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New Type of Particle May Have Been Found

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the outside-the-pipe dept.

Science 281

An anonymous reader writes "The LHC is out of commission, but the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is still chugging along, and may have just discovered a new type of particle that would signal new physics. New Scientist reports that the Tevatron's CDF detector has found muons that seem to have been created outside of the beam pipe that confines the protons and anti-protons being smashed together. The standard model can't explain the muons, and some speculate that 'an unknown particle with a lifetime of about 20 picoseconds was produced in the collision, traveled about 1 centimeter, through the side of the beam pipe, and then decayed into muons.' The hypothetical particle even seems to have the right mass to account for one theory of dark matter."

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281 comments

hardly news... (3, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619729)

What do you think they make Peeps out of?!

Peeps are made of (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619791)

Chewons

Re:hardly news... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619859)

marshmallow?

Obama was FOR Illinois Senate SB1195 in 2003 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619955)

This would have outlawed most legitimate hunting shotguns (greater than 5 shell capacity). Obama was also for SB2165. One really has to wonder about him when he says he supports individual gun ownership, yet backed down when faced with an opportunity to support law-abiding gun owners. Why would he not want to allow you to use a hand gun to defend yourself against a burglar in your own home?

Re:Obama was FOR Illinois Senate SB1195 in 2003 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620473)

And, as the republican and gun nuts got more and more scared, their propaganda became more and more desperate. Loving every minute of it. Every time one of these pathetic packs of lies appear, I get happier!

Re:hardly news... (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620057)

The LHC is out of commission

What? What did I miss? That sabotage thing with the beercans? Is it still not fixed?

Re:hardly news... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620643)

No, a capacitor blew, so they had to de-cool the entire facility to get in and inspect it. Because it's coming into European winter, and the facility takes months to cool, they've had to wait until next year (I'm not sure why it doesn't work in winter, but I'm from warmer climes, so there's probably something about extreme colds I'm not aware of). Also, the beercan sabotage thing was with an earlier facility, but you'd have to check on wikipedia to see which one.

Anonymous to mod on this thread :)

Re:hardly news... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620671)

No, a capacitor blew, so they had to de-cool the entire facility to get in and inspect it. Because it's coming into European winter, and the facility takes months to cool, they've had to wait until next year (I'm not sure why it doesn't work in winter, but I'm from warmer climes, so there's probably something about extreme colds I'm not aware of).

That's because it takes a lot of electricity to cool the collider down. Europeans like to use a lot of electricity to keep their buildings warm in winter, which drives up the price of electricity. So they wait for summer when electricity is cheaper and the giant German solar panel farms are pumping out lots of jiggawatts.

Re:hardly news... (1)

peektwice (726616) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620847)

nope, the damn thing had a giant liquid helium leak... see here. [web.cern.ch]
Perhaps caused by a capacitor, although I doubt it. The article stipulates only an electrical failure between two magnets.

That's no muon... (4, Funny)

verbalcontract (909922) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619783)

That's no muon, it's a space station!

I'll show myself out.

Re:That's no muon... (4, Funny)

bunratty (545641) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619853)

Too late. You're caught in a tractor beam!

Re:That's no muon... (4, Funny)

windsurfer619 (958212) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620059)

It's a trap!

Re:That's no muon... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620327)

I gotta bad feeling about this.

No, seriously. You're making me hurt. Stop it.

coincidence? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619849)

I just find it odd that with the introduction of a new collider this one has finally found something.

Re:coincidence? (1)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620049)

Not that odd... read "From Eros To Gaia" by Freeman Dyson, he has a LOT to say about "big-money science" versus "small-money science". Guess which one the LHC is.

Re:coincidence? (5, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620179)

The Tevatron is big money science. the LHC is bigger money science.

Re:coincidence? (4, Interesting)

domanova (729385) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621233)

Interesting. I'd guess that the Tev and the SPS (which is now the LHC injector) are sort of the-same-money physics, in real terms, as the LHC. But I don't know. The SSC, which was going to reach higher energy than the LHC, got far too expensive, mostly because of gross mismanagement. Disclaimer: I've worked on all the mentioned machines, and the demise of SSC http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_Super_Collider [wikipedia.org] hurt a lot.

Re:coincidence? (4, Interesting)

harlows_monkeys (106428) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620193)

Warning: the following is from memory, so details may be off. The gist of it is correct.

There's a section in "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman" where he goes to see the collider at the new school he's just arrived at. The collider at the school he came from is state of the art, so he's expecting something even better at the new school, because they have been producing many remarkable, cutting edge, results.

The collider he finds is small, and far from state of the art, and almost held together by duct tape and chewing gum. He realizes that this is why it has produced such remarkable results--the scientists that work with it are very hands on, getting down and dirty with the experiments, coaxing every last bit out of them. The scientists using the shiny new state of the art collider are sitting back in their offices, just getting disembodied data that they haven't really connected with, and don't understand on a gut level like their colleagues using the "inferior" equipment do.

Feynman knew then he was going to happy at the new school.

Re:coincidence? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620297)

I work in electrical engineering, and unfortunately very few people play with scopes and irons anymore. "Hardware" engineering is mostly abstract concept juggling on computers these days.

I'm the guy with the 45 year old tube scope with Nixie tube digital readout and the two soldering irons...

Re:coincidence? (1)

Toth (36602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620545)

Where are the folks who can solder, "feel" what a capacitor does and do all Ohm's Law calculation in their subconscious?

Trades schools used to produce them in quantity. All the guys at my company who do component level work are over 40 except for one who emigrated from China.

They have come from somewhere. I can't imagine Engineers getting anything work or fixing anything without technicians. :)

Re:coincidence? (2, Interesting)

dnoyeb (547705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620739)

I'm an engineer. I can use most of the equipment in the office except the soldering iron. I tried a few times and messed up a few things. Wasted some pads. Learned my lesson. Let the experts do their thing. I have mine...

Re:coincidence? (2, Insightful)

budgenator (254554) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621297)

Watch the experts do a few, try a couple of the larger connections, get a feel for the correct heat and how the solder flows and you'll be fine. there's a touch to it, it's not hard but you need a little practice, the old fashioned 40/60 lead tin solder is easier than the newer stuff.

Re:coincidence? (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621263)

They're paper EE's from offshore colleges. That fad won't last.

You can buy [hobbyengineering.com] a 2 channel USB O-scope for $140, and a datalogger for $80. Most electronics companies will send you bits of the latest science just for asking. I think if the kids today want to take over the world, they have the tools available. Do they have the wits?

Re:coincidence? (1)

ChienAndalu (1293930) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620467)

Yeah that's how I remember it, too. Great book, everybody with an interest in science should read it! You can even *aehm* find an entertaining audio book version.

Re:coincidence? (0, Troll)

Tawnos (1030370) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620515)

"Going to happy at the new school"

Is that anything like "Going to accidentally the whole school"? ;)

I know where the door is. I'll let myself out.

Re:coincidence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620799)

My god, what a great book. His forays into safe cracking and blueprint reading are particularly hilarious. A must read for everyone here.

Other than the Top quark? (1)

MushMouth (5650) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620433)

And the best evidence for the Higgs? CDF and d0 found exactly what they were built for, and probably a lot more.

Re:coincidence? (3, Insightful)

buchner.johannes (1139593) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620569)

The work is a ongoing one. You take measures all the time, it's not just one shot.

That's why I will believe the summary when a significant amount of particles fit for scientifically publication (say, 20) are detected.

Working against measurement mistakes and systematic errors should not be underestimated.

Was it long-awaited super-heavy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619851)

CowboyTacoQuark?

One theory of dark matter eh? (4, Interesting)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619861)

The hypothetical particle even seems to have the right mass to account for one theory of dark matter."

Not to ask the blatantly obvious, but if it's the right mass for one theory of dark matter, I can't help but wonder where they are all being produced. Given a life of 20 picoseconds, I can't imagine that there would be monstrous factories of these things all over the universe to account for the stupidly large amount of mass they are supposed to account for. How come we haven't found them before?

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619977)

Maybe these new particles are all moving at nearly c?

You're right, probably the dark matter implications won't hold up.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

Tacvek (948259) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621167)

As somebody notes below, it is apparently already traveling at (1cm/20ps)=~1.66c. So I'd say that at least some of the particles are traveling at over 99.99% c. ;D

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (5, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620083)

An absolutely good question. I've been wondering about the effect of radiation from GRBs, blackholes, and other radiation sources in the Universe for a while now. That radiation must have an effect other than raising the ambient temperature a little bit. Even if the radiation is not enough to fry all life on this planet, it's possible that radiation may have an effect on the Sun's activity... which in turn directly affects our climate.

I do understand that the collider is a bit different than our Sun, but does anyone know what effect gamma ray bursts have on the efficacy or activity of our Sun?

With all the hubbub about global warming, I've been getting more interested in what affect our planet's climate. Recently we have found/discovered a few things that might have some effect. While it seems a small thing at best, what is not known is the effect of combined events (or lack of) from outside our solar system on how our Sun behaves.

Note: I am not convinced that man has not contributed to climate change. I simply am not convinced that we truly understand how and what controls our climate. I'd like to know all the factors that have nothing to do with mankind's interference. Until we do, there is no method to fully describe the climate model, nor predict any change to it.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (-1, Flamebait)

kipman725 (1248126) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620167)

This state of confusion is quite common among the inhabitants of North America. How hard is it to just acknowledge the simple explanation (even if you are the worst offenders if this is the case)? I mean seriously cosmic gamma ray bursts?!?

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (5, Insightful)

Shark (78448) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620349)

The first thing to realise, regardless of which side of the debate you are, is that there is a lot more politics than science being done on climate change.

I believe this is why the acceptable term has now become 'climate change' rather than 'global warming'.

I'm pretty certain that we do influence the climate. But Parent has a very good point that argument without all the facts is still nothing more than rhetoric.

There are plenty of theories on either side of that debate, but way too much political pressure (agenda?) to even allow for any form of educated and intelligent debate.

Whoever thinks this is Al Gore vs. Big Oil definitely hasn't looked into it deeply enough.

If you want to reduce CO2, *plant trees*. Elaborating a CO2 tax scam is merely a tool for social control.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620571)

Well, maybe zappepcs was exposed to too many Stan Lee and Jack Kirby-inspired superhero comic books that involve some kind of transformation through exposure to "cosmic rays" or "the power cosmic". You just have to look at the mammaries depicted in Marvel superhero comics to realize they don't exactly foster a strong connection to reality.

If "cosmic rays" can turn ordinary people into the Fantastic Four, think what they could do to the sun!

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (3, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620837)

kipman, I did not ask for an explanation of global warming. I am curious as to what effects space radiation has on our solar system, and in turn, our planet. Feel free to assume that every conversation about the planet earth is or should be able man's contribution to the global warming effect. You may also feel free to consider that there is more to science than answering politically charge questions. More often than not scientists simply want to answer a question to know the answer... whatever their personal beliefs. I'm not confused at all. I'm not looking for a cause of global warming. I'm asking what effects various types of radiation have on our Sun and solar system... and in turn, on our planet.

Until not long ago it was not thought that anything escaped a black hole, now we know different. Fortunately we've not been in the middle of the full force of some of that radiation in the past few hundred million years (that we know of). There are some fantastically energetic radiation sources in the Universe, and understanding how they might affect us is an important thing. Perhaps as important or more so than tracking any objects that might collide with the Earth.

Now, we find new particles and the question is how do they interact with other matter in the Universe/Solar System. What effect will they have on our understanding of physics etc. Your dismissal of the thought is rather boorish. This might bring you close to being up to speed: http://www.jrmooneyham.com/ctctgam.html [jrmooneyham.com] or at least give you a clue.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621275)

A well thought-out, thoughtful, and courteous response. I wish I had mod points for you.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0, Offtopic)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620275)

Going with the change of topic from subatomic particles to human influence/lack of on the environment (I take bait easily enough)

Have you ever driven through the countryside and seen those big long white tent looking things? They are called greenhouses [wikipedia.org] . They have lots of plants living in them. They are generally substantially warmer than the area they are built in. This is because they retain heat. Opening a window at the top of the greenhouse will dramatically lower the temperature almost immediately.

From the wiki:
This warms the air near the ground, and this air is prevented from rising and flowing away. This can be demonstrated by opening a small window near the roof of a greenhouse: the temperature drops considerably.

Now. If we add carbon particles to the atmosphere, it acts to trap the heat reflected off the planet [csiro.au] .

Now, be convinced that man is contributing to the warming of the planet by adding carbon to the atmosphere [noaa.gov] at an alarming rate.

In short:
1) Stop hijacking threads.
2) Open your eyes to man's influence on the climate.
3) Accept that we are screwing the earth, not some "magical background radiation".
4) Take steps to reduce YOUR impact. Recycle, use clean energy, be selective with your purchases.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0, Offtopic)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620295)

Oh, one more.

5) Stop pissing off environmentalists like me with your "maybe it's not us..." rhetoric.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620409)

Oh, another one.

6) I'll keep going while there are modpoints to be spent on this kind of posts.

Kind regards, OP.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620579)

be convinced that man is contributing to the warming of the planet by adding carbon to the atmosphere at an alarming rate

Why? It's both unproven (it's even highly unlikely due to the latest eight years of cooling) and factually suspect due to the effect of CO2 in the atmosphere already being fully saturated.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620719)

Recycling bothers me, especially the recycling of plastic. Why is burying stablized carbon in the ground a bad thing?

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0, Offtopic)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620735)

Well, thanks for playing, but NO

I did NOT say that mankind is not contributing. There are many many reasons not to pollute our ecological system. Global climate effects are only one, and they are not the immediate need reasons.

What I did say is that I am curious as to how such things as new particles, GRBs, Hawking radiation and hundreds of other things that enter our solar system affect the planet's climate. You and a couple other take this to mean that this is a global warming because of mankind argument... and I'd like to point out that fine concerned people like you stop the conversation from ever being about fully and scientifically understanding what truly affects our climate outside of man's contribution.

Never test the water in a lake, just assume that man's urine is causing the ammonia levels to be so high. Wake up!!

If I want to talk about particle physics and space radiation and perhaps how that might affect our planet, it is NOT an invitation for you to spew idiocy across the thread.

Try now, if you can, to please contribute something to the questions posed: How might these discoveries lead mankind to truly understand what in space affects our planet, climate included.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621111)

2) Open your eyes to man's influence on the climate. 3) Accept that we are screwing the earth, not some "magical background radiation". 4) Take steps to reduce YOUR impact. Recycle, use clean energy, be selective with your purchases.

Hello Mr Science. Please answer these genuine science questions.

  1. How much has the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere gone up since the industrial revolution? How much has the temperature gone up?
  2. When and why were Europe and North America deforested? Why does it matter?
  3. What bad effects of the temperature rise have been observed since the industrial revolution? How sure are you that the bad effects are attributable to global warming?
  4. How much are you predicting that the carbon dioxide levels will rise?
  5. How much are you predicting that the temperatures will rise?
  6. What bad effects are you predicting due to increased temperature?
  7. Isn't it true that without the greenhouse effect, the earth would be a frozen ball of ice and life would be very difficult on the planet?

Since you presumably have some theory about global warming, please provide your predictions so that we can test that theory.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (5, Informative)

mpsheppa (1088477) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620121)

Not to ask the blatantly obvious, but if it's the right mass for one theory of dark matter, I can't help but wonder where they are all being produced. Given a life of 20 picoseconds, I can't imagine that there would be monstrous factories of these things all over the universe to account for the stupidly large amount of mass they are supposed to account for. How come we haven't found them before?

I thought the same thing at first, but the article states that they are theorizing that the particle produced is not a dark matter particle itself, but rather the particle that carries forces between dark matter particles. It is entirely possible that there are stable dark-matter particles, but for the force-carrying particles to be unstable when produced in isolation.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (5, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621099)

More than possible. Of the force carrying particles we know of, only the photon is stable. The graviton, if it exists, should be stable. But the W+/-, Z and all the various flavours of gluons are unstable.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

WalksOnDirt (704461) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620133)

I think it matches a particle predicted by one theory that might explain dark matter, not that the new particle actually could be a typical dark matter particle.

Bingo! RTFA in Action (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620379)

The picosecond particle is a hypothetical force carrier type particle that the dark mater would interact with.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620307)

Not to ask the blatantly obvious, but if it's the right mass for one theory of dark matter

Simple: It isn't dark matter itself, but a particle in that theory of dark matter. Whatever dark matter is, we have a pretty good idea what it isn't and this isn't dark matter.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

machine321 (458769) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620727)

I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it, and the particle involved in this case is not dark matter.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (1)

umberto unity (1142849) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620341)

I can't imagine that there would be monstrous factories of these things all over the universe to account for the stupidly large amount of mass they are supposed to account for.

It turns out there was actually a monstrous factory of these things -- scientists call it the big bang, and it's hard to make in the lab, so we're just getting enough energy together now to make them extremely infrequently.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620733)

This particle seems to be decaying, so it probably isn't the dark matter. It's antiparticle could be stable though. I wonder if their events have some missing transversal energy, if particles are produced in pairs.

The fact is that it wasn't detected until now (still it could be a false signal), so it certainly must have a very tiny cross section making them hard to observe from cosmic ray decays.

Waiting for LHC where it should be generated in larger amounts. Good for particle physics that something new finally appears in front.

Re:One theory of dark matter eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621273)

The hypothetical particle even seems to have the right mass to account for one theory of dark matter."

Not to ask the blatantly obvious, but if it's the right mass for one theory of dark matter, I can't help but wonder where they are all being produced. Given a life of 20 picoseconds, I can't imagine that there would be monstrous factories of these things all over the universe to account for the stupidly large amount of mass they are supposed to account for. How come we haven't found them before?

I find your lack of faith disturbing.

please let it be the higgs boson (5, Funny)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619865)

I wish it was the god particle, rendering the whole point of building the LHC an epic fail. It would just be deliciously ironic.

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619939)

If the standard model is wrong, there are almost certainly more particles to be found at higher and higher energies (see any website that is pulled up by googling "beyond the standard model"). And the tevatron isn't likely to probe much higher energies...

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620509)

>> the tevatron

What's that, the sneakernet of high energy physics?

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (-1, Troll)

kipman725 (1248126) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620113)

"God" particle did you hit ALL the branches of the stupid tree as you fell down to the level of faux news?

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620185)

"The Higgs boson is frequently referred to as 'the god particle', a name adopted after Leon Lederman's book which enjoyed wide popularity. "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_boson

Nice job making yourself look like a complete tool.

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (1)

philspear (1142299) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620203)

Clearly not: he didn't say anything about it being natural and therefore healthy, that's a major branch he missed.

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (1)

Tatsh (893946) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620309)

Something is wrong with your keyboard as it puts au in place o when it comes to the word fox. :P

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620539)

That's nau typau, it's the laung faurgautten Higgs mauraun particle.

maybe they could rename it (4, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620367)

the deliciously ironic particle

Re:maybe they could rename it (1)

PaganRitual (551879) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621081)

You can actually predict the weather by these particles. Everytime they get together with one another, it rains.

Re:maybe they could rename it (2, Funny)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621141)

Ah, so it's the Hungry Quark. It's anti-particle is the Tired Quark.

Re:please let it be the higgs boson (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621169)

No way. The linked article "one theory of dark matter" calls it PAMELA's Bosom er I mean Boson.

When asked about the new particle (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25619875)

When asked about the new particle during the first test, one of the instruments that was monitoring it malfunctioned. One of the resident scientists were quoted as saying:

"Overhead capacitors to one oh five percent. Uh, it's
probably not a problem, probably, but I'm showing a small discrepancy
in... well, no, it's well within acceptable bounds again. Sustaining
sequence."

Re:When asked about the new particle (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620085)

Thankfully another scientist had a crowbar at hand.

More data, less hype at arxiv (5, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619909)

The New Scientist article points to a paper at arxiv:

http://arxiv.org/abs/0810.5357 [arxiv.org]

with the rather less sensational title:

Study of multi-muon events produced in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

I'm amused to note that the author list stretches over three pages, which I gather is common for this sort of paper.

of course less hype ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620169)

... because a publication is not about excitement or popularity, but about solid results and conclusions.

For excitement and popularity one publishes in Nature or Scientific American.

Re:More data, less hype at arxiv (5, Funny)

PalmHair (1222728) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620301)

Femilab studies multi-moan events produced with p-bar colisions and squirts? Reminds me of the end-of-the-world party I hosted just before the LHC was fired up. Let me tell you - I regret nothing, apart from not wearing a condom. You will say I am narrow-minded and too much focused on sex. It is not me, it is the world around me, I say. The first-ever artifical satelite to circle the Earth was in a shape of a four-tailed spermatozoid. The ultimate scientific triumph of the western world - the Apollo mission was lifted by the Saturn-5 rockets - the biggest phallic symbol ever made by the man. And now the Large H Collider that comes with the promise of pushing the entire Earth into a black hole - the most ultimate sexual act ever. Yes, I am a nerd and if you are reading this, you can be sure you are one too. Science and technology are made up by people like us - to substitute in a cowardly way what every man is supposed to live for - fast cars and beautiful women. Cheers!

Probability? (2, Informative)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619915)

The question here is about repeatability, and given how long it's taken to have an anomaly like this surface, the only other accelerator that might be capable of confirming this find (ie, doing it again) is probably the LHC.

Anyone know what the probability of doing this again might be?

Re:Probability? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621283)

No, but it might not be as improbable as you would expect, as i gather Fermilab has been quite frantically increasing it's volume of recorded collisions over the last couple of years, anticipating the launch of the LHC.

Fermilab Maternity Ward (4, Funny)

EEPROMS (889169) | more than 5 years ago | (#25619931)

Doctor " Congratulations professor!! you have a new bouncing baby particle"
Professor "look at those electrons, its hung like a horse"
Doctor "eer, sorry to disappoint your sir but that is just residual background noise"

Re:Fermilab Maternity Ward (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621309)

Doctor: "On closer examination, that is not background noise... Professor, I believe we may have detected a strapon."

i can't believe it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620053)

those democrats had that old woman killed to get obama the sympathy vote. it shows there is no end to what the democrats will do to get their latest bitch into office.

Re:i can't believe it (-1, Offtopic)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620171)

Troll or not, that's pretty funny.

Clearly this is going to escalate: tonight McCain will start killing off all his surviving relatives (his 60-year-old great-grandchildren, one presumes).

Afterward Obama will have to retaliate by killing random people in the street, because his terrorist pals are too well armed to go after.

Where will this madness end? Will somebody think to barbecue the children?!

I'm hoping that both candidates will go for the ultimate in sympathy-vote tactics: killing themselves!

Re:i can't believe it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620925)

Exactly the reason why I read at -1. I don't wanna miss those gems.

And these guys know enough... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620079)

And these guys know enough to assure us that nothing can go wrong at the LHC. Weren't a lot of physics guys hired by Wall St. to run models a few years ago?

The little particle that could... (2, Funny)

C18H27NO3 (1282172) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620145)

Poor little guy gets a single centimeter in 20 picoseconds-time and poofs into nothingness but I'll give it an A for effort. I hope this does ultimately afford us a new awareness into how things work down the road; preferably in my lifetime. (Read: Something absolutely astounding).

Re:The little particle that could... (4, Funny)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620371)

Poor little guy gets a single centimeter in 20 picoseconds-time and poofs into nothingness

I can already see the spam... "P4rticl3 not going far enough? Last longer! Natur4l P4rticle eh4ncement!"

Re:The little particle that could... (2, Funny)

RxScram (948658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620749)

Wow, that's 500,000,000 per second... no wonder it was so short lived... it realized it was going 1.66 times the speed of light, so it expanded to become our new universe!!!!

New Physics (3, Interesting)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620357)

I conjecture that it's the same old physics, and that we only understand it a bit better.

Re:New Physics (5, Insightful)

ThanatosMinor (1046978) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620457)

I conjecture that it's the same old physics, and that we only understand it a bit better.

Physics is not Truth, nor is it nature or reality. It is an attempt at a scientific model of nature. When we only had Newtonian mechanics, General relativity was new physics. New models, new math, new science, same reality.

Re:New Physics (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620511)

shut your fucking mouth you fucking heretic. physics is the new god. fuck you straight to hell. you're a bitch and a fucktard and probably a faggot too.

Yay (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25620553)

I am an anonymous coward

Very exciting, but... (4, Insightful)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620565)

> The hypothetical particle even seems to have the right mass to account for one theory of dark matter.

That may say more about the number of theories of dark matter than about this particle.

I'm glad they found it (4, Funny)

Dan East (318230) | more than 5 years ago | (#25620919)

"Particle May Have Been Found "

It is really good - and amazing - that they found this particle. I've lost sub-atomic particles before, and the things are just so incredibly small that it is unbelievably difficult to find them again. The resulting migraine from eye-strain can be terrible.

Uhh... (0, Redundant)

Samah (729132) | more than 5 years ago | (#25621227)

"The LHC is out of commission,

This is news to me. Define "out of commission" and give me a link to backup claims.

Yes, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25621329)

does it run on linux?

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