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Stellar Seismologists Record "Music" From Stars

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the play-here-comes-the-sun-for-me dept.

Space 102

niktemadur writes "The BBC reports that a French team of stellar seismologists, using the COROT Space Telescope, have converted stellar oscillations into sound patterns, a relatively new technique that, according to Professor Eric Michel of the Paris Observatory, is already giving researchers new insight into the inner workings of stars. The subtly pulsating, haunting sounds are very similar to artist Aphex Twin's minimalistic nineties album 'Selected Ambient Works, Vol. 2,' only stripping away what little melody it had and leaving just the beat. These and many more recordings from space can be accessed at the Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics website, also known as the Jodcast."

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Beat? (0, Flamebait)

atomicthumbs (824207) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499589)

The subtly pulsating, haunting sounds are very similar to artist Aphex Twin's minimalistic nineties album 'Selected Ambient Works, Vol. 2,' only stripping away what little melody it had and leaving just the beat.

From a person who loves listening to that album: What beat? It's ambient. 85-92 had beat. II didn't.

Re:Beat? (1, Informative)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499709)

It's pretty much impossible to produce music without a beat (rhythm). Even Cage's 4 minutes and 33 seconds probably has a beat most of the time. Without beat it would also be monotone. Every time you introduce a new tone there's a beat. That beat maybe far apart from another, and it may be irregular, but it's there. It doesn't need drums and a 4/4 progression to have a beat.

Re:Beat? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25499737)

Aphex Twin sucks ass. Propellerheads FTW.

Re:Beat? (1)

atomicthumbs (824207) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500359)

Aphex Twin's ambient albums are some of the best music I've ever listened to. Have you listened to them? I can't vouch for his other stuff, though.

Re:Beat? (1)

kalpol (714519) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500665)

It's spotty. But if you haven't seen the Windowlicker [youtube.com] video yet, do so now (be aware though, probably NSFW for language and big booty action).

Re:Beat? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501403)

You really ought to listen to some of the others. Richard D. James will go down in history as one of the greatest electronic composers of the 20th century. He's right up there with Brahms, Bach, Stravinski, etc., IMHO. There isn't a single electronic composer out there who hasn't been influenced by him.

Get your hands on a copy of the Richard D. James album or Windowlicker, and enjoy.

Re:Beat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25503305)

Aphex Twin does great work. What's the name of the track that sounds like he's in shower spanking it and making soft deep "oh" sounds? Or, was I really trippin' hard? My friend thought he was frying some bacon & eggs. I have never laughed so hard.

Re:Beat? (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25510417)

Compared to what Stockhausen was doing forty years earlier, the music of Aphex Twin is trite and banal. There are such amazing possibilities in electronics. Too bad Richard D. James doesn't exploit them, instead playing it safe. If you want amazing electronic music these days, look to IRCAM [ircam.fr] .

Re:Beat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25506211)

LOL! mod this funny!

Re:Beat? (5, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500063)

Agreed. A "beat" doesn't necessarily imply periodic rhythm. I'm surprised, however, that the story here mentions on Aphex Twin and not an even more topical piece of music. In the 1980s, the French spectralist composer Gerard Grisey wrote a major concert work called Le Noir de l'etoile [amazon.com] for six percussionist. The material is partly based on sounds from pulsars, and in fact during the concert a radio telescope is to be used to directly pipe in the sound of a specific pulsar. Grisey's work at this time was increasingly fascinated by musical time, and the contrast between the clockwork of the pulsar and more organic aperiodic rhythms is a major concern of the piece.

Re:Beat? (2, Insightful)

mechanyx (960689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500081)

A number of pieces are accepted to have no beat and there is a variety of music thought to be ametrical or with long periods of ametricity. Take Penderecki's Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima or Xenakis' Metastasis for example. I've written a number of ametrical works. There are even works with percussion that could be argued to be ametrical such as the opening and title track to Gorgut's Obscura.

Re:Beat? (2, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500163)

Aren't the rhythms of the beginning of Metastasis based on the Fibonacci sequence? IIRC, there's a woodblock part that clearly marks out durations that the listener can relate to.

Re:Beat? (2, Insightful)

mechanyx (960689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500293)

In Formalized Music Xenakis details a lot of his mathematical process but a statement like, "that the listener can relate to" makes a LOT of assumptions about the listener. I certainly wouldn't identify a beat with those hits. Everything in sound has an underlying mathematical structure. It doesn't mean that structure necessarily translates to anything higher order or is perceptible.

Re:Beat? (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500367)

Well, what has attracted composers like Gubaidulina, Norgard, and Xenakis to the Fibonacci sequence is that such rhythms supposedly have gestalt universally.

Re:Beat? (1)

mechanyx (960689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500571)

Do you hear a beat there? Regardless as to whether or not some ppl might hear a beat in Metastasis, my point was that there are pieces that don't have a beat and I still think that is the case. There are too many bizarre pieces by guys like LaMonte Young and Wolfgang Schorn. I would argue that even something like Wolfgang Rihm's 8th string quartet has no beat.

Re:Beat? (1)

QRDeNameland (873957) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500111)

Everything in the universe is made of one element, which is a note, a single note. Atoms are really vibrations, you know, which are extensions of THE BIG NOTE ... Everything's one note. Everything, even the ponies. The note, however, is the ultimate power, but see, the pigs don't know that, the ponies don't know that ...

Re:Beat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500669)

I'm sorry but you are completely clueless when it comes to terms like "beat", "monotone" and even "music". Try again.

Re:Beat? (1)

node 3 (115640) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501587)

You've just defined "beat" into a meaningless term.

When people say that music has a "beat", they are referring to a subjective feeling, not "every time you introduce a new tone". At some point, while there's still technically some sort of rhythm, even if a non-repeating random "rhythm", it's absurd to call it a beat or a rhythm, except to show how the term isn't really an objective one, but really subjective, which is what music is in the first place.

Once you start treating subjective musical terms as objective, or take them literally, you end up with the absurdity of calling everything music. Music is often defined as rhythm and melody. You've just stated that everything with any sounds is rhythm, and melody can just be defined as a "series of different tones, even a series of one", ergo, any sound at all is music...

But that's not really true, is it? Unfortunately, for some, you can't objectively state that that's not true, only subjectively state it, which seems to throw them into a philosophical tailspin.

Re:Beat? (1)

larrrk (1061450) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501863)

proabably has a beat most of the time? which part in the score are you referring to?

Re:Beat? (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25505313)

So basically what you're saying is that even when there's no pattern there's a pattern?

Re:Beat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25499879)

A few of the tracks have beat. The most recognized track of the album (Track 9) has a beat.

Re:Beat? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500317)

Those silly Earthlings... we beamed all of our rap music into space to get rid of it and they're actually trying to listen to it

Man Who Fell To Earth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25499593)

Maybe Aphex Twin is the Man Who Fell to Earth and is merely making music for those he left behind....

Re:Man Who Fell To Earth (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500115)

Maybe Aphex Twin is the Man Who Fell to Earth

It was Aphex Twin's wacky predecessor Stockhausen who claimed he was born on the planet Sirius and sent on a musical mission to Earth. Fortunately Richard D. James is a lot more level-headed.

In other news.. (4, Funny)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499631)

..the RIAA looks to the stars for a new revenue stream.

copyright? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500893)

Undoubtedly, when the RIAA hears about this, they'll claim copyright over the "Music of the Spheres" and DMCA takedown notices will forthwith be sent to the all galaxies and the telescopes that index them.

Re:In other news.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501125)

And that's different from now how? In ten years time, they'll just be another generation of washed-up divorced coke- and meth-addicted has-beens.

Re:In other news.. (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501247)

Wait until they know about galactic piracy.

Re:In other news.. (1)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 5 years ago | (#25502523)

Wait until they know about galactic piracy.

Nothing to fear, Samus Aran is taking care of that.

Legal Question (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25499653)

And are these stars receiving any royalties from these recordings?
If not, then would that make these seismologists Space Pirates?

Re:Legal Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500237)

That would depend on if stars can hold copyrights. Hollywood would make us assume yes, so I guess we have space pirates on earth.

However, the stars would have to come here to file legal charges against the scientists, something I'd rather not see happen.

Space Pirates (1)

lrbays (1208996) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501867)

Rumor has it that RIAA is already training Space Ninjas, just in case.

Re:Legal Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25503889)

Clearly the copyright has run out since the work was created?

It's the same, only different. (1)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499657)

Yes, this is terribly informative. Maybe it would be better to describe it as like the Art Of Noise, minus any of the group.

Re:It's the same, only different. (3, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499829)

Actually using sound to view data from anything can be quite useful. I have worked in telcomms for some time, and in days gone by listening to the demodulated data as audio from a paging signal was very useful. Engineers can listen to it and know if it is 'right' or 'wrong' without a scope, data tracer, or any equipment at all other than a pager with audio output. I've actually located faults using this.

Using charts is a way for us to 'see' data in a form that we can readily digest. Using audio to 'hear' the signals from space will allow our brains to quickly digest what the data shows. I'd like to see more of this. We use IR cameras to see wavelengths that we do not typically see with our eyes. Why not use audio to look at radiation from space?

Re:It's the same, only different. (1)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501179)

Now that I completely agree with. Diagnostics and data analysis via the patterns inherent in sound makes a lot of sense - the human brain is designed to do pattern recognition in raw data for starters and computers could theoretically do pattern recognition for large volumes (no pun intended) of data far more efficiently this way because you are dealing with the information holistically rather than as a serial stream. You can also identify subtle differences in stars by means of sound - a subtle variation that might not be detectable otherwise might easily set up a very audible beat frequency when compared to a reference star. For that matter, if you know two stars to be functionally identical, then the interference pattern when overlaying the two sounds is going to be a function of velocity. As interference patterns will tend to make visible to humans information that is otherwise hidden in the general noise, this should allow you to determine differences in distances that are far too subtle to pick up otherwise.

Actually, now that I think about it, if there is a planet orbiting a star, the star wobbles. But there have been problems in the past in determining when the wobble is real and when it is simply an illusion. This might be a case where the sound from the star differs enough in the two cases (wobble = change in relative velocity = change in sound = change in the beat frequency relative to a reference star with no planetary mass, the illusion will change nothing) where you could identify which case it was with much greater confidence. In some cases, you may be able to detect a wobble via sound that would not be visible by direct measurement, exposing the existence of an orbiting mass that would not otherwise be detected.

MRIs (1)

IchNiSan (526249) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506823)

There was a story several years ago, either on NPR, or Discovery Channel, about a scientist/doctor in california who had put MRIs to music, was a very interesting story. Not sure if this was programming or something that just happened naturally, but normal MRI sounded harmonius, non normal MRI was discordant.

I have just spent a while looking for that story on google with no luck, there are just too many hits.

If someone know what I am talking about would welcome the link.

Re:It's the same, only different. (1)

Waccoon (1186667) | more than 5 years ago | (#25508519)

While I haven't gotten much practical use out of it, I remember doing RAM scans of my Amiga over 10 years ago, and being able to detect what kind of data was in the memory by listening to it in a sound editor. Played at high speed, it was much easier and faster than paging through a memory dump. Locating text is easy, too, since it has a distinct, quieter sound than binary.

It just sounds really cool, too, since back in those days things weren't compressed when in memory, but they were more condensed, so there were more harmonic data tables and less static and pops. While it's nice that modern computers don't crash as much due to memory protection, and memory paging would cause some abrupt breaks, I really miss being able to directly see or hear what's in my computer's memory.

I wonder if there's any kernel-level visual/audio tools for doing just that.

Re:It's the same, only different. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25502227)

Rubbish the Art Of Noise made mostly music with plenty of structure and rhythm, not just odd sound effects

Re:It's the same, only different. (1)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25502531)

The whooooooooshing sound is the point of "minus any of the group" going over your head at hypersonic velocity. (I would have said White Noise, but (a) almost nobody has heard of them, apart from fans of arcane Doctor Who trivia, and (b) I'd have to miss out the bit of excluding the band.)

Stellar? (2, Funny)

MikeTheMan (944825) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499699)

Am I the only one who interpreted 'stellar' to mean 'really awesome'? As in 'Some really awesome, talented seismologists Record Music From Stars'?

Man, that was confusing.

Re:Stellar? (1)

maroberts (15852) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500613)

I thought it was a misspelling and interpreted it to mean they were recording oscillations in lager beer [wikipedia.org]

me too (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500761)

I also interpreted "stars" as "celebrities" and just figured this was about a new remix album by DJ Seismologist

Ancient theory proven (2, Funny)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499719)

This just shows that Pythagoras and Kepler were right! [skyscript.co.uk]

After discovering The Music Of The Spheres, the pair of philosopher-scientists went on to form the ambient electronica duo P&K. After three moderately successful albums they split, citing creative differences. Pythagoras now teaches high school math in Wichita, KS. Kepler is currently in the Shady Acres Sanitarium.

Roll credits.

Re:Ancient theory proven (2, Informative)

night_flyer (453866) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499825)

goes back slightly further back than that...

Job 38:7 (King James Version)

  7When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy?

Re:Ancient theory proven (1)

Bloodoflethe (1058166) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500633)

I think the Valacuenta goes back at least as far and has a slightly different take on it all.

Re:Ancient theory proven (1)

ShadowXOmega (808299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506539)

Ya, is the music of the Ainur??, so we are hearing the 3rd theme of illuvatar?

omfg, so we are soo close to the Dagor Dagorath!

Re:Ancient theory proven (2, Insightful)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500709)

Good point. But I believe morning stars is another term used to describe angels (Isaiah 14:13-14 KJV):

How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations! For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north: I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High.

And apparently there's a link to the Latin root of Lucifer. [wikipedia.org]

Conclusion: Lucifer was thrown out of heaven for singing too loud and messing up the Music of the Spheres.

Re:Ancient theory proven (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 5 years ago | (#25504409)

Sounds like Morgoth in the Silmarillon, but less spherical....

Re:Ancient theory proven (1)

Frigga's Ring (1044024) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500403)

Clearly, you need to pitch this idea to Kate Beaton [katebeaton.com] .

Re:Ancient theory proven (1)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500617)

Wow, those comics are either some sophisticated post-modern irony or a big bag of suck. You made me look, though ;)

Binaural Beats (1)

FredFredrickson (1177871) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499789)

The origin of binaural [wikipedia.org] beats has been found.

Scientists would explain, but they're all apparently in the lab "tripping" out to ACID STARDUST.

Job 38 (1)

Jonah Bomber (535788) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499805)

4 "Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? Tell me, if you have understanding. 5 Who determined its measurements--surely you know! Or who stretched the line upon it? 6 On what were its bases sunk, or who laid its cornerstone, 7 when the morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for joy?"

Re:Job 38 (1)

mmalove (919245) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500133)

It's not a biblical event if you use a man-made amplifier.

Old hat. (1)

losthought (1393251) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499835)

Mogwai has apparently been doing this [youngteam.co.uk] since 1997.

Meh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25499941)

HD49933 was much better in its independent days. Ever since signing to Paris Observatory Records, its sound has become too "mainstream pop".

Jodrell Bank Center (1)

wahsapa (767922) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499965)

Jodrell Bank Center... is that where Kla-El does his banking

DMCA or something (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 5 years ago | (#25499987)

Richard James should sue these thieving bastards. Being a star is no excuse, right RIAA?

Re:DMCA or something (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500751)

Once he begins to refer to himself as "Rick", he can.

Then he'd be "Rick James, bitch."

Why the hate against Aphex Twin? (1)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500197)

I listened to the sound and there was no similarity at all.
They sounded like cheesy 50's sci-fi sound effects which were based on frequency modulation and oscillation ... just like these stars "sounds" are.

Re:Why the hate against Aphex Twin? (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501331)

I wouldn't worry about whether or not anyone hates Aphex Twin or his music. But it's possible that, from the descriptions of the sounds here, they're comparing it with his 'Selected Ambient Works Vol 2'. I love the album, and got my copy from a guy I shared a house with who worked at a record store at the time, and people were taking that (double) CD back in droves, as it was completely different to his earlier disks. Personally I think Aphex Twin's output is 80% shit, but the 20% that isn't (Selected Ambient Works Vol 2, surfing on sine waves, and parts of I Care Because You Do and Drukqs) is well worth seeking out.

Nobody remembers Dr. Fiorella Terenzi? (4, Informative)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500673)

From Wikipedia:

Dr. Fiorella Terenzi is an Italian astrophysicist, author and musician who is best known for taking recordings of radio waves from galaxies and turning them into music. She received her doctorate from the University of Milan but is currently based in the United States.

Terenzi is known for her CD-ROM Invisible Universe which combines music and poetry with astronomy lessons, and for a sexually charged 1998 book about science entitled Heavenly Knowledge. She has also released a number of albums of her music.

She is known as an Apple Computer "AppleMaster", and has collaborated with the likes of Thomas Dolby, Timothy Leary, Herbie Hancock and Ornette Coleman.

When she isn't performing, she teaches astronomy at Pierce College in Los Angeles. As of 2006, she was teaching astronomy at Brevard Community College in Cocoa, FL.

Home Page: http://www.fiorella.com/fiorprofile.htm [fiorella.com]

Videos: http://video.fiorella.com/ [fiorella.com]

Re:Nobody remembers Dr. Fiorella Terenzi? (1)

x1n933k (966581) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501055)

Obviously you don't understand how with the affects of the Internet change our short term and long term memories.

Here on Slashdot, we'll often see the news reel within the same day or several times in the same week. How can you expect us to remember some Italian bombshell with crazy hair from the early 90's.

[J]

Re:Nobody remembers Dr. Fiorella Terenzi? (1)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 5 years ago | (#25520793)

I never forget Italian bombshells!

I still remember Monica Vitti, Gina Lollobrigida, Claudia Cardinale, and Sylva Koscina, not to mention the ultimate, Sophia Loren.

Nerds! No consciousness of sex!

Re:Nobody remembers Dr. Fiorella Terenzi? (1)

Federico2 (792815) | more than 5 years ago | (#25541143)

Just unbelievely kitch.

Re:Nobody remembers Dr. Fiorella Terenzi? (1)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 5 years ago | (#25543253)

That would be "kitsch".

YOU FAI[L iT (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500765)

Retro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25500791)

My God! It's full of stars...

Recording Industry Association of the Galaxy (1)

rugatero (1292060) | more than 5 years ago | (#25500891)

So where is the Galactic equivalent of the RIAA - the people sharing the music from those stars must be stopped!

I knew it... (1)

bodland (522967) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501051)

The Giant Karl Rove space goat IS playing the universe like a fiddle.

Not the sound of the stars. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501053)

There are a million different ways you could convert any data into audio.

How do the audio recordings relate to the radio signals they received? Without that information, the audio is meaningless. I could make spacey sounding haunting oscillations from data about the movements of my bowels, it's all about how you represent the data.

The only time I have heard true 'sounds from space' is from VLF radio, as the radio frequencies are actually in the audio range.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (0)

spidercoz (947220) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501555)

...as the radio frequencies are actually in the audio range.

What?
Never mind, you're clearly an idiot.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501811)

What?

VLF radio is from around 0.5Hz to around 20KHz, which coincides with the range of human hearing.

You can create a VLF receiver with an ordinary sound card and a length of wire.

Never mind, you are clearly an idiot.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (1)

spidercoz (947220) | more than 5 years ago | (#25510303)

I was going to go on a diatribe about how sound and RF are two completely different things, that sound doesn't travel through space and you can't "hear" RF, but there's no point.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25512971)

You can take it for granted that people here understand that sound does not travel through a vacuum.

Think about it this way... what would you hear if you plugged a long length of wire into an amplifier, and listened to the result on headphones?

Do this in a city and you will hear 50hz hum.
Do it in the Arizona desert during a meteor shower and you will hear something a little more interesting.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (1)

spidercoz (947220) | more than 5 years ago | (#25519261)

I messed around with radios a bit when I was kid, that was fun. I always wanted to build my own radio telescope.

Re:Not the sound of the stars. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25521653)

Radios are lots of fun. I got into VLF when troubleshooting audio gear, and wondering what the weird stuff on the spectrogram was. Mostly ac mains harmonics, motors, switches etc. :)

Didn't you guys watch the Proms? (1)

ZackZero (1271592) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501255)

The Doctor did it already... nothing spectacular, but eerily good.

aphex twin, eh? (1)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501293)

Warn me about the stars that sound like "come to daddy" or "windowlicker."

morning stars sang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501341)

Job 38:2-11 ESV (2) "Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge? (3) Dress for action like a man; I will question you, and you make it known to me. (4) "Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? Tell me, if you have understanding. (5) Who determined its measurements--surely you know! Or who stretched the line upon it? (6) On what were its bases sunk, or who laid its cornerstone, (7) when the morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for joy? (8) "Or who shut in the sea with doors when it burst out from the womb, (9) when I made clouds its garment and thick darkness its swaddling band, (10) and prescribed limits for it and set bars and doors, (11) and said, 'Thus far shall you come, and no farther, and here shall your proud waves be stayed'?

i always do this (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501399)

...every time i compile a new kernel:

cat vmlinuz >> /dev/dsp

now *that* is geek music

I wonder what......... (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501561)

I wonder what effect this may have had on the development of music in humans. Can we somehow discern these oscillations, like magnetic fields in the brains of pigeons?

Suppose the timing of all our music is based on oscillations of our own star, Sol. What might the effects be on a planet that orbits a much different star. A planet under the effects of multiple stars? Would an extraterrestrial culture in such a situation have more complex music if it was under such effects?

Re:I wonder what......... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501697)

whoa... you just blew my mind...
Thank You

My God.... (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501569)

My God, It's full of stars!

Mixing memes (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501573)

I first read the title as "Stellar Scientologists Record "Music" From Stars" then read it correctly, but wondered if it had to do with the RIAA. I think this is a sign that my brain needs more sleep. ;-)

GlaDOS says Hi (1)

floatingrunner (621481) | more than 5 years ago | (#25501627)

and believe me I am still alive

I'm doing science and I'm still alive

i feel fantastic and I'm still alive

while your dying ill be still alive

and when your dead i will be still alive

still alive

still alive

insight into stars or music? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25501781)

"...according to Professor Eric Michel of the Paris Observatory, is already giving researchers new insight into the inner workings of stars"

Whether this gives researchers new insight into inner workings of stars or inner workings of music is debatable.

Website (1)

Mike Peel (885855) | more than 5 years ago | (#25503107)

erm... the Jodcast is the _podcast_ from Jodrell Bank, not the website. Try http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/ [man.ac.uk] for the actual website for Jodrell Bank.

But the Jodcast is well worth a listen to anyway.

I liked their earlier stuff.. (1)

Derrikex (1129819) | more than 5 years ago | (#25504357)

..but now EVERYONE is listening to them.

Poor synthesis technique (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25505563)

From the sound of it and from looking at spectrograms of the sounds it question I can safely claim that a few things are misleading about these sounds. I have every reason to think that these sounds have been generated by spectrogram synthesis, that is they analysed the original astro-seismic signal into a spectrogram (an image which is a plot of the frequency components and their amplitude over time) and resynthesised it into a sound so that we could hear it but also so that it wouldn't be too long and boring or too short.

However here's the thing, they used a very poor spectrogram synthesis technique (disclaimer : I consider myself a specialist in spectrogram analysis and synthesis and have made a spectrogram analyser and synthesiser called the ARSS [sf.net] ), which consists in modulating the horizontal bands of the spectrogram with sine waves of different frequency. What's worse, they used a linear frequency scale, which means that all these sine waves are separated from each other by a fixed frequency (in our case about 10 Hz), which creates a huge envelope beat at that frequency. What it means is that this "regular repeating pattern" you hear isn't "the entire star is pulsating" as the journalist claims, but rather an artifact of the synthesis technique.

Fortunately this technique, even if it produces an awful sound, conveys the original image in the sound's time-frequency plan almost intact (just as in this example [sourceforge.net] , note the similarity with the sounds in the article), and therefore I can reconstruct the original images they used and resynthesise them using a better technique to obtain a more natural sound. Which I'll post as a reply to this comment.

A better version of the sounds (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25505849)

I correctly resynthesised the two first sounds. The resulting sound can be found here [wikiupload.com] or alternatively here [soundupload.com] .

As one could have expected, there's nothing remarkable about these sounds, no eerie music, no mysteriously rhythmic beat, it's just one of the band-limited noise you find everywhere in nature, be it the ambient underwater sound of the oceans, the Earth's "hum", the wind, etc...

Re:A better version of the sounds (1)

TheCouchPotatoFamine (628797) | more than 5 years ago | (#25505957)

very cool - although i can't speak to your accuracy you might post some supporting documents to fully show you've found a flaw in the report. not to take any fun out of it, because it's pretty cool. But facts are facts..!

Re:A better version of the sounds (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506139)

you might post some supporting documents to fully show you've found a flaw in the report

Well very simply, here [imageshack.us] is a spectrogram of the two first sounds. It ranges vertically from 200 Hz to 700 Hz, each vertical pixel representing 1 Hz, the horizontal scale is 10 pixels per second and the amplitude is linear with a gamma of 1.5. Each modulated sine is what constitutes a bright horizontal bar, and as you can see each bar is regularly spaced by about 11.3 Hz. It's also clear enough that each "bar" is a sine modulated by what looks like noise, which supports my claim that the original spectrogram this was synthesised from was noisy.

Also I'd like to add, the third sound suffered the same flaws as the two first, but I think it sounds close enough to what it would with a proper synthesis. As for the fourth sound (the Sun), judging by the looks of its spectrogram, this one is genuine, as in, not resynthesised from a spectrogram.

Anthem 2.5 (1)

module0000 (882745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506321)

Gordon Way of WarForward technologies called. He's filing suit for infringing on his Anthem(c) product, developed by Richard McDuff. Read more Dirk Gently[by Douglas Adams]!

Is it just me... (1)

lumenistan (1165199) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506687)

or did anyone else initially read this as "stellar scientologists"?

The right recording? (1)

The Real Tachyon (1332153) | more than 5 years ago | (#25506809)

Am I the only one that thinks this is actually the background FX track from nearly every 40's-50's low budget scifi movie?

Seriously, the two sample star sounds are a lot like the intro to Forbidden Planet.

get it together (1)

votershatefreedom (1394171) | more than 5 years ago | (#25516081)

stripping the "melody" away from an ambient song leaves you with only a pulse. it's not surprising in any way that stellar *oscillations* converted to sound result in a pulse. there's science, and there's just random grabbing at stupidity to justify a research grant.

I didn't know space... (1)

GWBasic (900357) | more than 5 years ago | (#25533625)

I didn't know space actually sounded like a sci-fi movie!
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