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Linux Kernel Surpasses 10 Million Lines of Code

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the nice-round-figures dept.

Operating Systems 432

javipas writes "A simple analysis of the most updated version (a Git checkout) of the Linux kernel reveals that the number of lines of all its source code surpasses 10 million, but attention: this number includes blank lines, comments, and text files. With a deeper analysis thanks to the SLOCCount tool, you can get the real number of pure code lines: 6.399.191, with 96.4% of them developed in C, and 3.3% using assembler. The number grows clearly with each new version of the kernel, that seems to be launched each 90 days approximately."

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432 comments

Isn't that normal? (5, Interesting)

arizwebfoot (1228544) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471019)

That the line count increases with each new version unless you are starting from scratch?

--
Oh Well, Bad Karma and all . . .

Re:Isn't that normal? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471127)

How much would it cost for them foreigners to convert there notation in US Customary?? two...three dollars tops?

Re:Isn't that normal? (1)

TinFoilMan (1371973) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471311)

Wouldn't that also be true of most programming?

Core functions vs Drivers? (4, Interesting)

bubulubugoth (896803) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471025)

And how much of this lines are for core functions (Memory Managements, Scheduler, etc) and for drivers (USB, Filesystem)

Can this be converted into kloc ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471567)

I'm a COBOL programmer and that's all we ever counted by

linux kernel getting bloated (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471033)

A couple weeks ago, while browsing around the library downtown, I had to take a piss. As I entered the john, Barack Obama -- the messiah himself -- came out of one of the booths. I stood at the urinal looking at him out of the corner of my eye as he washed his hands. He didn't once look at me. He was busy and in any case I was sure the secret service wouldn't even let me shake his hand.

As soon as he left I darted into the booth he'd vacated, hoping there might be a lingering smell of shit and even a seat still warm from his sturdy ass. I found not only the smell but the shit itself. He'd forgotten to flush. And what a treasure he had left behind. Three or four beautiful specimens floated in the bowl. It apparently had been a fairly dry, constipated shit, for all were fat, stiff, and ruggedly textured. The real prize was a great feast of turd -- a nine inch gastrointestinal triumph as thick as his cock -- or at least as I imagined it!

I knelt before the bowl, inhaling the rich brown fragrance and wondered if I should obey the impulse building up inside me. I'd always been a liberal democrat and had been on the Obama train since last year. Of course I'd had fantasies of meeting him, sucking his cock and balls, not to mention sucking his asshole clean, but I never imagined I would have the chance. Now, here I was, confronted with the most beautiful five-pound turd I'd ever feasted my eyes on, a sausage fit to star in any fantasy and one I knew to have been hatched from the asshole of Barack Obama, the chosen one.

Why not? I plucked it from the bowl, holding it with both hands to keep it from breaking. I lifted it to my nose. It smelled like rich, ripe limburger (horrid, but thrilling), yet had the consistency of cheddar. What is cheese anyway but milk turning to shit without the benefit of a digestive tract?

I gave it a lick and found that it tasted better then it smelled.

I hesitated no longer. I shoved the fucking thing as far into my mouth as I could get it and sucked on it like a big half nigger cock, beating my meat like a madman. I wanted to completely engulf it and bit off a large chunk, flooding my mouth with the intense, bittersweet flavor. To my delight I found that while the water in the bowl had chilled the outside of the turd, it was still warm inside. As I chewed I discovered that it was filled with hard little bits of something I soon identified as peanuts. He hadn't chewed them carefully and they'd passed through his body virtually unchanged. I ate it greedily, sending lump after peanutty lump sliding scratchily down my throat. My only regret was that Barack Obama wasn't there to see my loyalty and wash it down with his piss.

I soon reached a terrific climax. I caught my cum in the cupped palm of my hand and drank it down. Believe me, there is no more delightful combination of flavors than the hot sweetness of cum with the rich bitterness of shit. It's even better than listening to an Obama speech!

Afterwards I was sorry that I hadn't made it last longer. But then I realized that I still had a lot of fun in store for me. There was still a clutch of virile turds left in the bowl. I tenderly fished them out, rolled them into my handkerchief, and stashed them in my briefcase. In the week to come I found all kinds of ways to eat the shit without bolting it right down. Once eaten it's gone forever unless you want to filch it third hand out of your own asshole. Not an unreasonable recourse in moments of desperation or simple boredom.

I stored the turds in the refrigerator when I was not using them but within a week they were all gone. The last one I held in my mouth without chewing, letting it slowly dissolve. I had liquid shit trickling down my throat for nearly four hours. I must have had six orgasms in the process.

I often think of Barack Obama dropping solid gold out of his sweet, pink asshole every day, never knowing what joy it could, and at least once did, bring to a grateful democrat.

Re:linux kernel getting bloated (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471109)

Obama's missing records:

1. Occidental College records -- Not released
2. Columbia College records -- Not released
3. Columbia Thesis paper -- Not Available
4. Harvard College records -- Not released
5. Selective Service Registration -- Not Released
6. Medical records -- Not Released
7. Illinois State Senate schedule -- Not Available
8. Law practice client list -- Not Released
9. Certified Copy of original Birth Certificate -- Not Released
10. Embossed, signed paper Certification of Live Birth -- Not Released
11. Harvard Law Review articles published -- None
12. University of Chicago scholarly articles -- None
13. Your Record of baptism-- Not released or Not Available
14. Your Illinois State Senate records--Not Available

Re:linux kernel getting bloated (2, Funny)

QRDeNameland (873957) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471215)

15. The Residents - Not Available [wikipedia.org]

If Obama is missing that record, I'd be glad to lend him my copy.

lameness filters (-1, Offtopic)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471159)

I try to paste sloccount output (so it can show us what the linux kernel is "worth") and it won't get through the "lameness" filter because of 'junk characters'. But this shit is considered fine. Well fuck you slashcode.

Re:lameness filters (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471339)

It's called a lameness filter because it's pretty lame. Try pasting the definition of a word from reference.com, or the lyrics to a longish song. Or a joke that relys on caps to be funny.

The lame mess filter won't let you.

W00t ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471049)

it growz like cancers

Meh (4, Funny)

alexborges (313924) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471053)

AND???

In other news, trees tend to grow up unless they tend to grow down or sideways. Sharks tend to eat anything they can, unless they are not hungry.

Anonymous will beat me to FP for sure, unless they dont.

Re:Meh (5, Funny)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471595)

Yeah so!? Cars are also getting bigger and more complex over time, so Linux must be heading in the right direction!

Did I just... ? Oh sh-

Re:Meh (1)

bonch (38532) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471619)

What happened is some bored tech author didn't have anything to write about, so they decided to do a Git checkout and count the lines of the Linux kernel, which would likely be over 10 million lines at this point if you include blank lines, comments, and text files. It's a completely meaningless story, especially because of the fact that actual code is almost 6.5 million lines, but it got them a Slashdot post and some ad views on their site.

Stolen code (5, Funny)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471055)

Too bad 9,999,999 lines of that code were ripped off from SCO.

Re:Stolen code (4, Funny)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471325)

And the unique line is commented out.

Lines of Code (1, Insightful)

Flyin Fungi (888671) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471063)

Lines of code is not a good metric for performance. I'm in a software engineering class listening to how to use metrics on code.

Re:Lines of Code (4, Interesting)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471145)

I used to have GEOS on my Commodore 64. I have absolutely no idea how many lines of code it used, but it could squeeze itself into just 20 kilobytes of RAM, and yet had lots of functionality (as good as an 80s-era Mac). I consider "how much RAM occupied" to be a FAR more useful metric.

I would love to see someone develop an OS that followed a similar philosophy of using as little RAM as possible.

Re:Lines of Code (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471251)

The amount of code doesn't always correlate to the size of the final binary. You have to consider a slew of things when considering the Linux Kernel. First of all there is a lot of architecture specific code in there since Linux can run on everything from ARM chips to Sparc machines. Also you have to consider the built in drivers that are included in the source but aren't usually compiled with the kernel binary unless you're running an embedded or specialized system. If you have ever set up building the Linux kernel anyone would see there are a giant combination of things that a person could add and remove. The Kernel size getting larger just reflects more improvements and support for a wide range of machines. The final binary of a typical kernel has grown in size over the years but not at the rate of the lines of code so I wouldn't call Linux bloated because of the shear size of the code base.

Re:Lines of Code (5, Funny)

megamerican (1073936) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471173)

Exactly. The better metric would be how many Libraries of Congress the kernal is.

Not as much as you'd think (4, Informative)

djupedal (584558) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471363)

Since that many lines = approx. 125,000 pages, which = approx. 0.0175 terabytes, and... a LOC is approx. 18 TB, I'd say they have a ways to go...

Re:Lines of Code (1)

ajmilton (975709) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471383)

And you don't even have to change the lettering!

Re:Lines of Code (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471413)

Exactly. The better metric would be how many Libraries of Congress the kernal is.

Let's not get carried away with LoC. Bag of tortilla (BoT) is the better unit for kernel.

Re:Lines of Code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471471)

Roughly two football fields worth.

Which begs the question, is it European football or American football? Short answer: yes.

Re:Lines of Code (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471517)

Lines of Code
Libraries of Congress

What's the difference?

Re:Lines of Code (0, Flamebait)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471195)

Oh you're in a software engineering class? Please, O great master, grant us your powerful wisdom.

Also nobody said we were measuring the performance of Linux's developer or the performance of Linux itself (you're a bit ambiguous on that), we're measuring the size of the source code. And lines of code is one of several acceptable metrics for measuring the size of source code.

Re:Lines of Code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471643)

Hrumph.

we're measuring the size of the source code. And lines of code is one of several acceptable metrics

Well I use a tape measure when I measure MY source code.

So there!

Re:Lines of Code (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471231)

Lines of code is not a good metric for performance.

True, but it is a good indication of bloat. Ten million lines of code at 100 characters per line is a gig (unless I got decimal places wrong); that's a lot of source. maybe somebody should be working to pare it down some?

Re:Lines of Code (1)

i23098 (723616) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471389)

True, but it is a good indication of bloat.

It would be good to know how many of those lines are drivers code...

It can be bloat or not :p
With Linux you don't have cd drivers to install, all the drivers are at the kernel. Drivers are added and very rarely removed. I would not call bloat something that is required for the computer to work. Sure, it can be only the computer of the maintainer ;) :)

Re:Lines of Code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471519)

Coding standards typically dictate =80 characters per line. Most lines are much shorter, so I'd guess the size of the Linux kernel source is much smaller than 1 gig.

Re:Lines of Code (1)

entgod (998805) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471299)

True, lines of code is not a metric for performance. What lines of code is is a pretty good metric for the size of a project.

Re:Lines of Code (4, Funny)

stephentyrone (664894) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471555)

I'm in a software engineering class listening to how to use metrics on code.

No, you're in a software engineering class posting on Slashdot.

Re:Lines of Code (1)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471637)

Isn't a raytracing algorythm just a few lines of code? Yet Quake3 with raytracing is heavyer than Crysis...

Um (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471075)

Weren't people whining about NT's kernel having an excessive amount of code? Yet this article treats the 10 million lines as if it were a good thing (not that it isn't; code size doesn't reflect on code quality)

Re:Um (5, Informative)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471163)

Yeah but you can customize the Linux kernel. If you don't want features, just don't compile them in.

It's easy, there's even a gui interface.

Good luck compiling a custom NT kernel. :)

Re:Um (2, Interesting)

Yfrwlf (998822) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471605)

And what would be better, a kernel that you could simply include or not include certain modules without the need for compilation, making the kernel truly modular, and hot-swapping them in or out based on your needs. That would make the kernel much more powerful and also useful for "normal" users/admins who might not want to mess with compiling. But, I'm sure my argument will be slapped at by some leave-things-be get-off-my-lawn fanboy who hates the idea of scary new features like true/better modularity.

Save a tree. Let the actual devs do compiling unless someone really actually wants to see the code.

assembler? (5, Informative)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471077)

*cough*assembly*cough*

"assembler" is the tool, not the language.

Re:assembler? (0, Flamebait)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471229)

I realize English is hard for you, but you can usually use verbs as nouns, and nouns as verbs.

Assembly is also a verb. So enjoy contemplating that one too.

Re:assembler? (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471441)

I realize English is hard for you, but you can usually use verbs as nouns, and nouns as verbs.

Sure, you are right, but that has nothing to do with the softness of my toilet paper. "Assembly" is a proper noun, specifying a specific language. "Assembler" is a generic noun, indicating any number of tools that can convert "Assembly" source code into compiled machine code. Both are nouns, regardless.

Re:assembler? (4, Informative)

hondo77 (324058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471631)

Then again, maybe not [wikipedia.org] .

Re:assembler? (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471445)

Actually, it's the people who consider themselves English wonks that get all bent out of shape when you verb nouns and noun verbs.

Re:assembler? (1)

ilovepolymorphism (642188) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471451)

Assembly is also a verb.

No, it's not.

Re:assembler? (5, Funny)

lilomar (1072448) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471621)

Sure it is, why, I was assembly some assembler code just the other day. I was using my assemble to do it.

Re:assembler? (-1, Troll)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471333)

*cough*jackass*cough*

Re:assembler? (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471525)

As long as you're getting all usage Nazi, it's "assembly language", 'cause "assembly" is an adjective. But in informal usage, it's OK to leave off the noun and use the adjective as a noun. (I prefer to say "noun the adjective" just to piss off POS Nazis.) And as for confusing the language with the tool: WTFC? This is Slashdot, where lose lips sink looser ships!

Tell us Bill (1)

b0ttle (1332811) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471099)

I wonder how many lines of code Windows has

Re:Tell us Bill (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471181)

Jesus Christ, does every single effin' story on Slashdot have to become an opportunity to throw more punches at Microsoft? It's beyond old. Hey, here's an idea: how about discussing, you know, the actual effin' topic?

Re:Tell us Bill (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471205)

How is this throwing punches at MS?, the GP asked a question

Re:Tell us Bill (1)

b0ttle (1332811) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471207)

I'm not throwing punches at Microsoft, I'm just curious. Anyway, I didn't know you read Slashdot, Bill...

Tell us b0ttle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471557)

I wonder what grade b0ttle is in.

[Remember, this isn't a punch, just a simple question. I mean, ZOMG, get a grip.]

Re:Tell us Bill (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471225)

It's a question, not a punch. Get a grip.

Re:Tell us Bill (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471583)

Yes, they are.

I think the slashdot effect is rubbing off on the general populous as well. My neighbor (whom I helped pick out his computer, to ensure that he didn't get an OEM skimped-in-all-the-right places piece of shit) told me everyone says that Vista sucks, because it's slow, and asked me if it was true.

I looked at him, and asked him if his computer was slow.

"No," he told me, "I think it's pretty fast."

Re:Tell us Bill (2, Informative)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471457)

Vista had 50 million lines at Beta 2 [wikipedia.org]

Kernel or Kernel + Userspace? (1)

maz2331 (1104901) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471573)

Remember, the 10M lines is just the kernel in Linux, not an entire distro (ie: kernel + GNU stuff + X + apps + all the other stuff), so a total count of Windows LOC would be comparing apples and oranges.

IE: How many LOC are in NTOSKRNL + Drivers would be a better comparison.

Re:Tell us Bill (2, Informative)

mdemonic (988470) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471627)

Ship Date Product Dev Team Size Test Team Size Lines of code (LoC)

Jul-93 NT 1.0 (released as 3.1) 200 140 4-5 million
Sep-94 NT 2.0 (released as 3.5) 300 230 7-8 million
May-95 NT 3.0 (released as 3.51) 450 325 9-10 million
Jul-96 NT 4.0 (released as 4.0) 800 700 11-12 million
Dec-99 NT 5.0 (Windows 2000) 1,400 1,700 29+ million
Oct-01 NT 5.1 (Windows XP) 1,800 2,200 40 million
Apr-03 NT 5.2 (Windows Server 2003) 2,000 2,400 50 million

Offcourse, you can't compare a whole OS to a kernel.
Data is from http://www.knowing.net/PermaLink,guid,c4bdc793-bbcf-4fff-8167-3eb1f4f4ef99.aspx [knowing.net]

What did sloccount say the kernel was worth? (2, Insightful)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471121)

Because we'd all like to know how many man-months something a big as the linux kernel should take to implement. And laugh at the huge price tag sloccount will put on it.

Re:What did sloccount say the kernel was worth? (1)

konohitowa (220547) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471397)

Most SLOC tools assume that there are high level requirements documents, systems engineering documents, design documents, and fully witnessed regression tests and reports. Plus CM and QA roles performed independently. And that means those documents are updated and tests performed for every release.

2.5 hours/SLOC isn't far off of the mark in cases like that, so I'm gonna guess it was around 9300 months, which is 775 man years. So, even if we pick 1992 as the first year of Linux, that's 16 years which comes out to a staff of 48 people working full-time per year. That's not exactly a huge staff.

Obligatory "That's what she said!" added for your convenience.

this is news? (-1, Redundant)

spazdor (902907) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471139)

Who cares?

Re:this is news? (0)

alexborges (313924) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471239)

Mods, get a clue, this is not flamebait.

I mean, a story about a piece of actively developed software growing in lines of code is like publishing a book about how much shit does humanity make per person born and then sayin: hey, we are shiting so much more than we used to.

Well, yeah, duh.

Re:this is news? (1)

SandFrog (1238038) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471431)

You cared. At least enough to add a comment...

Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (4, Interesting)

EraserMouseMan (847479) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471153)

I'm a developer and was wondering what kind of testing is done to verify the code. Do they use unit testing? Regression testing?

I'm just curious because keeping 6+ million lines of code almost completely bug free is pretty amazing.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471303)

Almost completely bug free? What are you smoking?

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471323)

Unit Testing.... Nope
Regression Testing... Nope

Its simple really. When code becomes mature or doesn't noticeably break after a period of time it gets accepted into the mainline kernel. As long as it plays well with others then it'll stay. If it causes havoc then the maintainer is called into action to fix it or it gets ripped out of the mainline kernel and good luck getting accepted again. If the code becomes unmaintained, as in getting stale from non-use or simply not updated to stay with current kernel changes, it is ripped out and left for dead.

So in all seriousness it is about code responsibly by the maintainers, the ones who created and submitted the code to be put into the mainline kernel. Code maintainers change, but good code lasts a really long time. :)

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471351)

If it's well thought out and implemented by competent programmers, it will be almost bug free.

The only real testing is putting it out there and dealing with the bug reports.

It's only when you are at a company with fifty borderline idiots working on a project that you have to automate testing.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (2, Interesting)

vally_manea (911530) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471353)

there is at least the linux test project http://ltp.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] I see a lot of unit, regression testing and stress tests.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471379)

There are literally thousands of men runnning the code on even more setups regularly, and apparently a healthy percentage of those report any and all problems they find. And now, with the addition of kerneloops, getting problem reports is even easier.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471393)

It's not bug free.

Oh, was this a troll? I'm sorry. Seriously though, I believe the strategy for testing is 'if you make a change, you are responsible for making sure it works'. Most of the code is driver code, which means it is modularized, so a change in one place won't break something in a different place. The core code is actually significantly smaller. It does run on 4MB devices, after all.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471443)

If you think that's amazing, check out one of the BSDs sometime. In particular, look at NetBSD's codebase. Compared to the hodge-podge that is the Linux kernel in which it's very obvious sometimes that it's being thrown together by multiple developers, the BSDs' cohesive source code is like looking at the Mona Lisa. No wonder Linux has a reputation for being used by sugar-charged 14-year-olds who want to appear cool to their Windows-using friends by installing EZ-mode Ubuntu and suddenly thinking they're sysadmins because of it. Meanwhile, the BSDs have seasoned UNIX developers with experience spanning decades, working on a codebase with roots in academia in which solid algorithms and peer review rule the day.

Benchmarks show FreeBSD 7 is faster than the Linux 2.6 kernel. It's pretty obvious why when comparing their source code.

Re:Reply from actual kernel developer please . . . (3, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471655)

From what I've gather, pretty damn near "all of the above". One of the nicer things about being a high-profile open source tool is that a lot of people are interested in researching automated code analysis on it, be it unit testing, regression testing, static analysis, dynamic analysis or whatever. And having a quality nazi on top helps. Here's what happened a few days ago on the dri-devel list from Linus:

"Grr.

This whole merge series has been full of people sending me UNTESTED CRAP.

So what's the excuse _this_ time for adding all these stupid warnings to
my build log? Did nobody test this? (...)"

In many places, you can do a pretty lousy job and still collect a paycheck. Something tells me you won't get many patches in the kernel that way.

Line Count Not Always a Good Thing? (5, Interesting)

linuxmeepster (1383107) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471193)

It's significantly easier to hide a malicious backdoor inside a huge software project than a small one. Linux has already had a near miss [theregister.co.uk] back in 2003, when the CVS repository was compromised. Considering how many mission-critical applications run under Linux, there's a huge financial incentive to hide a backdoor somewhere in those 10 million lines.

Re:Line Count Not Always a Good Thing? (4, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471629)

While Linux is huge, for a backdoor to be successful it would need to hit a huge number of systems. The majority of the kernel at this point tends to be drivers, not all of which are used in a given kernel.

For it to be even remotely worthwhile, it'd have to be placed into something that was both heavily used AND given little attention. These two positions are almost mutually exclusive.

Can anyone think of a place that would fall into these two categories? Even the more seemingly obscure parts of the kernel get attention fairly often and malicious changes wouldn't go unnoticed for long.

Happy Ten Million, Linux! (5, Funny)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471199)

Now, where do we find a birthday cake with ten million candles?

Re:Happy Ten Million, Linux! (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471337)

The cake is a LIE!

What about the other .3% ? (5, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471235)

96,4% of them developed in C, and 3,3% using assembler

That leaves .3% that is unaccounted for. What was it written in?

Re:What about the other .3% ? (5, Funny)

atomic-penguin (100835) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471285)

Visual Basic 6.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (1, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471287)

0.1 was written in APL, and the remaining 0.2% was in SNOBOL.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471307)

must be C#, seems everything else is being rewritten in that nowadays :(

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

Mr2cents (323101) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471435)

Really? Damn, I just finished rewriting linux in javascript, guess I can start over again.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

dotpavan (829804) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471343)

who cares, it was stolen from SCO

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

The Moof (859402) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471367)

Shattered hopes and dreams.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471403)

0100011100100010111011

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471429)

Magic.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (3, Insightful)

glavenoid (636808) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471533)

Makefiles, build scripts, etc., perhaps?

Re:What about the other .3% ? (2, Funny)

mx119 (1374607) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471603)

That leaves .3% that is unaccounted for. What was it written in?

Asgard?

Re:What about the other .3% ? (2)

macbuzz01 (1074795) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471607)

It's a GUI interface in Visual Basic to see if they can track an IP address. Yes that does take approximately 3000 lines of code, granted 2982 of them are comments explaining why vb was chosen.

Re:What about the other .3% ? (0)

fotbr (855184) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471609)

Whitespace (the language)

Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (3, Interesting)

apathy maybe (922212) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471245)

May I suggest that large parts of this shouldn't be in the kernel at all? That there should be independent sub-systems so that in the event of a crash or panic, the entire OS doesn't come tumbling down?

So that badly written drivers (especially graphic card drivers) don't affect the stability of the entire system?

May I suggest that flame-wars are good and the EMACS is also bloated?

(And lots of other folks have already talked about the bad metric that lines of code is...)

Re:Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (1)

mystuff (1088543) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471385)

Mod parent up, a valid point. I mean if you compare this to the Minix kernel (on which the Linux kernel is very loosely based, or inspired if you will), it has only 4000 lines of code. 4000 vs 6.4 million!

Re:Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (1)

Caesar Tjalbo (1010523) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471657)

Perhaps the original developers can debate the differences, say in a newsgroup.

Re:Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (2, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471415)

I think they are including modules as well. And there are a growing number of userland drivers as well. So you can't come to a conclusion without knowing the size of the parts outside the kernel.

Re:Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (5, Funny)

soulsteal (104635) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471565)

Tanenbaum, is that you? If so, give it up! It's been 16 years and you're not fooling anybody!

Re:Micro-kernel vs massive kernel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471575)

May I suggest that large parts of this shouldn't be in the kernel at all? That there should be independent sub-systems so that in the event of a crash or panic, the entire OS doesn't come tumbling down?

No. you may not. It is not 1985 any more and Slashdot is not academia.

Obvious (1)

eclectro (227083) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471281)

This raises the question - will Linus run out of magic powder?

Re:Obvious (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471421)

Only after Columbia.

I Wonder? (3, Interesting)

TheNecromancer (179644) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471417)

I wonder what the breakdown is of the almost 4 million lines that were omitted in the count, for blank lines, comments, etc.? I've always said that commenting your code is a very good thing to do, so it would be interesting to see what the percentage of this is comments, as opposed to blank lines (which isn't a bad thing for readability).

Trust Me... (1)

shellster_dude (1261444) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471449)

You don't want to know.

so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25471453)

how do I buy a copy?

A very fit 10 million (1)

renrutal (872592) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471491)

Interestingly only a year ago the i386 and x86_64 trees merged into one, greatly reducing the SLOC count at the time.

This story (2, Funny)

bonch (38532) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471503)

Basically, this story is "Linux kernel surpasses 10 million lines of code! Just kidding."

Lines of code as a metric (4, Insightful)

qoncept (599709) | more than 5 years ago | (#25471511)

Funny that the summary calls attention to the fact that the number of lines includes comments and whitespace without any mention of how worthless lines of code is as a metric. Someone could easily go in and add or remove newlines wherever they wanted and without changed a bit of code make it 50 million or 50 thousand.
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