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Birth of a New African Ocean

kdawson posted about 6 years ago | from the interesting-times-interesting-places dept.

Earth 261

Khemisty writes "Formation of an ocean is a rare event, one no scientist has ever witnessed. Yet this geophysical nativity is unfolding today in one of the hottest and most inhospitable corners of the globe. Africa is splitting apart at the seams. From the southern tip of the Red Sea southward through Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique, the continent is coming unstitched along a zone called the East African Rift." This stretching of the earth's crust has been going on for 20 million years, and within another 10 million the Red Sea will have broken through to create a new sea.

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Red Sea tag suggestion: (5, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | about 6 years ago | (#25266031)

blamemoses.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (3, Funny)

idiotnot (302133) | about 6 years ago | (#25266137)

No, it's global warming's fault.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (0, Troll)

mR.bRiGhTsId3 (1196765) | about 6 years ago | (#25266259)

Yes, everything is global warming's fault. Why, we should even blame those carbon-booted fiends for when everything is just right and we have nothing to complain about.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266409)

no, it's bush's fault!

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266667)

Hey now, this is still Slashdot. It's Microsoft's fault.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267533)

You still have it wrong. According to Twitter, it is M$'s fault. *me ducks* ;)

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267647)

I think you meant *me crashes*.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266155)

blamemoses.

Very true. How could this have been forming over the last 20,000,000 years when the earth is only 6,000 years old?

--
McCain/Palin '08!

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266767)

I hope you're being sarcastic...The earth is accepted by scientists to be 4.5 billion years old.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (1, Informative)

kakofb (725561) | about 6 years ago | (#25266947)

But it's accepted by Christians to be like 6000 years old. Seriously. They think that dinosaurs and humans coexisted.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266967)

Some Christians.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267033)

But it's accepted by Christians to be like 6000 years old.

And`I agree, it must be at least 6,000 years old.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267109)

But it's accepted by Christians to be like 6000 years old.

Seriously. They think that dinosaurs and humans coexisted.

Are there more of those types of Christians, or are there more "progressives" who believe in crap like astrology?

While there are loons all over the place, I'd rather deal with loons who are mistaken over how things were in the past than with loons who are loony over the present and most importantly the future.

Re:Red Sea tag suggestion: (3, Funny)

cp.tar (871488) | about 6 years ago | (#25267677)

But it's accepted by Christians to be like 6000 years old. Seriously. They think that dinosaurs and humans coexisted.

Of course they coexisted. Haven't you ever seen The Flintstones?

Wish I'd be around to see it (4, Interesting)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | about 6 years ago | (#25266049)

Bet there would be one very impressive waterfall when the Red Sea finally breaks through.

Re:Wish I'd be around to see it (4, Funny)

chill (34294) | about 6 years ago | (#25266103)

Blasphemer! How dare you reduce the Second Great Flood to a mere "waterfall"!

Re:Wish I'd be around to see it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267231)

Agreed.

It will also, likely, be good for the area. The presence of more water seems likely to result in better crops. Then again, the Red Sea is quite salty, so maybe not.

You know what this means, of course (5, Funny)

Provocateur (133110) | about 6 years ago | (#25266071)

That 10 million years from now, the split will be complete. Slashdot will report this, and one /.er will complain, "It's a dupe! This story appeared 10 million years ago! What's up with the cyborg editors?"

What's up with the cyborg editors? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266229)

Still waiting for Linux to win the desktop.

Re:What's up with the cyborg editors? (1)

should_be_linear (779431) | about 6 years ago | (#25267015)

Still waiting for Linux to win the desktop.

Over bundled Plan 9 OEM

Re:You know what this means, of course (5, Funny)

ccguy (1116865) | about 6 years ago | (#25266443)

That 10 million years from now, the split will be complete.

I've started moving 50 Gb worth of small files from a Windows box to a Linux box using Samba's default configuration + Windows explorer.

I figure we can use my progress bar as a reasonable approximation.

Re:You know what this means, of course (-1, Offtopic)

TypoNAM (695420) | about 6 years ago | (#25266567)

Yet when the progress bar is gone it doesn't necessarily mean the transfer is complete, might be half-way done.

Realistically its the Windows machine that is being slow to do the file transfers. I once did a test with two AMD 600MHz K6-3's running Debian sarge 3.1 each with an IDE drive (40GB 7200 WD drives) and used samba to transfer files between them to see what would happen (normally use rsync) and it finished copying ~1,200 small (~2KByte to ~90KB) source code files (various old projects that I was too lazy to archive up first) in just 20 seconds. On Windows to Windows machine (WinXP SP2 on both, ad-hoc / non-active directory, both using 160 GB SATA 7200 WD drives) it took ~6 minutes. Seriously what the fuck is Microsoft doing in their code base, just copying one byte at a time?

Re:You know what this means, of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267183)

"Idiotical" is right. Learn to spell.

Re:You know what this means, of course (1)

sir fer (1232128) | about 6 years ago | (#25267491)

Learn to shut up concerning things you don't understand, fool.

Re:You know what this means, of course (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | about 6 years ago | (#25266555)

I wish I will be this user...

Re:You know what this means, of course (1)

dlsmith (993896) | about 6 years ago | (#25266585)

And here I was going to complain that this is definitely *not* "news" if it's been going on for 20 million years.

Re:You know what this means, of course (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267049)

A 20-million-year lag isn't too bad for /.

Re:You know what this means, of course (1)

ypctx (1324269) | about 6 years ago | (#25267067)

In other news: Scientists are puzzled as it only took 2 weeks for the west half of what was previously the african continent to reach the east shores of North America.

So it's a "sea", then, not an ocean... (0)

Joce640k (829181) | about 6 years ago | (#25266083)

/Pedantic

Re:So it's a "sea", then, not an ocean... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266309)

Context, retard. Ever heard of it?

The rift is already creating oceanic crust.

Think in four dimensions (1)

mangu (126918) | about 6 years ago | (#25266531)

It starts small. It WILL be an ocean. AFTER it goes through the sea stage. Right now it's still just a "rift".

When thinking about geologic processes, it's very important to consider the time dimension.

Re:Think in four dimensions (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 6 years ago | (#25267361)

It starts small. It WILL be an ocean. AFTER it goes through the sea stage. Right now it's still just a "rift".

Better get that epic gear for your hunter then. Pet classes will rule.

Oh, wait...

Re:Think in four dimensions (1)

SEWilco (27983) | about 6 years ago | (#25267449)

And after the ocean stage, it will be a mountain range when the edge collides with another continent. So why isn't this article called "Birth of a New African Mountain Range"? How shortsighted.

Re:So it's a "sea", then, not an ocean... (1)

tirerim (1108567) | about 6 years ago | (#25266565)

Well, it's not anything, yet. When it opens further, it will become an arm of the Indian Ocean. If the expansion continues, and depending on what happens to East Africa and the Indian Ocean, it could become an ocean in its own right, or perhaps half of the Indian Ocean, with a substantial divider between it and the other half.

This thread is useless... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266089)

... without relief maps.

I don't want to read some art's grads long winded verbose description of something that can be shown to me in 2 diagrams.

Re:This thread is useless... (2, Insightful)

lysergic.acid (845423) | about 6 years ago | (#25267205)

I don't want to read some art's grads long winded verbose description...

as opposed to a long winded terse description?

Re:This thread is useless... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267543)

That's what Google [google.com] Maps [google.com] is for, or, better, Google Earth [google.com] (centered on Erte Ale). Flip on the "Wikipedia" button [google.com] , and, yeah, it's much more useful.

OMG!!! Seriously!!! (-1, Troll)

modmans2ndcoming (929661) | about 6 years ago | (#25266091)

geee.... really? How is this news at all? I knew this in 3rd grade when our teacher talked about the Great Rift Vally.

Re:OMG!!! Seriously!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266225)

The Rift Valley is on a different continent, but thanks for playing.

And no wonder... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266333)

...you performed so poorly in the spellympics.

Someone will blame this on... (2, Insightful)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | about 6 years ago | (#25266093)

Before long, someone will blame this on GlobalWarming.

Mention of this split WILL show up in someone's eco-speech.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about 6 years ago | (#25266195)

I blame George Bush!

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

owlnation (858981) | about 6 years ago | (#25266271)

I blame Al Gore...

Ha! Even his name nearly reads like "All Gorge"!

Re:Someone will blame this on... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266319)

I blame niggers, jews, spics, crackers, and gooks. Did I miss any race? (Jew isn't a race, but faggots believe they are, so I figured I'd throw them in too.)

Re:Someone will blame this on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267525)

Caucasians you insensitive clod!

Re:Someone will blame this on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266513)

I blame ManBearPig

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

S-100 (1295224) | about 6 years ago | (#25266675)

I blame Willow Palin.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (4, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 6 years ago | (#25266197)

Before long, someone will blame this on GlobalWarming.

Mention of this split WILL show up in someone's eco-speech.

And ideally they will get publicly called out on their idiocy

Here's another article on the Afar region
http://www.nj.com/south/index.ssf/2008/10/post.html [nj.com]
(they cite this article http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4512244.stm [bbc.co.uk] )

An 8-meter wide, 60-kilometer long rift (...) developed in the Afar desert region of north-eastern Africa in just 3 weeks. An earthquake on the 14th of September is said to have sparked the growing tear in the African desert, followed up by moderate tremors and then, finally, a volcanic eruption.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (0, Troll)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 6 years ago | (#25266237)

And global warming denialists will claim that the volcanoes in the rift are putting out far more C02 than humans are, so why worry about anything? Drill, baby, drill!

Young-earth creationists will find Biblical verses that explain how this process has actually only been going on for 6000 years.

ID'ers will claim that the whole process is irreducibly complex.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267627)

And some of us will huddle quietly in the corner bemoaning what humanity has been reduced to.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (5, Funny)

WamBam (1275048) | about 6 years ago | (#25266265)

I blame gay marriages, higher taxes and Obama Bin Laden. Sarah Palin will go maverick and fix this for us.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | about 6 years ago | (#25267127)

Sarah Palin will go maverick

Well if she does, I hope X and Zero are around to save our asses!

It is the fault of the Jews (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266299)

As are all problems in the Arab world (of which this portion of Africa is)

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

ccguy (1116865) | about 6 years ago | (#25266471)

Before long, someone will blame this on GlobalWarming.

There are bets on williamhill.co.uk on this, but I gotta tell you, GlobalWarming pays 3.0 while a Bush friend offering to rebuild a proper Red Sea pays 1.05.

Check on the 'what's going to happen first' section of political events for current odds.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1, Offtopic)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | about 6 years ago | (#25266739)

Mention of this split WILL show up in someone's eco-speech.

Not sure why people warning of global warming are such a popular target for snide comments, even if they do occasionally exaggerate or misunderstand the science involved. After all, the global warming is a reality and to quote a statement endorsed by "all of the national academies of science of the major industrialized countries" it is "is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic (man-made) greenhouse gas concentrations" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming). This is controversial in the same sense that the theory of evolution is, in that people are free to disagree even with established scientific facts when it is in their interest to do so. In both cases the interest is part religious and part financial.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | about 6 years ago | (#25267309)

because straw man attacks in completely unrelated discussions are the only time when the global warming deniers can feign a winning argument--since they can't refute actual scientific evidence that supports global warming (like the currently accepted climate model). but i'm sure these armchair climatologists know much better than IPCC researchers and scientists.

or maybe it's because any kind of social/political/environmental activism is unfashionable in the eyes of mainstream culture. it's much cooler to be apathetic and uninformed. and ridiculing those trying to make the world a better place helps ease the guilt of one's inaction.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267335)

Why would anyone blame this on Global Warming? Do you even know what Global Warming is? Even the most polarizing environmentalists have been careful not to confuse anthropogenic climate change with plate tectonics.

Re:Someone will blame this on... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25267537)

It's actually a solution for the problem of melting ice caps...all that extra water, instead of flooding low coastline cities, can be sucked up by this "ocean" in the making. Of course that's just a temporary fix to one of the problems of global warming, and we'll have to wait 10 million years for that fix.

Meanwhile, during a presidential debate, one party suggest that by drilling for oil there, we can solve two problems at once...get the oil, and simply replace it with melting ice. It will be called, the "Drill, baby, drill" solution, and it is expected that the President will point to this emergency problem, and congress will vote the rest of the money the US has in Ft. Knox to be directed to oil companies to solve the problem. Congressman Dennis Kuchinich will object.

Africa Become Flooded? (4, Funny)

AndGodSed (968378) | about 6 years ago | (#25266101)

Well there goes property values...

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266189)

What property values? Africa is full of niggers and you know what niggers do to land value.

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (0, Redundant)

AndGodSed (968378) | about 6 years ago | (#25266221)

Hey!

Get a clue. I am white and I live in Africa.

Geez - racist idiot...

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266351)

Please don't feed the trolls.

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266369)

So that just makes you a jungle bunny wannabe. Thanks for sharing, wigger.

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (0, Redundant)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 6 years ago | (#25266461)

That or he's a jaapie who didn't have an English grandad, and in consequence he's stuck there waiting for the day it all goes like Zimbabwe.

Re:Africa Become Flooded? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 6 years ago | (#25266381)

Well there goes property values...

Yes, right up through the roof! All these great new sea front lots! Great for your yacht! Let's build some golf courses! Invite Tiger Woods to play there! Tax-exempt for the next 10 million years! (Consider it a long term investment)

This will certainly give Dubai a run for their money!

doesn't seem that uncommon (4, Informative)

khallow (566160) | about 6 years ago | (#25266109)

There's another ocean forming in the Gulf of California. It's the same story with a rift underneath. The rift actually runs up to Albuquerque in New Mexico.

Re:doesn't seem that uncommon (1)

Khemisty (1246418) | about 6 years ago | (#25266231)

"The Gulf of California came into being as tectonic forces rifted the Baja California Peninsula off of the North American Plate about 12 million years ago. As part of this process, the East Pacific Rise propagated up the middle of the Gulf along the seabottom. The Gulf would extend as far as Indio, California except for the tremendous delta created by the Colorado River. This delta blocks the sea from flooding the Mexicali and Imperial Valleys."

Got this little gem from good ol' Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] . So the Colorado river delta is only temporarily holding back the expansion that would otherwise occur? Obviously I'm not a geologist so just wondering if anyone in the know can compare the above comment to the East African rift?

Re:doesn't seem that uncommon (1)

ShatteredArm (1123533) | about 6 years ago | (#25267403)

Possibly. The Salton Sea was formed when the Colorado River overflowed its banks. I'm not sure the delta is going anywhere soon, though.

Re:doesn't seem that uncommon (2, Funny)

Herkum01 (592704) | about 6 years ago | (#25266959)

Finally I am going to have beachfront property! (I live in Tucson, AZ BTW).

Re:doesn't seem that uncommon (1)

nycbauer (1378877) | about 6 years ago | (#25267157)

Didn't Lex Luthor try to take advantage of that???

May it be a sign of the Flying Spaghetti Monster? (5, Insightful)

gapagos (1264716) | about 6 years ago | (#25266123)

Maybe His Noodly Appendage wants us to bring new sea pirates to fight back global warming in the hottest place on Earth?

Re:May it be a sign of the Flying Spaghetti Monste (2, Informative)

pjt33 (739471) | about 6 years ago | (#25266267)

There are already a few pirates [google.com] in the vicinity.

That's not news (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266177)

It has been going on for at least a year.

The really funny thing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266183)

- is that niggers can't swim.

Re:The really funny thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266349)

Even their nation can't avoid the Chicken!

I say we dig a canal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266217)

parts of the area are over 100 meters below sea level. Low hills to the east are all that stops the Red Sea from encroaching.

Let's get to work and develop some shoreline real estate!

Re:I say we dig a canal (0, Troll)

sznupi (719324) | about 6 years ago | (#25266449)

Better leave it alone and let nature take its few million years; the place is already riddled with conflicts, imagine what

a) destroying some land
b) prospects of access to the sea for nearby places

would do...

Re:I say we dig a canal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266847)

We just want to see hundreds of tons of explosives going off at once and witness the resultant waterfall.

Stop feeding! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266289)

Africa is splitting apart at the seams.

Do you really need to give the trolls encouragement to post yet another Goatse link?

Plate tectonics? (3, Informative)

SupplyMission (1005737) | about 6 years ago | (#25266329)

Haha, this is news to Slashdot?

The African Rift Valley has been taught to first year geology students since plate tectonics were discovered decades ago.

No one? (5, Funny)

Minstrel Boy (787690) | about 6 years ago | (#25266341)

"Formation of an ocean is a rare event, one no scientist has ever witnessed. Yet this geophysical nativity is unfolding today in one of the hottest and most inhospitable corners of the globe. Africa is splitting apart at the seams. From the southern tip of the Red Sea southward through Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique, the continent is coming unstitched along a zone called the East African Rift." This stretching of the earth's crust has been going on for 20 million years, and within another 10 million the Red Sea will have broken through to create a new sea.

So actually *every scientist* has witnessed this event...
KeS

Sun comes up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266359)

Big News! Quick tell everyone the sun came up this morning!

YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266419)

When Sahara splits up we'll have the biggest sand beach ever!

A dollar short, 10 million years late (1)

Mipsalawishus (674206) | about 6 years ago | (#25266423)

Well, that's cold comfort for the inhabitants who are unable to sustain crops because of not having a water supply nearby.

Birth of an African Ocean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266435)

How long before Angelina adopts it?

YEAH! (1)

linhares (1241614) | about 6 years ago | (#25266469)

This stretching of the earth's crust has been going on for 20 million years, and within another 10 million the Red Sea will have broken through to create a new sea.

I hope they post this shit to youtube; that's gonna be really cool. Pressing reload already.

Some Google Maps highlights (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266475)

It's in this part of eastern Africa [google.com] , adjacent to the junction of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden in Ethiopia and Eritrea, and is known as the Afar Depression [wikipedia.org] . All this black stuff is Erte Ale [google.com] , a volcano [wikipedia.org] that is almost continuously erupting. You can see the fresh black lava flows that historically oozed down the sides, and if you zoom in, you can see the red glow of the lava lake [google.com] . The salt pan areas [google.com] mentioned in the article are to the north (Danakil Depression), and are well below sea level (the Wikipedia page on the former settlement of Dallol [wikipedia.org] notes that Dallol is 50m above sea level, but that's the settlement site, not the lake/salt pan, which is lower). There are vast areas of stretched and faulted crust [google.com] to the southeast (the cliffs are the fault scarps), and Lake Assal [google.com] , another salt lake 153 metres below sea level [wikipedia.org] .

This area is more impressive if you fly over it in Google Earth rather than Google Maps. Practically every cone-shaped peak you see in this area is a volcano that has been recently or not so recently active, and to the south you can clearly see the flanks of the East African Rift and the series of lakes [google.com] that occupy the rift valley as far south as Kenya [google.com] , Tanzania and Mozambique, interspersed with volcanoes [google.com] all along the way. This is an awesome part of the world for geology.

afar rift home page (4, Informative)

jefu (53450) | about 6 years ago | (#25266511)

For more information, you can try the Afar Rift Home Page [leeds.ac.uk] for the Afar Rift Project.

Here come the trolls. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266569)

They will reach great lengths to telling us about niggers from splitting Afrika. Niggers having great length, of course.

This is also the birthplace of our species. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266615)

\subject

mod dowN (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266625)

Oh OK so this is where we can find the..... (1)

3seas (184403) | about 6 years ago | (#25266669)

... melting ice cap water.

and even more important we find out that pulling in water from the salty oceans across alot of land makes teh water much more drinkable.

Is this news? (1)

orkybash (1013349) | about 6 years ago | (#25266835)

I thought it was well-known in scientific circles that the East African Rift Valley was going to eventually result in the formation of this. TFA seems to be really describing the interesting geological processes that can be seen in the rift valley, not breaking the news that it exists and that it will eventually turn into an ocean.

O snap! (1)

ndnspongebob (942859) | about 6 years ago | (#25266935)

Free Ocean!!!

Corners... on a sphere? (-1, Troll)

davidsyes (765062) | about 6 years ago | (#25266971)

It never ceases to amaze me that people use that tired, GRATING, erroneours phrase 'corner of the planet', or corner of something about a sphere or some surface having no obvious terminating walls or corners. /rant

Duh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25266995)

I must agree with the guys who have said this is not news... I studied this, and several other such geological events in Geography classes at the U.W. a decade ago... It was old info then...

i.e. The bottom of Hudson Bay bobs up and down like a boat floating in water. Like a metronome it rises too far and that whole area becomes a high mountain plain as it pushes the water out and then it falls too far becoming a "bay" that should be called a "sea" at least... It takes millions of years for each cycle and it rises/falls slightly less each time, so in about 100 billion years it might come to rest... maybe about the same time the Pacific Ocean becomes just a river between the continents we now call North America and Asia...

Hideous fun thought (1)

Sierran (155611) | about 6 years ago | (#25267019)

The frustrated weaponeer in me thinks "Hey! That's how we deal with ocean levels rising! Find some basins and nuke holes between them and oceans!"

Heh.

Didn't I learn this 20 years ago (2, Insightful)

dayton967 (647640) | about 6 years ago | (#25267287)

This isn't news, unless you state it has created a new ocean today. Which if it has, we better put our heads between our legs and kiss our butts goodbye.

Interesting (1)

moniker127 (1290002) | about 6 years ago | (#25267535)

This is interesting, sure, but how is this news? If it has been going on for the last 10 million years, why are we talking about it now? Was this just discovered? Perhaps I didnt RTFA well enough, but I'm missing whats happened.

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