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Math Prof Uncovers Secret Chord

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the with-a-little-help-from-my-mathematician dept.

Science 177

chebucto writes "The opening chord to A Hard Day's Night is famous because for 40 years, no one quite knew exactly what chord Harrison was playing. Musicians, scholars and amateur guitar players alike had all come up with their own theories, but it took a Dalhousie mathematician to figure out the exact formula. Dr. Brown used Fourier transforms to find the notes in the chord, and deduced that another George — George Martin, the Beatles producer — also played on the chord, adding a piano chord that included an F note impossible to play with the other notes on the guitar."

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177 comments

I've heard there was a secret chord (5, Funny)

syrinx (106469) | more than 5 years ago | (#25572831)

That David played, and it pleased the lord,
but you don't really care for music, do you?

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (0, Flamebait)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25572923)

That David played, and it pleased the lord,
but you don't really care for music, do you?

Not, but it's the craptastic idle design that's really chapping my ass.

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (2, Funny)

parkrrrr (30782) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573043)

I came here to make exactly that post, and I find that someone's already done it. Kudos to you.

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573093)

well played, shame most won't get the reference

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (2, Funny)

Wintermute__ (22920) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573339)

I wouldn't be surprised if quite a few did get it. Even younger music lovers might, that song has enjoyed somewhat of a revival the last few years. And well it should.

It's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah...

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (1)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573411)

Unfortunately it's now generally attributed to Rufus Wainwright. Better than nothing I suppose...

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (1)

olclops (591840) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574011)

And before that people assumed Jeff Buckley wrote it.

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (2, Insightful)

lordnabob (1397169) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575057)

Jeff Buckley was born to sing that song.
Unfortunately, he died shortly after.
Anyone else cringe when they heard that sublime work of Cohen used in a silly movie like Shrek?

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573575)

It goes like this: the fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift

Re:I've heard there was a secret chord (3, Funny)

olclops (591840) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574005)

The baffled king determined to carry on a joke well past the breaking point.

Well, this isn't total crap (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25572927)

Decent idle story. Not completely retarded, though still generally meaningless. I can appreciate this kind of stuff, instead of the utter crap idle started out with. I guess it's getting better.

Re:Well, this isn't total crap (5, Insightful)

stormguard2099 (1177733) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573459)

the problem is that /. designates idle to be full of crap. all of the good articles get shoehorned into other categories. For example, the article about how Heinlein responded to fans with a preformed checklist was under entertainment. Something like that is much better suited to idle and it would make the section worth reading.

Umm... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25572973)

Why didn't anyone just ask Harrison?

Re:Umm... (4, Insightful)

capt.Hij (318203) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573067)

They probably should have. Unfortunately the only way to ask him now involves a ouija (tm) board.

The Secret Chord? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573009)

I know there was a secret chord that David played, and it pleased the Lord....

Simple Solution (1, Redundant)

SageinaRage (966293) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573015)

Why didn't anyone just ask him?

Re:Simple Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573231)

Well, he is dead. Maybe someone could come up with a way to regenerate him and ask him the question. Although they would need to kill him again right after they got the answer, before he starts eating other people.

Re:Simple Solution (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573247)

You want to talk to a human -- a musician -- when you could be performing a discrete Fourier transform? You must be new here.

Re:Simple Solution (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573275)

go ahead and ask him. see what he says.

Re:Simple Solution (0)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574141)

During the years that followed, Harrison's ego had grown far too large to be approached by a mere mortal man.

Re:Simple Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25574185)

Dude, there in no way later years George remembered that session...WAY too many drugs. Also, studio sessions often deviate from the written music as various tracks get laid down so it's likely he didn't really know or thought it was a simple chord and didn't remember or know about the piano.

Re:Simple Solution (1)

fireman sam (662213) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574415)

Also, who said that all the instruments were played at the same time. Maybe in final editing it was decided that the starting chord needed something more and it was only at that point the piano was added. For all we know (nothing) the musicians may not have known themselves there was a piano added.

So, having RTFA... (1)

DudeTheMath (522264) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573021)

Well, perfesser, what the frell's the chord?

Offtopic sig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573255)

If I'm on time as opposed to a minute late, it is worth it.

Re:So, having RTFA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573439)

It is the brown chord: a chord consisting of all possible brown notes. This chord is very popular among the constipated.

You've gotta be kidding me (0)

timpintsch (842091) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573027)

I don't get it. Why do we get two Beatles-related items in one day, did we miss a Ringo birthday or something? Please, leave the idle stuff off the main page. You know its lame, we know its lame, since it is a complete waste of time, why let it be a complete waste of disk space, cycles and bandwidth?

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573105)

one man's trash...

be happy someone, somewhere, didn't have your point of view when approving DARPANET for federal funding.

this is a site for nerds that hunger for news. not all nerds play video games, some play instruments, too.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573215)

I believe you mean ARPANET, unless my networking class lied to me.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573307)

The original name of the agency was ARPA, changed to DARPA in '72, changed back to ARPA in '93 and back to DARPA in '96.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (3, Insightful)

zn0k (1082797) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573113)

I don't get it. Why did it take me less than 30 seconds to figure out how to make anything Idle related disappear from the index, even though I'd never tried before? Please, leave the pointless bitching out off the commends. You know it's lame, we know it's lame, since it is a complete waste of time. Why let it be a complete waste of disk space, cycles and bandwidth?

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573763)

Then, why are you here?

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25574129)

When you get right down to it, why are any of us here?

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574981)

Because he didn't WANT to make the Idle stories disappear from the index, he just wanted to find out HOW because GGP was bitching about it.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573963)

My head just exploded with irony.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573185)

You know its lame, we know its lame, since it is a complete waste of time, why let it be a complete waste of disk space, cycles and bandwidth?

I assume that the "it" to which you refer is your comment.

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (1)

Mr. Firewall (578517) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574065)

OMG! At first I thought I'd read, "why let it be a complete waste of dick space...." Made me go "HUH??"

Re:You've gotta be kidding me (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575859)

Geez, I don't know. Maybe for the same reason I beat up mythical monsters made entirely of pixels? Because it's fun. There's no cost/benefit analysis to be placed on fun (unless your idea of fun is CBA of course. I find accountants funny, in an elbow nerve-pinch sort of way.)

This Is What "Idle" Should Be Used For. (5, Interesting)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573041)

Stories like this are actually interesting and have a math/science side to them, instead of being mindless humor that everyone has already seen elsewhere. This is something that a math teacher could show her students to make them interested, more so than all the silly posters and videos they used when I was going through grade school.

Re:This Is What "Idle" Should Be Used For. (-1, Troll)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574089)

Yeah, nothing excites the kids like learning about the opening chord of a crappy song recorded by a pop band that broke up over 30 years before they were even born.

Re:This Is What "Idle" Should Be Used For. (-1, Troll)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575213)

Looks like some baby-boomer with mod points can't accept the truth.

Re:This Is What "Idle" Should Be Used For. (1)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575551)

Looks like some crappy teeny-bopper who thinks he knows everything there is to know can't accept the truth that some opinions might differ from his.

Re:This Is What "Idle" Should Be Used For. (1)

MindlessAutomata (1282944) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575903)

Actually, I'd never heard of them before and found the whole idea that people couldn't figure out what chord he was playing rather interesting, and I have no real interest in music, either.

Not Lost, just Secret (4, Funny)

CelticWhisper (601755) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573083)

The Moody Blues have been in search of that little bastard since 1968. Can someone call them and tell them it was finally found?

Re:Not Lost, just Secret (4, Funny)

parkrrrr (30782) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573199)

They wouldn't know what to do with it anyway. They're just singers in a rock & roll band.

Re:Not Lost, just Secret (2, Informative)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573715)

The fact that your post got modded informative probably means someone missed the joke. ;) (I know, I know... Or they just wanted to give you karma...)

Re:Not Lost, just Secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25576087)

Arthur Sullivan (of Gilbert and Sullivan) started his own search in 1877. http://math.boisestate.edu/gas/other_sullivan/songs/lost_chord/chord.html

Hang on. (0, Troll)

Khyber (864651) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573117)

I've always known there was a piano in the song. It's actually kind of hard to miss if you ever played one before.

But then again, I do have hearing that's sharper than most. at age 26 I can still pick up about 25+KHz frequencies.

Professor works a hard day's night... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573211)

The professor was working like a dog on this.

Mathematician Doesn't Realize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25573335)

that the sheet music could be read.

Cordially,
Kilgore Trout

P.S.: Enable Cyrillic morons.

Not so secret (2, Informative)

I'm a banana (1139431) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573343)

It's a G7sus4 chord. It's never been a secret. http://guitar.about.com/library/blchord_g7sus46.htm [about.com]

Re:Not so secret (5, Informative)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573695)

It's a G7sus4 chord. It's never been a secret.

Not really, the piano is playing a Dsus4.

If it was as simple as you say it is then people would have been able to recreate it long ago and no one did.

Re:Not so secret (1)

chad.koehler (859648) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574923)

So, G7sus4 + Dsus4?

a b c d f f# g

?

Re:Not so secret (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575083)

The guitars are playing an F with a G on top, the bass is playing a D at its second octave and the piano is playing the notes D-G-D across an octave...

Beats me what that is called...

But that's the point... A weird sort of dissonance that gives a signature sound.

They were probably really high at the time.

Re:Not so secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25575497)

There are no B's or F#'s in either of those chords. Suspended chords have no 3rd, "suspending" them to the 4th. G7sus4 = G C D F, no B... Dsus4 = D G A, no F#... Try playing G and F# together, without G being the root, or C and B together without C being the root. It will sound like a bad horror movie soundtrack.

Re:Not so secret (2, Informative)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575241)

I'm trying to picture it in my head, and It seems like you could get all of the notes from a G7sus4 and a Dsus4 in one chord on a guitar. Those would be F, G, A, C and D. Such a chord could be played with a Barre chord all on the 10th fret with or without muting the low D.
Maybe it sounds better with the piano though.

Right guy, right song, wrong story (4, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573401)

Dr. Brown's work on the opening chord of Hard Day's Night is four years old. His paper is at:

http://www.mscs.dal.ca/~brown/n-oct04-harddayjib.pdf [mscs.dal.ca]

(Note the "oct04" date in the URL).

His recent work is on the same song, but it's not about the opening chord. It's about the guitar solo (which was actually a duet with the piano), which Harrison played an octave down, at half speed, and then sped up. Which he proved by noticing where the piano notes went from double-strings to triple-strings, as seen by tiny mis-tunings between the strings.

It's pretty interesting work:

http://www.mscs.dal.ca/~brown/AHDNSoloJIB.pdf [mscs.dal.ca]

(Note: slashdot is just reporting the article, which is new. But it comes from Dr. Brown's own school, so I don't know why they're reporting the wrong story, except to guess that the older story was a well-known mystery among guitarists.)

Re:Right guy, right song, wrong story (1)

cecille (583022) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573565)

Actually, I thought his most recent work was on "In my life", trying to figure out who wrote it. I just think maybe he doesn't have too many results for that research yet, but people were interested, so they started talking about his old stuff too.

So What's the chord? (5, Informative)

jordan314 (1052648) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573463)

The article doesn't actually say what he thinks the chord was. I do music transcriptions (http://jordanbalagot.com/musictranscriptions.html ) and to me it sounds like G7 sus 4 / D. Or actual pitches: D1 G2 G3 C3 F3 G3. I do hear the F in there...If it's not playable on guitar it's possible the Beatles combined two recordings at once of different takes. They used all sorts of innovative recording techniques like that.

Re:So What's the chord? (1)

thedonger (1317951) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573893)

I just closed the PDF of his math paper where he does state his theory of what was played by George, John, Paul, and George Martin. Harrison played (in tab notation, from low E to high E): x0001x

Re:So What's the chord? (1)

jordan314 (1052648) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574527)

Thanks for that. After reading the PDF and looking at the article more closely I agree with him, the F was played on piano. The cymbal crash and the mixing obscure it but I'm glad that Brown agrees that someone is playing it and that I'm not going crazy.

The impossible note (2, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 5 years ago | (#25573745)

...adding a piano chord that included an F note impossible to play with the other notes on the guitar.

There are no notes that are impossible to play on a guitar. However, you have to tune the guitar to a nonstandard, non eagbde like Led Zepplin did on a few songs (an example is Black Mountain Side [wikipedia.org] on their first album.

I have an incredibly hard time playing a B chord; I have to kind of fake it and not hit all the strings. But then I'm no virtuoso, it took me twenty years to learn Starway To Heaven.

Re:The impossible note (4, Funny)

2names (531755) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574063)

And apparently even longer to spell it...

Re:The impossible note (2, Funny)

bfandreas (603438) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575287)

No. Starway to Heaven by Creme Brulee. Great band that. Did all the hits. It's a shit business; I'm glad I'm out of it.

Re:The impossible note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25574127)

with the other notes

Those are the key words here. If you have X strings, and want to play X+1 notes in a chord, it's time to grab a piano. In this case, whatever strings were tuned to be capable of producing that pitch's F were in use for other notes in the chord.

Re:The impossible note (1)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575333)

According to the article, the chord Harrison played had the 1st and 6th string muted, which means he could easily have played the F on the 6th string 1st fret, in fact since he was playing the 1st fret C on the 5th string, he would have been muting the 6th string on the F. He was probably already getting the "thunk" of the F and just not letting it ring!

Re:The impossible note (1)

tirerim (1108567) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574245)

Sure there are. You can play at most six notes at once on a guitar; besides that, there are plenty of notes that are off the bottom of the guitar's range.

Re:The impossible note (1)

Rary (566291) | more than 5 years ago | (#25576073)

"Sure there are. You can play at most six notes at once on a guitar; besides that, there are plenty of notes that are off the bottom of the guitar's range."

That's assuming it's a six-string guitar, and it's tuned normally, neither of which are necessarily valid assumptions. Especially considering George did not play a six-string guitar (although, admittedly, a 12-string isn't that much different from a six-string, it just doubles 2 strings exactly and 4 of them an octave higher).

Re:The impossible note (1)

scaryjohn (120394) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574307)

I think the submitter meant the chord was impossible to play. I don't know squat about guitars, but the paper seems to say that since there were three F's played by everyone, Harrison couldn't have played them on his twelve-string. Else, there'd be an even number of F's. And everyone else's opening notes are accounted for. But three F peaks is consistent with the note being played on a piano.

All the same, I'd hate to be playing the new Beatles Rock Band and have this song come up. "There isn't an octarine button on my controller!" Game over right out of the box!

Re:The impossible note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25574991)

If you do a Fourier transform of a musical track, each instrument will leave a distinct footprint for each note it plays. (The foot print will slide up and down the frequency scale depending on the pitch played, but it will still look nearly identical.)

I think the quote refers to the discovery of a foot print that clearly did not belong to any kind of guitar.

Is that bag-pipe tuning or something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25575367)

to a nonstandard, non eagbde

eagbde is pretty darned non-standard. Standard 6-string guitar tuning [wikipedia.org] is ebgdAE high to low.

Well, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25574419)

I for one welcome our new music math overlords.

From Wikipedia (1, Redundant)

bgspence (155914) | more than 5 years ago | (#25574867)

Opening chord

"A Hard Day's Night" is immediately identifiable before the vocals even begin, thanks to George Harrison's unmistakable Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string guitar's "mighty opening chord".[12] According to George Martin, "We knew it would open both the film and the soundtrack LP, so we wanted a particularly strong and effective beginning. The strident guitar chord was the perfect launch"[8] having what Ian MacDonald calls "'a significance in Beatles lore matched only by the concluding E major of "A Day in the Life", the two opening and closing the group's middle period of peak creativity'".[13] "That sound you just associate with those early 1960s Beatles records".[14]
Listen to the opening chord (helpinfo)
Analysis of the chord varies, with it being described as G7add9sus4,[13] G7sus4,[15][16] or G11sus4[12] and others below.
The exact chord is an Fadd9 confirmed by Harrison during an online chat on 15 February 2001:[17]
Q: Mr Harrison, what is the opening chord you used for "A Hard Day's Night"?
A: It is F with a G on top, but you'll have to ask Paul about the bass note to get the proper story.
According to Walter Everett, the opening chord has an introductory dominant function because McCartney plays D in the bass; Harrison and Martin play F A C G in twelve-string guitar and piano, over the bass D, giving the chord a mixture-coloured neighbor, F; two diatonic neighbors, A and C; plus an anticipation of the tonic, G -- the major subtonic as played on guitar being a borrowed chord commonly used by the Beatles, first in "P.S. I Love You" (see mode mixture), and later in "Every Little Thing", "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Got to Get You into My Life" (in the latter two against a tonic pedal).[18]
Film of the Beatles performing "A Hard Day's Night", shows both John and George gripping a Gm11 in 3rd position, not an Fadd9. The Fadd9 is used during the chorus and is the chord form used for the outro fade out.[citation needed]
In contrast, Alan W. Pollack interprets the chord as a surrogate dominant (surrogate V, the dominant preparing or leading to the tonic chord), in G major the dominant being D, with the G being an anticipation that resolves in the G major chord that opens the verse. He also suggests it is a mixture of d minor, F major, and G major (missing the B).[19] Tony Bacon calls it a Dm7sus4 (D F G A C), which is the dominant seventh (plus the fourth, G).[20] (For more information regarding chord functions see diatonic function.)
Everett points out that the chord relates to the Beatles' interest in pandiatonic harmony.[21]
Dominic Pedler has also provided an interpretation of the famous chord, with the Beatles and George Martin playing the following:
George Harrison: Fadd9 in 1st position on Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar
John Lennon: Fadd9 in 1st position on a Gibson J-160E 6-string acoustic guitar
Paul McCartney: high D played on the D-string, 12th fret on Hofner 500/1 electric bass
George Martin: D2-G2-D3 played on a Steinway Grand Piano
Ringo Starr: Subtle snare drum and ride cymbal
This gives the notes: G-B-D-F-A-C (the B is a harmonic). One of the interesting things about this chord (as described by Pedler) is how McCartney's high bass note reverberates inside the soundbox of Lennon's acoustic guitar and begins to be picked up on Lennon's microphone or pick-up during the sounding of the chord. This gives the chord its special "wavy" and unstable quality. Pedler describes the effect as a "virtual pull-off".[22]
Jason Brown, Professor for the Faculty of Computer Science at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, whose research interests include graph theory, combinatorics, and combinatorial algorithms, announced in October 2004 that after six months of research he succeeded in analysing the opening chord by "de-composing the sound into original frequencies, using a combination of computer software and old-fashioned chalkboard." According to Brown, the Rickenbacker guitar wasn't the only instrument used. "It wasn't just George Harrison playing it and it wasn't just the Beatles playing on it... There was a piano in the mix." Specifically, he claims that Harrison was playing the following notes on his 12 string guitar: a2, a3, d3, d4, g3, g4, c4, and another c4; McCartney played a d3 on his bass; producer George Martin was playing d3, f3, d5, g5, and e6 on the piano, while Lennon played a loud c5 on his six-string guitar.[23] A pdf of Brown's conclusions is available here http://www.mscs.dal.ca/~brown/n-oct04-harddayjib.pdf [mscs.dal.ca]
A repeated arpeggio outlining the notes of the opening chord ends the song in a circular fashion, fading out with the sound of helicopter blades. This provides "a sonic confirmation that the thirty-six hours we have just seen [in the movie] will go on and on and on" [13]. The song contains 12 other chords.[12]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Hard_Day's_Night_(song)#Opening_chord [wikipedia.org]

Nobody thought to look at the frequencies?!?!?! (1)

skintigh2 (456496) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575183)

So let me see if I got this straight: for 40 years Beatles fans have been fighting over what combination of frequencies were used in this chord, but not one of them thought to check what frequencies were being used in the chord until now?

For non-EEs out there, a Fourier transform is a basic algorithm to translate from the time domain to the frequency domain. Any audio program or player or graphic equalizer that displays the frequency spectrum instead of the actual wave coming out the speakers is using this transform. The idea that nobody thought to look at that display for 40 years is a more than a little absurd.

Re:Nobody thought to look at the frequencies?!?!?! (2, Interesting)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575511)

Graphic equalizers often cheat, actually.

I think the problem is a little more interesting than the story makes it out to be. As you point out, you should be able to recognize the overall chord pretty easily with an FT, but it's not quite as trivial to figure out who's playing what. For that you have to analyze the ratios of the harmonics, which turns into a nasty little decomposition problem when you've got more than one instrument playing the same note.

Re:Nobody thought to look at the frequencies?!?!?! (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25575839)

When involve ins a 'religous' war no one likes to check for any fact, it might mean they're wrong.

The exact chord is an Fadd9 confirmed by Harrison (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25575363)

"The exact chord is an Fadd9 confirmed by Harrison during an online chat on 15 February 2001:[17]

        Q: Mr Harrison, what is the opening chord you used for "A Hard Day's Night"?
        A: It is F with a G on top, but you'll have to ask Paul about the bass note to get the proper story. "

quoted
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Hard_Day%27s_Night_(song)

What chord did George play live then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25575907)

Did George just play the G7sus4 chord in concerts?

If he'd just waited for Beatles Rock Band... (0, Redundant)

ajd1474 (558490) | more than 5 years ago | (#25576351)

he'd know the mystery chord is most probably "the green button".
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