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Microsoft Announces Windows Azure, Cloud-Based OS

ScuttleMonkey posted about 6 years ago | from the do-you-feel-azure-after-use dept.

Microsoft 419

snydeq writes "Microsoft today introduced Windows Azure, its operating system for the cloud. The OS serves as the underlying foundation of the Azure Services Platform to help developers build apps that span from the cloud to the datacenter, to PCs, the Web, and phones. Cloud-based developer capabilities are combined with storage, computational, and network infrastructure services, which are hosted on servers within Microsoft's global data center network."

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fp? (-1, Offtopic)

byteframe (924916) | about 6 years ago | (#25536049)

boo ya?

Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (0, Flamebait)

gnutoo (1154137) | about 6 years ago | (#25536083)

This is why Windows 7 is stripped of nicer applications [slashdot.org] . M$ is once again trying to make an all Windows world. Too bad no one in their right mind is going to leave tried and true LAMP and desktop OS that work. RMS, once again, was right [slashdot.org] , doubly so in this case, the user surrenders their software freedom and their data when they use Windows 7 in the M$ Vapor.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536259)

$hut up, twitter.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536521)

There is something seriously wrong with that boy. Some kind of obsessive compulsive disorder that makes him focus every waking moment of every living day into posting articles about the evils of MS (er... M$) while fellating Stallman (or, RMS as he likes to call him).

One day his trolling will stop, and there will be a blurb of an obituary that nobody bothers to read. "Man takes own life, blames Microsoft for releasing a product he actually likes."

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (0)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | about 6 years ago | (#25536571)

Oh, damn. I just spit my drank all over my keyboard. That has to be the funniest damn thing I've seen in at least a week.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (5, Insightful)

Anpheus (908711) | about 6 years ago | (#25536585)

Windows 7 is losing core applications and replacing them with an installer to download them because doing so appeases the federal regulators who will come down -hard- on Microsoft implementing any program that could be considered, even if twenty years from now, unfair competition.

Microsoft doesn't want the headache and says, fine, we'll take our toys and replace it with an installer that is on the users' desktop or start menu or whatever, and they can choose to use it or not. OEMs can choose to leave it in or not, etc.

I'm OK with that, I don't use the Windows Live apps anyway.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536601)

You are wasting [slashdot.org] your time.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (0, Offtopic)

Vexorian (959249) | about 6 years ago | (#25536677)

No, you are.

1. Some accounts agree with twitter's way of thought.

:. Therefore this is UNDENIABLE EVIDENCE THEY ARE TWITTER!

The logic doesn't add up, oh well, if you get to reply these questions enough times with a link to SockDisclosure, I guess people will get convinced, sure you just need to use plenty of AC posts and pretend it is a different person...

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (1, Offtopic)

ZosX (517789) | about 6 years ago | (#25536773)

Forgive my ignorance, but why does everyone hate twitter so? I was absent for a while from slashdot and I seem to have missed the twitter hate fest. Could you please possibly be a chap and explain, because I've simply become far more than curious at this point.

Re:Thanks for the place holder. Windows 7 plans. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536675)

This [wikipedia.org] is what I always picture when twitter starts posting with all his accounts. I think it's just that caught-in-the-headlights look that kills me, because he was never clever enough about it to actually pull it off.

This one [masturbatoreum.com] is another one that comes to mind...

Twitter troll, mod down (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536763)

n/t

Re:fp? (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | about 6 years ago | (#25536121)

Just when I think Microsoft software couldn't become any more viral...

Re:fp? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536141)

Try not to shoot that puck up my pooper!

Does anyone use this? (4, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | about 6 years ago | (#25536053)

Was anyone waiting for this? Or interested in this?

Anyone?

Bueller?

Re:Does anyone use this? (4, Insightful)

Jrabbit05 (943335) | about 6 years ago | (#25536173)

Microsoft moving into services may be good for us all. The giant assuring that Google was ahead of it is the first on a path to think of the consumer and open access, and portability. Hopefully this means proper standards for IE8 and JS3 support?

Re:Does anyone use this? (5, Insightful)

falcon5768 (629591) | about 6 years ago | (#25536223)

absolutely not. This means proprietary standards developed by Microsoft and given cutsie names. It ALWAYS means that.

Re:Does anyone use this? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536493)

I am waiting for Cloud 9.

Re:Does anyone use this? (1)

Teilo (91279) | about 6 years ago | (#25536621)

But sadly, all you're likely to get is Plan 9 From Outer Space, only this time it won't be so bad it's good.

Oh, and this is my first posting from my new G1.

Re:Does anyone use this? (5, Interesting)

truthsearch (249536) | about 6 years ago | (#25536291)

Hopefully this means proper standards for IE8 and JS3 support?

If Microsoft owns the desktop, browser, server, and data center, what's going to motivate them to follow standards?

Re:Does anyone use this? (3, Informative)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#25536697)

If Microsoft owns the desktop, browser, server, and data center, what's going to motivate them to follow standards?

Erm, you might have a point on the desktop and the browser. Both are shrinking share. Server and data center never was wholly owned. Though they did get some good sports inserted in there, not enough of them will ascend to senior management to make a difference in the long run. They totally owned the laptops for a while but they're losing it on the laptops as netbooks are taking a good chunk. They're losing a bit even on desktops - I hear they just lost all of Russian schools. That's a bite right there. We had a good laugh with their attempts at HPC, but those folks do their own ROI math don'tcha know and they never had a chance there.

Folks in phones haven't given them much thought since they so publicly cannibalized their first partner there, and phones look like the high volume platform for the next decade. They could OEM systems, but that's a short trip to the grave as the top 20 OEMs deprecate their brand overnight for the sake of their own survival.

In short, a declining share of a declining market doesn't look good for continued growth. Long term outlook: negative.

Re:Does anyone use this? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536427)

Hmmm. MS moved into the web, and broke all the standards. MS moved into the data center, and made sure they were incompatible with everything else.

How is this good again?

I was waiting for this (5, Funny)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#25536639)

I cant wait to see how sucktacular it is. All the reliability and stability of Microsoft software delivered through Microsoft's legendary networking skill.

Friends, the LHC has nothing on this. We're about to see an example of negative energy, when modern physics had all but proved it completely impossible.

Why the Cloud Wins (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536699)

Why the cloud wins: An anonymous Essay

By about 2017 Moore law ends as chip features become atomically fine. Until then feature density will perhaps to continue to double in fits and starts every 18 mo. At that time to improve computing photonics, logic, pure math and quantum computing will be the source of improvments in computing. As transistor density doubles media density will continue to improve. Roughly doubling every 12 months. Assuming they solve the attendant problems, and there's little reason to assume they're insurmountable, as with solid state logic. But network capacity, is a whole other story. There the doubling may increase to 2050, or beyond, and that doubling occurs every 9 months. While this takes a while to trickle down to the last mile, the hand writing is on the wall. The cloud will be orders of magnitude more powerful than everything else. It will so outstrip all other options that there won't be any objection. It'll be the patently obvious choice. It'll be permission to view any of your favorite media anywhere on demand, and it'll be all but instantanious. Your data will be diffuse and nearly indestructable, and perhaps terrifiyingly ubiquitious, and not all of will be true. Any argument against cloud computing now is exactly equivalent to supporting any of the classing quotes of historic misunderstanding in computer science. 640k ought to be enough for anybody. I see a worldwide market for maybe 4 computers. What ever. The cloud is the future. Everyone is positioning themselves to be able to take advantage of that physical reality. Blame the standard model.

Re:Why the Cloud Wins (1)

Rennt (582550) | about 6 years ago | (#25536843)

Yeah, It will be a world within a world, a graphic representation of the databanks of every computer in the human system; a consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate users in the Sprawl alone.

I'm only a joeboy, but I've pre-ordered my Ono-Sendai Cyberspace deck. I'll be ready.

[mod +1; Sarcastic]

Re:Does anyone use this? (5, Interesting)

MightyYar (622222) | about 6 years ago | (#25536827)

I, personally, would be THRILLED, if I could sit down at any broadband-connected PC in the world and get the same desktop and files that I have at home. I've played with Ulteo [ulteo.com] , and it is close - but clearly needs some time and manpower thrown at it. If there was a mature, polished version of Ulteo that could do what other OSs can do, I'd probably be willing to give up my Macs as well as my Windows/Ubuntu machine.

Can MS pull it off? I doubt it, but I'm glad that they are trying.

This should be good (-1)

conteXXt (249905) | about 6 years ago | (#25536069)

Subject says it all.

Re:This should be good (5, Funny)

Renderer of Evil (604742) | about 6 years ago | (#25536453)

Subject says it all.

It's really hard to argue with such an extensive and reasoned argument.

I'm sure this won't survive the downturn (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536081)

The MS version of cloud, SAS and all that crap will just be half-built and then be recycled for another set of acronyms in 2010.

Microsoft becomes a ISV (5, Insightful)

HannethCom (585323) | about 6 years ago | (#25536085)

From what they've said so far, Windows Azure is just Microsoft hosting your applications on their distributed network.

They were touting all these "great" things, but really that's all it really is.

Re:Microsoft becomes a ISV (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 6 years ago | (#25536171)

exactly it will only work with window's mobile. Think of Azure like the MSFT answer to BeFS of the mid 90's. a perpetual motion project that will always be in the clouds and if they ever finish it might be cool, but will be fscked in all the wrong ways.

That will be a rude awakening (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#25536767)

For all their ISV "partners"....

Naming? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536087)

Windows Azureus.

Re:Naming? (1)

gringer (252588) | about 6 years ago | (#25536307)

If you're referring to the file sharing application, it has had a name change, and is now called Vuze.

http://vuze.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]

[however, the project page is still at azureus.sourceforge.net]

Re:Naming? (3, Insightful)

larry bagina (561269) | about 6 years ago | (#25536341)

it's also ugly, bloated, and losing market share.

Vuzta.

Re:Naming? (2, Informative)

AngryLlama (611814) | about 6 years ago | (#25536559)

True. I used to use Azureus. Then it got bloated, turned into Vuze.. Now I use ktorrent and recommend my Windows friends use uTorrent.

Re:Naming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536641)

So true. When they turned to Vuze, I sticked around for a while since they got "mature" content. I went on getting those "mature" content and was disappointed and since there is no point in usign it, I then grabbed the latest uTorrent instead.

Re:Naming? (1)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | about 6 years ago | (#25536731)

Butters? Is that you?

I Think I Get It (2, Funny)

retiredtwice (1128097) | about 6 years ago | (#25536125)

Replacing the BSOD with the ASOD.

Except with ASOD, you wont know whos SOD it is...

Re:I Think I Get It (1)

glitch23 (557124) | about 6 years ago | (#25536163)

Replacing the BSOD with the ASOD. Except with ASOD, you wont know whos SOD it is...

Just what I was thinking, but I figured out what SOD stands for: Sky of Death. It is a stretch but Azure is blue so I figured we could actually keep BSOD and now it just means Blue Sky of Death since we are talking about a cloud now. A BSOD "out there" will send a message to your computer to display a BSOD locally.

Re:I Think I Get It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536465)

Now the son of Jor-El will kneel before... SOD!

Not going anywhere (4, Insightful)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | about 6 years ago | (#25536145)

Considering the source of this software, one can be pretty sure of this lifecycle:

Phase one: deployment by thousands of small businesses, the poor schmucks.
Phase two: serious security and compatibility problems go exploited and unreported. Those in the know start to advise against use of the software.
Phase three: Patching attempts by Microsoft. Cracking attempts by crackers. Either: Massive advertising campaign by Microsoft OR Microsoft puts out Version 2 with bug fixes and advertises that.
Phase four: more patching by Microsoft. More cracking by crackers. Microsoft comes out a with Service Pack. New Ubuntu does everything this product does, but faster and more securely.
Phase five: fewer and fewer companies use this product, but it enjoys a long half-life as companies fail to stop using it.

Re:Not going anywhere (3, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | about 6 years ago | (#25536355)

I thought "those in the know start to advise against use of the software" happens minutes after the announcement that it's being developed.

Yes, I'm flattering Slashdotters by referring to them as "those in the know".

Re:Not going anywhere (3, Insightful)

freddy_dreddy (1321567) | about 6 years ago | (#25536399)

Or ...

Phase 1: Deployment of hundreds of small businesses, no major advantages
Phase 2: a few killer applications emerge
Phase 3: the whole thing is hyped and MS cashes in
Phase 4: FOSS community accuses MS of monopolization and some other clichees
Phase 5: the whole thing becomes common practise, FOSS starts to develop and lags 5 years behind on everything

The replies here become predictable, to use an understatement. It suffices to add one word in a post to get a completely polarized set of comments.

Cloud computing may or may not be a bubble, but whichever way you turn and twist it someone has to start. It'll take baby-steps and corrections along the way, but so far this is the first real attempt at it.

Re:Not going anywhere (5, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | about 6 years ago | (#25536645)

It'll take baby-steps and corrections along the way, but so far this is the first real attempt at it.

Wrong. No Microsoft paycheck for you.

Google, Sun, Alexa, Amazon, GoGrid, Skytap, 3tera, Apache Hadoop, 3Par -- these companies/projects have all been doing cloud computing -- some for as long as the last 5 years. Microsoft is the johnny-come-lately here.

Re:Not going anywhere (2, Informative)

freddy_dreddy (1321567) | about 6 years ago | (#25536683)

Ehr, wrong !

The examples you give are merely load-balancing servers which have been dubbed with cloud. If you look at the specs you'll see they use Microsoft & Linux servers.

OS != server

Re:Not going anywhere (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | about 6 years ago | (#25536775)

Google Apps is a load-balancing server? What about Google App Engine? What about other Google APIs? And that's just one example.

And Azure != OS. Azure == interface to Microsoft's load-balancing servers.

Try again. No Microsoft stock options for you.

Re:Not going anywhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536817)

I think F/OSS is usually ahead of everything, its just that people don't use F/OSS stuff because its not what they have been brought up on and most people are afraid of change

Re:Not going anywhere (5, Funny)

Renderer of Evil (604742) | about 6 years ago | (#25536497)

Phase 6: Pay Kramer $150 to appear in 2 commercials with Steve Balmer

Nothing but Blue Screens (of death) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536157)

Why is when I see Windows and Clouds mentioned in the same article a song comes to mind?

 
I was blue, just as blue as I could be
Evry day was a cloudy day for me
Then Azure came a-knocking at my door
Skies were gray but theyre not gray anymore

Blue screens
Smiling at me
Nothing but blue screens
Do I see

Bluescreens
Singing a song
Nothing but bluescreens
All day long

 
Oh damn, now the image of Data singing that has sprung up.

Ooh, a new color! (5, Funny)

waferbuster (580266) | about 6 years ago | (#25536169)

According to Wikipedia, "Azure is a blue color, halfway between blue and cyan. Commonly it refers to a bright blue, resembling the sky on a bright, clear day."

So, now we can look forward to seeing a soothing Azure Screen of Death.

Re:Ooh, a new color! (2, Funny)

waferbuster (580266) | about 6 years ago | (#25536193)

"Dude, what's up with your computer?"
"Oh, it's just having an Azure Seizure. The mouse will start working again in a few seconds."

Ok (4, Insightful)

Daimanta (1140543) | about 6 years ago | (#25536175)

- It's slow(duh, connecting to the internet and such)
- You have no privacy (MS knows all)
- You have no control (MS controls all)
- You have no guarantee (MS decides when you are allowed to use it)

I'm sold

Re:Ok (5, Insightful)

lilfields (961485) | about 6 years ago | (#25536575)

But when Google offers this, it's brilliant!

Re:Ok (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536637)

AFAIK, google hasn't yet been convicted of a felony, unlike Microsoft.

Re:Ok (1)

AceofSpades19 (1107875) | about 6 years ago | (#25536755)

where did google offer this?

Re:Ok (1)

elcorvax (1395311) | about 6 years ago | (#25536589)

But come on !! Google is doing the same for years and nobody scream that loud !!

Re:Ok (1)

bondsbw (888959) | about 6 years ago | (#25536743)

But come on !! Google is doing the same for years and nobody scream that loud !!

But Google doesn't have a large marketshare in every industry that this technology touches. Microsoft can get this technology out quickly and make Windows, Office, Live, and even third party software so dependent that consumers would never be able to give it up.

Google has no route into forcing their system on consumers.

Microsoft can't make a decent API (5, Interesting)

CuteSteveJobs (1343851) | about 6 years ago | (#25536183)

I've been writing Windows apps since 3.1. Microsoft couldn't write a decent API if their lives depended on it. They manage to take simple concept, and bury under layer upon layer of useless complexity. Too often their documentation doesn't give examples, and the only way to find out what something does is it sit around and experiment with it. Take the absurd DirectX: you *have* to use it, but even today it takes pages to get a window on the screen and the documentation is useless. Remember Microsoft OLE? Such a simple thing made so hard. I want to code in as few a lines as possible. I don't want to write pages of COM declarations. Worse of all is their DirectShow - put a video on the screen. It's a mess of pins and connectors. Ugh!

Although I'm a Windows programmer by training, I've been spreading my wings and it's nice to use APIs that are simpler and more elegant. I can write code to do what I want to do, instead of wasting days with my nose buried in absurdly thick reference books trying to understand what they were trying to do. It's like the people at Microsoft who spend their time writing APIs never have to actually use one.

So Microsoft Cloud? No, thanks. Cloud may turn out to be another flash-in-the-pan fad, but even so I'd rather use a cleaner API by someone else. Microsoft have a lousy track record. Thanks, but no thanks.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 6 years ago | (#25536261)

Microsoft couldn't write a decent API if their lives depended on it. They manage to take simple concept, and bury under layer upon layer of useless complexity.

I think they may have caught that one from Digital.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536325)

Microsoft may have had a lousy track record in the past, but they have really cleaned up their act lately. The .NET framework is actually nice to use.

Granted, Microsoft has made some poor libraries in the past, but lately they've made great improvements by focusing on .NET for their new API's (WPF, XNA, Silverlight, ASP.NET, ASP MVC).

They do still show that they can't always create good APIs. The ASP AJAX framework is a pretty poorly designed API, but besides that, their recent endeavors have been pretty tolerable.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (4, Interesting)

Unoti (731964) | about 6 years ago | (#25536607)

Agreed. While OLE and the original Windows SDK sucked, that's ancient history. Focus on stuff from the last decade. The .NET API is excellent by and large.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | about 6 years ago | (#25536747)

Yeah. I have to admit, the .Net API is pretty clean. Although, I do have to say that it looks very much to me like they took the GNOME APIs as an example and practically ripped off the design.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (4, Insightful)

sleeponthemic (1253494) | about 6 years ago | (#25536605)

Cloud may turn out to be another flash-in-the-pan fad

May? From the moment it was named, it was predestined to become nothing more than a scourge of sane people and a fantastic technological lubricant for the "sexually attracted to techterms" IT managers across the globe.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | about 6 years ago | (#25536659)

Disclaimer: this is coming from an ardent mac user....

what about directx?

I've expressed continuous vexation at the lack of video game portability because people keep building them off the dx9 api.

I'm told by /.'s resident graphics devs that, essentially, Dx9 is to them what MacOS X is to power users, and that opengl was clunky, and falling behind.

Assuming that was not fud, I'd say MS made one good api.

Microsoft's APIs are world class (4, Funny)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#25536811)

Microsoft couldn't write a decent API if their lives depended on it.

Microsoft's APIs are seamless, coherent and reliably engineered. They are flexible enough to enable seamless integration of all their apps into every aspect of the operating system in such a way that they seem to be part of it. They even build into the APIs current developers of their apps need to implement various features.

Although I'm a Windows programmer by training,

Oh. You mean the APIs they let you use. Never mind.

Re:Microsoft can't make a decent API (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536829)

omg finally someone else notices they're making simple things too complex! Have you had a look at a networking book for win2k3/2k8 lately? My Lord, I have never seen managing users and file shares become so complicated in my life! Sure, I understand Active directory, but it is too bloated with buzzwords and "definitions" to do a simple thing for my taste. I save businesses money and TCO by installing *nix systems (even with win clients; thanks samba project) with SSHFS and tunneled NIS, and laugh at the other guys that spend hours scanning an Active directory tree for the answer to a weird dialog box!

Security boundary? (2, Interesting)

argent (18001) | about 6 years ago | (#25536199)

What's the security boundary between customers based on? Virtual machines?

Re:Security boundary? (2, Interesting)

Wesley Felter (138342) | about 6 years ago | (#25536737)

It looks like Azure uses the .NET sandbox and Hyper-V.

Frankly... (2, Insightful)

edalytical (671270) | about 6 years ago | (#25536209)

...I'm sick of the "cloud". I like the idea of syncing data over the net, but I hate the idea of having to be online to do work. Worse yet, I hate the idea of using web-based interface. They all work differently, they all look different and frankly they suck. It's hard for them to be open source, they're hard to extend and hard to deploy.

Re:Frankly... (2, Informative)

ducomputergeek (595742) | about 6 years ago | (#25536379)

Cloud computing as defined by IEEE is where your data is permanently stored on a server somewhere on the internet and then cache it locally as needed on a computer, smartphone, etc.. If you are a larger company that hosts your own data centers and have control over your own network, there maybe some merit to this.

But for most consumers I think they are looking for something similar to Mobile Me or similar type application where you cache the item online temporarily (whether that be hours, days, weeks, whatever) to be synced and then stored on the various devices. You still control the data. It is synced and stored on multiple devices providing a measure of redundancy for your files.

That is exactly how we operate. Most of our files are still done on laptops in MS Word and then we upload to Google Docs when we need to share or edit a document or spreadsheet. But once we delete the document online, is it really gone? It is not important to what we do, but to others it maybe.

Re:Frankly... (4, Funny)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 6 years ago | (#25536581)

You might not be interested in the cloud, but the cloud is interested in you.

Re:Frankly... (1)

Darkk (1296127) | about 6 years ago | (#25536633)

Microsoft should skip Windows 8 and go straight to "Cloud 9"

See if I got this straight (2, Funny)

HangingChad (677530) | about 6 years ago | (#25536227)

BizTalk plus .NET, add a little FrontPage, a dash of Silverlight and mix it all up on a hosted server. For some reason I just had flashbacks to the Bass-o-Matic on SNL.

Microsoft Pipe Dream? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536257)

I can hear it now: Not on our pipes they won't... [slashdot.org]

Until it boots hardware... (5, Insightful)

diamondsw (685967) | about 6 years ago | (#25536273)

...it's not an OS in my book. It may be an excellent (hmph!) network API, but it is not an operating system of any kind.

Re:Until it boots hardware... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536441)

It's not an OS. It's a platform

It's not an OS. It's a platform (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 6 years ago | (#25536841)

Azure is a platform like the beach is a platform for building sand castles on.

Sooner or later comes the tide.

Azure (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536293)

Azure will just be a framework for computing how much cpu time and resources an application uses, and deciding how much CPU time to bill the user.

Welcome back to the mainframe era.

Kiss your "personal" computer goodbye.

Re:Azure (1)

postbigbang (761081) | about 6 years ago | (#25536371)

You probably already do a large fraction of your work online. Nothing changed, they just called their competitive service to Amazon's, a cloud resource with a 'blue sky' sort of name. If you're server's in another city, you use a lights-out method of rebooting it. It gets a PxE or other kind of image, then goes from there. You're already doing cloud computing with Microsoft, whether you like it or not. Microsoft's behind in this game, along with dozens of other games that they're late to dinner with. The list is long and embarrassing for them.

The cloud already exists. Some of it's inside your data center. Maybe it's a virtualized server in Iceland (where they need the money right now, really badly) in a cheapo green NOC. Like most things Microsoft, it's not ready yet, but when it is, it'll resemble generic data centers across the planet.

Therefore: no big news. You can move along.

It is NOT A NEW OS (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536305)

It is a new interface to a hosted platform for your .net apps, sharepoint, dynamics CRM and SQL server which will surely be running on clusters of good old server 2003 and 2008.

The Advantages? (4, Insightful)

SageMusings (463344) | about 6 years ago | (#25536313)

1. Can turn off access to any application, at will.
2. Can force upgrade$, even when perfectly happy with an older version of an application.
3. Can nickle-and-dime you for every piece of the OS, similar to purchasing your car one bolt at-a-time.
4. Over tax our still not-ready-for-prime-time broadband.

Gosh, how the hell does this benefit me in anyway? I am not an automatic MS-basher like some people here but I'm quickly learning.

Re:The Advantages? (2, Interesting)

PapayaSF (721268) | about 6 years ago | (#25536651)

You forgot: 5. No piracy. (You can't pirate apps or an OS hosted in the cloud, can you?)

Of course, that's not a benefit for you, but I'm sure Microsoft sees it as a benefit.

antitrust (1)

timmarhy (659436) | about 6 years ago | (#25536329)

unless they have a way to get your data out i can yes some big anti trust issues. i'm pretty sure they will though, MS can ill afford another tangle with the DOJ.

online OS's have their merit, no need for big expensive desktops, access your files AND applications anywhere. i hate the cloud buzzword, but i can see the concept catching on.

Differences? (1)

linuxdude_tux (810699) | about 6 years ago | (#25536403)

So other than running Sharepoint and Dynamics CRM, how is this any different to what Amazon already offer?

They've got the concept wrong... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536505)

IMHO cloud computing should be based on personal clouds... as in all the software, files, and stuff on a small device like a portable hard drive or USB flash drive, that you can plug into a console which contains just the hardware, or switches off or disconects its own boot/storage media in favor of booting your cloud... while using your "cloud" the internal storage device on the console/computer/terminal should not be active(security reasons protecting the console from you and you from the console) this would allow you to take your OS, settings, programs, files and other stuff anywhere as long as theres a compatible console available.

down with the cloud (4, Insightful)

adamruck (638131) | about 6 years ago | (#25536511)

Does this explain all the bullshit slashdot articles about cloud this and grid that? I hope this turns into microsoft bob 2.0.

If you run a business, you have to know DAMN well that your data is:

1) private and secure
3) available to your apps
4) backed up

How can you do that if your data is "in the cloud"? The SLA isn't worth the paper that it is written on if your business goes down for a week because something went wrong with "the cloud".

Some businesses put costs before security (5, Insightful)

Freaky Spook (811861) | about 6 years ago | (#25536625)

How can you do that if your data is "in the cloud"? The SLA isn't worth the paper that it is written on if your business goes down for a week because something went wrong with "the cloud".

Supporting small business I've seen some down right foolish and stupid decisions made on IT, placing cost over their data security.

Most cloud services offer business access to applications and services they could not afford if they put the software on site and I see it as no different to a SMB deciding to spend 5K on a new server and ignore the extra 5K for a backup system to support it.

Some business owners will understand the risks, and some will either not care or go for the bottom line with cost.

Just two small comments (1)

awpoopy (1054584) | about 6 years ago | (#25536525)

1. Microsoft getting involved in cloud computing brings up images of pollution - for some reason.
2. Why doesn't Microsoft just fix XP and Vista instead of spreading their viral programming practices into a cloud?

My Little Cloud (1)

AngryLlama (611814) | about 6 years ago | (#25536547)

Nobody wants to visit me in my little cloud... I don't know why. Maybe cuz I'm cuttin' muffins.

An operating system for the cloud? (1)

largesnike (762544) | about 6 years ago | (#25536549)

golly what are these people saying? not much? it must be commercial bulshytt

Remember: (2, Insightful)

TuaAmin13 (1359435) | about 6 years ago | (#25536563)

Windows, not walls.

You can look, but you can't touch.

That's not really your data you're downloading from the cloud, it's a copy provided to you by the grace of the service provider.

MicrosoftLOL (1)

tobias.sargeant (741709) | about 6 years ago | (#25536579)

I love that Microsoft chose to call their cloud-based operating system Azure. Azure, as in: bright blue, like a cloudless sky.

Synapse? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 years ago | (#25536627)

What about Synapse? Tim Robbins failed on his promise. :(

Cloud (1)

Vexorian (959249) | about 6 years ago | (#25536665)

Is the cloud made of vapor?

Where is the GNU OS (0, Offtopic)

gnu-98 (1381455) | about 6 years ago | (#25536703)

Where is the GNU OS, Micro-kernel based HURD?

Azure is just a fancy word for blue (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | about 6 years ago | (#25536707)

which they didn't choose, because then people would think everyone was saying "Windows Blew", which it does.

Bypass. (2, Interesting)

geckipede (1261408) | about 6 years ago | (#25536719)

I may have missed the point of this, but it really looks to me like an attempt to give windows a package manager without ever having to admit that any other package managers were a good idea.

Billions of crap (1)

HermMunster (972336) | about 6 years ago | (#25536723)

A company that makes billions a quarter is going to pump out a lot of stuff. ...and it is going to pump out a lot of crap.

Oh thank God (-1, Flamebait)

Thad Zurich (1376269) | about 6 years ago | (#25536833)

Now I can start ignoring it. Smells like DCOM to me... awful smell...

Might as well make a cloud OS... (1)

LeedsSideStreets (998417) | about 6 years ago | (#25536837)

...since they have so much experience with vaporware.
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