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"Minority Report"-Like Control For PC

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 5 years ago | from the baby-steps dept.

Displays 138

An anonymous reader writes "A startup named Mgestyk Technologies claims that they have an affordable solution for 'Minority Report'-like PC control. They have released a video in which they use hand gestures to play games like Halo and Guitar Hero, as well as perform 'multi-touch' interactions for applications like Google Earth. Engadget and Gizmodo discuss the potential of the technology but point out that the system has visible lag when used for gaming. Will camera-based interfaces ever meet the low-latency demands of gaming? For how much longer will we still be using keyboards, mice and joysticks?"

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138 comments

Porno (4, Funny)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682821)

I definitely want Minority Report-like hand controls for porno.

Re:Porno (4, Funny)

LandDolphin (1202876) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683029)

Nah, it will break as it keeps going back and forth between FW and Rew.

Re:Porno (4, Funny)

rhizome (115711) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683533)

I definitely want Minority Report-like hand controls for porno.

Yeah man, remember the controls for zooming? Wakka wakka!

Re:Porno (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684741)

I definitely want Minority Report-like hand controls for porno.

Yeah man, remember the controls for zooming? Wakka wakka!

More important the "scale" controls.

Re:Porno (2, Informative)

sdpuppy (898535) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683595)

No - for your particular application you'd want something like this:
http://inition.com/inition/product.php?URL_=product_glove_vti_grasp&SubCatID_=26 [inition.com]

CyberGrasp haptic feedback interface - its a cyberglove with tactile feedback

In other words, (RTFL)

With the CyberGrasp force feedback system, users are able to explore the physical properties of computer-generated 3D objects they manipulate in a simulated 'virtual world.'

The difference between that and the "Minority Report" type interface is like the difference between IMax 3D and print media.

I suppose it depends on what you prefer.

Re:Porno (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683625)

Not specialized enough: this [virtual-fleshlight.com] really puts the "Human interface" in "USB HID".

Re:Porno (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684357)

The interactive Diltron is a moving dong that follows your thrusting action stroke for stroke and gives the girl on the other end of the connection the screw of her life.

FUFME, anyone ?

Re:Porno (2, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684535)

From the link:

If you already have a Fleshlight use this Plug and Play kit to make it interactive. Simply unscrew the cap from your fleshlight and screw our cap on. Then plug the USB cable into your computer and you are ready to go. Includes free game.

And how!

Re:Porno (1)

jepaton (662235) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683763)

One problem - it's non tactile. But with some further programming the system could be operated like a joystick.

Of course the latency can match (3, Interesting)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682843)

, it will just require faster cameras with better movement algorithms.

There reals question is do people want to stand there and point at the air with no tactile feed back?

Says the guy (0, Flamebait)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682867)

with a Wii..sheesh, what a moron.

Re:Of course the latency can match (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25682971)

That's right. Factory control and QA systems use machine vision in extremely low latency applications now. The issue is whether it is desirable enough to fund the development and reach economies of scale in production...

Re:Of course the latency can match (3, Interesting)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682997)

It would be healthier and yes I think people do want it. They don't mind looking like complete twats talking on their blue tooth headset or walking around with fanny packs and those two things along are more embarrassing than doing Minority Report-like hand movements, imo.

Re:Of course the latency can match (5, Insightful)

holophrastic (221104) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684155)

People seem to think that keyboards and mice are lower on the totem pole than hand gestures. That's just rediculous. Hand gestures are all but useless for the vast majority of interfaces, and it has nothing to do with latency or technology in general. I've been yelling at minority report since it was released. Have you ever tride boxing? At your local fitness gym for example? You can't keep your arms up for an hour -- your shoulders aren't built for it. Ten minutes of using hand gestures, and you'll be too exhausted to work anymore.

Aside from physical strength, there's the obverse side of the coin. If you did have the muscles to hold up your arms, they'd be too strong for any degree of precision. Keyboards have a great feature besides tactile feedback -- they have discrete commands. If you try to press the letter "T", you aren't going to miss. You'll know that you've pushed it. And if you do miss, you'll know that you've missed.

Consider trying to draw a straight line with hand gestures. It's going to be nearly impossible. Really easy with a keyboard.

All of these "advanced" interfaces are nice for some specific scenarios, and tehy are all great gimmicks for consumer garbage. But they are rarely appropriate for real business. Voice recognition is a great example. There's one simple proof to why voice recognition won't ever be a as accurate as a keyboard -- talking isn't as accurate as writing. It's that simple. People mis-speak, and mis-hear all the time. Would you accept a voice recognition system that interupts you to say "sorry, what was that last word? I missed that." Of course not.

Voice recognition certainly has uses, of course. If you lack fingers, or the space for a keyboard, or your hands are busy doing other things -- like flying a fighter jet -- certainly. But if you're composing an essay, or a report, or doing anything where accuracy matters. . .why not type up your resume by throwing a frisbee -- one foot for the letter A, two feet for the letter B., and so on.

"pushing a button" is incredibly simple, incredibly easy, direct, and discrete. It's quantifyable, by all parties.

Re:Of course the latency can match (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684431)

But keyboards and mice just aren't "cool" now.
Its all about gestures! Get with the times gramps!

But seriously, it can have its uses.
- Organization due to being able to work with loads of things using two hands.
- modelling - could easily create a precise movement mode)
  Could also add a tactile feedback glove with this to have an actual feel for the model you are creating.
Generally just things that require clicks over precision really.
Multi-focus interfaces are much more appealing than single-focus. (Google Earth example... as a good example)
Also, you don't need to hold your arms in mid-air, just sit them on your desk, simple.

I'd still rather have a mind-reader though.
And that good one (forgot the name, NOT Neuro-fail) with loads of inputs that can be trained fairly easily - unless you are as dense as a rock - looks interesting.

Re:Of course the latency can match (1)

sexybomber (740588) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684633)

You can't keep your arms up for an hour -- your shoulders aren't built for it. Ten minutes of using hand gestures, and you'll be too exhausted to work anymore.

Who says you have to keep your arms up? You could have something like a Surface to replace the keyboard and mouse that sit on the (real, physical) desktop, and also make the screen itself touchable. It might be weird switching between the two, but I'm imagining something like a kiosk, perhaps with an adjustable-height "keyboardish" surface.

Why yes, I have been smoking, how'd you guess?

Re:Of course the latency can match (1)

ross.w (87751) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684733)

I don't think the majority of slahdotters used to one handed surfing would have a problem with this.

Re:Of course the latency can match (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 5 years ago | (#25685137)

I don't think the majority of slahdotters used to one handed surfing would have a problem with this.

I disagree. In that application, they're still using a joystick.

Re:Of course the latency can match (2, Interesting)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684915)

You can't keep your arms up for an hour -- your shoulders aren't built for it. Ten minutes of using hand gestures, and you'll be too exhausted to work anymore.

I think you have discovered the cure for the fitness problem among geeks and office workers alike.

Consider trying to draw a straight line with hand gestures. It's going to be nearly impossible. Really easy with a keyboard.

While I agree in principal with your beef, I totally disagree with this example.

You assume that the hand-gesture interface for line drawing is going to look as closely like actually drawing a line as possible. That would be a terrible design decision and other than in the movies where there is dramatic effect, I don't think anyone would be so foolish as to implement it that way. A smart implementation would conform to what is easy for a human to do -- like one finger poke for the start of the line and another finger poke for the end of the line that follows your finger around until you poke even deeper in order to indicate that is where you want the end of the straight line to be.

Re:Of course the latency can match (1)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684783)

We have the cameras, at least. A friend of mine works for an outfit that develops drivers for them and related capture boards. The real problem is expense (which always tends to decrease-- just look at optical media technology) and demand. We may have the tech, but if people decide that their current interfaces are good enough, then it's going to go nowhere.

Energy Expended (3, Insightful)

negRo_slim (636783) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682847)

Ahh yes even more opportunity to damage my body with repetitive motions!

Re:Energy Expended (1)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683651)

Yes, except this time rahter then being in a wrist brace you'll be in a full body cast. It's the future baby! Yeahh!

hmm.. (5, Informative)

max99ted (192208) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682853)

..I thought this type of input was found to be tiring after using it for only 5 or 10 minutes? Or is that just for slashdot types? :)

Re:hmm.. (5, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683009)

..I thought this type of input was found to be tiring after using it for only 5 or 10 minutes? Or is that just for slashdot types? :)

Did you even see the movie? On these types of systems, you can do anything you need to do in less than 30 seconds, after which it's time for more high-speed chases.

Clearly, you just don't understand high technology.

Re:hmm.. (4, Insightful)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683301)

It always seemed silly to me to track hand movements for basic computing.

Neil Stephenson had it right in Snow Crash with Hiro's computer/terminal.

Track eye movements. A wink is a click. A two-eyed wink could be back, or escape.
Such a system could work with goggles or sci-fi contact lenses.
If we need to add hands on top of that for gaming or CAD or Photoshop, that would be fine.
But the basics start with what we're looking at, with our eyes.

OF course that doesn't make such an easily cool looking moving scene.

Re:hmm.. (3, Informative)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683425)

Track eye movements. A wink is a click. A two-eyed wink could be back, or escape. Such a system could work with goggles or sci-fi contact lenses. If we need to add hands on top of that for gaming or CAD or Photoshop, that would be fine. But the basics start with what we're looking at, with our eyes.

The several years old 'Nouse' [newscientist.com] . Nose tracking for mouse movement, blinks for mouse clicks.

Re:hmm.. (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683715)

Sounds cool, but define the difference between a wink and a blink.

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683799)

Wink with one eye, blink with two.

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683937)

Try it. A wink takes much longer.

Nose tracking? (1)

fuego451 (958976) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683815)

They called me Hawk in the Army and it wasn't for my vision. With my beak, this system would explode.

Re:hmm.. (1)

BorgAssimilator (1167391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683465)

Track eye movements. A wink is a click. A two-eyed wink could be back, or escape. Such a system could work with goggles or sci-fi contact lenses.

Yeah, but think of all the random muscle spasms that would come out of that. It would get really annoying really quickly...

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684021)

Like twitching a steering wheel half an inch causes you to careen of the road??
It's not as blunt an "instrument" as a sledge hammer or even a steering wheel.
You're just talking levels of refinement in the implementation.

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684377)

Oh please no. Our eyes do enough work day to day just performing their basic function, without having to start doing somersaults and superhuman feats to operate a computer.

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684775)

They're already looking in the right place.

Or do you compute from behind closed eyes?

Re:hmm.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684471)

so every time i blink i go back a page?

Headed in the wrong direction (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25682873)

Everything should be tactile push buttons, dials and levers.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (3, Funny)

negRo_slim (636783) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682919)

Everything should be tactile push buttons, dials and levers.

I'm tired of you damn kids coming along and thinking every new fangled method of connecting electro-mechanical circuits is just the bees knees! I do believe toggle switches and rope/pulley systems have served us well for this long and can continue to serve us well into the future!

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (2)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683243)

Toggle switches were fine for Scotty and Sulu. They're good enough for me.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683771)

Amen

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684379)

Don't forget the big rotary knob. You HAD to have the big rotary knob for when Scotty or Kirk had to really crank up the juice.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (1)

BorgAssimilator (1167391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683517)

Actually, that is something to consider. In Star Trek everyone is constantly pushing on flat interfaces everywhere. I would think that I'd get pretty bored with that fairly quickly. Tom Paris did, which led him to creating basic button, switch, and lever controls for the Delta Flyer.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683939)

Which was lame as hell..second only to the joystick Riker used.

Completely misses the point.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (3, Insightful)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684781)

typing into a keyboard or sliding a mouse around all day isn't particularly exciting either. but input devices aren't meant to be exciting or interesting. they're supposed to be useful/practical.

touch screens are so popular because they're intuitive and easy to use. the more natural an input device feels, the more transparent it becomes, and the more effective it is at its job. ideally, the input device should be unnoticeable to the user. they should feel like they're directly manipulating & interacting with the virtual content on the screen.

the ball-mouse was adopted so quickly because it greatly reduces the effort needed to interact with computer software. when your hand is on the mouse, the cursor becomes just an extension of your arm. moving the pointer becomes effortless and natural. whereas, with a keyboard you have to fiddle with a bunch of clumsy arrow buttons, and this creates a virtual & psychological gap between the user and the software they're trying to interact with.

the touch screen is an evolution of the mouse cursor. with it you can directly point and touch items on the screen to interact with them. there's no need for a mouse or pointer. that eliminates another gap between the user and the virtual environment.

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683903)

Everything should be tactile push buttons, dials and levers.

I do believe toggle switches and rope/pulley systems have served us well for this long and can continue to serve us well into the future!

Amateur. In ancient Thundera, we used Fire and Ice!

Re:Headed in the wrong direction (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684439)

Everything should be tactile push buttons, dials and levers.
.

This was the last year for our pull-the-lever voting machines.

Invented here in upstate New York and first used in Lockport in 1892. Vote: The Machinery of Democracy [si.edu]

I will miss them.

Each little lever snapping into place with a loud and satisfying "Clack!" and revealing a clear and unmistakable red X.

There was never any ambiguity about what you had done and everything was reversible until you pulled the one big Big lever and exited the booth.

Generally speaking, with a dial, the mid-range is safe and the extremes are dangerous.

The position of a lever has equal clarity and the lever itself has enough resistance that it cannot be moved accidentally.

These are lessons you can teach a child.

Alternate Input Devices (1)

Emb3rz (1210286) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682897)

I just ordered an OCZ NIA today. This after having reviewed the three top contenders in the arena of brain-controlled input devices. Kind of disappointed that the new one from Emotiv isn't available yet - with its additional electrodes and gyros to detect head position it looks like a promising piece of gear.

One of the cool things from the demo video of the Emotiv EPOC was that of their official game where you use the controller for, well, everything. One of the clips showed a man levitating a boulder ingame by focusing on the 'lift' action and raising his hand. Perhaps advances in this arena could negate any usefulness for camera-based systems?

Re:Alternate Input Devices (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684945)

thought commands definitely have a lot of potential to supersede all other input devices/technologies. i've never seen, or heard of, the OCZ NIA or Emotiv EPOC, but if there are effective neural signal monitors that aren't prohibitively expensive, i'd be interested to learn more about them.

if an advanced neural interface can be developed to accurately read thought commands, conventional input devices would become largely obsolete. paraplegics and other users with disabilities would benefit greatly from such technology. i mean, what's more intuitive than thought commands?

though i imagine we're still quite a ways away from being able to dictate a letter with our minds or draw images with our mind's eyes. there's still a lot more that needs to be uncovered about how the brain works before we can fully interface between mind and machine. and i do wonder if it'd really be easier to monitor, and accurately interpret, motor commands than using video imaging to receive motion inputs.

the future of gaming is almost here (3, Interesting)

mcfatboy93 (1363705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682901)

with the rate at which computers are getting faster it won't be long until we can use things like this to play games. just imagine useing this to play halo with a plastic gun and running around in a human sized hamster ball. the utimate virtual reality

Re:the future of gaming is almost here (3, Interesting)

negRo_slim (636783) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682937)

Just imagine useing this to play halo with a plastic gun and running around in a human sized hamster ball.

Once you bring back physical prowess into competition you will most certainly lose the geek demographic.

Re:the future of gaming is almost here (2, Insightful)

prod-you (940679) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683673)

Some of the weak minded geeks may degrade into jocks.

Re:the future of gaming is almost here (2, Funny)

Velocir (851555) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684485)

Or the geeks will adapt and be smarter and fitter. Or at least, we can hope.

The future is NOW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25685051)

a plastic gun and running around in a human sized hamster ball

We have something very similar now: Paintball.

The only difference between paintball and the approach you outlined (besides the massive initial investment) is the ability to play with/against people from different locales.

The real future of gaming and computer interfaces is of course: Direct Neural Link. The ability to create a virtual environment and beam the stimuli directly into your brain. It's only a matter of time.

Not efficient (4, Interesting)

jamesshuang (598784) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682943)

I find the allure of making Minority Report devices rather... funny. The movie itself already shows one REALLY good reason why these interfaces are awful. When he tries to shake the guy's hand, the interface suddenly resets itself. You can't "snap out" of the interface like you can letting go of a mouse. It really only looks cool. After waving your arms in the air for 5 min without support, you'll wish you had the mouse and keyboard back...

Re:Not efficient (2, Interesting)

LandDolphin (1202876) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683059)

Maybe it would make sitting in front of a desk workign on the computer more healthy? Would that be a bad thing?

Re:Not efficient (2, Interesting)

jamesshuang (598784) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683207)

Such a device wouldn't be exercising the right muscles. For one thing, there's no way you'd be able to work up a sweat waving your arms around like that. So, definitely not aerobic activity. For another thing, that's only likely to give you all sorts of odd repetitive stress problems.

Re:Not efficient (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683239)

For one thing, there's no way you'd be able to work up a sweat waving your arms around like that.

At the risk of not sounding very pc, I know people that nearly have a heart attack walking up one flight of stairs (they stop in the landing in-between) so there are people who could work up a sweat doing this.

Re:Not efficient (2, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683199)

For some tasks these types of interfaces are very well-suited. Virtual surgery comes to mind as one example. Another might be the manipulation of objects in 3D remotely, such as on a battlefield in order to remotely disarm IEDs, where the feel of texture and a natural interface would be important. Why does everybody think that an input device is crap if it doesn't give them an edge in [insert favorite video game here]? I use a trackball at work due to RSI, and it works very well for long hours at a terminal without fatiguing my wrists. Maybe my "frag count" won't very high with this setup, but that's not why it's there.

Re:Not efficient (2, Interesting)

jamesshuang (598784) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683337)

For surgery devices like what you're suggesting, look at some current haptics research. I'm actually participating in some of this stuff, where you stick your fingers in two little armatures. These armatures use inverse kinematics to determine the location of your fingers in space, and allow you to manipulate a 3D world. It's really really convincing, because you can "feel" the objects. The armatures give you very real feedback on the boundaries, stiffness, and texture of the object you're manipulating.

A device like this would be much better for surgery because they don't rely on inaccurate gestures for input. In addition, they provide direct feedback, giving an extra level of immersion. The wiimote relies on gestures, and as such, the motion control adds very little beyond what a button or two can do.

LAWSUIT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25682951)

I invented ALL of this in my mind the day I saw Minority Report!

Can I sue?

Re:LAWSUIT (5, Funny)

khellendros1984 (792761) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683063)

This idea invented by Shampoo.

Re:LAWSUIT (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683647)

Oh man, you brought back the memories with that one. Is he still active?

Goodbye QWERTY! (1)

BoldlyGo (1288070) | more than 5 years ago | (#25682979)

Between touch screens, voice recognition, and breakthroughs that are already happening concerning controlling computers through thought...

Kids born in 2050 probably will not know what qwerty is.

Re:Goodbye QWERTY! (2)

mqduck (232646) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683037)

Which is exactly what the visionaries who keep developing this useless but pretty junk keep telling themselves.

Don't know what's more painful (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683043)

The thought of performing silly motions over and over again, or their name.

How about the johnny mnemonic data gloves? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683073)

How about the johnny mnemonic data gloves?

I almost thought... (5, Funny)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683085)

I saw the title of the article and for a moment I almost thought that this was a software package that would allow your computer to see future crimes that you might be involved in, contact the authorities, and have you arrested. Then I read the paragraph and was greatly disappointed.

Re:I almost thought... (1)

riceboy50 (631755) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683457)

I thought exactly the same thing. We really need to stop reading so many Big Brother technology stories!

Re:I almost thought... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683467)

I thought it would predict when your computer was going to commit a murder.

Re:I almost thought... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683653)

What, does this story display with "Australia" somewhere in the title for you?

Re:I almost thought... (1)

ljw1004 (764174) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684677)

Along the RIAA lines that if you have bittorrent on your computer then you're likely doing illegal file-sharing...

Three Words... (5, Informative)

FFCecil (623749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683123)

Johnny Chung Lee

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~johnny/projects/wii/ [cmu.edu]

He did this ages ago with nothing but a Wii remote, some IR LEDs, and bits of reflective tape. And all his code is openly available!

If you're interested, take a look around his site at some of the other stuff he's done... and not just with Wii remotes, either. The man is a genius. I love the projector calibration work he did. I mean, he's turned folding fans and umbrellas into screens!

Re:One Word... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683767)

Lame

Three More Words... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683957)

It's fucking different.

What he did was cool, but not the same thing.

How much longer? (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683129)

How much longer will we be using keyboards and mice for gaming? Well, until you can shoot me faster than I can flick my wrist and waste you of course. And the camera support will not be added to games for a very simple reason: You don't want to see what other gamers look like in front of their PCs. Really, you don't.

Useless!? (1)

BoldlyGo (1288070) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683157)

this useless but pretty junk

The new interfaces I listed are useless but pretty! I already know people who use voice recognition to chat on IM's instead of typing because it is quicker. More intuitive and efficient interfaces are about as far from useless as you can get. Can you surf the internet mearly by thinking about it.... No. Will we get there? Yes.

Admittedly, not everything that is being developed is going to be revolutionary right out of the box. Progress rarely works in leaps.

Gesture control for TV (1)

eatvegetables (914186) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683159)

Talk about timing. I'm considering building a gesture control system for my TV as a project in a comp vision class. The image recognition from a vid camera is fairly straight forward. However, I'm not certain what HW I will need to take in digital TV signal (assuming Haup TV card) and that export pic/sound to my TV via HDMI cable after processing. I want to enable image pause/zoom/draw menus, buttons/etc., which is why I need to intercept pic. Anyway, processing time and resulting latency would seem to make this approach infeasible for gaming. Also, the users looked horribly uncomfortable in the video. The lag could just be due to the use of poorly designed algorithms, but I'm not certain since I haven't yet delved into my project. Also, I'd suggest not being so literal with the hand gestures used for various things. Comfort is key to a good interface.

Re:Gesture control for TV (1)

theurge14 (820596) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683543)

"Talk about timing. I'm considering building a gesture control system for my TV as a project in a comp vision class"

On the contrary, good timing would have been you building this BEFORE the election...

Most of you are "doing it wrong" (3, Interesting)

MentlFlos (7345) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683237)

Even the video in TFA is wrong. This is not a primary input device but great for niche usage.

At work we are setting up public use, always on, video conference stations in public locations. One of the large problems we are running into is controlling the 2-4 large flat panels or projectors in these locations. A keyboard and mouse would walk away and is impractical. A secondary device with a lower resolution "mirror" to manipulate would be nice, but still is not practical for several reasons.

My boss wants to be able to point at the machine and have it do something. This is exactly what we are looking for. We are only interfacing with the machine for up to one minute at a time and then it is all talking via the video conferencing with whomever is on the other end of the line.

RIT AG info [rit.edu]

Re:Most of you are "doing it wrong" (2, Interesting)

gznork26 (1195943) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683605)

A suggested enhancement: to use this sort of interface during a presentation, you'd want to enable and disable the thing so you could also use your hands for emphasis while you talk. Perhaps a voice-recognition system listening for a keywords to toggle it. Then it would become a very fluid process to do the presentation, using the screen only when you want to.

+++
JMS is writing a sequel movie to Forbidden Planet.
Read my take on the Krell's side of it at:
klurgsheld.wordpress.com/2007/09/18/short-story-singularity-of-soul/

Re:Most of you are "doing it wrong" (1)

MentlFlos (7345) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684415)

Perhaps a foot pedal at the optimal viewing location... Force people to stand in the best spot AND give a trigger option.

Well... (1)

abroadwin (1273704) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683347)

I think the idea is good, but some form of haptic feedback would really complete it. I remember reading about some research into tricking us into feeling like we're getting solid tactile feedback when in reality it's a slight vibration. That kind of change could also make playing Mario Kart Wii with the wii-wheel slightly less horrible. When I read about it the tech was being applied to touch screen cell phones so it felt like you were really pressing a raised button instead of a flat screen.

Not really viable for long term use... (3, Insightful)

Bones3D_mac (324952) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683401)

The biggest problem facing in-air hand gesturing is that it requires some level of stamina to maintain continual use. For sifting through data that could be done via other means, this just isn't practical due to the eventual strain it places on the user. It's sort of like trying to paint a ceiling. At first you're fine, but the longer you do it, your efficiency starts drop at a sharp curve.

Technologies like multi-touch and Microsoft's "surface" simply make more sense for extended use, since they allow the user to rest against the surface they're interacting with. The same is true of mice, keyboards and track pads.

Another example of this is to compare the Nintendo Wii's motion control setup against more traditional controllers, such as those on the Xbox 360. In a marathon gaming session, the user is going to tire out far quicker and need more breaks on the Wii side, while the worst you might get from the more traditional controller setup is an uncomfortable cramp a few hours in.

This is the same reason why virtual reality never really took off during the early 90s. It put too many physical demands on the user.

Re:Not really viable for long term use... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25685025)

Are you kidding? If someone comes up with some high-tech, tactile, interactive virtual porn device, Slashdotters will "rise to the occasion" so to speak. I predict a sudden outbreak of physical fitness amongst nerds in general.

>>This is the same reason why virtual reality never really took off during the early 90s. It put too many physical demands on the user.

Just what we need... (1)

TheSambassador (1134253) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683403)

More reasons to wave our hands around like idiots.

Hands only? (1)

Nux'd (1002189) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683415)

Wouldn't this be a great deal more effective if it could pin-point your view point aswell?

Cynical (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683537)

The first thing I thought of when it said "Minority Report like control" was the complete loss of privacy and totalitarian fascist monitoring of citizens with the added benefit of never being able to escape advertisements ever again.

Part of me thinks I might actually need to visit an eastern European ex-con with a nasty ass nurse just to get some of my own privacy back in the future.

If we are going to really concentrate on obtaining any technology from that movie it should be that virtual room with all the stripper girls grinding on that dude.

New/Old Tech (2, Insightful)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683707)

"For how much longer will we still be using keyboards, mice and joysticks?"

We've been using pencils and paper how long now? Just because a cool tech shows up doesn't mean the old tech will go away.

Piano (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683743)

For how much longer will we still be using keyboards, mice and joysticks?"

Yep, the future will be keyboard and mouse free. That's why no musical instrument has keys or strings that the player has to touch. It's so wonderful how technology has rid us of all those useless interfaces.

How about making controller we REALLY need? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683773)

It' been pointed out before, waving your hands in the air in front of you is tiring and most of all anything but accurate.

How about some input devices that are easy to make AND useful? Ever thought about multi purpose foot pedals? If nothing else, you could put four buttons of your mouse onto your feet. I'd love that for games. You get pedals for flight sims, race sims (with the accompanying wheel), which work as two analog buttons, basically, but did nobody ever have the idea to implement something as simple and useful as a pedal system for buttons? I'm sure FPS and MMO players would jump on it.

How long? (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25683783)

For how much longer will we still be using keyboards, mice and joysticks?"

Oh, probably for as long as people want to sit quietly at their PCs to perform their tasks. Who wants to flail their arms around like a spastic monkey in order to surf the web?

::considers the wii::

Erm, scratch that.

Old idea, and it was never any good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683791)

Anybody remember the NES U-Force controllers? Worst UI idea ever.

obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25683909)

But what about the rum?

Don't diss it just yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25684295)

I want it in addition to keyboard and mouse--because those two input devices force me to sit down. What if I just want to view a different web page real quick, or skip the next song? Or zoom a window from underneath and so on, and then head back to the fridge for a cold one?

Probably not ment for Home Use (1)

shdowhawk (940841) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684833)

Even though they were showing it used for games and such, I honestly doubt that they mean it to be used for normal home use (at least initially)

As everyone says, the lack of tactical feedback, and the tiredness factor would keep it out of use for most people. I can on the other hand see a MAJOR markets for these elsewhere:

1. Presentations. Having someone just point towards a screen in a meeting would be great for collaborative use. It's better than a touch screen since people wouldn't need to crowd around the projector and block out the image.

2. How cool would it be if something like this was set up with a "reverse camera"... Then you would point at something, and a system would look to where you are pointing at and pull up information. Example: At the aquarium, you point at a specific fish or shark, and it'll recognize it, and pull up a little information window about that animal.

3. Something MUCH MORE futuristic. This is the beginning of using 3d holographics. With this part done, we just need to show a 3d hologram, use this technology on it, and we can poke certain parts of the hologram image to "select" it. Example: Doctors have a 3d hologram of their patients x-ray, they could use this as a "multitouch" hologram to grab the image and move/rotate it. That would be freakin sweet!

The key here is that it would be used for LOTS of things that don't involve constant use for long periods of time (gaming, computer work, etc). That's just my $.02 though...

Minority Report style interfaces are not for geeks (1)

Technomancer (51963) | more than 5 years ago | (#25684887)

We lack upper body strength to do it for prolonged periods of time (say, more than 2 minutes).

Give credit where credit is due... (1)

dexmachina (1341273) | more than 5 years ago | (#25685033)

This technology was invented by Shampoo [slashdot.org]

Not the first ... (2, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 5 years ago | (#25685125)

A startup named Mgestyk Technologies claims that they have an affordable solution for 'Minority Report'-like PC control.

The tech in Johnny Mnemonic predates Minority Report by a number of years, and Keanu Reeves hand-waving while interfacing with the global network was prophetic, it sounds like.

For how much longer will we still be using keyboards, mice and joysticks?

Forever, or until we get a direct neural interface. Most people don't want to hold their hands up in the air all day. It's tiring.

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