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Every Email In UK To Be Monitored

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the what-are-you-writing dept.

Privacy 785

ericcantona writes "The Communications Data Bill (2008) will lead to the creation of a single, centralized database containing records of all e-mails sent, websites visited and mobile phones used by UK citizens. In a carnivore-on-steroids programme, as all vestiges of communication privacy are stripped away, The BBC reports that Home Secretary Jacqui Smith says this is a 'necessity.'"

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That's it (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394313)

I'm out of here!

Fuck the UK!

Re:That's it (-1, Redundant)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394327)

I'm out of here!

Fuck the US!

Re:That's it (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394363)

Fuck the US!

No, fuck the THEM!

Re:That's it (0, Redundant)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394525)

I already left.

Re:That's it (-1, Redundant)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394537)

So where are you two going? ...can I come?

Re:That's it (3, Funny)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394653)

Venus! That's where I hear all the chicks are from.

Re:That's it (3, Insightful)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394335)

Anarchy in the UK? :D

Actually, I just thought of something. There's a line in that song. "I use the enemy." That sounds SO much like our government in $country. "$enemy is going to get you if you don't let us $action!"

Re:That's it (-1, Redundant)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394403)

"I use the enemy."

No, it's "I is the enemy".

Re:That's it (-1, Offtopic)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394577)

For real?
Damn...

No, it is USE (3, Informative)

electrogeist (1345919) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394691)

How many ways to get what you want
I use the best
I use the rest
I use the enemy
I use anarchy

Re:No, it is USE (1)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394709)

So I was right.
Thanks! :D

Re:That's it (1)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394743)

$darkside == $country && $enemy && $action && $secrecy && $$.

Re:That's it (5, Funny)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394381)

Ultimate, absolute proof, that despite having given the world George W, we did the right thing by sticking it to (the other) King George. Woohoo! Suckas! No taxation without representation, and no email retention without representation either!! The sad thing is they actually have representation now. Hope that doesn't pass. Dang, I'm gonna go buy me a pistol.

Re:That's it (4, Insightful)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394721)

They had representation then, too, just not for the colonies. Seriously, what do you think the Americans were wanting representation in, anyway, if not Parliament?

On a side note, to what degree do your elected representatives represent you personally? I think the tree of liberty could use some refreshment on both sides of the Atlantic...

Re:That's it (-1, Redundant)

yoldapirate (1304207) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394591)

i am having a flashback to 1984

Re:That's it (3, Funny)

vawarayer (1035638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394655)

I'm out of here!

Fuck the UK!

Could you please send this comment to me by e-mail?

In other news (5, Insightful)

ChromeAeonium (1026952) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394317)

Snail mail no longer the subject of jokes.

Gotcha! (4, Funny)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394417)

If you're using snail-mail you must have something to hide!

Re:Gotcha! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394567)

If you're using snail-mail you must have something to hide!

True, in all these years they have never guessed I am smuggling Escargot!

Re:Gotcha! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394617)

I for one welcome our thought crime preventing overlords.

Re:Gotcha! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394769)

When I have something to hide, I use UPS. Heaven knows where half the stuff sent through them ends up. I'm guessing they just throw it all into that abyss Nietzsche's always going on about.

Re:In other news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394501)

No, that's been monitored for years. But at least it is a slower way of telling the government your plans.

Re:In other news (2, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394505)

Snail mail no longer the subject of jokes.

Does the UK have laws preventing the government from opening your snail mail?

And don't forget that all incoming and outgoing international mail is fair game, in any country.

Re:In other news (4, Interesting)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394623)

It really disturbs me that the plots in various movies, video games, and books that would have been considered "out there" or "couldn't happen" are gradually becoming true.

Obvious ones (which I've mentioned in a related post a few weeks ago): V for Vendetta and 1984.

Disturbingly accurate: Mirror's Edge. From the Mirror's Edge Wikipedia Article: [wikipedia.org]

The game's name derives from the mirror-like aesthetic of the city of tall, gleaming skyscrapers and Faith's existence on the fringes of that city along with other dissidents, who have been pushed to the edge.

Though set in a seemingly utopian city environment with low crime, clean streets, and sterile architecture, it is ruled by a totalitarian government regime that conducts unbridled levels of surveillance on citizens. [emphasis added.] In this world of communications monitoring, the only way to deliver confidential information between parties is to employ couriers (called runners) to physically deliver the information.

Granted, it's more likely that drivers, bicycle messengers, etc. would be used in our current era, but I imagine even vehicles will eventually be surveilled and controlled. "We need to be able to watch people in their cars so we know they're driving safely." "We need to be able to remotely shut off cars in case it is stolen or if someone is driving drunk." etc.

I wonder how they'd handle couriers delivering information to circumvent this system.

tl;dr: cute Asian mailwomen will backflip off of walls to get your letter to grandma.

Unbelievable (5, Insightful)

ip_freely_2000 (577249) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394341)

I thought the cameras were bad enough, but this goes far, far beyond anything remotely reasonable. If they do this, they should have no problem listening to every phone call, opening up every piece of mail and package. In fact, they should just put microphones in every house, restaurant, bus and automobile.

Next year, they'll want to plant RFID into every person.

Is the UK government and authorities completely without morales? Or are they this > close to being destroyed by some threat? Or are they incompetent? Or all of the above?

Re:Unbelievable (3, Insightful)

deep_creek (1001191) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394375)

Is the UK government and authorities completely without morales? Or are they this > close to being destroyed by some threat? Or are they incompetent? Or all of the above?

spot on. mod points... mod points.

Re:Unbelievable (4, Insightful)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394453)

If they do this, they should have no problem listening to every phone call, opening up every piece of mail and package. In fact, they should just put microphones in every house, restaurant, bus and automobile.

Don't forget the telescreens, not just cameras. The UK is part of Oceania, ya know.

Re:Unbelievable (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394573)

I think that, in general, the UK is relatively small enough for such a surveillance to be feasible.

The USA has 300 million people (5 times the UK population), which changes the dynamics somewhat.

Re:Unbelievable (4, Funny)

Amiralul (1164423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394761)

It's Eurasia, not Oceania, check today's newspaper.

Re:Unbelievable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394459)

rfid is actually in 6 months

Re:Unbelievable (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394473)

Is the UK government and authorities completely without morales?

It would seem their morale is quite high, though their enthusiasm could be better directed to other tasks.

Morales no longer employed by UK (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394483)

Q: Is the UK government and authorities completely without morales?

A: Lead Programmer Jose Morales left the program recently for a position at Yahoo China. Many pundits claim that without him the implementation of the Communications Data Bill will fail as no one can read his code and his commenting mostly consisted of rambling diatribes against the IMF.

Re:Unbelievable (4, Funny)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394485)

Is the UK government and authorities completely without morales?

Completely. And I won't hesitate to mention that if you think a Mexican could break into politics in the UK, you're raving mad.

Re:Unbelievable (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394493)

... In fact, they should just put microphones in every house, restaurant, bus and automobile...

Didn't that happen in 1984?

Yes, I mean the book

Re:Unbelievable (2, Interesting)

msclrhd (1211086) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394639)

Welcome to the new China.

Either that, or we have gone back to 1984. I didn't know Orwell wrote non-fiction!

So what does this mean for email clients like Gmail that use SSL encryption? Are we going to be required by law to give the government all our passwords?

Re:Unbelievable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394673)

Or are they this > close to being destroyed by some threat?

Well, we can hope. I'll take the "threat" over being treated like a prisoner any day of the week.

Jeeee-zus (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394353)

Hey, Britain. What's going on over there?

Re:Jeeee-zus (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394391)

Hey, Britain. What's going on over there?

Alabama
You got the rest of the union to help you along
Whats going wrong?

I'd like to know, too. (3, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394545)

Does Britain actually have problems with terrorism?

Or is this just a power grab?

Re:I'd like to know, too. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394629)

Not so much now that the IRA is gone.

The terrorism card has replaced "think of the children" as the preferred method of forcing through whatever legislation the government wishes (though "think of the children" is still used too).

PGP... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394357)

PGP.

Re:PGP... (5, Interesting)

xrayspx (13127) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394455)

I really do hope this drives people to make encryption ubiquitous. All of the egregious US programs have failed to make the public use crypto, but this seems to be well publicized enough that it might make a large chunk of people install and use good crypto.

GPG plugins for Mail.app and Thunderbird are at the point now that it's basically set it and forget it, come on folks. (I don't so much like the GPG Outlook plugins, but maybe I haven't messed with it enough)

Re:PGP... (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394731)

Quantum Computing. (Eventually.)

Time for a new protocol (4, Interesting)

chiasmus1 (654565) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394365)

Assuming email messages in the UK are actually sent using clients and servers in the UK, it seems that this would be a great time to start working on getting a newer fixed up protocol ready to completely replace the easy to snoop on SMTP.

Re:Time for a new protocol (2, Informative)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394401)

I'd quote from the spam form, but really, look up PGP. It works, and it works just fine over SMTP.

Re:Time for a new protocol (3, Informative)

erikina (1112587) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394513)

Apparently they're only logging origin and recipient. So PGP isn't going to help you. In response to the GP: http://freenetproject.org/freemail.html [freenetproject.org]

Re:Time for a new protocol (4, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394595)

Apparently they're only logging origin and recipient. So PGP isn't going to help you.

They claim that's all they're logging. Even if that were the case, it sets a dangerous precedent.

Re:Time for a new protocol (2, Insightful)

erikina (1112587) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394703)

Indeed. PGP isn't a bad idea (it's a great idea), it just isn't a solution to the problem (unless as you said, they start trying to read the content of messages).

Police state bullshit. (3, Interesting)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394369)

How about this. Lets start a movement for false positives. If you know someone from the UK, email them saying "Hey, dude, dont forget to plant that bomb at the government building on 231 baker st. Oh yeah, and remeber the time we agreed on. 11:15 on tuesday the 21st. " Police state or no police state, they cant arrest us for doing nothing, espically people outside of the UK sending emails to the UK.

Re:Police state bullshit. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394413)

yes they can. theyve locked up the liquid bombers for exactly that sort of thing. conspiring to commit murder.

Re:Police state bullshit. (5, Insightful)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394475)

That's dumb as a box of hair. Better to say:

Hey, dude. You looked the BOMB when I saw you at the STATION. Hope you look the BOMB when I see you at 11:17am at King Cross. Don't forget to bring your BOMB the Bass CD. Then OSAMA will pick us up and GUN the engine of his car and take us through LONDON as we BOMB along the M25.

I'm more concerned about how large the scope of this will be. Once again the here and now is bad enough, but what about in the future?

Re:Police state bullshit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394479)

Man, your not the first to think of this. Don't you know all the spammers are really terrorists. They have created the biggest hindrance to email monitoring possible. Vast quantities of mail that are basically indecipherable are clogging the system. All they have to do is toss in some catch phrases that trigger the filters to 1 in 100000 spam messages and the monitors won't have a chance at detecting them.

Re:Police state bullshit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394503)

That's not doing nothing. That's evidence of conspiring to do something, and conspiring to commit an illegal act is itself (usually) illegal.

This article is misleading (5, Informative)

belmolis (702863) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394377)

In a carnivore-on-steroids programme, as all vestiges of communication privacy are stripped away,

This is quite misleading. According to the linked article, the program will only log traffic information, not message content. This may not be good, but it is a far cry from stripping away "all vestiges of communication privacy", and it means that it is not comparable to Carnivore, which actually would log message content.

Re:This article is misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394405)

Yeah, I very much doubt the house of lords, which has been a voice of sanity in the post 9/11 madness, would sit quietly and let something THAT bad go unmolested.

Re:This article is misleading (3, Funny)

Rod Beauvex (832040) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394535)

Maybe I'm just an ignorant American, but you got elected officials, chosen by the working classes, against the population in general, and the House of Lords, who are 'appointed' working for the general population? How does this work? :D

Re:This article is misleading (2, Interesting)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394719)

Maybe I'm just an ignorant American, but you got elected officials, chosen by the working classes, against the population in general, and the House of Lords, who are 'appointed' working for the general population? How does this work? :D

I think it's a rather ominous demonstration of how beholden our political systems (on both sides of the pond) have become to media manipulation.

We all know how much media loves the internet.

The rest of it, for all the conspiracy theories, probably goes back to ratings.

The more apprehension you create, the more likely they are to turn to your channel the next day, and the next, and the next.

They get their ratings through BOTH edges of the sword too.
They get the statists who think mama government will save them from the big bad terrorists.
They get the sane people who feel compelled to at least know what is going on, and turn on the news out of dread of what their own government will do next.

Welcome to "wag the dog"

Re:This article is misleading (1)

msclrhd (1211086) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394767)

Gordon Brown (the currently the Prime Minister) was not elected, although the Labour Party was (via Tony Blair). He took over from Tony Blair (who was elected by the people) who stepped down from leadership.

It's a slippery slope... (4, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394435)

How long before somebody thinks it's "necessary" to see the content as well?

Re:It's a slippery slope... (2)

belmolis (702863) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394551)

Who knows? If they do, that would be a new program and would be much more objectionable. But that isn't what they are proposing now, fortunately.

Re:This article is misleading (2, Interesting)

deathtopaulw (1032050) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394451)

Whether they read every word or not is irrelevant. The fact that they consistently encroach further upon the privacy of their own people is the real point to get from this. There have been no signs of letting up, and true spying is now only a few steps away.

Re:This article is misleading (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394583)

This is quite misleading. According to the linked article, the program will only log traffic information, not message content. This may not be good, but it is a far cry from stripping away "all vestiges of communication privacy", and it means that it is not comparable to Carnivore, which actually would log message content.

It's not comparable to Carnivore? It's the first step toward it, you dope!

And the rest... (1)

GrpA (691294) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394385)

  And Instant Messengers... And the web-based Email clients... And encrypted mail... And..

  Hang on, they'll need to take record the ENTIRE Internet!

  Seems to me now's a good time to buy shares in Seagate and Western Digital.

  GrpA.

Re:And the rest... (2, Insightful)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394425)

It does not matter if they're unable to do it effectivly now. The thing is, they are trying to. That is why this whole thing smells of bull shit. What the flying fuck happened to civil rights? More and more we see governments walk all over them with no explaination whatsoever. This is unacceptable. We not only need to bill burned, we need to see someone fired for drafting it.

Where will them oney come from? (2, Insightful)

bestiarosa (938309) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394387)

I wonder whether the UK govt will have the money to implement such a grand plan after the Zillion Quids Great Gift to the banks.

Re:Where will them oney come from? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394607)

Surely, there is some left over from what they stole from Iceland a few weeks ago using the anti-terror laws.

(Seriously, look it up)

Re:Where will them oney come from? (1)

ogl_codemonkey (706920) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394687)

Too lazy - links or it didn't happen.

Re:Where will them oney come from? (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394695)

Surely, there is some left over...

No there isn't, and don't call me Shirley.

Forcible decryption (5, Informative)

adoarns (718596) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394407)

Made worse by UK statute giving the police the authority to order the disclosure of encryption keys or the decryption of encrypted data.

Yay fifth amendment and subsequent interpretations equating disclosing cipher keys with self-incrimination!

Re:Forcible decryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394561)

Learn about steganography [wikipedia.org] if you're really concerned about being forced to decrypt a message.

crypto-anarchists can always work around the pernicious protocols of platituding politicians.

Re:Forcible decryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394663)

There is no "fifth amendment" in the UK. Quit watching Law & Order, chav.

This makes me proud to be an American. (4, Funny)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394415)

Joe the Plumber is laughing his ass off at you Brits.

Re:This makes me proud to be an American. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394443)

Because government on America doesn't spy on it's citizen =)

Re:This makes me proud to be an American. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394579)

"This makes me proud to be an American."

wow, especially being a US citizen this _really_ makes you sound dumb. oh well, what to expect from people who are intentionally being kept uneducated by their government and believe the world ends at their state's borders.

Re:This makes me proud to be an American. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394589)

At least the Brits once actually had to live under the constant threat of terrorism, unlike you lot.

Re:This makes me proud to be an American. (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394717)

Yeah we did. It was called the 1700's and the Brits were the terrorists.

Who can view this database? (5, Insightful)

demiurge11 (898886) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394423)

If this database were publicly accessible, and could be used by anyone to monitor the communications of anyone (like in David Brin's The Transparent Society [wikipedia.org] ) then I might not object to this sort of system. It could just as easily be used by the people to find government corruption as it could be used by the government to prosecute individuals.

However, if the database could be used only by a few to monitor anyone, then this is clearly incompatible with the concept of a free country.

Revolution? (2, Funny)

theNetImp (190602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394439)

I would have thought that the British would have learned not to piss off their citizens in the late 1700s. ;-)

Um, (1)

Warll (1211492) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394445)

Does none realize that there is no way earth for them to read even a fifth of all email? The key word to remember is spam, spam, spam, spam, sure they could use some form of filtering, but we all know how effective that would be. I'd take five minutes for the "bad guys" to disguise their "bad guy" emails as spam, just like the other 90 percent of email traffic. .

Movie quote. (5, Insightful)

B5_geek (638928) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394447)

"People should not be afraid of their government, instead a government should be afraid of its people."

Re:Movie quote. (2, Insightful)

Wog (58146) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394593)

Too bad that in the UK, the authorities and the criminals (but I repeat myself) are the only ones with guns.

Not much to be afraid of when you can just shoot the dissenters.

Good Luck w/ that (1)

explosivejared (1186049) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394509)

"I want this to be combined with a well-informed debate characterised by openness, rather than mere opinion, by reason and reasonableness," she told the IPPR.

Good luck with that!

People already have there mind made up over how they feel about this issue. However, to me this seems like not a big deal. This information is already stored for long period of a time. It's administration is just changing hands from private to public sector. As long they keep the promise to not allow trawling of the database without probable cause or whatever equivalent they have across the pond, I'm not seeing the big deal. The actual context of the e-mail is off-limits still. I definitely see a distinction between something like this and say COINTELPRO or MI-5 tapping your phone and having you under 24 hour surveillance.

Its going to happen sooner or later.... (1)

Neffirithion (950526) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394511)

So I'll get it out of the way now... [INSERT NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR REFERENCE HERE] No matter how accurate it may be, it still shocks me that it is *the* go to source for OMGTHEGOVERNMENTRULESUSALLL!!!!! stuff... But it is really scary how accurate it is...

Look for the key words... (5, Insightful)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394515)

Orwellian down to the doublespeak:

There are no plans for an enormous database which will contain the content of your emails, the texts that you send or the chats you have on the phone or online.

Translation: We might build one now, we might build one later. We might already be building one, just without a plan.

See? No lies, just no plans!

Nor are we going to give local authorities the power to trawl through such a database in the interest of investigating lower level criminality under the spurious cover of counter terrorist legislation.

In other words: There's going to be a database, but only available to those sufficiently high up in the government. Not to local authorities. What a relief!

If you think I'm being too harsh, read again. If there's not going to be such a database, why would she go on to talk about who should have or not have access to such a database?

Some of the commentary on the speech is at least as disturbing as the speech itself:

The raw idea of simply handing over all this information to any government, however benign, and sticking it in an electronic warehouse is an awful idea if there are not very strict controls about it.

How'd you fall this far, Britain?

So, to translate: It's actually a fine idea, so long as there are sufficiently strict controls. I wonder who gets to decide how strict those controls should be.

And who controls the controllers, so to speak?

More of the same:

The government must present convincing justification for such an exponential increase in the powers of the state.

Again: A giant database of every email ever sent, from now till forever, in Britain, is alright so long as there's sufficient justification.

At least someone has the balls to take a stand:

These proposals are incompatible with a free country and a free people.

Amen.

You have suggested... (5, Funny)

nacturation (646836) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394533)

Your post advocates a

(*) technical (*) legislative ( ) market-based ( ) vigilante

approach to fighting terrorism. Your idea will not work. Here is why it won't work. (One or more of the following may apply to your particular idea, and it may have other flaws which used to vary from dictatorship to dictatorship before a bad federal law was passed.)

(*) Terrorists can easily encrypt their email
( ) Other legitimate email users would be affected
( ) It will stop terrorists for two weeks and then we'll be stuck with it
( ) Users of email will not put up with it

[...] anybody feeling ambitious? :)

Re:You have suggested... (0, Redundant)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394563)

My kingdom for a mod point!

look at the positives (4, Funny)

natergj (904065) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394553)

1. when that intern you hired accidentally deletes all your users' emails, you can reassure everyone, "Don't worry, the government now backs that up for us"

2. I'm sure it will take just a few petabytes of Viagra ads for the UK government to develop a foolproof SPAM filter for us all.

3. Just think of the decline in crap emails from management. No more wading through piles of pointless CC'd emails once they become paranoid.

4. Did someone just approve my budget for video phones for everyone? Try archiving that traffic, UK!

I think we all need to look at the glass being half full on this one

There's a BBC show about this... (4, Insightful)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394555)

...it's called "The Last Enemy." I caught an episode and the thrust of it seemed to be that these powerful surveillance tools become an instant menace once *one* person uses them for the wrong purpose.

So, apparently some people in the UK care enough to get the word out. These tools are being entrusted to people who don't get it.

It's like giving a nuclear-powered car filled with laser-armed sharks to your local branch of Neo-Nazis. (Sorry, had to get the triple analogy in there)

Re:There's a BBC show about this... (1)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394645)

Godwinned, nuked, and shagged, all in one. Nice.

Re:There's a BBC show about this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394699)

Godwinned less than 70 posts in...nice!

From the article... (4, Insightful)

nebaz (453974) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394557)

Home Secretary Jacqui Smith ... promised that the content of conversations would not be stored, just times and dates of messages and calls.

I don't trust her any farther than I could throw her, but even if I did, promises mean jack squat. Even if she happens to be the most honest, unabusive
person that exists, there will be someone that abuses this.

That's why the American Founding Fathers had it straight on. If men were angels, there would be no need for government. If angels governed men, there would be no issue.
But since men govern men, this fact must be acknowledged, and governments given as little power as possible over people.

A Letter (3, Funny)

CynicalTyler (986549) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394565)

Dear Everyone in the UK, When emailing me, please be up front about the fact that you're emailing me from the UK so I can promptly not respond. Yours, Joe Sixpack The United States of At-Least-We're-Not-Yet-as-Fucked-Up-as-You

Re:A Letter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394657)

with a president like dubyah i would be _really_ quiet about the fucked-up-ness of other countries.

at least there you can get wasted outside without getting arrested :D (*laughs at the ridiculous put-a-bag-around-your-beer-shit*)

on a different subject; the rest of the world is currently laughing their asses of about you guys right now for the spectacular failure of your whole economic system. don't stop entertaining!

Re:A Letter (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394659)

Joe Sixpack The United States of At-Least-We're-Not-Yet-as-Fucked-Up-as-You

Yet.

Actually: *more* fucked up & don't seem to kno (4, Interesting)

toby (759) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394675)

Miss the memo? [eff.org]

Warrantless surveillance of American domestic communications has been going on for years.

Not only has it been comprehensively abused [salon.com] (to exactly nobody's surprise), the spying infrastructure has no legal reason to exist. [salon.com]

That sinister sound you hear is Nixon laughing at you, wearing a Dick Cheney mask.

Ineffective as well? (1)

davros-too (987732) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394599)

Won't criminals simply avoid this measure by using other ways to communicate?

Bankrupt them ! Problem solved. (5, Insightful)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394647)

Get together a group of 500 similarly frustrated people.
Have each person send everyone on the list a 1GB non-compressible, encrypted message titled "Iraq Iran Afghanistan Islam and North Korea"
This would generate 250TB of data per day that they would need to store.
In a month this would create more than 7 Petabytes of data to warehouse,
which is physically impossible with current technology.
So in short, 500 determined people could bring this system to it's knees in less than a month.

From the Site: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25394661)

The public consultation on proposals for new laws has ended - the Government will now be considering the responses received Government - Proper Noun Governator - Proper villain

Making the US Look Not So Bad (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 5 years ago | (#25394685)

It brings me no pleasure to see other countries chipping away at the USA's leadership in totalitarianism.

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