly if its Frontier however. Frontier isn't exactly the best ISP for price, performance, and well being helpful in any way.

Though really, you should have been running your own name servers anyways and this would not have been a problem for you.

difficult challenges facing cable subscribers (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203785)

greed, fear & ego are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of yOUR dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & any notion of prosperity for us, or our children, not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one. see you on the other side of it. the lights are coming up all over now. conspiracy theorists are being vindicated. some might choose a tin umbrella to go with their hats. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. there are still some choices. if they do not suit you, consider the likely results of continuing to follow the corepirate nazi hypenosys story LIEn, whereas anything of relevance is replaced almost instantly with pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking propaganda or 'celebrity' trivia 'foam'. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

http://news.google.com/?ncl=1216734813&hl=en&topic=n
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080918/ap_on_re_us/tent_cities;_ylt=A0wNcyS6yNJIZBoBSxKs0NUE
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/world/29amnesty.html?hp
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/06/02/nasa.global.warming.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/05/severe.weather.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/02/honore.preparedness/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/opinion/01dowd.html?em&ex=1212638400&en=744b7cebc86723e5&ei=5087%0A
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/06/05/senate.iraq/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/17/washington/17contractor.html?hp
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/world/middleeast/03kurdistan.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080708/cheney_climate.html
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20080805/pl_politico/12308;_ylt=A0wNcxTPdJhILAYAVQms0NUE
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/09/18/voting.problems/index.html
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080903/ts_nm/environment_arctic_dc;_ylt=A0wNcwhhcb5It3EBoy2s0NUE
(talk about cowardlly race fixing/bad theater/fiction?) http://money.cnn.com/2008/09/19/news/economy/sec_short_selling/index.htm?cnn=yes

is it time to get real yet? A LOT of energy is being squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, most of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're in. for example; the insidious attempts by the felonious corepirate nazi execrable to block the suns' light, interfering with a requirement (sunlight) for us to stay healthy/alive. it's likely not good for yOUR health/memories 'else they'd be bragging about it? we're intending for the whoreabully deceptive (they'll do ANYTHING for a bit more monIE/power) felons to give up/fail even further, in attempting to control the 'weather', as well as a # of other things/events.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=weather+manipulation&btnG=Search
http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

'The current rate of extinction is around 10 to 100 times the usual background level, and has been elevated above the background level since the Pleistocene. The current extinction rate is more rapid than in any other extinction event in earth history, and 50% of species could be extinct by the end of this century. While the role of humans is unclear in the longer-term extinction pattern, it is clear that factors such as deforestation, habitat destruction, hunting, the introduction of non-native species, pollution and climate change have reduced biodiversity profoundly.' (wiki)

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I did it! (1)

ApolloX (1017440) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203803)

Sorry about the 404/DNS mistake, I tried correcting it shortly after submitting the story but the Firehose missed my comment!

I love /. (5, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203805)

I love it when an editor or story writer makes a technical error on /. You can actually hear the simultaneous erections of a thousand anal-retentive techies, each typing as fast as they can without even bothering to check if their fellow anal-retentives hadn't already pointed the same thing out in dozens of posts. It's the best sexual gratification most of them are going to get all day.

Re:I love /. (1)

Icarium (1109647) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204113)

Second best. First would have to go to the 'Frist P0st' that actually manages to be first!

Re:I love /. (2, Funny)

deander2 (26173) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204167)

and i love the smell of condescension and self-righteousness in the morning...

Re:I love /. (1)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204225)

You can actually hear the simultaneous erections

If erections actually made a sound, I guess this world would be completely different!

Marginal cases (3, Funny)

InspectorxGadget (1230170) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203813)

Hey, let's not be too quick to judge here. Sometimes I do look for sex entertainment phentermine college click here now rolex and I'm glad at least one ISP understands that.

Easily solved (2, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203855)

http://www.opendns.com/ [opendns.com]

However this does not solve it for less technical people as they would have no idea what is going on, would have no idea how to solve it and perhaps have not even a clue that there is a problem and that they typed in something wrong.

If I were looking for nekid ladies, this might be help full. If I try to contact my bank it isn't. It could even be dangerous if things I were looking for is something similar to what I get presented as advertisement.

Re:Easily solved (2, Insightful)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204321)

Yes, incredibly easy to solve your ISP hijacking failed DNS lookups by switching to a service that (by default) supports itself by hijacking failed DNS lookups ;)

OpenDNS have (or at least used to have) a way of tagging your account as "don't show me the adverts and give me a proper response" but it is associated with an IP address.

Every time we turn our router off for the night we get a new IP because the lease expires. As I run a Linux box I can't use their Mac or Windows "update your IP from the client" apps. If I get a new IP and forget to manually update then they'll still be giving me the adverts. That means there's still going to be a lot of people who can switch to OpenDNS but still won't get rid of hijacked results.

Trademark Violation Potential (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203857)

This is no different than if Burger King squatted the domain for McDonadls.com (see the typo) and sent traffic to their site instead.

Here's one way to tackle this. If I'm a local business owner in an area served by Cablevision, I would complain to the local utility commission to have Cablevision's franchise dissolved and then file suit against Cablevision if someone tried to go to my company's web site, misspelled the name by one letter and was referred to my competitors through their advertising system.

Hurting the Underlying Stablity of the Internet??? (1)

Ash Vince (602485) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203907)

How can this hurt the underlying stability of the internet??

Aside from hurting the underlying stability of the Internet, there have been instances where hackers have used such tools against customers.

Yet the page linked in the above statement just details how a security researcher came up with a proof of concept that was specific to a different companies implementation of the same idea.

Re:Hurting the Underlying Stablity of the Internet (4, Informative)

guruevi (827432) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204071)

Quite simple: run a mailserver, then use these type of DNS servers. In a few days, you'll have so much mail that doesn't get accepted by xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (your provider's DNS) that it might fill your storage. Then 7 days later (instead of a few hours later) the e-mail gets sent back with the message that the other server doesn't accept the mail (instead of saying that the domain doesn't exist) after being retried hundreds of times eating up valuable bandwidth and processing time. Then if your end-user isn't smart enough, he'll retry sending it, not noticing he has a typo in his address book, because after all, the other e-mail server DOES exist.

GoDaddy has hijacked Scrabulous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203943)

When an Indian judge said that the Scrabulous Brothers couldn't use the Scrabulous name to promote their business, GoDaddy grabbed it and started serving his usual soft-core domain ads promoting his business. :-| Anyway LEXULOUS.COM is where Scrabulous now lives.

I just confirmed it and then opted out. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25203945)

I just confirmed it after trying twice to make up a fake domain name. Making up a fake domain name is harder than it sounds.

As far as evil things that Optimum could do, I wouldn't put this high on the list. They do have a fairly easy to get to opt out link if you click on the about link.

Since they don't complain about my abuse of the bandwidth, I'll give them a slide this one time. I would just prefer that this kind of service was an opt-in and had some sort of benefit to me. Other than this incident, I've been happy with their service. I still wish they didn't do it and won't defend them the next time they pull something like this.

Do I pay for the content I did not reqest? (1)

KreAture (105311) | more than 5 years ago | (#25203985)

If they hijack my request for a text-only site, and I pay for bandwidth or overuse, do I pay for the graphical ads they attack me with?

I think this question alone is enough cause to call any such modification/hijacking illegal.

Use dnsmasq (1)

stevied (169) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204035)

dnsmasq [thekelleys.org.uk] has an option to reverse the effect of this sort of thing.

It runs nicely on OpenWRT [wikipedia.org] .

Or you could use maradns instead, and avoid all present and future problems with your ISP's caching DNS servers..

Your point would be what, exactly? (1)

Monty Worm (7264) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204117)

So? And?

My employer's ISP (that is - the one that provides service to our office, as opposed to that which has our telehoused machines), a company called Tiscali do this.

This is fairly ironic. We're a domain registry, and we make most of our income on non-existent DNS names, via simple parking pages. You do understand parking don't you?

Dot TK - Renaming the Internet

Rogers Cable (3, Informative)

Naito (667851) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204157)

Rogers Cable high-speed internet has been doing that for the past couple months now too. URL typos get redirected to their own search.rogers.yahoo.com or something like that, disabling toolbar search functions in browsers.

The kicker is that I also think they're actively blocking access to other search engines periodically in order to increase usage of their own. www.Google.com will sometimes time-out while trying to load, but works fine when accessed through Dogpile meta-search.

Since I've moved off of Rogers already, I can't do more experiments to test, but if anyone else is on it, I suggest you keep an eye out.

use OpenDNS (1)

MadJo (674225) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204161)

Easy solution, use OpenDNS.
Oh wait, they also do that.

Re:use OpenDNS (1)

SkyDude (919251) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204313)

Easy solution, use OpenDNS. Oh wait, they also do that.

Yes they do, but it's the user's choice to see the ads and in exchange, get a damn reliable DNS.

I thought by now the concept of internet==$0.00 was over but I guess not.

Actually not a bad thing. (1)

ghinckley68 (590599) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204195)

Do you have any idea the number of tech calls 404 pages generate. A lot.
So those that this bothers use 4.2.2.2 or set up your own DNS server. To the rest of those a page saying your site was not found and some alternate links is probably a good idea.

But hey that's my 2 cents worth I could be wrong.

Glen

Deja vu (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204417)

Hi,

i think this is the third story on an ISP catching DNS errors :-(. Even the follow-ups seem to be similar.

Personally, my only surprise was when i learned how much money an ISP can make by selling Ads on error landing pages.

Regards, Martin

makes VPN suck (1)

houstonmat (1375373) | more than 5 years ago | (#25204443)

Earthlink does this in Houston. It has caused me lots of problems with VPN.
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