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UK Opens National Video Game Archive

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the grandaddy-pac-man dept.

Games 121

BBC News reports that the UK is acknowledging video games as a "key component of modern culture" by opening the National Videogame Archive inside the National Media Museum. "'The National Videogame Archive is an important resource for preserving elements of our national cultural heritage,' said Dr Newman. 'It's not just about cartridges and consoles, it's also about video game culture, the ways in which people actually play them. Unlike film and music, it's very difficult to walk into a retail store and walk out with a bunch of games from the 1970's,' said Dr Newman. He feels that games should be archived in the same way that music, books and film are preserved, as we often use them as markers in our culture and history." There's a similar archive at the University of Texas at Austin. What games would you put on display?

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What about the hardware? (4, Interesting)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565951)

So how do we archive all of the fantastic hardware that the likes of Sega and Atari produced? What about pinball games and crane sandboxes? What about the machines that would cast a souvenir for you out of plastic on the spot? There is a lot of gaming history that is sadly endangered.

Re:What about the hardware? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566003)

yes, fuck the panda! it's the game plastic overlord machines who are truly endangered.

Re:What about the hardware? (3, Insightful)

penginkun (585807) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566141)

Well that's just stupid. Are you saying pandas are more important than cultural ephemera? Seriously now, consider what you're saying here. You're saying that my cherished 25-year-old Mold-a-rama figure of a dolphin from Chicago's Brooklyn Zoo is LESS important than some smelly old animal in China.

Wow. Grow a set of priorities, man.

Seriously though, preserving one does not preclude preservation of the other. I think it's safe to say we all care about pandas (awww, they're cuuuute!) but that doesn't mean we should knock down the museums to build panda habitats.

Re:What about the hardware? (1)

montyzooooma (853414) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566913)

Well that's just stupid. Are you saying pandas are more important than cultural ephemera? Seriously now, consider what you're saying here. You're saying that my cherished 25-year-old Mold-a-rama figure of a dolphin from Chicago's Brooklyn Zoo is LESS important than some smelly old animal in China.

Wow. Grow a set of priorities, man.

Seriously though, preserving one does not preclude preservation of the other. I think it's safe to say we all care about pandas (awww, they're cuuuute!) but that doesn't mean we should knock down the museums to build panda habitats.

Oh really
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubZimS4E3F0

Re:What about the hardware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25572971)

Not to be a pedant, but it is "Brookfield Zoo".

And those Mold-A-Rama machines are awesome. I think a few of them still exist in the zoo, the aquarium, and the museums.

Re:What about the hardware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566561)

What if the game is about pandas and the plastic dispenser dispensed plastic pandas therefore raising panda awareness?

Of course if there is no game museum you would not know about it would you now.

Pandas are very tasty I would love to ensure future generations have tasty panda.

Re:What about the hardware? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25569121)

So how do we archive all of the fantastic hardware that the likes of Sega and Atari produced? What about pinball games and crane sandboxes? What about the machines that would cast a souvenir for you out of plastic on the spot? There is a lot of gaming history that is sadly endangered.

Coin-op hardware-wise, there's the annual California Extreme [caextreme.org] event in San Jose. There's also a good vintage console selection (as well as computer selection) at Vintage Computer Fest [vintage.org] , which has both an East Coast and a West Coast show every year.

Pinball-wise, we have the Pinball Hall of Fame [pinballmuseum.org] in Las Vegas, and the Lucky JuJu [ujuju.com] in the SF Bay Area. (And these are museums, not shows.)

Pinball show-wise, a bunch of Bay Area pinheads also put together the Pacific Pinball Expo [neptunebea...museum.org] , which features a lot of fully-restored electromechanical machines from the 50s-70s, and even a small selection of flipperless / woodrail / bumper games from the late 20s-30s. (If you ever go to the expo, play these games. They're surprisingly fun!)

There's a preponderance of "shows" over "museums" here, but that's because games are interactive (and old electronic/mechanical hardware, even if engineered to take the abuse of an arcade environment, can be fragile), and the risk to the artifacts over the long term is enough to discourage most museum curators from having lots of hands-on exhibits. Building a sufficiently large collection to warrant a museum, leasing a permanent space, and then opening that collection up to the general public on an ongoing basis is a prohibitive amount of time and money for all but a handful of people.

Crowdsourcing the collection process (by having a few hundred people haul in a couple of their own personal games for a weekend), by contrast, works very well. The downside is that you can only attend the event one weekend a year, but the upside is that it's a very well-populated event. And because you've also crowdsourced the repair/maintenance (each exhibitor is responsible for the upkeep of only one or two games on the show floor, and no individual collector's entire collection is at risk), you can let the general public show up and play the games.

So that's how it's done in the coin-op amusement community (and the crane sandboxes and plastic mold-making machines would probably be welcome at either CAX or Pacific Pinball Expo). Anyone got any links for other museums or shows featuring other forms of cultural ephemera?

Re:What about the hardware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25570499)

this is actually a lot more on the point than some might expect. my ex-fiance being a professional archivist, i'd hear a lot about the specific problems of archiving computer-based information. in this case, do we archive the ROMs of the games, or do we archive the cartidges. archives are about preserving original documents in original form and order. however, the hardware gets to be an issue. how long can we maintain old atari 2600 machines to keep KABOOM! in its original format, played with its original controller. what about duck hunt? that game isn't the same without the same gun-controller. archiving simply the ROM for it seems a little incomplete.

Gaming the post. (1)

Ostracus (1354233) | more than 5 years ago | (#25565967)

"What games would you put on display? "

Getting First post on Slashdot. :)

Re:Gaming the post. (4, Insightful)

NoisySplatter (847631) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566347)

I prefer "Karma-Whore: The Grind to +2"

Re:Gaming the post. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567065)

I was the first to mod this insightful rather than funny, I'm glad the other mods have a sense of humour too.

What? (2, Insightful)

Azuma Hazuki (955769) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566001)

No "Mega Man 2" tag yet? =P

It already is archived (1)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566019)

Pretty much every variant of every game made in the past two decades is neatly archived on various sites. They are easy to find, you just have to look.

What games would you put on display?

Why not put all of them in storage, and have a computer to browse it displaying the most popular ones [metacritic.com] by default? Let people play them. Record their games and put up some good past recordings on a few big screens for others to see.

Re:It already is archived (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566105)

Some of them are corrupted though.

For example all the online copies of the 1982 Apple II game Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves that I can find are corrupted - you can play it, but not all of the original characters are present.

Re:It already is archived (1)

Kleen13 (1006327) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566167)

I have fond memories of Pitfall on an Apple 2E (PR#6, Baby!)

Re:It already is archived (2, Informative)

electrictroy (912290) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567153)

The best version of Pitfall II was on the Atari 5200. The programmer directly ported the original VCS/2600 version to the 5200, and discovered he had some spare time to kill, so he created a whole other game (think Pitfall III) that happens immediately after you beat the first game.

The second game can only be described as "extremely difficult". I couldn't get past the first screen due to the fact all the crabs run about four times faster! One of these days I'll get-around to beating it.

Thanks to emulation, everyone can now play these games. It's no longer limited to just those who have ~$100 to spend buying the necessary hardware.

Re:It already is archived (1)

Nursie (632944) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566355)

What you describe kinda exists...

We have ROMNation and home of the underdogs.

Are they legal? Doubtful. Are they useful when you want to play that game you were addicted to when you were 10? Hell yes.

I luv my megadrive emus.

Fix copyright first (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566027)

Well archiving ROMS and disk images for emulation would be all fine and dandy if COPYRIGHT DIDN'T STILL EXIST on most of it.

We had this discussion in regards to the Digital Dark ages not so long ago. Copyright needs a massive overhaul in order to preserve most of this gaming history, and bring it out of it's current legal grey area. ..otherwise all these obscure Commodore 64 tape games will never see the light of day.

Re:Fix copyright first (1)

electrictroy (912290) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567273)

Ehh.... just host all your ROMS on piratebay.org where the U.S. can't touch them.

DRM? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566043)

What about games crippled with DRM? Will they "die" ?

Re:DRM? (1)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566571)

Short answer yes with an "if", long answer no with a "but".

Re:DRM? (1)

Moryath (553296) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567253)

You could ask the Once-ler... I hear he knows a thing or two about stuff becoming extinct because people don't take care of it properly [cornell.edu] .

Yes, I realize I'm comparing computer systems to real-world ecology, but hey... it's actually not that different. Think of changing standards of common media storage, DRM, and the (unfortunately short) shelf-life of most storage components as your particular species' (software package) "home environment" and think about it.

what would I archive (4, Interesting)

ozbon (99708) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566063)

Manic Miner / Jet Set Willy : Disturbingly Addictive
Elite : 3D in 32Kb
Sabre Wulf : First (I think) forced-perspective 3d
Daley Thomson's Decathlon - for single-handedly killing more Z and X keys than anything else on the market. Ever.

Re:what would I archive (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566127)

SabreWulf was plain 2d as far as I remember. You're thinking of Ultimate's Knightlore [wikipedia.org] which was the first 3d isometric game.

Re:what would I archive (2, Informative)

malf-uk (456583) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566625)

There were 3D isometric games before Knight Lore, such as Sandy White's Ant Attack [wikipedia.org] , but Knight Lore's Filmation engine featured forced perspective.

Re:what would I archive (1)

vidarh (309115) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567341)

Wikipedia lists Knightlore as being published in 1984, which means Zaxxon beat it by 2 years...

Re:what would I archive (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566193)

Daley Thomson's Decathlon - for single-handedly killing more Z and X keys than anything else on the market. Ever.
... and being my primary source of cash during high school. The "local" computer repair place was 120 miles away, took two weeks, and charged a fortune. I could replace the keyboard membrane for a fiver or the membrane and the aluminium top cover together for eight quid over lunch, and always had both in stock. Not especially cheap in 1988 money, but a quarter of the price of the computer shop, and same-day service ;-)

Kept me in Sonic Youth, Husker Du and Half Man Half Biscuit tapes and beer from third year to sixth year...

Re:what would I archive (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566333)

LOL, you must be nearly as old as me. It was for that reason that my brother was specifically banned from playing that game on my (no, not our) speccy. Second time I caught him doing it I shredded the tape.

Re:what would I archive (1)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567737)

My brother had a quickshot joystick for DTD. He'd stick a lump of blu-tack on the end, then shake the base to make the shaft wobble (ooer). It was much, much quicker than I could mash the keys, and he only broke two or three joysticks in his quest for better and better scores.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566287)

It belongs in a museum

Re:what would I archive (2, Informative)

PoiuyTerry (736125) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566575)

Hmmm, Fighter Bomber for the Spectrum and Amstrad CPC. Why yes, I did write it, a long time ago.

Re:what would I archive (1)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567173)

I lost hours of my youth thanks to you! Great game, should go on there. Deatchase 3D I think was from the same stable and equally as worthy of preservation... Just like riding a speeder bike through the forest in ROTJ.. Well, at the time at least..

Re:what would I archive (1)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567747)

That was a 16k game, too. I played 3d deathchase a lot, what with my first speccy being a 16k model and me not actually having any other games to play on it.

Re:what would I archive (1)

16K Ram Pack (690082) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566589)

haha. I did that to my Speccy too. Learnt to switch the keys after that.

It's funny how many speccy games would be in my list, and I don't think it's just nostalgia. The restrictions of the hardware and that film companies hadn't caught on to licensing meant that people had to innovate with gameplay.

I'd add 3d Monster Maze and also the Scrabble on the Speccy (which seemed to use some clever compression to squeeze as many words as they did into 48k).

Re:what would I archive (1)

16K Ram Pack (690082) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566603)

Ooops: For 3d monster maze read 3d Ant Attack

Re:what would I archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567953)

Ooops: For 3d monster maze read 3d Ant Attack

Pffft! His pixellatedness- Rex himself, of course- would stomp all over those pesky ants :)

Re:what would I archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566753)

Raiden.
And Warriors of Fate. Knocking down enemies with Kassar's (Zhang Fei) fists!

Re:what would I archive (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567689)

"Daley Thomson's Decathlon - for single-handedly killing more Z and X keys than anything else on the market. Ever."

I never killed the keyboard with DTD but I did destroy at least one Interface II (the ones that could take console-style "ROM cartridges" and boot games instantly... wow!), several IF2 joysticks and the edge-connector on the back of the Speccy twice. I think I also killed the power supply numerous times by pulling out the connector, though. For as long as I can remember it was held together by dad's soldering and a lot of black electrical tape. Nothing more fun than accidentally wiggling the wire when you wanted to load the next level...

Re:what would I archive (1)

psychofox (92356) | more than 5 years ago | (#25569787)

Sorry, this comment is rather pointless, which is unlike me, but.. Ozbon.. it's incredible. Those are actually the exact same games I would have chosen! Freaky.

One game which must be included (2, Insightful)

willoughby (1367773) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566071)

...is M.U.L.E. [wikipedia.org] This game was a true landmark.

Hrmm (4, Funny)

acehole (174372) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566073)

Daikatana.

Why? So future generations may know how exactly not to create a game.

Duke Nukem Forever (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566115)

And Duke Nukem Forever!

Re:Duke Nukem Forever (1)

altloser (1113413) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566277)

And Fallout 3!

Re:Duke Nukem Forever (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566429)

And Superman 64!

Re:Duke Nukem Forever (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566745)

Duke Nukem Forever, HAHA, alright moving along.

Re:Hrmm (1)

jaguth (1067484) | more than 5 years ago | (#25571533)

Custards Revenge.

Why? To show future generations that raping Native American women is really, really funny.

Kudos (1)

CranberryKing (776846) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566077)

I have no clever point to make. I just think it's a good idea.

Re:Kudos (1)

paniq (833972) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566099)

Me too. But if they put these games into showcases, that would be sad.

Okay, perhaps they can put some of these behind showcases, like all game adaptations of movies - ever.

Re:Kudos (1)

Kleen13 (1006327) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566191)

I'd be a little sad if nobody knew what "Don't have time to play with myself." meant. I agree. I think everyone should know what CS or DOD is all about. Adminmod days were cool gaming days....

Elite (2, Insightful)

sister bliss (1234142) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566163)

Elite on the Commodore 64 .. that was f**ng awesome

Re:Elite (2, Funny)

stripyd (614714) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566269)

Elite *on the Commodore 64* ? what's wrong with this picture Commander Jameson?

Re:Elite (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 5 years ago | (#25570051)

Elite and it's sequals. I really enjoyed Frontier: Elite II [wikipedia.org] on the Amiga.

Re:Elite (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573115)

Are there significant differences between C64 Elite and Apple II Elite? I ask because I have an Apple II, but not a C64.

Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in museums (5, Insightful)

radimvice (762083) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566187)

He feels that games should be archived in the same way that music, books and film are preserved, as we often use them as markers in our culture and history.

This only applies to the destructive elements of games (packaging, artwork, instruction manuals, etc), and the actual computer or console hardware the games are run on. However, the whole 'stick videogames in museums' mentality this projects reeks of reflects a much greater ignorance of the preservation of software in general. What we really need in order to 'preserve' video game culture is not some expensive museum space full of trite screenshots of software still under copyright that nobody is legally allowed to play themselves, but we need a relaxation of copyright and a strengthening of fair use so that old cultural artifacts that are no longer profitable and would otherwise be forgotten are defaulted to the public domain. Then the 'preservation' and archiving would happen on their own for free by people who still love the old games and enjoy taking part in the preservation of a culture they were a part of. Just look at projects like MAME and the massive ROM archives collections that are passed around the Internet underground and continue to exist despite all of the legal obstacles.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566267)

Where are my mod points when I need them.

Good old Games [gog.com] is actually a sort of museum for games. For a entry fee of $6 to $10 per title you can re-experience some of the (PC) classics on current systems (running WinXP or Vista.
Just having a digital copy of the software is sadly not enough, you need to be able to run it. DosBox helps a lot, and in some cases virtualization software can also help. But there are still quite some things very difficult like the games that used 3Dfx (or games that rely on an older version of DirectX, specially the versions prior to 7 are very incompatible).

So it's not just legal problems, but it wold help a lot of the "abandonware" concept could have some legal backing. Because technical problems are easier to solve when more people can help, instead of just the few that were lucky enough to buy a copy of the game.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (1)

tweak13 (1171627) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566401)

But there are still quite some things very difficult like the games that used 3Dfx

I thought that Glide wrappers were available from multiple projects, and several work quite well. I can't say personally since I haven't used one, but I have seen them being used on an older game and it seemed to work just fine.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (5, Insightful)

stranger_to_himself (1132241) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566381)

What we really need in order to 'preserve' video game culture is not some expensive museum space full of trite screenshots of software still under copyright that nobody is legally allowed to play themselves, but we need a relaxation of copyright and a strengthening of fair use so that old cultural artifacts that are no longer profitable and would otherwise be forgotten are defaulted to the public domain.

You're right about copyright etc but there's more to a museum than just displaying old stuff. The curators have an important job of putting everything in context, finding the really interesting stuff and giving it prominence, and providing the historical and cultural background behind each gaming milestone. And make it interesting for old gamers and people who aren't old gamers.

So I would expect the museum to show me stuff I'd never think of looking for on my own, to talk about who made the games, who was playing them, where they were played etc, and to help my kids to understand more about how I grew up.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567333)

I wish I could mod this up past 5, great post.

Do both (4, Insightful)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566677)

Allowing use of abandonware would certainly keep the good games alive, but I think you're missing the point of an archive: to make as complete a collection as possible, so that the non-popular stuff is preserved, and to make it available to researchers. The two complement each other, and shouldn't be treated as alternatives.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567217)

Agreed. It is information you want to save. The obstacles are legal, not material.

Re:Videogames don't need to be 'preserved' in muse (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25569577)

Your description brought up an image of Fahrenheit 451. With a dedicated group of "criminals" passing around the heritage of a media through an underground network, while the official powers that be hunt them down. When the official powers that be find a stash, the burn it to the ground.

priorities (-1, Flamebait)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566215)

glad to see we have our priorities sorted. cure for cancer? cure for aids? clean energy? nope, preserving gaming "history"

Re:priorities (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566541)

Yes, because all of the world's scientific and economic resources have been taken off of all those important projects in order to dedicate them to building the gaming history section of the National Media Museum.

I'm glad to see you have your priorities sorted; Cure for cancer? Cure for aids? Clean energy? Nope, trolling Slashdot.

Re:priorities (1)

stranger_to_himself (1132241) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566567)

glad to see we have our priorities sorted. cure for cancer? cure for aids? clean energy? nope, preserving gaming "history"

Just so you know medical research got direct funding of about two billion pounds last year from government. I don't know how much of this will be diverted to the gaming museum, but if you're right it's gonna be awesome!

Back to the Future (1)

britneys 9th husband (741556) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566285)

Back to the Future 2 & 3 for NES. Best game ever.

Political Science of Archivism (2, Insightful)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566321)

He feels that games should be archived in the same way that music, books and film are preserved

Let's hope he changes his mind. Today's music, books and film are archived in proprietary formats, often requiring proprietary for-profit DRM services and software to access, legal (copyright) restrictions on making backup copies; and in the case of movies and TV shows the original films are often changed to suit the fad of the current day while the original copies sit literally rotting in storage. Books are often stolen or vandalized in libraries (including more restrictive academic libraries), and many are just banned and even burned because of PTA (think-of-the-children) activism.

Once knowledge becomes commercialized and given moral value then archivism will deal more with political science rather than library science.

Re:Political Science of Archivism (1)

eiapoce (1049910) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566873)

Today's music, books and film are archived in proprietary formats

A book in DRM? Do they give you a barcode reader to decrypt the pages? Or maybe special glasses? :)

Re:Political Science of Archivism (1)

walshy007 (906710) | more than 5 years ago | (#25568237)

he is referring to e-books, obviously

Re:Political Science of Archivism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567691)

wow Paper is a proprietary format.

an openformat version of a book is a bad thing.
for example i disagree with that passage of the Illiad lets change it. If you look at european copyright libraries they will never destroy a book and are public access (unfortunately many wont let you take the books away)

In contrast i agree that film ,recorded music and games should be in a open format with source code attached for future recompiling.

Paper music is fine in current format.

And much of the 'Think of the Children' idiocy occurs only in the USA.

Tag? (5, Funny)

SpooForBrains (771537) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566391)

Which gibbering simpleton tagged this UK-based story yourtaxDOLLARSatwork?

Re:Tag? (1)

scapaman (827445) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566975)

Which gibbering simpleton tagged this UK-based story yourtaxDOLLARSatwork?

the way the £ is going it might yet be true

Re:Tag? (1)

simong (32944) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567077)

Other monolithic currencies are available, and indeed far closer.

Donations (1)

IRGlover (1096317) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566577)

It seems that they will soon be asking for donations - just when I was looking to get rid of my old consoles and computers (Atari 2600, speccy, Master System, NES, Game Gear, some Binatone thing from the early/mid 70's, etc.)

Perfect timing! unless someone wants to buy them from me ;-)

Raid over Moscow (2, Insightful)

Zarhan (415465) | more than 5 years ago | (#25566669)

A true product of cold war era.

Especially as a Finn I find it significant, for reasons highlighted in the wiki article [wikipedia.org] . It was pretty funny to follow from sidelines...Talking heads on TV and all that about how computer games might affect our kids, relation to the USSR and so on. Of course we have since heard that same stuff again over GTA and similar games, but at least back then it was related to foreign politics instead of scoring random points for next election.

Victor. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25566879)

Fine... videogames is my unique culture... lol
Im from: http://www.laplegariadeunpagano.com

"it's also about video game culture" (3, Funny)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567039)

I'd like to see how they capture all the bigotry and name calling on Xbox Live. Hopefully they have some recordings of actually taunts while playing Halo 3 online with some 12 year old kid.

Will they also have a wax model of a 12 year old kid with cheetohs all over his fingers and lips?

UK games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567043)

i bet the Jeff Minter games will be protected by anthropomorphic goats and llamas with turrets

Banjo-Kazooie (1)

Rick Richardson (87058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567061)

UK company: Banjo-Kazooie for the Nintendo 64. Before they got bought out by Microsoft. R.I.P.

what games would i put on.. (1)

ramul (1103299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567089)

another world, flashback

fallout 2

final fantasy 7

Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

electrictroy (912290) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567203)

>>>What games would you put on display?

ALL of them as playable ROMs at various PCs setup around the museum. As for the actual displays, I would get 1 of every console ever made, and display it in 5-year "segments" such as:

1970-1975 Odyssey, Fairchild Channel F, Pong and other dedicated standalones
1976-1980 Odyssey 2, Atari VCS/2600, Intellivision
1981-1985 Atari 5200, Colecovision, Famicom, NES
1986-1990 Atari 7800, Sega Master System, Sega Genesis
1991-1995 Super Nintendo, Atari Jaguar, Amiga CDTV
1996-2000 Playstation 1, Nintendo 64, Sega Saturn, Sega Dreamcast
2001-2005 Playstation 2, Gamecube, Xbox
2006-2010 Xbox 360, Playstation 3, Wii

I would do the exact same thing for the portable units like Gameboys and Gameboy Advances, but in their own separate area, since portable and TV-connected consoles are not the same thing.

And I would do similar displays for computers since Apple IIs, Atari 800s, Commodore 64s, and Commodore Amigas were a huge part of videogaming during the 1980s.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567351)

A travesty, sir, that the Neo Geo is not listed among those.

It would be cool if they hit up places like RetroZone [retrousb.com] (Full disclosure: run by a friend of an acquaintance) for added retro kick.

It would be cool to see those old NES time-based coin-op machines, too... the ones with a bunch of games loaded up, and every quarter equaled a few minutes of playtime. It turned non-arcade games into arcade games instantly.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567991)

The Neo what?

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (2, Interesting)

vidarh (309115) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567491)

In fact, in many (most?) countries in western Europe at least, home computers massively dominated for most of the 80's and consoles were a niche. Most kids I knew considered consoles as something for people that couldn't afford a full fledged computer until at least the Super Nintendo, which was the first one I remember people talking about without being embarrassed for not getting something better.

(At least part of this I think came from parents delusion that if they bought a home computer it'd get used for a lot more than games, which was untrue for maybe 90%+ of the kids that got the).

The C64 (and VIC 20 before the launch of C64), Amigas and Atari ST's dominated in Scandinavia (pretty much in that order in terms of volume), with Spectrum and Amstrad as lesser players. Elsewhere in Europe Spectrum, Amstrad and BBC did comparatively better. Acorn Archimedes also didn't do too badly in the late 80's.

In fact, I've never seen most of the consoles you list before 1991 apart from in pictures despite being in and out of the local tech stores as often as I could (probably almost daily from '85-'90 or so) and reading all related magazines I could get my hand on - none of my friends ever had them.

I remember seeing a wide variety of home computers in the computer stores near where I lived (in Norway) in the early 80's, including Commodore PET's, Dragon 32's, Spectravideo, Oric, the odd MSX and other rarities - some larger stores or specialist stores would have other models, but I can't recall ever seeing any of them sell any consoles until the late 80's (I'm sure I ignored some, by virtue of our complete lack of interest in them).

By 1985 most shops around me had stopped stocking any other 8 bit home computers than C64 and Spectrum, with some selling Amstrad CPC's. Then the Amiga's and Atari ST's and the occasional console slowly started showing up.

At least Commodore's massive popularity here was a uniquely European thing - Commodore's European sales far outpaced it's US sales, and the sheer volume probably was part of "stunting" the importance of consoles in Europe in the 80's significantly.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#25568077)

Computers dominated? I disagree. The most popular computer ever made only sold 30 million (C=64).

In comparison, during the same 1982-92 timeframe the NES/Famicom sold twice as much. People were buying 2 NESes for every 1 C64 sold.

Which makes sense because a console only requires a $200 investment, whereas a computer requires buying external peripherals like tape drives, disk drives, joysticks, ..., all of which increase the computer's price to $500. Customers naturally gravitate towards the cheaper product (console), especially if those customers are "parents" buying "toys" for their kid.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 5 years ago | (#25569583)

People were buying 2 NESes for every 1 C64 sold.

You can prove anything you want with selective use of statistics, and that's very selective. How many brands of console were there in the 80s vs brands of computer? For the former, I can think of two or three: for the latter, I can come up with a dozen off the top of my head (Apple, Commodore, Atari, Amiga, Tandy, Dragon, Spectrum, Amstrad, IBM, Sinclair QL, Acorn, BBC).

But to get some actual stats into the picture, see the UK's Competition Commission's 1995 report on the market for video games [competitio...ion.org.uk] . It seems that, in the UK at least, consoles overtook what the report calls "home computers" in about 1992, but still lagged behind combined domestic "home computer" and "personal computer" ownership.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#25570985)

As you said, that's only the UK, not worldwide. In the 1980s U.S. consoles were certainly more-popular than computers. Here's a quick rundown of consoles during the 1980s, along with worldwide stats:

Atari 2600 - 30 million sold
Atari 5200 - 5 million
Atari 7800 - 8 million
Intellivision - 3 million
Colecovision - 6 million
NES - 60 million
SMS - 13 million

That's a total console sale between 1979 to 1989 of 125 million units. Now if you can demonstrate during that same timeperiod that home-gaming computers (Atari 800s, Spectrums, C64s, at cetera) sold more than 125 million, I will concede defeat. However I don't think you'll be able to do that. Take for example the Apple II series - it only sold 5 million units. C=64, despite being number one, only did half the NES numbers. Its "offspring" the Amiga only did 5 million.

The original person's comment that "computers massively dominated for most of the 80's and consoles were a niche" to be demonstrably false. Most gamers were doing their gaming on consoles. Same as now.

Re:Display Hardware and make software playable. (1)

pjt33 (739471) | more than 5 years ago | (#25571517)

Hang on. The post to which you originally replied was explicitly talking about Europe, and made the point that Europe and the US differed in this regard.

SCUMM Archives (2, Insightful)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567373)

The Lucasarts point and click adventure games have a special place in my heart. Maniac Mansion, Zack McKraken and the Alien Mindbenders, Indiana Johnes and the Fate of Atlantis, Sam and Max Hit the Road... all classics near and dear to my early gamer career!

Re:SCUMM Archives (1)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567779)

Ditto. The Sam & Max talkie version was far and away my favourite, although my wife and I played Loom and Zak on the Atari ST and enjoyed them both immensely. Thank goodness for Scumm, eh?

Re:SCUMM Archives (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567845)

Goddammit how can you forget Monkey Island

Sierra Games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25569519)

Sierra adventure games like Space Quest, King's Quest, and Leisure Suit Larry were what drwew me into computers in the first place -- despite not being much of a gamer currently.

A "Timeline of Adventure Games" is mandatory! (3, Insightful)

The Ultimate Fartkno (756456) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567519)

I want to see one hallway that starts with "Adventure," leads on to an Infocom retrospective, then "Mystery House," the Sierra library, and so forth. Adventure gaming is a very distinct subset of the gaming canon that relies on narrative and immersion rather than action and graphics. Leaving it out would be like going to a museum that didn't bother exhibiting paintings because they were just 2D.

Asteroids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25567595)

Asteroids...the only early game with no "pattern" or easy way to win. Just hyper-manic gameplay.

Sadly, there have been few versions, save the early Apple shareware Megaroids (system 7, for you youngsters) that measured up to the Arcade version.

Only ONE Game Should Be Showcased (1)

Skeetskeetskeet (906997) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567767)

E.T., along with the map to the secret landfill.

Here's an archive (1)

Alarindris (1253418) | more than 5 years ago | (#25567839)

For all you Apple // fans.

http://www.virtualapple.org/ [virtualapple.org]

Pretty solid collection too, plus you can play online or download for your own archiving.

The Classics. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25568463)

Tetris and Duck Hunt. As long as those two are there I'll be happy. Without those games, who knows what gaming would be like today!?!

Put this in: (1)

KefkaZ (1393099) | more than 5 years ago | (#25569099)

Duke Nukem Forever. It'd be pretty easy to display. Just stick an empty box under a sheet with a big question mark embroidered on it.

CP/M Games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25569115)

Too many good old CP/M games are already lost for good. The good games (Ascii action games, not text adventures), like Y-Wing, Y-Wing II, Arcadia Adventures. Those are gone for good already, you can't find a copy. Lost.

The Nintendo, Atari games, those we have a chance to save, to keep for future generations. This is long overdue.

Oscilloscope Pong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25570751)

I want to see oscilloscope pong.

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