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Scientists Erase Specific Memories In Mice

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the where's-the-cheese dept.

Medicine 320

Ostracus writes "It sounds like science fiction, but scientists say it might one day be possible to erase undesirable memories from the brain, selectively and safely. After exposing mice to emotionally powerful stimuli, such as a mild shock to their paws, the scientists then observed how well or poorly the animals subsequently recalled the particular trauma as their brain's expression of CaMKII was manipulated up and down. When the brain was made to overproduce CaMKII at the exact moment the mouse was prodded to retrieve the traumatic memory, the memory wasn't just blocked, it appeared to be fully erased."

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Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (5, Insightful)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480339)

How long until ethically underfunded governments decided to "offer relief" from "dangerous memories" to their political detractors? Happy shiny people, indeed.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (5, Funny)

Aranykai (1053846) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480343)

Perhaps its already happening and no one remembers?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (5, Funny)

JuzzFunky (796384) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480397)

Perhaps its already happening and no one remembers?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (4, Funny)

Aphoxema (1088507) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480523)

What did you just say?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (0, Redundant)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480565)

what did yooooooooo aaaa .... *drools over kybord having forgotten how to type*

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (3, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480673)

what did yooooooooo aaaa .... *drools over kybord having forgotten how to type*

Patrick Starfish, is that you?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480833)

Did I leave the Oven on?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480969)

Yes.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (3, Funny)

ionix5891 (1228718) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480459)

ethically underfunded governments

that about describes them all

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (2, Interesting)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480621)


There has already been research done (I think in the US) on ways to prevent short term memory formation as a means to reduce trauma for soldiers. I.e. If the drug is taken before an attack, they wont feel guilty or traumatised by the things they do.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480699)

the only thing i can find on google is that SSRI's are in trials for use with PTSD and that statins can cause memory loss by depriving the brain of cholesterol.

i'm really not seeing any 'magic pill' to make a marine forget all the people he just blew up with a grenade. i do know the military focuses hard on conditioning people to being ready to handle killing another human being, especially when they learned that in world war 1 only 30% of troops ever fired a bullet.

other than this research on mice, there doesn't seem to be any info on a magic pill to make people forget.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480745)

The Pentagon has tested Viagra to help prevent impotence in My Lai type situations.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (4, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480507)

No, it's not happening. That's insane. Besides, I'm sure there would be some after effects like brain damage.

No, it's not happening. That's insane. Besides, I'm sure there would be some after effects like brain damage.

No, it's not happening. That's insane. Besides, I'm sure there would be some after effects like brain damage.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

VShael (62735) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480757)

Well that explains AOL.

Oh look! A free AOL CD! Back in a minute...

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (4, Funny)

scubamage (727538) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480761)

Well, technically it is a form of brain damage. Though I'm sure it'd be on par with, say, a night of heavy drinking.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480603)

Apparently it's not as specific as they claim... it also erases basic grammar skills.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

njko (586450) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480665)

Because i have several undesired memories

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480963)

Agreed, there are more than a few memories I wouldn't mind to forget.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

GooberToo (74388) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480857)

Where is the "+1 Really Scary" mod when you need it?

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480355)

Ethically underfunded? Will you stop the fucking double-speak already? Isn't there enough of that mush-mouthed bullshit floating around? Just say unethical. You're not clever, and you're not cute.

Re:Everlasting Sunlight of the Spot-Free Brain (1)

Futile Rhetoric (1105323) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480463)

Doublespeak is intended to confuse or deceive. In this instance it's neither. There is nothing wrong with rhetorical flourish per se, poor execution notwithstanding.

Kristallnacht (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480915)

http://www.local6.com/politics/17784129/detail.html [local6.com]

How long until lack of support for the Messiah becomes deadly?

I 4 1 (2)

Mipoti Gusundar (1028156) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480341)

I 4 1 am welcomming our new selectively amnesiac rodent overloads.

There's really only one question to be asked. (5, Funny)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480359)

When do I get my own flashy-little-memory-messer-upper-thing?

Re:There's really only one question to be asked. (4, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480377)

We gave you your session last week.

Re:There's really only one question to be asked. (1)

G-forze (1169271) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480385)

When you grow up.

I have my own flashy-memory-messer-upper-thingy (3, Funny)

rodney dill (631059) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480593)

... I call it Glenfiddich

Re:I have my own flashy-memory-messer-upper-thingy (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480705)

no, that's too memorable. Try Tesco value Scotch [mysupermarket.co.uk] instead...

Re:There's really only one question to be asked. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480639)

Maybe yours is defective, it keeps erasing your memory of having bought it before...

erase undesirable memories (5, Insightful)

cosmocain (1060326) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480361)

[...]erase undesirable memories[...]

undesirable for whom? While this might positively applicaple for e.g. victims of rape there are tons of possible missuses which really should be feared.

Goatse (5, Funny)

mfh (56) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480399)

undesirable for whom? While this might positively applicaple for e.g. victims of rape there are tons of possible missuses which really should be feared.

All memory of Goatse could be erased! That has to count for SOMETHING.

Re:Goatse (5, Insightful)

cosmocain (1060326) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480421)

All memory of Goatse could be erased! That has to count for SOMETHING.

Jup. It does.

Being shocked by goatse the same amount as if seeing it for the first time. Great. Hooray.

Re:Goatse (4, Insightful)

LoverOfJoy (820058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480633)

and then you'd likely be rickrolled to it again and again. Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

National Security Threat (1)

spruce (454842) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480683)

How long until terrorists attack by removing all one's memories except for Goatse? shudders

Re:Goatse (2, Funny)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480789)

All memory of Goatse could be erased! That has to count for SOMETHING.

In theory, yes. But not in practice. See it should have been a learning experience about protecting yourself from shock sites. Those who forget anuses are doomed to repeat them.

Re:Goatse (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480849)

So what has been seen, can be unseen? < img of vomit kitten looking relieved >

Re:erase undesirable memories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480489)

i knew something was up and there's the examaple:

"When the brain was made to overproduce CaMKII at the exact moment the mouse was prodded to retrieve the traumatic memory"

so doesn't that mean that to cure some one of a bad memory you have reproduce the stimulus?

i'm sure a rape victim would be down with that.

Re:erase undesirable memories (1)

Emb3rz (1210286) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480585)

There is nothing to indicate you have to recreate the environment in which the memory originally happened. It says only to 'retrieve' that memory. I can easily retrieve some bad memories in my past; having identical stimulus not required.

Re:erase undesirable memories (2, Interesting)

ideonode (163753) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480553)

While this might positively applicaple

I tell you where else this would be a positive thing - in erasing the memory of good books/films/video games, so that you can experience them all again as if for the first time. I would love to be able to re-experience the magic of reading some of my favorite fiction as if for the first time.

Re:erase undesirable memories (5, Funny)

PotatoFiend (1330299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480671)

I tell you where else this would be a positive thing - in erasing the memory of good books/films/video games, so that you can experience them all again as if for the first time. I would love to be able to re-experience the magic of reading some of my favorite fiction as if for the first time.

Holly: I've just finished reading everything. I've now read everything that's been written by anyone ever.
Lister: Would you go away?
Holly: You know what the worst book ever written by anyone ever was?
Lister: I don't care!
Holly: "Football, It's a Funny Old Game" by Kevin Keegan.
...snip...
Holly: Well, only if you're not busy. Would you mind erasing some of my memory banks?
Lister: What for?
Holly: Well, if you erase all the Agatha Christie novels from my memory bank, I can read 'em again tonight.
Lister: How do I do it?
Holly: Just type, "Holmem. Password override. The novels Christie, Agatha." Then press erase.
Lister: I've done it.
Holly: Done what?
Lister: Erased Agatha Christie.
Holly: Who's she, then?
Lister: Holly, you just asked me to erase all Agatha Christie novels from your memory.
Holly: Why should I do that? I've never heard of her.
Lister: You've never heard of her because I've just erased her from your smegging memory.
Holly: What'd you do that for?
Lister: You asked me to!
Holly: When?
Lister: Just now!
Holly: I don't remember this.

Re:erase undesirable memories (4, Interesting)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480799)

I would love to be able to re-experience the magic of reading some of my favorite fiction as if for the first time.

I'd much rather experience the magic of something genuinely new.

Re:erase undesirable memories (1)

Lord Byron II (671689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480751)

It might not be so positive for the rape victim. If she can't remember being raped, then how the hell did she get pregnant? Where did those bruises come from? And why does she now have HIV?

Also, why do people from the district attorney's office keep coming by and asking her to testify? Testify to what?

Re:erase undesirable memories (3, Insightful)

harry666t (1062422) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480953)

> While this might positively applicaple for e.g. victims

My life was far from painless, but I regret no single decision and want no memory to definitely fade away. I treat every unpleasant moment, every "evil" done to me as a lesson, and forgetting what I've learned would be like... devolution. It's my personal point of view, but I believe that everything that ever happened to someone, had happened for a reason.

so now when us paranoids rant wbout your memories (3, Funny)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480363)

being wiped by the cia, the nsa or homeland security, we've got the link to prove it.

ah, i feel vindicated. one of my paranoid thoughts is that people have their memories wiped of certain things they've done, knowing that science has reproduced it in mice means time travelers from the future could easily have been doing it for years now.

well, just as soon as the time machine gets proved to be possible. quantum physics is dangerously close to that with 'particles being everywhere all at once, until observed.' how can a quantum particle like a photon be everywhere all at once, until observed, unless time travel is also possible on the quantum level.

Re:so now when us paranoids rant wbout your memori (1)

Scutter (18425) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480395)

ah, i feel vindicated. one of my paranoid thoughts is that people have their memories wiped of certain things they've done

How do you know it hasn't already been done to you?

Re:so now when us paranoids rant wbout your memori (4, Interesting)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480465)

ah but that's the thing, i lost about 6 months all told of memory.

the doctor wasn't really up on his paranoid schizophrenia, and he said that the memories were probably repressed. no, no they weren't they were gone completely.

the last time it happened i only lost 3 days, i was on a different medicine then though, and there are some files of what i said and did that are very weird. my explanation for what happened was hackers broke into my computer and used the wifi connection to directly control my thoughts. i don't bring that up to my doctor of course. wifi is everywhere, and hacked computers are a dime a dozen. which lead to my going all hard wired internet with hardened firewalls that are half-open and have specific configurations settings for each pc and each os that connects to the hardened firewalls, and oh i don't run my computers at night.

but the doctor just thinks i am a computer hypochondriac, in addition to being paranoid schizophrenic.

Re:so now when us paranoids rant wbout your memori (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480579)

Nod and smile, nod and smile.

My Wife... (4, Funny)

Smivs (1197859) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480367)

has the ability to selectively forget anything inconvenient!

Lots of potential uses (4, Interesting)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480369)

It sounds like science fiction, but scientists say it might one day be possible to erase undesirable memories from the brain, selectively and safely.

Screw that. I want to erase desirable memories from people's brains. Think how easy it would be to make office workers stay later when they can't remember any of the good stuff that happens when they leave the office?

Or for shits and giggles, how about removing all traces of memories of sex for the unwed father of a child? Would make the paternity suit industry tons of coin, I bet.

But enough of the super-villain type stuff.

How abvout erasing the memory of the first time you had warm apple pie? Then, you get to try it for the first time every night.

Re:Lots of potential uses (2, Funny)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480415)

How abvout erasing the memory of the first time you had warm apple pie? Then, you get to try it for the first time every night.

I was thinking of something a little different... but whatever floats your boat, man.

Re:Lots of potential uses (2, Funny)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480587)

I was thinking of something a little different... but whatever floats your boat, man.

Ah, so you caught the allegory. It wasn't unintended.

Re:Lots of potential uses (3, Interesting)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480543)

"Or for shits and giggles, how about removing all traces of memories of sex for the unwed father of a child? Would make the paternity suit industry tons of coin, I bet."

the 1990's called, we use DNA to figure out who isn't cleaning up their dog poophttp://idle.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/09/17/160246&from=rss [slashdot.org] , paternity suits likewise are solved with DNA tests.

perhaps if you time traveled back to the 1950's in a time machine with 3 other scientists and crash landed in new mexico, you would find a use for the drug in paternity suits. but how to market something that scientifically can't be proven to work? since the science that makes it possible makes it obsolete (for paternity tests at least)?

or perhaps after the 1970's that failed time travel experiment from the 1950's would result in a government using the super secret modern tech needed to make such a drug possible that they retrieved from a 'weather balloon' and would widely use it to control the nation and wind up with a huge massive government that has to tax everyone and is still ten trillion dollars in debt, because mass producing all that memory wiping drug is expensive so more an more memories need to be wiped, and perhaps people become resistant to the drug after being flooded with it all their lives...

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480563)

the 1990's called, we use DNA to figure out who isn't cleaning up their dog poophttp://idle.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/09/17/160246&from=rss, paternity suits likewise are solved with DNA tests.

Who cares how it's solved? The point is that if the fathers don't remember having sex with the mother, there are likely to be more paternity suits than there are now, since the fathers will deny responsibility... which means more coin for the paternity suit industry.

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480615)

ahh, i didn't see the lawyer connection, in there. so the idea is to make load of money for lawyers by having men refuse to be dna tested in paternity suits.

so how do lawyers find these guys? go to bars and instead of slipping em extasy slip them a little 'forget me' pill and then goad them into recalling the babe they got in the sack last night?

perhaps you should have stuck to the

step 1: become a paternity lawyer
step 2: find a one night stander in a bar
step 3: give him a forget recalled memory pill in his beer
step 4: get him to recall the babe he laid last night
step 5: represent him in his paternity suit
step 6: Profit!

format, although there is no ellipse

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480759)

I was thinking it'd be a better idea to use it on the mothers.... ;)

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

Meumeu (848638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480655)

perhaps if you time traveled back to the 1950's in a time machine with 3 other scientists

Good idea ! I'm starting this right away, who wants to join me?

Re:Lots of potential uses (5, Funny)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480595)

I could get excited about The Phantom Menace all over again!

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

Emb3rz (1210286) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480651)

Child's play. We could all forget Jar-Jar!

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480763)

I could get excited about The Phantom Menace all over again!

Think of all the potential disappointment which could await you in life if you could re-experience the let down of that movie new every week or so!!

We could erase all memory of Uwe Boll and his movies and let you experience the suck all over again.

I figure the absolute best use for it is to make kids fall for "pull my finger" more often. Send 'em to bed, scramble their brains, wake 'em up in the morning, bam -- hit 'em when they don't expect it!! :-P

Cheers

Re:Lots of potential uses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480743)

How abvout erasing the memory of the first time you had warm apple pie? Then, you get to try it for the first time every night.

I want to do that for times I have sex with my wife. It'll be like doing a new chick every night without the fuss! Sweeeeeeeet.

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

VShael (62735) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480787)

Or erasing all those Agatha Christie stories, so that you could re-read them again?

Re:Lots of potential uses (1)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480829)

I wouldn't mind having this for movies. If you see a really, great, awesome movie that blew you away, you can erase your memory of it, watch it again and get blown away again!

HOLY SHIT! He's Kaiser Soze?!?!?!?!?

I would be more willing to watch trailers if I knew I could erase all memories of them before watching the actual movie. Right now I religiously avoid trailers for movies I want to see because they spoil plot points, ruin funny moments, etc, etc. But if it was "here's a good summary of the movie. Would you like to experience it? If so, make yourself a note and press FUDGE MY MIND to continue".

Ironically, I wouldn't want to erase bad movies. I wouldn't want to risk seeing them again.

This just gives me warm fuzzy feelings... (1)

CFBMoo1 (157453) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480371)

"But memory in a human is much more complex than a memory in a mouse," Verghese added. "So, this experimental model, while it brings to mind all sorts of possible applications, is many steps removed from any human application."

Imagine if they got this stuff working for humans. They could really erase a criminals memory of an event and all the stuff that makes him bad. Now say in order to preserve law and order you need to make sure the family of the victim he killed is "conditioned" to not take revenge.

Say you don't like people voting for Obama or McCain? Now you can erase certain things to sway people towards voting for you in the election.

Don't like what the whistle blower in your company is about to do even though you may be poisoning the local population by doing something less then ethical or just stealing from them with extra fees? Clean that whistle blowers whistle so he/she can't remember the facts.

Yeah this will be good down the road if they ever get it perfected for humans and especially in an easy to transport size.

Re:This just gives me warm fuzzy feelings... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480433)

Then it's a thing good that we've already started twitering, blogging and logging our lives. Once the day is over and everybody is done with your brain, you sit down and read back what happened.

Re:This just gives me warm fuzzy feelings... (2)

kesuki (321456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480635)

"Imagine if they got this stuff working for humans. They could really erase a criminals memory of an event and all the stuff that makes him bad."

you assume that criminal activity isn't caused by how the brain is wired, or how their genetic code is coded, and which codes are active, and which are repressed.

but yeah, you could reduce a criminal to a drooling idiot, the problem is he'll eventually relearn how to be a criminal, and there are going to be people saying no you can't do this to criminals. albeit in a world where a forget me pill exists some of those problems can go away by themselves, at least if information is tightly controlled.

The brittlestar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480383)

Can anyone remind me what a brittlestar is?

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (1)

Daryen (1138567) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480393)

Does anyone else find this scarily similar to how it worked in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind?

Also, it isn't "welcoming our new selectively amnesiac rodent overloads." It's "I for one am welcoming our memory-erasing government sponsored scientist overlords."

Re:Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (1)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480571)

you haven't watched that movie recently, have you?

Re:Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (1)

Sebilrazen (870600) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480649)

I don't remember.

handy for interogation (1)

Sarin (112173) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480423)

basicly you can get all information out of someone with this technique.

you "just" torture them to get the information and wipe their memories of the interogation and do whatever you want with the aquired information. you can even let the subject loose and observe some more, knowing what you've learned from interogating the subject.

Re:handy for interogation (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480491)

The tortured person may wonder how their fingernails got ripped off though.

My balls (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480425)

I can finally forget all those times I got kicked in the balls.

not applicable to humans (4, Interesting)

thermian (1267986) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480477)

What with humans being rather complex, mentally, Information may not be stored only once, or it could be fragmented.

The only way to selectively destroy memory would be to track down all instances of it, which I would say is pretty unlikely in the human brain. Same goes for most other primates.

Amnesiacs typically have a non uniform memory loss. Some things they can recall, but not others. Two people with identical brain damage can easily experience different levels of amnesia. Producing a reliable general method for memory deletion is almost certainly impossible.

Short term memory disruption, and the prevention of moving short term memories into long term memory is easier to achieve.

If you want to experience it, dislocate your elbow and go to hospital. They'll give you a nice pill, you'll scream while they manhandle your arm back into position, and five minutes later you won't remember any of it. I've not experienced it, but I've relocated a fair few arms. Its funny when the people wake up and ask when your going to start.

Re:not applicable to humans (1)

sckeener (137243) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480667)

On the positive side, it might possible to smudge or blur a memory.

I know I'd like to make a few memories less painful such as my divorce.

Though I have to wonder if blurring or wiping bad memories is enough as in my case with a divorce. The bad memories of the divorce could be erased, but then I'd have the longing of why such a positive marriage ended.

Re:not applicable to humans (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480725)

How are they going to deal with all associated memories also?

Say I want to forget an ex. Bamn, 'her' memory is gone. But what about the memory of who I watched a certain movie with? Would I remember:
1) Not ever seeing the movie
2) Not ever seeing the movie with someone
3) Not ever remember seeing the movie with her
4) Not remember that the person I saw the movie with was my ex.

Smells, Sounds, Sights can all trigger memories in humans, what is going to happen when the 'interrupt' is still there but there's nothing to call?

Re:not applicable to humans (1)

Kirth Gersen (603793) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480739)

thermian:

They'll give you a nice pill, you'll scream while they manhandle your arm back into position, and five minutes later you won't remember any of it

Yeah. That works well for general anaesthesia too. It's dangerous to give you enough morphine for you to really sleep through surgery: it'll kill you most of the time. So they give you inadequate morphine, plus curare so you can't move, and the date-rape drug so you don't remember the pain. But you *experience* the pain, every second of it, helpless and immobile.

Re:not applicable to humans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480779)

What is the nice pill? Do you mean something int the class like rohypnol?

Re:not applicable to humans (1)

iammani (1392285) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480881)

If you want to experience it, dislocate your elbow and go to hospital. They'll give you a nice pill, you'll scream while they manhandle your arm back into position, and five minutes later you won't remember any of it. I've not experienced it, but I've relocated a fair few arms. Its funny when the people wake up and ask when your going to start.

The drug the parent is taking about is commonly called propranolol. Visit http://www.cognitiveliberty.org/neuro/memory_drugs_sd.html [cognitiveliberty.org] for an interesting read about how exactly it works and its long term effects (minus the journalist bullshit)

Obligatory spoof transcript (2, Funny)

stoofa (524247) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480497)

Scientist: "Here, mouse, have some cheese."
[Mouse eats cheese]
Scientist: "Right, now forget about it completely."
[Waits 5 minutes]
Scientist: "Say, mouse, how was that oak-smoked camembert with chive and onion?"
Mouse: "Chive?"
Scientist: "Wow, it works."

You have never been to mars. (2, Funny)

chrispatch (578882) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480505)

You do not want a vacation on mars. You want to stay here and keep doing Sharon Stone.

Enforceable NDA's (2, Insightful)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480509)

So soon we will have truly enforceable NDA's.

Its not science... (5, Funny)

rodney dill (631059) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480551)

...its the Haitian

hi this is testing (0, Redundant)

dashyaoo (1143463) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480575)

sending

Used on /, already (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480589)

Because everyone's forgotten we were discussing this not too long ago. I specifically rememeber someone saying they wanted to erase their first sexual experience.

Re:Used on /, already (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480795)

Re:Used on /, already

Oh, I'm sorry, this is slash dot. Slash comma is down the hall on your left.

Stupid git. ;-P

Cheers

Re:Used on /, already (4, Funny)

harry666t (1062422) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480977)

I think this is how all the dupes get into the front page.

Old tech (2, Funny)

Pompatus (642396) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480629)

I can already erase memories. It's called whiskey.

Self-amputation? (5, Insightful)

Big Nemo '60 (749108) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480637)

Maybe I am just grouchy but...

Even for traumatic memories, I would choose healing and closure over forgetfulness anytime. I may like it or not, but I am the sum of all the things I experienced, and I am not looking forward to self-amputation.

On the other hand, I understand that achieving healing and closure is a very inefficient process - just being able to erase unpleasant experiences would probably set us free to pursue more worthy achievements, like making the current global economic breakdown ever worse...

Again, sorry for ranting.

Re:Self-amputation? (1)

Crookdotter (1297179) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480853)

Does the same apply to a cancerous limb? Do you want to live with that eating at your body and try to like it? Some traumatic memories eat away at your mental health.

Nothing to see... (2, Funny)

PinkyDead (862370) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480659)

Brewers have been doing this for centuries.

Lori (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480719)

"THAT'S for making me come to Mars. You know how much I HATE this fucking planet."

At last! (2, Informative)

InspectorGadget (149784) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480741)

I look forward to the removal of goatse, tubgirl and 2 Girls 1 Cup from my poor tortured mind.

I can't remember anything anyway (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480773)

This would be a waste on me. I couldn't remember anything for them to trace what to erase anyhow.

Heck, I can't even remember my login.

I'd totally steal Kate Winslet's panties. (4, Insightful)

scubamage (727538) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480811)

Just sayin. Clementine was farking hot.

Dupe! (1)

MrLogic17 (233498) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480823)

This article has been posted every day this week, then deleted at the end of day!

What, you don't remember that? Hummm.....

Be careful with lab mice (1)

murphyd311 (1364187) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480837)

"Gee Brain, what do you want to do tonight?" "The same thing we do every night, Pinky--try to take over the world."

Psychological issues caused by trauma (4, Interesting)

sorak (246725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480875)

It will be interesting, to one day see if removal of a traumatic memory can help with psychological issues that may stem from it.

For example, can erasing war-time memories lessen PTSD, and to what extent? Or would said person simply exhibit the same symptoms and have no idea why?

Re:Psychological issues caused by trauma (1)

genner (694963) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480949)

It will be interesting, to one day see if removal of a traumatic memory can help with psychological issues that may stem from it.

For example, can erasing war-time memories lessen PTSD, and to what extent? Or would said person simply exhibit the same symptoms and have no idea why?

Since the symptoms revolve around reliving those experiences I wouldn't think it would be possible if you don't remember them.

My Geass Works far better. (1)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 5 years ago | (#25480919)

Plus I can command people to do just about anything.

Mwahahaha time to take over the world.

replace (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25480925)

s/undesirable //g

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