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Working Calculator Created in LittleBigPlanet

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the impressive dept.

Math 142

jamie pointed out a really impressive creation from the LittleBigPlanet beta. The game allows the creation of puzzles from a collection of simple objects and tools. A player called upsilandre used 610 magnetic switches, 500 wires, 430 pistons, and a variety of other objects to create a functioning calculator that will do decimal/binary conversions as well as addition and subtraction. The creation does well to illustrate the potential for amazing creativity in level design. Another user recently designed a level to play the Final Fantasy X theme song. LittleBigPlanet is almost finished and set to be released later this month, though the controls may be refined in a future patch. We recently discussed a student level-design event at the Parsons New School for Design and Technology.

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142 comments

Two words: (4, Funny)

bigstrat2003 (1058574) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293083)

Fuckin'. Awesome.

I knew a low-level understanding of computing must be useful for something! ;)

Re:Two words: (5, Funny)

krakass (935403) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293167)

Great, now other games are going to try to one-up them and Half-Life 3 is going to make you design a 386 processor in order to solve a puzzle.

Re:Two words: (4, Interesting)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293199)

Full adders are really simple to implement.. this really isn't so awesome. But you can do amazing things with wire mod in Garry's Mod.. I've seen autonomous pets, auto-targeting turrets, and chess engines constructed out of physics objects. Also it's extremely powerful because you can write lua scripts that are represented as black-box "chip" objects in the game with inputs and outputs.

Oh Shut Up (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293251)

Just go the fuck away.

Re:Oh Shut Up (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293367)

Aww I'm sorry. Are you jealous that your so called 'revolutionary' console game concepts are years behind PC gaming. As per usual.

Awww, Poor Liddle PC Fanboy! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293429)

Wait! Let me guess, you're one of those faggots who talks about his 'rig'

LOL! What a bunch of fucking retards.

Cry bitch, cry as all those shitty PC developers continue to flee the dying PC games market like rats off a sinking ship.

Re:Awww, Poor Liddle PC Fanboy! (-1, Troll)

delysid-x (18948) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294099)

And you're a faggot who says "LOL." How are you superior?

Re:Awww, Poor Liddle PC Fanboy! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294353)

You are ALL faggots for using faggot, you faggots!

Now quit your whining, trolls.

Re:Oh Shut Up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293427)

I love you, Anonymous Coward.

Re:Oh Shut Up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25297443)

I think this was more of a joke "go the fuck away" rather than a serious "I hate you, leave" Loosen up a bit.

Re:Two words: (4, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293567)

Full adders are really simple to implement.

A full adder is simple in theory, and quite easy to implement in electronics. It's not nearly as easy to implement when you're looking at mechanical parts. Granted, this particular mechanical calculator is virtual, so it doesn't need to worry about mechanical stresses. But that doesn't mean that it lacks the complexity of wiring up 16 bits via mechanical means. (7 bits for the number, one bit for the sign, two numbers.)

It's not like he can simply call "add(8)" and have an 8-bit full adder with carry flags magically created for him. (As so many modern electronics toolkits can do.)

Re:Two words: (0, Troll)

Goaway (82658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293681)

So if you have a general-purpose programming language, you can make complicated things? Well, I sure am amazed!

Re:Two words: (2, Insightful)

pizzach (1011925) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296065)

This is special in a similar way to writing a Java interpreter in JavaScript. Or weird. That might be the word. It does however serve as an example of how flexible the editing is in LittleBigPlanet, which I think was a large part of the point.

Re:Two words: (2, Informative)

TehZorroness (1104427) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294941)

I remember a while back someone made something like this in doom out of dummy players, conveyer belts, and doors. Absolutely nothing new, but fun to play with none-the-less :)

Turing Machine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293425)

Pfft, I won't be impressed until they build a Turing Machine.

Re:Turing Machine (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25296737)

Seconded, provided it's a Universal Turing Machine that they then use to re-implement Little Big Planet.

Re:Turing Machine (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296871)

Pffft. I won't be impressed until they can implement a Nondeterministic Turing Machine.

This just in (4, Funny)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293125)

Someone has spelled out "BOOBLESS" on said virtual calculator. This comes 3 seconds after the level went public.

Re:This just in (5, Funny)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293161)

Update: someone else in littlebigplanet has made a virtual XBOX 360 using just 3 red lights.

Re:This just in (3, Funny)

powerlord (28156) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294091)

Update: someone else in littlebigplanet has made a virtual XBOX 360 using just 3 red lights.

Ah ... so its even fully functional.

(yes ... this was a joke, I know XBoxes don't experience the RRoD as often as they used to)

Boob-gate rocks LittleBigPlanet (4, Funny)

nobodyman (90587) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293677)

In light of this newly discovered piece of illicit content, the ESRB has fined Media Molecule and slapped the game with an M rating.

Jack Thompson was quoted as saying "Oh, what cruel irony is this!? At a time when Sony has unleashed this family destroying game murder-simulating calculator on our children, I am no longer a lawyer!!"

But is it FUN? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293225)

so what. Is it a fun game?

Re:But is it FUN? (1)

Attackinghobo (1212112) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293471)

Playing by yourself is pretty fun. But playing the beta last weekend at my friends house, I can honestly say that it is the most fun game I have played in my life so far.

PS3 (1)

AsnFkr (545033) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293245)

This seriously makes me want a PS3. Are there any other actually good creative games for the system? I don't care about your normal mainstream-crap like Guitar Hero or FPS'es. Anyone have any other suggestions to push me over the edge to drop the money for a PS3?

Re:PS3 (3, Insightful)

Trogre (513942) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293401)

Tell me - might you like Guitar Hero or an FPS if they weren't mainstream?

Re:PS3 (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293595)

Thats a legitimate reason. New ideas/games are good. Its reasonable to be sick of something thats been done to death. Guitar hero kinda sucks in the first place its just a popular fad. L2Play guitar oh yeah that would actually involve talent. And there are like 5million FPS' out all of which are better on the PC making it pointless to put on a console.

Re:PS3 (1)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294449)

It's not a legitimate reason. Disliking a game because it's popular is just as lame as disliking a band because they are popular. If you don't like guitar hero because you don't like it, that's one thing, but if you don't like it "because it's a fad," you are missing out on what is actually a great game.

And I have to say this, learning to play guitar takes no more talent than it does to learn to play guitar hero, just more time. For proof, look to the many talentless idiots who play guitar and troll on slashdot.

Re:PS3 (2, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294661)

Guitar hero kinda sucks in the first place its just a popular fad.

Sadly, you're missing the point that the gazillion people who are playing Guitar Hero like games legitimately find them to be fun, and are willing to spend money on them. You may dislike them and think they suck. But, seriously, look at the sales figures for these games. This isn't "just a popular fad".

For a lot of people, games like this are fun, and games like FPS are annoying and tedious. These games appeal to "non-gamers". I'm one of them. You're welcome to your FPS on your PC, but you're being shockingly arrogant to think that a game like GH3 which sold 1.4 million copies [hardcoreware.net] in October of last year and which seem to drive actual music sales [arstechnica.com] is just a fad.

Like it or not, GH3 and that kind of game are not going to go away anytime soon. I know a ton of people who fall well outside of any realm of what you can call gamers who are absolutely into the instrument rhythm games.

Cheers

Re:PS3 (1)

AsnFkr (545033) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295231)

Like it or not, GH3 and that kind of game are not going to go away anytime soon.

I could care less if they make GH games. I'm glad people have fun with them. Some of my best friends are even ga....I mean like Guitar Hero. I just want to know if the system offers other more creative platforms before I invest in it.

Re:PS3 (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296165)

Magic the gathering sold multiple billions of cards. And yet turned into a fad. Hell i'm sure atleast a million or 2 sets of pogs have been sold.

Re:PS3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25296887)

Magic the gathering sold multiple billions of cards. And yet turned into a fad. Hell i'm sure atleast a million or 2 sets of pogs have been sold.

I'm sure the current millons of Magic the Gathering players worldwide would disagree that it was a fad.

Re:PS3 (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25295295)

L2Play guitar oh yeah that would actually involve talent.

Actually, it wouldn't. But most people think it would. That they won't be able to learn it because you need to be a special person with some special talent. Which is part of the reason why guitar hero sells so good, I believe.

To learn how to play guitar, you'd need a guitar, and play. Play more. Learn chords. Play more. Learn patterns. Play more. Learn picking. Play more. Learn barres. Play more. Listen to what you play. Play more. Polish it by moving your fingers differently. Play more.....

The more you play *and* try to improve what you can, if possible in logical small steps, the better you'll learn it. I've taught myself to play drums and play guitar. People seem to like what I play, and how I play it.

However, I seriously don't recognize this "talent" thing at all. Unless it's created by learning and playing.

The bad thing about the "talent" idea is also that it's a self-fullfilling prophecy. If you'd believe you'd need a special talent to learn something and believe you don't have the talent, you believe you won't be able to learn it, and never seriously take the first step towards learning it.

And then you can say, see, I can't do that, I don't have that talent.

But if you'd seriously give yourself a chance to learn 2 chords (easiest is A minor and E minor to start with, real simple on the fingers) and a simple strumming pattern, I think you'd quickly discover it's something that *you* can learn as well.

Re:PS3 (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296081)

ok swap talent for effort i suppose. It has a higher degree of difficulty. I agree with what you are saying about talent. Though i DO think however that talent is needed in the higher end. Or ... a deep understanding of music which is not gained through practice. More of love of music the ability to express emotion w/e. Without that you can be very good but not great.

Re:PS3 (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296881)

Or you get Wii Music (yes I know it's not released yet so add some waiting), skip the whole learning part and just play.

Re:PS3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25296077)

Thats a legitimate reason. New ideas/games are good. Its reasonable to be sick of something thats been done to death. Guitar hero kinda sucks in the first place its just a popular fad. L2Play guitar oh yeah that would actually involve talent. And there are like 5million FPS' out all of which are better on the PC making it pointless to put on a console.

Why do you have a karma bonus?

Re:PS3 (1)

quadrox (1174915) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296155)

I used to think somewhat along those lines about Guitar Hero until I tried it. It's just a whole lot of fun.

I have a real Guitar too. I'm not very good at it yet, but even if I was I'd consider Guitar Hero to be extreme amounts of fun. And if I were any good at it, it still wouldn't be the same without the rest of a band. And it's sort of difficult to get together with the rest of the band on a pure whim, whereas you can always just fire up guitar hero for a song or two.

I think I have been trolled :/

Re:PS3 (1)

AsnFkr (545033) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294129)

Tell me - might you like Guitar Hero or an FPS if they weren't mainstream?

No. I want creativity and beauty in games, which for the most part FPS'es, rhythm and *most* big production games tend to omit. Of course, there are some of them that think outside of the box. For instance portal was epic, and is sort of a FPS, right?

Things I have played in recent time (aside from Portal) that I have found to be good are things like Soul Bubbles, LostWinds, N+, Patapon, Loco Roco, Rez, Geometry Wars, Castle Of Shikigami III etc. I'm looking for games for the PS3 that will appeal to me...and it's not the big blockbuster games I tend to see they have on their roster. It's not that I dislike all mainstream games as I do have a absolute love for things like Mario Galaxy and Twilight Princess....but they tend to still hold some actual artistic value as opposed to something like...you know....Grand Theft Auto games.

Looking at the list of "top PS3" games on Gamespot I literally don't see one single game that looks interesting to me so I'm asking to see if anyone has any recommendations that may be more tailored to me that I have just missed. Obviously Little Big Planet fills what I am looking for, but I find it hard to drop $400 or whatever a PS3 costs just for one game, regardless of how awesome it looks. Someone convince me to get one! I'm dying for it!

Re:PS3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25295129)

you might find interest in the games, Ico(ps2) and shadow of the colossus (ps2). I believe there will be a third one in this series, by the same team , designer etc which will be on the ps3. And seeing what amazingly artistic and epic games they did on ps2 hardware it will surely be stunningly beautiful on the ps3 platform.

Re:PS3 (1)

AsnFkr (545033) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295251)

Yea, cool. I never owned a PS2 and I'm slightly annoyed to find out that not every Ps3 has backwards compatibility with PS2 games. Things like random feature omissions on new hardware is really quite annoying when buying consoles.

Re:PS3 (2, Informative)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295527)

I think taking out the PS2 compatibility was a bad idea, that said there's plenty of 80GB MGS4 models out there and plenty of compatible models in the used market. But one of the biggest selling points, besides the PS3 games, the PS2 games, the multimedia stuff, the PSP integration, was this:

[CronoCloud@mideel ~]$ cat /etc/redhat-release
Yellow Dog Linux release 6.0 (Pyxis)
 
[CronoCloud@mideel ~]$ cat /proc/cpuinfo
processor : 0
cpu : Cell Broadband Engine, altivec supported
clock : 3192.000000MHz
revision : 5.1 (pvr 0070 0501)
 
processor : 1
cpu : Cell Broadband Engine, altivec supported
clock : 3192.000000MHz
revision : 5.1 (pvr 0070 0501)
 
timebase : 79800000
platform : PS3

I can dual boot between Linux and GameOS functions as I desire.

Re:PS3 (1)

merreborn (853723) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294455)

This seriously makes me want a PS3. Are there any other actually good creative games for the system? I don't care about your normal mainstream-crap like Guitar Hero or FPS'es. Anyone have any other suggestions to push me over the edge to drop the money for a PS3?

Tell me - might you like Guitar Hero or an FPS if they weren't mainstream?

It's not really a killer app [wikipedia.org] if it's not an exclusive. You can play an FPS or Guitar Hero on any platform, so they're not really high on the "reasons to buy a PS3" list, especially if you already have a competing current-gen console.

Don't get me wrong; I enjoy Guitar Hero at least as much as the next guy, but those games are ported to a total of 4 consoles, two of which I already own.

Re:PS3 (1)

azuredrake (1069906) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293569)

Uncharted: Drake's Fortune is a great adventure game with spot on voice acting, brilliantly rendered art, and characters and plot worth caring about.

Rachet and Clank Future: Tools of Destruction was a pretty neat platforming game if you enjoy creative games that don't necessarily have a message to drive home (other than that lombaxes are awesome)

GTA IV is available on PS3 if you don't already have it for something else - a great game even apart from the hype machine.

Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots is also supposed to be amazing. I have not ever played that one myself, though - all the others can be considered personal recommendations from one gamer to another.

Little Big Planet is definitely what I'm most looking forward to, though - it really validates the system purchase decision in my eyes.

Re:PS3 (1)

KodaK (5477) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293903)

Just an FYI: I bought the MGS4 bundle because I wanted backwards compatibility (my daughter has taken over my old PS/2) and I have yet to make it through MGS4. I'm told fans of the series absolutely love it, but so far it's been incredibly boring with long, drawn out (mostly skip-able, thankfully) cut scenes that make absolutely no sense. Whoever did them has absolutely no sense of pacing, and a cut scene that should be a minute or two is drawn out into 20 minutes with lots of unnecessary pauses in the dialog. It's pretty bad, IMO.

Otherwise, I'm loving the PS3 so far. I'm in on the LBP beta and it's a shitload of fun.

Re:PS3 (2, Informative)

deek (22697) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294397)

Some of the most creative games on the PS3 are only available for download from the Playstation Network.

Have a look into the following:
Pixeljunk Eden
flOw
Everyday Shooter
Echochrome

They're my favourites, anyway. I'm also looking forward to Flower, made by the same group as flOw.

Re:PS3 (1)

AsnFkr (545033) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295271)

Awesome! This is exactly what I was looking for. I will def be hitting youtube looking for videos about these games. Question....when you get a game from Playstation Network do they enable you to download a trial and then buy if you like it, or do you have to buy before you can play any of the game? Thanks!

Re:PS3 (1)

deek (22697) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296019)

Eden and Echochrome have demos available. There's also plenty of youtube videos of Eden; it has a feature to upload directly to youtube. Check out wikipedia too. I'm sure the games have a writeup there.

Re:PS3 (1)

Shaterri (253660) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295619)

I have yet to drop $60 on a retail PS3 game (LBP will be the first, and I actually got my PS3 just for it -- a few months back, when I could still get a PS2-compatible system), but both flOw and Everyday Shooter are $10 titles available through the PSN store that push the 'art game' form in different directions. flOw is a bit closer to interactive screensaver than to game in some ways, but it's still gorgeous to watch and reasonable to play; and the gameplay in Everyday Shooter is fantastic. More recently there's Echochrome, a really clever game based on Escherian paradoxical geometry; not the deepest title in the world, and not without its share of frustrations, but wholly unlike anything else out there.

Re:PS3 (1)

mr_exit (216086) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296357)

Ratchet and Clank (there's also a downloadable followup)
Gta4 can be creative.

and some great cheap downloadables
Pixeljunk Monsters
Pixeljunk Eden.
Riff everyday shooter
echochrome

I'm not a fps or a driving game guy but there is plenty to keep me entertained on the ps3

So I've gotta ask... (1, Funny)

geedra (1009933) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293311)

A player called upsilandre used 610 magnetic switches, 500 wires, 430 pistons, and a variety of other objects to create a functioning calculator

How many MPG does it get?

Re:So I've gotta ask... (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293673)

How many MPG does it get?

With 430 pistons, I'd say about forty rods per hogshead.

Dwarf Fortress (3, Interesting)

Danny Rathjens (8471) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293347)

This reminds me of the way you can combine the various elements in Dwarf Fortress to be able to perform computations. The graphics are at a wee bit of a different level, though. :D

http://www.dwarffortresswiki.net/index.php/Mechanical_logic [dwarffortresswiki.net]

Re:Dwarf Fortress (1)

FloydTheDroid (1296743) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295375)

I'm reminded of Rocky's Boots for the Apple ][ which was very similar. You would connect gates to various contraptions to make simple machines. Thanks to that software I know the pure joy of creating an alligator kicking machine which is, quite frankly, beyond words.

Levels of abstraction (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25293553)

As they say, there's no problem which cannot be solved by adding a level of abstraction.

1. There was a world full of physical objects, with all the interactions between them exactly as they should be.

2. Someone built an amazingly powerful calculator out of these parts.

3. Someone else built an amazingly complicated program which could be run by said calculator. The amazingly complicated program would simulate a very small subset of the physical world as described in 1. on the machine.

4. Someone else built a calculator out of the parts available in the world available in the program running on the powerful calculator. This second calculator was much more simple and less powerful than the first calculator.

Re:Levels of abstraction (3, Funny)

Spazntwich (208070) | more than 5 years ago | (#25295179)

Kind of makes you wonder what happens once we design a computer fast enough to accurately simulate physics exactly as in our universe.

How would we limit the universe? Maybe just create a pacman-like solution where hitting the boundary sends you back to the other side. Maybe increase the size of the simulation as you can throw more computing power at it. You'd need a method of interacting with the matter in the universe to make sure the new space is utilized, right?

Why not just create some shit that doesn't ruin the rest of the simulation by interacting in any fashion other than pushing the various systems away from each other so your ant farms don't get too close to one another and fight.

what?

Re:Levels of abstraction (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296685)

Eh, at that point I imagine that infinite regression would be the result. Which has resulted in me having an epiphany that will lead to my winning a nobel prize. Probably not, but its an interesting thought. I have long argued that there is nothing in principle that stops us from building a complete simulation of the entire universe past, present and future (as quantum mechanics becomes a stochastic phenomenon on a macro scale and is thus perfectly predictable). Thinking about your post made me realize I was wrong, the reason having to do with data storage and processing. There is no way to store all the data on the state of the universe (position of all particles, charges, etc.) without using a storage device AT LEAST as massive as the entire universe. You cannot store more bits of data than you have particles. Its simply not possible. Therefore we will never be able to build a computer that can simulate the entire universe exactly. Of course, we can do approximations to some level, but we already do this for the entire observable universe regularly in galaxy supercluster formation simulations. That would be nothing new. But a particle by particle precise simulation is physically impossible because we could never build a calculator with enough data storage. Woe unto the computational physicists!

Re:Levels of abstraction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25296815)

...and the people in that simulation would observe an expanding universe as we add computing power.
We could also add some optimizations like not simulating the spin of subatomic particles until they become relevant (like, being measured).

Hmmmm!

Re:Levels of abstraction (2, Interesting)

bentcd (690786) | more than 5 years ago | (#25297185)

Kind of makes you wonder what happens once we design a computer fast enough to accurately simulate physics exactly as in our universe.

Some would say that the only computer capable of accurately simulating physics exactly as in our universe /is/ our universe. And, further, that our universe is already doing these calculations at the maximum possible speed. If this conjecture is correct then in order to make accurate predictions of future events you would need a computer even bigger than our universe to do so. Implementing this is left as an exercise for the reader :-)

Re:Levels of abstraction (1)

storkus (179708) | more than 5 years ago | (#25297435)

> Kind of makes you wonder what happens once we design a computer fast enough to accurately simulate physics exactly as in our universe.

What makes you think you aren't living in one right now a la "The Matrix", "The 13th Floor", etc. For that matter, what's to say that, if this world is a simulation, that the "real" world "above" doesn't make this world look like "Tron" or the digital world of any cyberpunk novel? Just because those worlds are cooler than ours doesn't mean that our reality isn't the opposite (that is, simpler and more boring).

Mike

How about a beowulf cluster of those? (1)

Fry-kun (619632) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293629)

Very impressive! Make a Babbage Difference Engine next!

Re:How about a beowulf cluster of those? (1)

Workaphobia (931620) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293709)

I'm disappointed that, in a Slashdot comment page on a topic such as this, no one has yet said these magic three words:

Universal Turing Machine.

Re:How about a beowulf cluster of those? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294023)

Did you even check before posting your pithiness?

http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=988535&cid=25293425
 
Posted 28 minutes before you did.

Re:How about a beowulf cluster of those? (3, Interesting)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294253)

Universal Turing Machine. Implemented using Conway's Game of Life. [rendell-attic.org]

Just amazing. If you know what those words mean, you HAVE to check that pattern out. I could watch in run for days. Just mind blowing.

Re:How about a beowulf cluster of those? (1)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294295)

OK, it's not a "Universal" Turing machine. But it is a Turing machine. And it is amazing.

Re:How about a beowulf cluster of those? (1)

Workaphobia (931620) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296181)

Yes, I've seen that before. I thought it was claiming to be a universal Turing machine though. Oh well, it is still pretty damn awesome.

Color me unimpressed (3, Funny)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293973)

I owned my first calculator 30 years ago and implemented my first one in BASIC not long after. If it's only just reached the capability of a machine with just a few K of RAM and a BASIC interpreter then it can't be very impressive. What is LittleBigPlanet anyway? The codename for the latest OS from Microsoft? Trust the /. editors not to provide any context.

Re:Color me unimpressed (2, Insightful)

nutshell42 (557890) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294389)

Trust the /. editors not to provide any context.

I know that you were just trying to be funny. But honestly, this is the 1-in-1000 /. story that actually explains what it's talking about in the second sentence:

The game allows the creation of puzzles from a collection of simple objects and tools.

So, kudos to Soulskill who did not remove the useful part of the submission. You must be new here.

Re:Color me unimpressed (2, Funny)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294961)

> The game allows the creation of puzzles from a collection of simple objects and tool

But I work with a system like that every day. It's called C++.

What about a game with a programming mini-game? (3, Interesting)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 5 years ago | (#25293997)

I've, from time to time, mused about the possibility of trying to create a game with a 'programming' mini-game. This might not obviously be programming to most users - maybe it would use some sort of icon-based programming (which it sounds like LittleBigPlanet sort of has with this parts system). Maybe this could be a system to let users create their own spells in a magic game, or used as a 'hacking' mini-game in a sci-fi game (something like Bioshock or Mass Effect, but replace the simplistic GUI puzzle 'hacking' mini-game with a slightly more robust mini-game which actually encourages people to learn real programming techniques), or maybe the ability to give a ship or other piece of equipment new abilities in a sci-fi game.

Anyone know to what extent this idea has been tried in the past by any other games? The only thing that comes to my mind is a game I saw a few years ago (can't remember what it was called now), where the player was in some sort of base on Mars or one of the moons of Jupiter or something, and the player created these autonomous vehicles by combining parts (chasis, engine, wheels, breaks, batteries, and various 'logic components') using a wiring system (which is sort of like programming). Then the vehicles would be pitted against each other in a sort of arena. Sometimes you would be racing an obstacle course, other times the vehicles were fighting each other (you could get weapons which you could wire up to the vehicle).

I imagine that, for the game to gain any popularity, this should be a fairly optional part of the game, since most users might get a little overwhelmed by it, if it were complex enough to be fairly powerful.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (1)

Frac O Mac (1138427) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294239)

on a slightly related note, bit bath [hacker.org] programming IS the game. I'm admittedly not too good at it but the idea of competitive programming is just too fun in concept.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294821)

Try Light Bot:

http://www.gameroo.nl/games/light-bot

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294861)

I think you're thinking of MindRover [mindrover.com] .

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294905)

There is a PSX game called Carnage Heart which is like this. You program a robot (similar to Mech Warrior) with an icon-based interface and they go out and kill other robots with the AI you gave them.

This isn't a mini-game, but the entire game. I think. I lost it before getting into it.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (1)

Lockblade (1367083) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296263)

Garry's Mod for Valve's Source engine is extremely powerful, but easy enough for just about anyone to make an attack tub. Especially when you take into the addons for it such as Wire, which itself could be considered a programming language.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25296341)

"light bot" (google it, it's a flash game) has some programming elements. It's quite simple, but I guess it is a good introduction to the stuff.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (1)

anomnomnomymous (1321267) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296559)

Garry's Mod does this: Afaik it offers a very solid framework where people with some knowledge of (iirc) LUA can create their own gametypes.

Re:What about a game with a programming mini-game? (1)

Christoffer777 (991273) | more than 5 years ago | (#25296745)

Well, you always have the programming games, like AT-Robots (http://necrobones.com/atrobots/). You program a robot to fight in an arena. There are many varieties in this genre, with many different "languages", but what I like with AT-Robots, is that it is assembly style, with interrupts and registers etc. In many ways, it actually feels like you are programming a cpu in that robot, interfacing with all the hardware.

I found it quite educational when I first came over it in my Uni days and actually submitted a crude first attempt in one of the arranged ladders.

The toolset is solid and without bugs (which cannot be said for all of these types of "games").

I think the whole thing is made in Turbo Pascal. There is a very nice graphical representation of the "fighting" between the robots.
Definetly worth checking out if you like pogramming games in general.

Cheers,
Chris

Lego? (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 5 years ago | (#25297543)

Lego has this of course with its most advanced sets that allow for simple programming of a control unit.

As introduction to programming there are 'games' that allow you to program a robot and you 'win' by using the fewest instructions to clear a maze the fastests.

The problem is however limits imposed by the game. A maze is only so complex, the sensors in Lego only so good. Pretty soon you hit the game limits, the solution has been found and the game is over.

It is not that you can't make a game out of it, but that you either need a LOT of ways to do things yet keep it simple or face the fact that your game is going to be finished pretty quick.

Reminds Me of Marathon (4, Interesting)

adavies42 (746183) | more than 5 years ago | (#25294379)

Reminds me of Marathon 2/Marathon Infinity--back before Aleph One and the addition of a scripting language, some people liked to use only standard game elements to create logic effects. One guy designed a half-adder cell using two monsters, a platform, and a switch, and used a bunch to make a ripple-carry adder that triggered as you ran down a hallway, displaying its results on a bank of lights at the end. Another guy won a Bungie contest by reimplementing most of Myst Island's puzzles in Marathon.

610 magnetic switches, 500 wires, 430 pistons... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294817)

A player called upsilandre used 610 magnetic switches, 500 wires, 430 pistons, and a variety of other objects to create a functioning calculator

That's a lotta parts. The Curta [vcalc.net] has only 605 parts and I thought that was complicated.

This isn't real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25294927)

This is just another proof that we are currently living in a game.

Great! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25295517)

Yes, but does it run Linux?

PS3's true potential (1)

weirdcrashingnoises (1151951) | more than 5 years ago | (#25297057)

finally the PS3's true processing potential has been revealed to us!

but seriously, it's funny to think how many hundreds/thousands?/millions?/billions? of calculations the ps3 is doing... simply so that game can do a little addition. bwhahaha

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