×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

94 comments

At least (4, Insightful)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562611)

For those of us who have a lot of waiting involved in our jobs, social networks encourage multitasking(and help us enjoy our coffee high) by keeping us busy while the code is compiling or the tests are running.

Re:At least (5, Funny)

martinw89 (1229324) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562667)

...social networks encourage multitasking(and help us enjoy our coffee high)...

Bullshit. Get back to work!

...by keeping us busy while the code is compiling...

Oh, carry on then.

Re:At least (2, Funny)

Mozk (844858) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565003)

I steal LCDs while my code is compiling.

(Reference [xkcd.com] for the stupids. Mouseover the comic.)

Re:At least (0, Redundant)

martinw89 (1229324) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565479)

Wow I didn't realize I pretty much copied that verbatim. Well then, what a douche I am.

Re:At least (1)

Mozk (844858) | more than 5 years ago | (#25590045)

I don't know if you're being sarcastic or what, but I put the reference so people wouldn't think it was some random statement.

Re:At least (1)

martinw89 (1229324) | more than 5 years ago | (#25623539)

I wasn't being sarcastic, in fact thanks for the reference. I didn't realized until after I posted that it could sound kind of directed at you.

Re:At least (1)

Nasajin (967925) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562711)

Naah... Work just keeps me busy while I'm waiting for my friends to post their newest hilarious status update on Facebook.

Why the hell would you use Facebook? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25562749)

Google "Total Information Awareness DARPA". Why would anyone willingly facilitate this kind of personal data collection and deep profiling?

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (4, Insightful)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563299)

Two reasons

1. To some people, the benefits of facebook outweigh the risks of the government knowing your favorite movies.

2. Limiting the amount of trivial information availiable is NOT the way to fight big brother. If myspace, facebook, and whatever else were to crumble, as they very well might with the impending dotcom bubble 2.0, that's not going to prevent abuses of privacy. You combat this by voting, by raising awareness, by protesting, letter writing, etc.

To me, it seems kind of like saying "Why would anyone drive on the roads? Your tax money is being used to keep up those roads, and taxes are too high!" Not driving won't lower taxes, and not having a facebook account won't keep you safe from big brother.

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25563485)

I used to be your average Joe Sixpack. After 8 years of Bush, I'm now your average Joe 40-oz.

...and in less than a week, you will be "Joe Pint" because it will be decreed that 16oz is enough for you and that the extra will be given to those "in need".

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25564163)

You aren't too bright, are you? There's plenty that can be inferred by the "trivial information" in your FaceBook profile: who your friends are, your political beliefs, your religion, what you did last weekend, etc. Plenty of info to deem whether or not you're a "threat" to whoever has access to that huge amount of data about millions of people.

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (2, Insightful)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565553)

You aren't too bright, are you? There's plenty that can be inferred by the "trivial information" in your FaceBook profile: who your friends are, your political beliefs, your religion, what you did last weekend, etc. Plenty of info to deem whether or not you're a "threat" to whoever has access to that huge amount of data about millions of people.

Thinking you've foiled big brother by not making a facebook profile? You're the one who isn't too bright.

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573465)

Your phone records are more valueable to big brother than facebook friends.

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25565317)

Exactly. I don't mind if the big brother knows my favorite movies or books.

If Finland turns to fasist state, BB will be able to see that I oppose it from my favorite quotations, sure. However, I have only myself to blame if I haven't made my opinion otherwise public by then by participating to rallies, etc.

Re:Why the hell would you use Facebook? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25564875)

Soap box, ballot box, jury box, ammo box - in that order - or GTFO.

Re:At least (1)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562799)

"For those of us who have a lot of waiting involved in our jobs, social networks encourage multitasking(and help us enjoy our coffee high) by keeping us busy while the code is compiling or the tests are running."

Try to do nothing all day with the story that you are compiling the newest Gentoo release.

Now if they'd study slashdot use at work ... (3, Interesting)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562681)

I'd be interested in what they'd say about slashdot use at work and whether they'd rate it as a net gain or loss for the company.

Though I suppose it would depend on how the user used it...

Re:Now if they'd study slashdot use at work ... (3, Insightful)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562759)

For me, work comes first. If there is alot of stuff going on, I might not even look at /. all day. Most days there are natural breaks in the day that I use to surf the web. Some days things just run smoothly.

Re:Now if they'd study slashdot use at work ... (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563023)

Last week's talk..:

Boss: You're a really informed guy...

Me (thinking): " OMG he got me at /."

Boss: ...and I'm pretty sure you read a lot in your house to keep this up.

Me: hmmm... er... of course!

Re:Now if they'd study slashdot use at work ... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25563505)

Most IT staff read slashdot, and have few friends. Ergo social sites are okay to block. ;-)
(It's true for my company... but to be fair most facebook apps are probably security nightmares.)

Our local IT group is going the extra mile for us though. With the new faceless corporate data centre laying the proxy block-down, we now get wireless routers on an extranet for personal browsing. That's pretty damn impressive actually, and just in time to enjoy my new iTouch.

Re:Now if they'd study slashdot use at work ... (1)

Sobrique (543255) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567233)

Keeping up to speed on industry developments is a valuable part of a lot of IT jobs. Slashdot serves quite well at providing a weathervane on what's important and what's not.

I find stuff like instant messaging to be invaluable - or would if my current employer was a bit more tolerant. At a previous job it was massively useful as a collaboration tool - there's just a whole realm more communications that are possible, when you're not 'interrupting' someone to ask. Especially when said person is a friend, rather than a colleague.

Water-cooler talk (4, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562687)

Before computers, people engaged in "water-cooler" talk, where much of it was social. But often if you want assistance or approval from other sections or departments, you had to make friends with people by "shootin' the breeze". It's not much different in cyberland. They often say business is about who you know, not what you know.

Re:Water-cooler talk (2, Insightful)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562761)

The difference between the 21st century workplace and the 1950s workplace is that the water cooler got a lot bigger and there are far more people drinking out of it,...

Re:Water-cooler talk (2, Interesting)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562789)

The difference is that the people at the water cooler are people who are likely to be peripherally related to your job, with expertise relavant to your job.

Sure SOME people will have some 'work-related/work-useful facebook friends' but most of the people I see at work on facebook are just goofing off with their boy/girlfriends and drinking friends planning their weekend/party/whatever.

I'm not saying it can't happen that you've got a guru facebook buddy who helped you fix a perl script... but that's the exception, not the norm.

Re:Water-cooler talk (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564653)

Also, I'd find this study (or this survey???) far more persuasive if it had been sponsored by some organization like The Chamber of Commerce, and not sponsored by a social network mostly composed of other Web2.0 Social Networks Companies/Entrepreneurs/VCs.

Re:Water-cooler talk (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564793)

Since I didn't work a frontline user facing job at my current employer going out drinking has been one of the biggest ways for me to connect at a personal level with a good chunk of my user community. Basically if you aren't a bigwig or a social drinker you're probably just a lookup field in our ticket system as far as I'm concerned. These types of connections help the business function better as people tend to work better with those they have a reason to like. So while you might think of planning this weekends party as a waste of time I think of it as a way to connect with my users and increase the businesses productivity =)

Re:Water-cooler talk (1)

Sobrique (543255) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567281)

Actually, I have a lot of people on my 'social networks' that have a broad expanse of relevant expertise. Mostly because my friends are (mostly) people I've met through University. I have been able to make a post about a technology I knew nothing about, and over a couple of days accumulated a selection of very valuable primary sources to learn about.

So no, not _specifically_ 'tech support' level - "I am getting error xyz with this code snippet, anyone know what's up?" responses, but often eliciting useful redirects to 'hot' sources of techniques, knowledge and advice.

Re:Water-cooler talk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25577079)

Indeed, everyone at my office that uses facebook (that I know of, anyway) is either using it to relive/rekindle their high school popularity (look how hot my wife it, look how many friends I have) or it accomodating an SO in that sense.

Your milage may vary, of course, but so far, observing this has kept me away from facebook.

Re:Water-cooler talk (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562791)

had to make friends with people by "shootin' the breeze". It's not much different in cyberland.

You can say that again. I don't even need to meet someone for them to be my friend. I have over 1,000 friends and I never cry myself to sleep.

No No No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25569157)

It is about who you BLOW!

you make me laugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25562693)

The purpose of a "think tank" is almost invariably to provide specious evidence for the viewpoint of its sponsors. In this case, I'm going to assume the sponsors are one or more social networking sites.

I'm sorry, but no. No, no, no, no. If staff cannot communicate face-to-face, by 'phone, e-mail or mailing list, but need the playpen environment of Facebook / Myspace / Bebo (what the fuck is a Bebo?), then they are not welcome in my office. Fortunately, I've never had to enforce any such rule - the kind of people I employ all cringe at the thought of Facebook and the like.

Re:you make me laugh (1)

PresidentEnder (849024) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564895)

(what the fuck is a Bebo?)

Sponsor of this study. Facebook and Myspace are thrown in there to lend it legitimacy.

Alfresco/Sharepoint (2, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562745)

I would suggest using internal tools like Alfresco, Sharepoint, Jabber, Wiki, whatever to increase social interaction within the company without the need for sites like Facebook.

I can see the future now! (1)

LockeOnLogic (723968) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562779)

Social networking can encourage employees to build relationships with colleagues across a firm

Employee from dept A: Dude I drank so much jager last night i'm sossoooo hungover!

Employee from dept B: Yea well at least you got some from those skanks over in dept C!!1! letz duck out for an early lunch at flingers, hair of the dog man

Employee from dept A: Oh %@#$ you better untag any photo's my wife might see them!

Employee from dept B: lolz

Facebook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25562843)

A place I used to work at blocked access to various social networking sites including Facebook. A short time later exceptions had to be granted to many staff members because the company cut a huge marketing deal with Facebook.

I always found it humorous that we weren't allowed to visit facebook.com without special permission, but apparently someone was allowed to cut a big promotional deal with them.

Re:Facebook (1)

gigne (990887) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563029)

I fail to see the humour in this situation.

If my hypothetical company wants to cut an advertising deal with a game publisher, that doesn't mean I want the staff to waste all day playing the game.

The people I know that use Facebook do it to do twitter type updates and leave pointless messages for friends.

I do think that blocking websites for employees is a bad idea, and only generally reinforces the idea that the company doesn't trust them.

Re:Facebook (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567187)

its not always a trust issue. some companies cant afford to expand there bandwidth. Ive worked with companies were we had to block sites to ensure that people who were working would be able to work.

Blocking those sites actually gave us the time needed to research options in the area.

Also didnt hurt that we discovered that a few employees were going to porn sites as a result of the filter.

Re:Facebook (1)

chris_mahan (256577) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563747)

What's interesting is that if they had let their employees use facebook, they would not have had to do a huge marketing deal with facebook.

And Turrell is CEO of Imaginatik (1)

mschuyler (197441) | more than 5 years ago | (#25562877)

"which develops bespoke networking software" and he's the guy quoted most extensively in the article. So that's legit, right? And if you'll just buy his software suite, productivity will skyrocket, business will be better, and--uh--Turrell gets rich! Such a deal.

The things they say they want to promote could be easily handled by a plain old listserv. Got a question? Put it on the listserv. Everybody sees it. Reply comes quickly. Works for us.

Good, but not good with the security risks. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25563021)

Social networking at work (and outside of work) IS good however it is bad to utilize an external website such as Facebook/Myspace to fulfill that goal.

Businesses have options to utilize "internal" social networking and collaboration tools (such as Clearspace http://www.jivesoftware.com/products/clearspace) instead of violating networking and security firewall policies by allowing that user to go to an external website to post personal views/etc. This function is a part of any good company and should be kept in-house with the use of purchased or free (open-source) social networking software.

Everything that happens at a company (workflow, production, creativity) is usually property of the company. Why should that info be on an external and "uncontrolled" site versus on an internal server and/or application platform (especially for long-term retrieval such as "hey remember whats his name in programming, he knew a way to. . . ." and that data being on an internal server versus external such as Facebook/Myspace (and possible modified by now and/or removed).

Just my 2 cents - I think internal open-source collaboration server is much much better than allowing users to post personal/work info on any public and uncontrollable website.

Imagine what Sarbanes/Oxley thinks of this study and suggested action in order to increase productivity. Let your employees post work data on a social networking site and you are asking for another Enron (or something of that caliber .. maybe long term but still not worth the risk).

-Rm!

Amazing... (2, Interesting)

ITEric (1392795) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563041)

to think that I've been spending my work hours actually working when I could have been goofing off and calling it 'productive social networking' :P Sure, social networking has a place in a productive work environment, but it should be limited in a very tangible way, with the guidelines explained up front, for it not to be abused.

Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (3, Interesting)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563129)

...I'm sure they'll reverse all their decisions immediately.

At work email sites, social networking and YouTube are blocked. It smacks of not trusting your employee to do work but there are PR implications if it gets out that employees are slacking.

We also have a download proxy that filters everything for virii (and often stuffs up large downloads since it returns its own download progress page). I can't blame my employer for protecting their assets, especially since a virus outbreak where I work has even worse PR implications, but at the same time I wish there were a better way than this.

The way it is at the moment, some days I don't get time to download anything and don't even think about whether I'm blocked or not, other days it just gets in the way of getting work related content, and on a few rare days where there's little to do it would be nice to have access to these things. This has all been implemented since I joined s few yers ago, and it's certainly not enough to change jobs over on it's own, but it's another thing that has made looking elsewhere in the future a little more palatable. I'm also no longer permitted to play chess on my personal laptop at my desk at lunch time or after work any longer as "it gives the wrong impression", and that really stinks. Telling your employee you don't trust them, and eroding the employee's non-monetary benefits doesn't exactly do wonders for morale...

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

LifesRoadie (1342921) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565315)

Don't forget of course that even only half a dozen people using uTube in a big office can make a serious dent in available bandwidth for use by other users. My company just stopped any video access recently because, especially on a Friday afternoon, it was impossible to get your email. But, thank goodness for low bandwidth Slashdot.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566013)

My company just stopped any video access recently because, especially on a Friday afternoon, it was impossible to get your email.

Sounds like time for a QoS solution, with video being given a limited amount of bandwidth.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

IchNiSan (526249) | more than 5 years ago | (#25569253)

Why not just force employees to watch Tiger vs Man on Elephant [youtube.com] on their own time?

It is called work after all, not play or slashdot.

Oh Wait...

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25572909)

Why not just force employees to watch Tiger vs Man on Elephant on their own time?

It is called work after all, not play or slashdot.

Perhaps because we work in an industry where unpaid overtime is expected?? Perhaps because if an employee can do things from their desk it'll encourage them to spend more time at work? Perhaps because when you're paying someone over $50/hr and trusting them with valuable data in critical situations you're silly to then refuse to trust them with a video connection? Oh and perhaps since it's just as easy to slack off without the net if an employee is so inclined.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573685)

Your overtime IS paid for in your normal wages, the extra hours are a part of the job.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25578073)

Your overtime IS paid for in your normal wages, the extra hours are a part of the job.

Perhaps yours are. Mine are not. I do get overtime. It's just rare that it's formally recognised, and so I'm rarely paid for it. Believe it or not, some people are paid by the hour.

Maybe before you start being so arrogant as to tell someone (probably from another part of the world) how their employment contract works, you might want to try getting a few facts first.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#25578605)

I get paid by the hour, what's your point?

You see to have issues with doing the job your paid for!

It is not unreasonable for your employer to expect you to do some work when they are paying your wages/salary!

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25580463)

I get paid by the hour, what's your point?

My point is that if I choose to occassionally engage in personal activity on a work computer, it is not a bad thing

You see to have issues with doing the job your paid for!

No I have issues with trolls that don't know me telling me what the conditions of my employment contract are, telling me what I should and shouldn't do at work despite that contract, and throwing straw men like "You see to have issues with doing the job your paid for!" in my face. You couldn't have provided a nicer example of trolling if you tried.

It is not unreasonable for your employer to expect you to do some work when they are paying your wages/salary!

You're right that isn't unreasonable at all. Please point me to the point in the conversation where I stated otherwise. That's right, I didn't and that was a classic straw man on your part. What I said was that if I'm going to be doing unpaid overtime, I'd at least like to be trusted to do my work despite having access to the web in all it's glory. YOU have gone out of your way to twist that, tell me what I should and shouldn't do, imply that I'm a slacker that doesn't work etc. You really REALLY need to get a life buddy. If this is an example of the sort of attitude you demonstrate at work, no wonder you require childish restrictions to get you to do your job.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#25580709)

I have never encountered any restrictions on what I can and can't do, but just because the opportunity to mess around is there it doesn't mean you should take it.

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25580991)

I have never encountered any restrictions on what I can and can't do, but just because the opportunity to mess around is there it doesn't mean you should take it.

What exactly is it that you're implying that I'm messing around and doing? We were talking about restrictions on email, youtube, playing a game on a laptop at lunch time, not screwing your employer out of millions.

You really have nothing better to do than this????

Re:Yeah I'll send this to HR right away (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25565997)

If work is getting done on time, then people are not slacking.

Slashdot.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25563151)

The original social networking site (for Nerds). Posting anonymously though, because my boss reads this site too...

Now where did I leave it? (1)

Eil (82413) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563191)

I just know there's an "unlikely" tag around here somewhere...

New Study Shows: Not Working At Work Is Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25563339)

This break through discovery will undoubtedly lead to a much more productive work force.

Silly me. (1)

Alegery (1018890) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563407)

By "social networking" I assumed it meant talking to the other humans around you. A terrifying prospect. I'm relieved to see it's only make-believe socialization through the protective glowing screen.

Unintended consequences (3, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#25563777)

At an outfit I used to work for, we had an internal Usenet set up on out intranet. Hey, it was in the last century! We didn't have all this new fangled technology you young punks take for granted.

But, back to the topic at hand. Management took a dim view of the employees chatting back and forth while at work. So they cracked down on it. That drove the on-line conversations to external sites and encouraged anonymity on them. The end result is that the same conversations go on now as before. But enlightened management has a harder time keeping a finger on the pulse of the workforce by lurking on the newsgroups. And more than once, some sensitive information has made it on to the outside systems where the world (competitors, federal regulators, etc.) can see them.

Great move, PHB!

Re:Unintended consequences (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564853)

That's one of the motivations behind our Intranet portal with a communities module, to encourage communications and keep conversations within the company private. I really hope we don't go through what you experienced because it would be a lot of wasted money and effort (money) if some clueless PHB tries to lock it down because they didn't like something they read.

Re:Unintended consequences (1)

uncle slacky (1125953) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567933)

A similar thing happened at my old company - we had a set of internal newsgroups allowing people at sites all across the country (and world in some cases) to communicate freely...however, management wanted to ensure that the control of the information flow remained with them (knowledge is, after all, power, and I often knew about things going on in the company before my managers did) and they wanted to crush the emerging subculture. Thus we were driven to use public mailing lists and there we remain (though we are careful not to trade secrets).

Funnily enough, a few years later I heard that they are now setting up internal social networking à la Facebook...

Iron fist of demotivation? (2, Insightful)

jonaskoelker (922170) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564265)

a Demos study suggests. Attempts to control employees' use of such software could damage firms in the long run by limiting the way staff communicate, the think tank said.

How about the demotivational impact of having authority used against you, stripping away your own?

At a company where I worked, we had to show up for brief (10m) morning meetings, and we had to hand in our weekly reports saying what we accomplished. If you could make leprechauns write your code while you read slashdot, more power to you. If you had to go shopping for tobacco for five minutes before taking a smoking break (whenever you wanted), off you went. Add wii tennis after lunch and beer plus more wii tennis on fridays :)

They adjusted their hiring policy down a little while I worked there, from "add 90%" to "add 75%" or something like that. Yeah, all that long leash really made people not work, that is why they needed more; not because of the profitability of their work.

If people slack off at work rather than at home, who cares as long as their job is done in time? Employ and pay people based on their ability to provide value, not on how hard they must work to do so. Fire the numbskulls, moneyshower the brainiacs.

Re:Iron fist of demotivation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566039)

Companies are run by idiots mostly. If work is getting done on time, who gives a shit where the employee is or what they are even doing? It makes no sense. If you can do your job from a beach in Brazil, more power to you.

The idiots running most IT departments need to be thrown out of the business. Companies don't even run themselves as real businesses even. Why do I say this? Because if they did, they wouldn't pay you on some dipshit payscale. They would pay you on the work you do, the money you save, or the value of the work you generate.

Because most companies don't do this, the good employees quit and take their ideas with them. What kind of dumb fuck would give their best idea away to their company with no compensation? I don't know, but I would never do so. But, I'm a consultant anyway. I got out of that full time gig years ago. That's for suckers.

Not if you want to stay at a govenrment contractor (2, Interesting)

f16c (13581) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564583)

I'd rather stay away from the networking sites. I need to keep my clearance to keep my job. Make enough noise and they start wondering what else you're up to. This is not negotiable with most similar positions. It's agreed to as a term of employment.

I have 5 bucks that say... (1)

The_AV8R (1257270) | more than 5 years ago | (#25564637)

...that the staff at Demos are l33t at Facebook's Traveler IQ Challenge and Bloons Tower Defense 3.

I can just see it now: "No way. They actually bought into the report? - SWEET!"

--
If there is one thing I know, it is the fact of my own ignorance

mod doown (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25565093)

fobr membeKrship.

not to be the sour apple here, but... (2, Insightful)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565175)

sometimes it's very essential to business to control the way in which its employees communicate. If it were my company, I would prohibit company business on any service not explicit in the employee communications manual. (yes, I would write an employee communications manual). Such a manual would lay out a terms of use for using company resources.

Sometimes you have to enact damage control, but it's rarely necessary if your employees know what they can and can't disseminate over services like facebook and twitter.

Lest we forget corporate secrets going out over someone's flickr album. In this new day and age, employees are expected to be productive while communicating readily and instantly with the rest of the social world. There is a way to do it safely. Sometimes you simply must restrict their access if it would damage the company.

Re:not to be the sour apple here, but... (1)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566707)

Ordering people to use your local mail server for work-related e-mails for security reasons is one thing; trying to filter the internet to keep your sysadmin/computer lab technician/receptionist/whoever from using their computer to check personal e-mails is another. People aren't busy 100% of the time, even if you need them there ... sometimes they're on-call for internal tech support, compiling code for debugging, rendering video, or just eating their lunch on a break. Why can't they check their facebook for non-work-related e-mails during that downtime?

At best, filtering the internet will lead to employees staring at a wall or reading a book during their downtime; at worst, you will inspire animosity amongst the workforce which will surely impact intrinsic motivation levels ... that is sure to impact productivity much more than a youtube video here or there.

Re:not to be the sour apple here, but... (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 5 years ago | (#25568239)

I wasn't suggesting that employees won't have downtime. But what you're suggesting is that they will have like 30-40% downtime.

If they have more than 5% downtime, maybe it's time to downsize.

Employee downtime is very costly to a business.

And I wasn't writing specifically about tech companies.

If you work for an insurance company, or a mortgage broker, or a doctor, or dunder mifflin, you're not supposed to have more that an hour of downtime a day for your federally mandated breaks.

That being said, I understand people have downtime. I've worked in places where the boss thought that downtime meant you weren't working.(despite being almost three times as productive as other employees).

I'm just saying if it were my business, I would try to minimize downtime because it's costly overhead.

Re:not to be the sour apple here, but... (1)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573131)

I agree with that. I think that filtering sites at the work internet connection is a poor solution to reducing downtime, though. It's like trying to fine-tune a computer with a hammer -- you're just going to ignore the original problem while making a dozen new problems for yourself.

Re:not to be the sour apple here, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25578003)

I have started a few small to large companies over the years, I've ran several large departments, I've got my MBA and doing business is my business.

So you can trust me when I say... You're an idiot and have no understanding of strategy/competition/leadership/SHRM/etc.

Luckily I understand that because of this, you will never run a company.

This just in... (4, Insightful)

definate (876684) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565297)

... people aren't busy 100% of the time, and attempting to force people to be busy 100% of the time, is more destructive than letting it go.

Wow. Who would have thought?

Seriously, this has been known for quite some time, and any businesses that think they can improve productivity by reducing other options, needs to go back to business school and study leadership and general motivation theory.

Monitoring and punishing people to get them to work harder is industrial revolution style management. We've come a long way since then... baby.

On Call (2, Informative)

schlick (73861) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565349)

I get paid salary and part of that is being on call. So the way I see it my downtime can be on call too. If they expect me to wake up and fix a server at 2:00am then they can just suck it up if I read /. while I'm also in the office. If I'm expected to work at home then they should expect some downtime at work. They can't schedule emergencies? I can't schedule the articles I'll be interested in on slashdot.

Luckily I work at place that understands that productivity and "work" aren't the same thing

Agreed (3, Interesting)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566897)

I use my facebook to network. 90% of my "friends" on facebook are past clients, programmers, project managers, executives, creatives, ... I've worked with as a consultant. It helps you to keep track, keep a certain connection and allow you utilize your network inthere, in a slightly more casual way... With other tools it's harder to maintain your network and have more of a feel with your network, and what they're busy with: after a while the image of someone waters down because of the excess of contacts as a consultant, so if you have a face and the conveyed personality you can more easily reconnect with how the person is/was while you worked with them.

It also helps teamspirit in a company: we've created a company group, post our company events, show off to eachother the events we've ended up with with clients and just fool around, have a bit of competitive fun as well. It creates a more tight bound with all our consultants and is just plain fun! Happy, fun developers are productive ones.

Bring Social Networking to the Work Place (1)

Mondrames (242558) | more than 5 years ago | (#25570705)

Business should try to harness social networking tools for their business - not just to encourage "Citizen Marketers" but also in the corporate intranet. I've found that this improves collaboration and idea sharing across departments/offices/countries. The intranet then becomes a self reinforcing loop of communication and improvement which hardly ever happens with intranets. You in effect create a discussion with your employees, just as you do with your consumers.

Social Networking Sites Blocked At Work (1)

davewalden (1028118) | more than 5 years ago | (#25571363)

Due to the virus/malware issues that have and currently plague many of the social networking sights, they are blocked at the proxy in many companies.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...