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World's Smallest IPv6 Stack By Cisco, Atmel, SICS

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the is-beautiful dept.

The Internet 287

B Rog writes "Cisco, Atmel, and the Swedish Institute of Computer Science have released uIPv6, the world's smallest IPv6 compliant IPv6 stack, as open source for the Contiki embedded operating system. The intent is to bring IP addresses to the masses by giving devices such as thermometers or lightbulbs an IPv6 stack. With a code size of 11 kilobytes and a dynamic memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes (yes, kilobytes!), it certainly fits the bill of the ultra-low-power microcontrollers typically used in such devices. When every lightbulb has an IP address, the vast address range of IPv6 sounds like a pretty good idea."

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287 comments

Sweet (5, Funny)

mypalmike (454265) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387763)

With a code size of 11 kilobytes and a dynamic memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes (yes, kilobytes!), it certainly fits the bill of the ultra-low-power microcontrollers typically used in such devices.

With my IPv6-enabled Commodore 64, I'm ready to surf both IPv6 websites.

Re:Sweet (1)

fictionpuss (1136565) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387897)

C'mon, you and I both know that an IPv6 Spectrum would kick its ass, with or without hardware sprite support.

Atari all the way (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387963)

Your are both wrong. The Atari 1200XL is the one to beat, with a RANA disk drive with its motor covered in aluminum foil!

Re:Atari all the way (2, Funny)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388307)

Your are both wrong. The Atari 1200XL is the one to beat, with a RANA disk drive with its motor covered in aluminum foil!

Haa! My Uber TI-99 4A with Extended Basic Cartridge would kick the Atari in the teeth.

Re:Atari all the way (0)

tjstork (137384) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388405)

Haa! My Uber TI-99 4A with Extended Basic Cartridge would kick the Atari in the teeth.

At least into you threw it through the wall with those god aweful TI fonts! I mean, you don't get better than the original Atari "g"!! :-)

Re:Atari all the way (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388517)

Haa! My Uber TI-99 4A with Extended Basic Cartridge would kick the Atari in the teeth.

At least into you threw it through the wall with those god aweful TI fonts! I mean, you don't get better than the original Atari "g"!! :-)

If you need readable fonts to code in your basement late into the night while your parents are asleep then you must be an Atari user.

Re:Sweet (4, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388077)

And in fact, the Wikipedia page for Contiki links to a web server running on a C64! Shall we see if we can Slashdot it?

Whenever I trash MS-DOS 1.0 on Slashdot, I get a contradictions ("arguments" presumes too much actual knowledge) from people who insist that it's the best OS that could have been implemented on the hardware available in 1981. The counterexamples I usually answer are things like CP/M (the leader before commodity PCs took over), QNX (now sold as an embedded OS, but originally meant as a desktop system), and CTOS (utterly dead now, but my favorite at one time) that all had more power and lower hardware requirements. These examples go right by people because they've never heard of these OSs. (Except maybe CP/M, and then they assume that it's the same level as MS-DOS 1.0, because 1.0 was based on QDOS, and QDOS pretended to be a CP/M clone.) I'm very pleased to learn about Contiki, even though I'll probably never work with it, since it's a prime example that you can even do high-powered OSs with GUIs on 80s-era hardware.

Re:Sweet (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388167)

what, you mean slashdot this: http://www.c64web.com/ [c64web.com] ? Cheers and My apologies to the website owner

CTOS (3, Funny)

turgid (580780) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388489)

I hear that the first version of Duke Nukem Forever was written for CTOS and that Elvis, Roy and George are basing the next AmigaOS on its source code. Jesus is not available for comment.

Re:Sweet (3, Funny)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388557)

This is how it all begins. Soon each thread in your clothing will have an IPv6 stack powered by the static built up by movement. Then when it detects a thread break, it sends a notification to your iDoEverything to let you know your shirt is damaged.

Yes, this is how we'll end up running out of IPv6 addresses, thermometers and light bulbs.

hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25387791)

vibrators with ipv6 addresses

Lightbulb on the internet? (4, Funny)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387839)

Why would anyone want to have a light bulb with a data connection? Oh the switch to the bathroom? Go to the computer, click file --> power --> lights -->bathroom. Select lights 1, 2, & 3. Click enable, then confirm. Got that?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25387869)

Stop flashing my bathroom lights!

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (4, Funny)

Shados (741919) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387911)

IP Addresses on everything is useful so you can ping the chocolate cake you made to see if your significant other stole it.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (3, Funny)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388049)

My significant other has her own IP address so I can ping her to check her latency.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388269)

I'm pretty backward. I can't figure out how to put IPv6 into some off color joke in reply to this...

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (5, Funny)

Zerth (26112) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388431)

With IPv6, instead of using multiple ports at one address, she can use the same port at multiple addresses! It all depends on whether she likes to multiplex or be serially promiscuous.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (4, Interesting)

stoanhart (876182) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387915)

So your standard $50 DVD player can dim the lights in your living room when a movie starts?

That's just one example of hundreds of little features that become trivial when everything in your house (not just bulbs) has a data connection.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Cougem (734635) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388063)

Or do what would be much more sensible and have a lightbulb controller, which has an IP address, and which controlls all bulbs it's connected to, in all of the different rooms.

This would keep costs down of the bulbs, and would result in probably much less wiring, since the bulbs would only need 1 wire, power (assuming they're traditional tungsten filament).

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (4, Funny)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388189)

Yes, a lightbulb conroller. Lets keep the lingo with the networking world and call it a "switch". We could give it a nice simple human interface and place it on the wall, about chest height. Perhaps one per room. Then all users would have to do is go to the light panel and "switch" on the light. I like where this is going.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Cougem (734635) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388237)

Right, that's not really going to fulfil the requirements of the stoanhart's post, though, is it?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (2, Insightful)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388101)

Now that is a feature that I would rewire my house and buy new light recepticles for! Wait, who still uses DVD?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388201)

So your standard $50 DVD player can dim the lights in your living room when a movie starts? That's just one example of hundreds of little features that become trivial when everything in your house (not just bulbs) has a data connection

.

That doesn't tell me why devices living inside your home network needs IPv6.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (2, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388465)

So your car can turn off all of the lights when you drive away, using the same protocol and address that your DVD player uses? And with the amount of address space IPv6 gives you, you could have a subnet for lightbulbs and a subnet within this for each room, so you just send a packet to the broadcast address in this subnet to toggle a group of lightbulbs.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (2, Funny)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388543)

Dammit honey! You drove off and left me in the dark again!

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (5, Funny)

Splab (574204) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388215)

Gonna be real fun when the local script kiddie turns your house into a disco.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388467)

You are intending to have 256^6 individually controllable lights/components in your house? Or are you planning on exposing some number of lights in your house to the public internet where they would have to share out of the possible addresses?

-Rick

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

coolsnowmen (695297) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388603)

you would only need ipv6 if you wanted your dvd player to dim someone else's lights. There are plenty of ways people connect and control electronic things together without 2^64 addressees.

If you search "X10 lighting" you will find at least one of the many existing solutions to your problem.

DVDs, Bluray, EULA (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388629)

So your standard $50 DVD player can dim the lights in your living room when a movie starts?

That's just one example of hundreds of little features that become trivial when everything in your house (not just bulbs) has a data connection.

Will I have to read a 200 page EULA before accessing the online functionality of the DVD player? Will the lights be held hostage when Sony ships a DVD or Blu-ray player with a root kit?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

HipToday (883113) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387967)

Ping on, ping off! The Pinger(tm)!

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388093)

Why would anyone want to have a light bulb with a data connection?

Yeah, well come back when my candles can have a data connection.
And my lawn. And my walking stick.
Now get off the first one or I'll wave the second !

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388207)

Get off your candles or you'll wave your lawn?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388463)

Give the man a break, he didn't remember what the first one was when finishing his last sentence.
Old people get alzheimers and stuff like that.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (3, Interesting)

pwnies (1034518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388117)

It's not just for internet connectivity purposes. The range of addresses used by IPv6 is broad enough that everyday objects can be identified with an IPv6 address for indexing and tracking purposes.

Let's say Wallmart is selling a lawn furniture set, and each one has a unique IPv6 address. Suddenly, keeping track of the stock is immensely easier. Need to know if the furniture set that the person returned was really the one that he bought from Wallmart? No worries, just scan the IPv6 chip in it. An employee has a garden gnome that looks suspiciously like the one that disappeared from the store a few weeks ago? Scan it and find out.

It's uses are significant. Don't dismiss the possibilities of having mundane objects having an address.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Sinbios (852437) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388179)

Let's say Wallmart is selling a lawn furniture set, and each one has a unique IPv6 address. Suddenly, keeping track of the stock is immensely easier. Need to know if the furniture set that the person returned was really the one that he bought from Wallmart? No worries, just scan the IPv6 chip in it. An employee has a garden gnome that looks suspiciously like the one that disappeared from the store a few weeks ago? Scan it and find out.

...Isn't that exactly what SKU does?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388313)

Have you ever had walmart try to locate something by SKU? Obviously not...

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (2, Interesting)

Minwee (522556) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388631)

And, based on this amazing success, you think that they would do any better with IPv6? Maybe the method of addressing isn't the real problem there.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388337)

No - SKU says that an item is a particular model.

All Ninteno Wii's in the store will have the same SKU. All "Super TurboTron 400k Devastator" action figures will carry a diffent SKU from the Wii's, but amongst themselves it will be the same.

What the GP is saying is that Wal-mart could identify one of those action figures from the other using this. So if your kid breaks his Wii that's out of warranty, you couldn't go buy a new one, swap them out, and then return the old broken one asking for a refund.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Warll (1211492) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388435)

Even now your kid can't do that, all consoles have model numbers, as do GPUs, Routers, RAM, Wacoms, Monitors, ect...

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

SmarkWoW (1382053) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388239)

Is this an original idea? No. Ever heard of RFID tags and RFID technology?

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

coolsnowmen (695297) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388665)

if you replace ipv6 with RFID you get the current state of things.

If all you have is a hammer, suddenly everything looks like a nail.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388275)

Why would anyone want to have a light bulb with a data connection?

Yeah, that's pretty stupid. Now, an LED with a connection and an IPv6 stack, that'd be totally fight!

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388279)

Why would anyone want to have a light bulb with a data connection?

That was my first question too. Should we use more technology just because we can?

Addressable light bulbs might be great for legislated, remote or automatic control of energy reduction, but what about the waste when the bulb fails? There's a switching supply that gets tossed every time a CFL fails.

It would pave the way for a webcam in every light bulb. Should our light bulbs have firewalls?
Will someone engineer a light bulb that streams the contents of our networks out hidden in the R.F. noise they radiate? Something new to increase the trade imbalance too. Just think of the possibilities...

Re: Better than that (3, Interesting)

apankrat (314147) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388301)

> Go to the computer, click file ..

Now imagine that this computer is a size of a card deck, with a touchscreen. And it understands which area of the house it is in. And it automatically shows you all actionable elements in the interior - lights, fireplace, shades, speakers, etc. And it has an IR transmitter, so it also acts as a TV remote. And it has a WiFi, so it is hooked up to all networked devices in the house such as DVR and media box. And it run a SIP client that is hooked up to a landline. And a module for the cell calls. That would've been pretty sweet, wouldn't it ?

Re: Better than that (1)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388479)

Until it gets lost. Then I'm stuck in a cold, dark house, the TV is stuck on the weather channel, and I can't call for help. If the sucker also controls door locks, the stove, and the fridge, I'm as good as dead.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (2, Funny)

liam193 (571414) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388317)

A program you have just launched is trying to turn on your lights. Cancel or Allow.

Re:Lightbulb on the internet? (1)

Reece400 (584378) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388515)

It would be handy in a large building. Maintainence could be notified automatically whenever a bulb dies.

Please specify OS licence (4, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387855)

At least on Slashdot, it would be nice if posters specified the OSI approved license as it tends to be import for different types of software.

The FAQ says it uses the 3-clause BSD license.

I personnaly like stuff like this to be BSD, while applications are GPL

Government controlled lightbulbs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25387873)

So does this mean that the government will now be able to control how many lights I can have on and when?

Re:Government controlled lightbulbs? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388111)

You kid, but remote controlling consumer loads is indeed on the table. The idea is to make it less troublesome to turn the grid back on after a power failure by remotely disabling big consumers and reenabling them one at a time. The technology is based on powerline communications and uses the electric meter as a gateway.

Re:Government controlled lightbulbs? (1)

mustafap (452510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388223)

Consumer pay-as-you-go electricity meters already address that by using a random delay on power-up before connecting the consumer. Can say they all do, but the ones I wrote s/w for did.

Re:Government controlled lightbulbs? (1)

SmarkWoW (1382053) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388273)

This brings up a good point. Hacking light bulbs. You laugh, but if whatever controls the bulb is connect to the net, there is a possibility of a security breach. Imagine you're chatting with someone on the net, they decide they don't like you and have the ability to turn off the power strip that is powering your computer.

Linux? (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387913)

I assume this wouldn't easily integrate with Linux's current networking setup?

Re:Linux? (1)

Chirs (87576) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387991)

It likely wouldn't interact nicely with all the other networking functionality provided by linux--throttling, filtering, packet mangling, multiple routing tables, varying levels of hardware offload, etc.

Re:Linux? (2, Informative)

c_oflynn (649487) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388411)

Wrongo. The USB stick plugs into Linux and shows up as a network interface, instantly working with Linux (or Windows) IPv6 network.

There is a quick demo at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjztYx_F2Ko [youtube.com]

And you can browse some of the documentation. It is fully IPv6 compliant, hence should work with anything...

Re:Linux? (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388569)

Sure, it can network with Linux just fine. But I am asking if it could be used as Linux's network stack.

Lightbulb? (4, Interesting)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387947)

Not everything needs an IP address. That's just silly.

There is still the rather big issue of security. I don't think it has been addressed to anyone's satisfaction yet. Certainly not mine.

Right now the worst somebody could do is take out my computer. I could deal with that, given enough time and resources. However, dealing with the loss of my computer requires "light" and "coffee". You take that away from me and I am really screwed. Without my computer I am bereft of all the wonderful porn on the internet. Of course, I have a backup plan that involves a rather large library of tapes and magazines. Once again, I still need light!

Put IP addresses in light bulbs and other appliances and you risk a natural disaster creating a large population of pissed off men in the dark unable to "relieve their stress".

How's that for a "Ripple of Evil"?

Re:Lightbulb? (4, Interesting)

cavtroop (859432) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388055)

How about more nefarious things, like home heating/cooling systems. Power outlets that heart monitors are plugged into. Space heaters, electrical closets.

Kill the power to the fridge. Damn, there goes $400 worth of food. Turn on someones microwave while they are on vacation, and they come back to a $500 electric bill.

Not to mention the worry about botnets. Right now, they number in the millions. If every appliance can suddenly participate, it'll be billions.

No thanks, you can keep my appliances/lights/furnaces/toiletpaper off the net. Thanks, k, bye.

Re:Lightbulb? (1)

SmarkWoW (1382053) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388319)

Being part of a botnet implies that the IPv6 address actually has a computer behind it. I doubt that each light bulb/fridge/microwave will have the firmware (dare I say OS?) to host a botnet client to the point of it being useful for anything.

Re:Lightbulb? (1)

Mesa MIke (1193721) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388281)

Not only will your toothbrush have an IP address, but even the packaging it came in!

Re:Lightbulb? (1)

morgauo (1303341) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388641)

It could be worse... what if the magazine and tape libraries had IPs. Then all that's left is the backup - backup plan... the wife!!

The IP stack isn't the limiting factor (5, Insightful)

John.P.Jones (601028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387951)

Making the IP stack smaller will not allow low power devices to harness the power of the Internet because while it lowers the bar for technically interacting on the Internet we can't do so safely with a device that can't also implement sane security.

If a light fixture can't execute a secure authentication mechanism to determine whether it really should be turned off/on then it really shouldn't be taking those controls (or reporting its status) to IP queries. These requirements are already beyond the resources needed for less optimized IPv6 implementations this brings us back to Amdahl's law doesn't it... Don't optimize blindly.

Re:The IP stack isn't the limiting factor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388311)

You don't have to connect everything to a hostile network!

Lock it down and it'll do whatever you want.

Re:The IP stack isn't the limiting factor (3, Interesting)

c_oflynn (649487) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388587)

You CAN fit authentication into these devices. The Contiki example was in a device with 16K of RAM and 128K of ROM.

So the fact you have a tiny stack leaves enough room to run authentication. Simple authentication, yes, but hopefully enough...

IIGS (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387955)

This would be freaking awesome, if I could afford an ethernet card, ram card, and transwarp GS for my IIGS. But hey, it plays Ultima, so I'm not complaining.

Re:IIGS (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388181)

IIgs is a sweet machine. I think it was a better road to personal computers than the Macintosh, which was almost 3x the price. But did Apple do much with the 65816 cpus beyond the two releases of the IIgs, I think not.

There's A Reason For All Those Bits... (1)

j h woodyatt (13108) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387965)

"When every lightbulb has an IP address, the vast address range of IPv6 sounds like a pretty good idea."

Sigh. It would be nice of the know-nothings who keep mocking IPv6 for its 128-bit address space would read RFC 4941 [ietf.org] , and take the time to comprehend what it means, before spouting off.

Which way is this impressive? (4, Insightful)

johnw (3725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25387975)

With a code size of 11 kilobytes and a dynamic memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes (yes, kilobytes!)

I'm left wondering whether the submitter thinks this is impressively small or impressively large. Perhaps I'm getting old, but to me 11 kilobytes seems rather large. I might be impressed by someone squeezing a stack into, say, 301 bytes, but surely you can implement *anything* in 11 kilobytes.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (2, Informative)

mustafap (452510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388315)

Any idiot ( even you ) could do a simple stack in much less than 11KB. It just depends on how much functionality you want to drop.

I've an IPv4 webserver running here:

http://mikehibbett.dyndns.org/ [dyndns.org]

that's running* a Microchip stack on a PIC micrcontroller in about 16KB of code. I bet I could get that down to less than 1KB if I knock much of the functionality out. Want to have a bet on it?

* it's running now. Not sure what a slashdotting would do to it.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

CaptainPatent (1087643) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388331)

Considering the address space of IPv6 is 128Kb, it would be difficult to meet your requirement of 301 bytes. You do have to consider though the physical size of the memory required to carry it. I have a 1GB micro SD card for my phone that's about .5in x .3in x .02in that I purchased for 30 bucks about a year ago. The physical space and cost to implement an 11kb space is on the order of microns and minuscule fractions of a penny.

Additionally IPv6 supports a ton of new features [wikipedia.org] so the fact they can fit everything into 11kb is fairly impressive. Yes, if this were the good ol' days, it could have been done in ASM in bytes, but the additional security, multicast and autoconfig portions that are now handled by the implementation itself would still need space to run in software over top. If we're talking about enabling network devices like thermostats, you don't have a ton of processing power.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

amorsen (7485) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388633)

Considering the address space of IPv6 is 128K

Huh? An IPv6 address is 128bits, i.e. 16bytes. Add another byte for the netmask if you want to support non-/64-netmasks.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388693)

Considering the address space of IPv6 is 128Kb, it would be difficult to meet your requirement of 301 bytes.

You mean 128 bits = 16 bytes? It's possible you could something simple up and running in 301 bytes, if this is anything like full IPv6 support then I'm more impressed.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

jfclavette (961511) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388345)

While the 11 KB code footprint might not be all that impressive (altough I think it is), the 13 is very impressive for an IPv6 stack. I haven't RTFA but if it accepts a largeish number of simultaneous connections, I highly doubt they got it working at all with that kind of footprint.

Heck, 13KB is only slightly over the space required to load a 64 by 64 24 bits bitmap in memory. And you haven't displayed it yet.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388399)

I'm left wondering whether the submitter thinks this is impressively small or impressively large.

I'm leaning towards "impressively small".

Re:Which way is this impressive? (1)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388449)

Nope, but 640K is enough for *anything*.

Re:Which way is this impressive? (2, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388695)

Note that this 11KB can go in ROM, and only 1.8KB needs to be RAM. The same guy wrote an IPv4 stack that is much smaller, but IPv6 is a huge protocol comparatively. Considering that the MTU size for most of the Internet is 576 bytes, implementing TCP on IPv4 or v6 in 301 bytes for RAM would be tricky...

in the ipv6 future (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388015)

your lightbulb will spam you with really short emails

Re:in the ipv6 future (3, Insightful)

need4mospd (1146215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388451)

You turn me on. -Kitchen "sparky" Lightbulb

no (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388513)

i said that your zombie bot lightbulb would spam you

not flirt with you on twitter ;-)

Re:in the ipv6 future (1)

proselyte_heretic (1030466) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388503)

No, your light bulb will spam you with morse code.

dateline november 12, 2016: (2, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388607)

a man drowned today in his sinking boat, but not before he had his laptop reprogram a lightbulb in his house to blink SOS in morse code to get attention. his wife and children, who did not know morse code, simply tried changing the lightbulb 2 times, not understanding the bulb wasn't faulty. the man took his last breath reading his last email message: "honey, you need to fix the lightbulb in the study"

"IPv6 compliant IPv6 stack"? (1)

jeffb (2.718) (1189693) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388071)

Does the IPv6 standard compel redundancy, or merely permit it?

Over imagination (1)

tragedy in chaos (1382095) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388099)

So now we have to worry about securing our lamps? Great, just what the world needed.

At the same time however, should be interesting about the time the hackers get into DoL attacks.

I'd be totally interested in a web-accessible (and controllable) vacuum however.

An this, ladies and gentlemen.... (1)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388107)

...is what we need to replace X10: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X.10 [wikipedia.org]

That, and some way to secure this stuff. Wouldn't want the neighbors to turn on our sauna while I'm at the summer cottage now would I?

Lightbulbs? (0, Offtopic)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388143)

I'd be happier if every ACORN-registered "voter" had a unique IP address. That way when they vote in more than one state or precinct simultaneously, we'll get an IP address conflict message. Once resolved, we can use that same IP address to track their federal court docket, and even their newly laundered prison jumpsuit. Unless, of course, the result is fresh new justice department that doesn't feel obligated to follow up on pizza delivery guys that registered 70+ times.

Before anyone says so, no, I don't think pizza guy is going to try to vote 70 times. The strategy is to overwhelm the registration offices, and provide opportunities for lawyers to get more and more tangled up in each piece of the election process and in the wake of the election, should it be close. It's a DOS attack on the registration system, plain and simple. And ACORN is spoofing the traffic, on purpose.

Re:Lightbulbs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388211)

Kudos on being totally offtopic.

Re: memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes (1)

apankrat (314147) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388153)

> memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes

Not with some nicely fragmented traffic, it's not. :)

Re: memory usage of less than 2 kilobytes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388649)

You don't have fragments in IPv6. You get a too big packet and have to send smaller packets.

Gosh it's gong to get crazy... (1)

kabocox (199019) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388245)

I wonder how long it'll take for "everything" "human made" to be assigned an IP address? I don't see why my socks or undies need an IP address, but sooner or later...
I'm waiting for RFID or something similar to get going widespread and for our houses to do an inventory of all the crap that we bring into them.

I wonder how long it'll take to combine IPv6 with RFID and these types of devices and say a 1/2 GB of storage for less than $.001

Will my bottle of equate pain reliever with 100 caplets have it's own IP address and the default value of 100 and maybe a date/time stamp of every time the lid will be removed? Will the lid ever show how many remaining tablets are in the bottle?

Will my pens each have their own IP address? What do I need an IP addressable pen for anyway? An RFID pen I could somewhat see so I could find the thing, but what info would I need to retrieve about a pen? This goes for most kitchen appliances as well.

Re:Gosh it's gong to get crazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388575)

What do I need an IP addressable pen for anyway? An RFID pen I could somewhat see so I could find the thing, but what info would I need to retrieve about a pen?

Perhaps it could inform you when it is low on ink and add itself to your shopping list.

Are you NUTS? (1)

BobMcD (601576) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388363)

When every lightbulb has an IP address, the vast address range of IPv6 sounds like a pretty good idea.

Right, because I want to communicate with every lightbulb in my home, and so does everyone across the globe.

Or, and I'm just spitballing here, we COULD just leave them off the grid, as, you know, LIGHTBULBS and quit connecting things together just because we can...

Re:Are you NUTS? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388567)

I want to control everything from my iPhone, after successful authentication of course. I want to start the coffee maker while on on my way home from work on the bus. I want to be able to turn of the lights in my closet from work if I think I might have left them on.

Not everyone wants this but I think it would be beneficial.

Youtube Demonstration (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25388373)

FYI There is a youtube demo at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjztYx_F2Ko

Actually that's a pretty good idea (4, Interesting)

wandazulu (265281) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388403)

Laugh if you will, but a light bulb with an IP address would be a good idea for an environment which has thousands and thousands of them. Any industrial plant, stadium, etc., would probably benefit from being able to generate a report based on pinging each bulb to see which responded and which didn't, and to change the ones that didn't.

One place I think this could really be useful is an airport...think of all those lights everywhere, scattered about the runways and taxiways.

World's Smallest Stack (1)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388419)

I wonder if all the other IPv6 laugh at this one for being so small.

IPV6 overlords (1)

moteyalpha (1228680) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388423)

IPV6 is great because everybody's brain implant can have an IP address and skynet can broadcast a shutdown code to humans to avert the messiness of a human-cyborg war. I want to sftp to my refrigerator to see what is in there so I don't have to get up and check.

lewl (1)

kingsteve612 (1241114) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388457)

im in ur lightbulbs, hacking ur ipz.

Photoshop Please!!! (2, Funny)

FunkyELF (609131) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388521)

Someone skilled in photoshop please show me a lightbulb or socket with an ethernet port

When every lightbulb has an IP address (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388653)

The world will self-destruct due to the stupidity.

Security (1)

JoeRandomHacker (983775) | more than 5 years ago | (#25388673)

While the idea of having my lights on IPv6 is kinda cool (I have IPv6 at home already), I'd be worried about security. There isn't a lot of experience with IPv6 access control out there yet, especially for tiny devices. I'm really not interested in having random users surfing my electrical appliances. Even for larger devices, would you want your iPod accessible on the Internet? I think there are more problems to solve before a totally connected world can happen.
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