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Chandrayaan Enters Lunar Orbit

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the fly-me-to-the-moon dept.

Moon 111

William Robinson writes "After an 18-day journey, Chandrayaan-1, the moon mission of India, has entered Lunar orbit. The maneuver was described as crucial and critical by scientists, who pointed out that at least 30 per cent of similar moon missions had failed at this juncture, resulting in spacecraft lost to outer space. The lunar orbit insertion placed Chandrayaan-1 in an elliptical orbit with its nearest point 400 to 500 kilometers away from the moon, and the farthest, 7,500 kilometers. By November 15, the spacecraft is expected to be orbiting the moon at a distance of 100 kilometers and sending back data and images (the camera was tested with shots looking back at Earth). The Chandrayaan-1 is also scheduled to send a probe to the moon's surface."

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Space Station (0, Offtopic)

Lije Baley (88936) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688261)

In Soviet Russia, old Koreans... ...ah crap, wrong joke!

First (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688281)

First Indian

Re:First (-1)

kraemate (1065878) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688303)

First Orbit!!!

Does it too smell of curry? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688289)

Like all things Indian. Ewww.

Also, 3rd world underdeveloped countries like China and India shouldn't do space missions. People are fucking starving to death and the government loonies are shooting for the moon, literally.

FACEPALM.jpg

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688363)

You know, India is one of the most cutting edge countries in a lot research fields. Glaring back at the USA do we not having starving and homeless? Just because we trade their tribal suffering for urban suffering doesn't mean either countries don't have the same problems. Even more so I'd say China is hardly a third world country. It's economic growth will soon put it on top of the USA. You just see culturally different nations as "third world" Is Sweeden third world too with all their socialism?

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688419)

Is Sweeden third world too with all their socialism?

of course not, socialism puts the "wee!!!" in Sweeden

Nobody is starving in the US (0, Troll)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688857)

We do not have anyone in the US "starving." We have these government programs called WIC [usda.gov] and Food Stamps [usda.gov] and welfare. You know, the ones used by people in front of you at the supermarket yacking into cellphones that are nicer than yours?

Quite the contrary, the real problem with the poor in America is obesity, not starvation.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689417)

Except people do still starve to death, only it is the socially ignored old man who sleeps in the park because he is too proud to go to a shelter. This demographic often freezes to death.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (4, Insightful)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690155)

it has nothing to do with being too proud. a large portion of the homeless population in the U.S. are mentally ill. we just aren't willing to fund the social programs and mental health infrastructure to take care of these people, so they end up in the streets. and not all cities with a homeless population have shelters. in my area there are neither homeless shelters nor facilities for the mentally disabled. this has been known for quite some time but little has been done about it.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (2, Interesting)

fireboy1919 (257783) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691709)

just aren't willing to fund the social programs and mental health infrastructure to take care of these people, so they end up in the streets. and not all cities with a homeless population have shelters

You seem like someone who has never spent any time with any crazy homeless people. Nearly all big cities do have shelters. All the ones I've visited and had the chance to look do (Orlando, Chicago, New York, Atlanta, Indianapolis).

Those are generally *not* for the crazy homeless, though. They're for the temporarily homeless. If you really want to keep being homeless, and you refuse any medical treatment that will help you get better, you are allowed to remain homeless. You are not forced to change. I know that the primary city in which I've lived - Orlando - has *plenty* of ways of keeping people from being homeless and of giving the very, very poor homes and medical treatment - both through the government and through local philanthropic organizations.

little has been done about it

Thanks especially to this [imdb.com] , we realized that "fixing" such people means that we're curtailing their freedom - freedom to be crazy, and freedom to make the choices that leave them homeless.

Let me have my own self-destructive vices; let the homeless have theirs. It is their right as human beings. Don't try to make decisions for them. I am proud that we live in a country were we don't lock up our crazy people like criminals just because we don't like the way that they think, and am glad that "little is being done about it."

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (1)

Archades54 (925582) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693477)

There is alot of room in those shelter's I'm sure, if it's anything like in Australia pretty much every bed is full for any shelter.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (1)

lennier (44736) | more than 5 years ago | (#25697549)

"we realized that "fixing" such people means that we're curtailing their freedom - freedom to be crazy, and freedom to make the choices that leave them homeless."

One thing I'm curious about -- what percentage of 'crazy homeless people' in the USA are war veterans? Are there any statistics on this?

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (2, Funny)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690695)

Except people do still starve to death, only it is the socially ignored old man who sleeps in the park because he is too proud to go to a shelter. This demographic often freezes to death.

Pick one or the other, AC, but not both: if they freeze to death, they can't have starved to death.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25691387)

So you're in 3rd grade are you? Quite an achievement for such a little tyke.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (1)

Geoffrey.landis (926948) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691433)

Logic R us.

Re:Nobody is starving in the US (1)

ultranova (717540) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693877)

Pick one or the other, AC, but not both: if they freeze to death, they can't have starved to death.

What if your inability to keep up your body temperature was caused by insufficient blood sugar and abnormally thin subcutaneous fat layer, caused by starvation ?

MODERATION ABUSE ALERT!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25690473)

Who exactly did parent flame? Stop abusing your moderation privileges.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25690509)

My loony bun is fine, Benny Lava.
Minor bun engine made, Benny Lava!

Have you been high today?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZA1NoOOoaNw

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (4, Insightful)

ryen (684684) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690829)

China on top of the USA economically? The amount of poverty in urban and rural areas in China is astounding. And with the looming recession and intake of chinese exports already drying up I highly doubt their economy will look like anything other than "developing nation" status for a long time.

You only read about the rich in china and the communist govt's facade of "how good things have become" to the rest of the world.

Did you watch too much of the farce of an olympics this year to think that everything is fine and dandy in China? Probably. Wake up.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (2, Insightful)

shashark (836922) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691561)

In the next decade or so, India and China are going to figure out they can do business with each other _than_ sucking up to Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam though would want to ensure this never happens [read up ASEAN].

Discount 2 billion people trading with each other at your own peril.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (0, Troll)

Smivs (1197859) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688379)

countries like China and India shouldn't do space missions.

Of course they should...how else are we going to get a curry or chinese take-away when we visit the moonbase?

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (5, Insightful)

damburger (981828) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688663)

Aside from the troll, he has sort of a point. India has massive inequality problems, is still haunted by the caste system (perhaps the only advantage of Mao was he got rid of equivalent crap from China, at quite steep a cost).

Its possible space technology will filter down and help the poorest people, but somehow I doubt it. If you want to look beyond the western media fawning over India's neoliberal development, look up the 'Naxalite' and 'Salwa Judum'. It isn't all roses and tech support over there.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (5, Insightful)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688713)

Governments need to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. They invariably have to. Given this, arguing that there's some other problem that needs to be addressed is never a valid argument against any other action the government might do, save in those cases where that other problem prevents the action. Devoting a majority of your resources to a major problem is often a good idea. Devoting all of your resources to a major problem is almost never a good idea. That just tends to create more major problems, while only minor improvement to the state of the first.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (4, Insightful)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690343)

then perhaps the U.S. should shelf all fundamental research until we get our poverty level down to at least as low as Eastern Europe. it helps no one to point fingers at others whiles our own domestic problems continue to go ignored.

also, if we get rid of all fundamental research, where do you recommend scientists & researchers go for employment? are they all going to be re-trained in order to find a place in a society without fundamental scientific research? or should they start a mass exodus of intellectual/scientific talent out of the U.S.?

what effect do you think abolishing public research will have on a society? if people are discouraged from going into the sciences & exploratory research, what effect will that have on our national culture? we already live in society rife with anti-intellectualism and reactionary attitudes. do you really think cutting all funding for fundamental science & public research is going to have a positive social effect on either the U.S. or India?

we fund public research in fundamental science not because it strokes our national ego, or as part of some lofty abstract idealistic goal, but because public research is vital to societal progress. it not only drives a society forward technologically, but it also fosters an intellectual culture and encourages rational thought. when you do away with fundamental research, you're killing the pursuit of knowledge, and that will simply invite intellectual & cultural stagnation.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25691029)

Aside from the troll, he has sort of a point. India has massive inequality problems, is still haunted by the caste system (perhaps the only advantage of Mao was he got rid of equivalent crap from China, at quite steep a cost).

Its possible space technology will filter down and help the poorest people, but somehow I doubt it.

Already has: Education, communication, irrigation, weather forecasting, telemedicine etc.

In a country like India, where over 60% of the economy is agricultural, and most of that is without man-made irrigation, satellites are essential.

to quote the founder of ISRO, sarabhai, (and, er, disregard the whole 'moon' bit :)):

"There are some who question the relevance of space activities in a developing nation. To us, there is no ambiguity of purpose. We do not have the fantasy of competing with the economically advanced nations in the exploration of the moon or the planets or manned space-flight. But we are convinced that if we are to play a meaningful role nationally, and in the community of nations, we must be second to none in the application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society."

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (3, Informative)

vivtho (834049) | more than 5 years ago | (#25692563)

India has massive inequality problems, is still haunted by the caste system

You must be referring to K.R.Narayanan [wikipedia.org] , President of India 1997-2002. He was born a Dalit, one of the lowest castes possible.

I'm not trying to deny the existence of castism in India. It is still present in some of the rural areas, but it is on the wane.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25692945)

After traveling to India, I think racism is far more prevalent in the US than castism in India. There are far few temples(I've heard of one in several villages I visited) where people of all castes cant go. But most of the churches here, is superbly "color" segregated. I think we should not mud sling when there is so much to do on our side.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (2, Informative)

argiedot (1035754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25694249)

Actually, casteism and regionalism are rife in India's society. It is all just kept under a light veil. I remember reading a study which showed a statistical disadvantage against people who had lower caste names when applying for a post in a private sector company. Class differences are also obvious. I'm fairer skinned than other people here, and I can tell you that it is obvious to me that I am being treated with more 'respect'.

Not True! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25694529)

There are 300+ million Dalits and Tribals in India.
And there is not a single restaurant owned and operated by a Dalit or Tribal in India.
India is manipulating rest of the world through Reservations aka Affirmative Action to Dalits and Tribals.

How to prevent Casteism and Religious Conversions (1)

jawahar (541989) | more than 5 years ago | (#25692927)

Govt must notify every Caste as a separate Religion.
Does anybody here have other innovative ideas to prevent Casteism and Religious Conversions in India

Re:How to prevent Casteism and Religious Conversio (1)

argiedot (1035754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25694273)

Prevent religious conversions? Our constitution expressly guarantees the right to people to practice whatever religion they want, irrespective of whether or not they were born into it. That's what Freedom of Religion means.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25693011)

One of the primary objectives of Chandrayan 1 mission is to map the lunar surface for helium 3.
The world oil productions has reached half way point ( still debated though) and growing countries like India and China are being foresighted in their quest for sources for energy. I believe if helium 3 is found on the moon even a single lunar mission could supply the worlds requirement for many many years to come.

Nitin Joseph

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (1)

Lord Haw Haw Haw (1280782) | more than 5 years ago | (#25696555)

umm.. The Indian space program not only pays for itself, it is profitable (i.e. it returns money back to the Government). I think gross margins are 100%. Not too shabby. http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/moonmission/Story.aspx?ID=NEWEN20080068200&type=SpecialReport [ndtv.com]

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (1)

nikhilvgs (922415) | more than 5 years ago | (#25699563)

Its never all rosy, is it? Look at the conservatism and racism in the rural areas of the US - they still havent gotten out of it - its the same for the rural areas in India. If you go to the cities, nobody cares about caste, etc. - its all the villages.

The man on the moon said (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688805)

"Thank you. Come again!"

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (3, Interesting)

powerslave12r (1389937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25692567)

There's a lot to be learned from these third world countries.. one word - Efficiency.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (2, Interesting)

argiedot (1035754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25694263)

That's a false dichotomy. India can feed all its people and do space missions. It doesn't.

I used to think the same as you, but the INSAT series was very beneficial to India, including the rural population. While a moon mission may not make as much sense, I think it is worthwhile because it gives the ISRO experience. And that is useful because the ISRO makes quite a bit of money from launching commercial satellites.

Re:Does it too smell of curry? (1)

nikhilvgs (922415) | more than 5 years ago | (#25699839)

I agree with you here. In fact, a 6 instruments on Chandrayaan are non-Indian. They must have got paid for that too.

And when can I hire the lunar call center? (-1, Troll)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688291)

Or are they keeping it domestic to support the spacecraft. "Hello, my name is Ted. I am here to help you dock your spacecraft. Can I get your name please? What was that? Can you spell it?"

Great! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688297)

Now they can outsource tech support to NASA.

By the way, 75% of the population in India lives below the poverty line. Fascinating for a country with nuclear and space technology.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689919)

Actually, the correct figure as of this year is more like 25%. Get your facts right before you express your hatred for brown people.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25692303)

Quit being an idiot. He didn't express hatred for them. Indeed, to even consider the alleged fact significant, he must have some empathy for them.

Re:Great! (1)

argiedot (1035754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25694283)

If you're using the World Bank statistics, that is because of the weird way they measure the poverty line. I think that is not a good idea. Other people have made the point better than I can [epw.in]

My other car is a Porsche... on the MOON (4, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688305)

Too bad the Moon's just one big tourist trap now.

Re:My other car is a Porsche... on the MOON (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689121)

Yes it's too bad that we've made such amazing progress that what used to be a monumental accomplishment can now be done by any country with enough cash. Oh wait, progress is actually a good thing...

Re:My other car is a Porsche... on the MOON (1)

gilgoomesh (966411) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690737)

Futurama references always win.

Fascinating photos (4, Interesting)

CruddyBuddy (918901) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688315)

Fascinating photos. We don't often get views of the Earth from this altitude, stuck as we are in low earth orbit (ISS - looking at you).

The size of the craft, at over 1300 kg, is a big honking'* thing. I wonder what kind of tracking systems they are using.

*Honkin' is a technical term.

Re:Fascinating photos (1)

von_rick (944421) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688759)

I was expecting to see a cloud pattern that spelled "HOPE" or "YES WE CAN" over North America.

Re:Fascinating photos (4, Informative)

mritunjai (518932) | more than 5 years ago | (#25689415)

The size of the craft, at over 1300 kg, is a big honking'* thing.

Yes!, it is, and for a reason. It's carrying the largest number of payloads ever carried by a lunar mission - 11.

5 (TMC, HySI, LLRI, HEX, MIP) - ISRO
2 (C1XS, SARA) - ESA + ISRO
1 (SIR-2) - Max Planck, Germany
1 (RADOM) - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
1 (Mini-SAR) - NASA
1 (M3) - Brown University & JPL

More info here on ISRO page [isro.org] .
So it's kinda an international mission :-)

Re:Fascinating photos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689705)

"Yes!, it is, and for a reason. It's carrying the largest number of payloads ever carried by a lunar mission - 11."

Okay, I get it.

This lunar probe is heavier because the instrument payload goes to 11.

Impressive. (-1, Troll)

Noose For A Neck (610324) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688321)

It's only a matter of time now before Indians discover Lawn Darts and color television!

Re:Impressive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688347)

It's only a matter of time now before Indians discover Lawn Darts and color television!

I guess its only a matter of time before you discover...you are an a**h*le...

Re:Impressive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688593)

You let him convince you to try catching the lawn darts? Sheesh, no wonder...

But yeah, that '60s era game is fun despite the dangers if you play it properly.

Moon Impact Probe (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688343)

From the linked article: "The spacecraft will make observations from the initial orbit, and then the orbit will be lowered a 100 km circular polar orbit. Following this, the Moon Impact Probe (MIP) will be ejected, impacting the lunar surface."

I going to give my car a new name... Instead of "the old Honda Civic", I'm going to call it the "Car Impact Probe" ...that way I can justify all of my accidents as being for science's sake.

Re:Moon Impact Probe (4, Funny)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25689355)

Unfortunately, that means that your insurance will not cover them as the vehicle functioned as intended.

Re:Moon Impact Probe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25692737)

Although not funny, ISRO never insures any of its missions. Thats because, if they insure, they insure with the govt insurance companies and the mission itself is funded anyway by the government. So, they generally dont insure any indian space missions. That also keeps their costs low.

Re:Moon Impact Probe (1)

nmg196 (184961) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690783)

I used my Honda Civic as an impact probe last month and to be honest, it wasn't as fun as I thought it would be.

Of course ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688439)

... this blows the 'turtles all the way down' [wikipedia.org] model of orbital mechanics right out of the water.

Re:Of course ... (1)

Kagura (843695) | more than 5 years ago | (#25692523)

What do you propose holds the solar system up?

Fake! (0)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688473)

It's just little plastic models and Photoshop!

Awesome! (5, Insightful)

mmaniaci (1200061) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688483)

I see mostly jokes about this story, but I give India a high five! This is a HUGE accomplishment. Not just for India, for the entire world. More countries are getting into space! I hope people will realize that progress is essential and fantastic, regardless of where it happens.

Agree (2, Insightful)

Seth Kriticos (1227934) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688581)

I can just agree. It is interesting, now that we are driven more by economic interests than politic agenda the space exploration is expanding all around the world. India, China and some other folks surely. I mean, India has kind an astonishing commertial satelite launch program and they are expanding. That's globalization, but I still wonder how the american ego can live with this? When is the moon going to be bombed next? (after colonzation)

Re:American ego... (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688707)

Shall we point out that India is also a nuclear power and has three times the population of the USA?

Hopefully this is all prelude to an effort to find/extract He3 from the moon. As such the USA, India, China, Russia, etc. should be working as a team, not against each other. Energy/climate problems are global and don't stop at national boundaries.

Re:Agree (1)

Dutch Gun (899105) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691733)

I still wonder how the american ego can live with this?

I don't think it would be a big deal to most Americans. For example, you don't hear a huge outcry over the fact that we don't build the most sophisticated robots anymore (according to popular perception at least). We tend to generally admire the Japanese inventiveness and industry. American culture is largely built on competition: political, economic, sporting events, etc. This means that people learn to deal with losing, since it inevitably happens to anyone that competes at anything.

Re:Awesome! (5, Interesting)

jools33 (252092) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688667)

It would be really cool if they could send back a nice high res picture of one of the old Apollo missions - just to kill of the conspiracy theories once and for all. Although the theorists would no doubt immediately claim them as fakes...

Re:Awesome! (2, Funny)

HermDog (24570) | more than 5 years ago | (#25689241)

It would be really cool if they could send back a nice high res picture of one of the old Apollo missions - just to kill of the conspiracy theories once and for all. Although the theorists would no doubt immediately claim them as fakes...

There's a simple solution to that. Somebody's got to take pictures of Chandrayaan, and somebody else needs to take pictures of the somebody taking pictures of Chandrayaan, and so on, and so forth, ad nauseum ad infinitum. Looks like a job for elephants all the way down!

Re:Awesome! (1)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693663)

It would be really cool if they could send back a nice high res picture of one of the old Apollo missions - just to kill of the conspiracy theories once and for all. Although the theorists would no doubt immediately claim them as fakes...

Naturally. I remember once asking one of those people why it was that the Soviets never denounced Apollo as faked. Given that they were surely monitoring all transmissions and independently tracking the whole mission by radar. Apparently they were in on it too. An admirable example of co-operation between two deadly rivals at the height of the Cold War. If the Soviets were perfectly willing to collaborate in a hoax whose purpose was to greatly increase their worst enemy's prestige, there's clearly no reason why India wouldn't also fake up a few photographs too.

Awesome (4, Funny)

rarel (697734) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688549)

The scientific community will certainly not stay hindi-fferent to this expansion of India's science curry-culum!

Re:Awesome (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688571)

*groan*

Re:Awesome (1)

NotmyNick (1089709) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691249)

*groan*

This got modded to +3 informative, how?

Re:Awesome (1)

junglee_iitk (651040) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693357)

Hey! Some people didn't know how to groan before this article!

Re:Awesome (5, Funny)

grcumb (781340) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691283)

The scientific community will certainly not stay hindi-fferent to this expansion of India's science curry-culum!

That's sikh. Trying to curry favour with the mods using such blatant pun jabs. I hope they're having nan of that.

Re:Awesome (1)

aalu.paneer (872021) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693057)

*funny* Wish had mod points

Nice summary of the mission... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688577)

The ISRO site has a page on how the orbits look like in the Mission Sequence page [isro.org] .

And to anybody still complaining about India spending money on its space mission when 500 million people are in poverty, you are not the first [gilscottheron.com] .

9000 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688585)

The lunar orbit insertion placed Chandrayaan-1 in an elliptical orbit with its nearest point 400 to 500 kilometers away from the moon, and the farthest, 7,500 kilometers.

HAH!! UNDER 9000!!!!

Quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688705)

"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere."

-- Isaac Asimov

Excellent! (-1, Troll)

frydaddy33 (1386421) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688737)

I'm planning a moon mission in the near future. I'll definitely be stopping by the Quickie Mart for gas and a Slurpee.

Re:Excellent! (1)

Cyko_01 (1092499) | more than 5 years ago | (#25695293)

who modded this troll? lighten up, it's a joke!

Mod parent +1 funny

WOW (0)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688739)

A remote working job that wasn't farmed out overseas... oh, wait

Re:WOW (2, Insightful)

mikael (484) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691461)

Yes, it was outspaced to a robotic probe.

It's funny - 30 years ago, everyone in manufacturing was scared they were going to lose their jobs to Japanese robots. Now everyone is scared they are going to lose their jobs to Indian workers.

YES WE CAN! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25688901)

WE CAN HAS THE MOON ORBIT!!

Wow, wtf (4, Insightful)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25688953)

If you're having a hard time making out the image, it might be because the image is flipped, as though looking at it in a mirror. Emily Lakdawalla over at the Planetary Society blog figured this out and has flipped the image for us (see below). Why is the original image backwards? Emily explains, "Data doesn't come down from spacecraft in familiar formats like JPEG or TIFF; it's a stream of ones and zeroes, with a format unique to the science instrument, and scientists and engineers write their own software for translating that into raw image data. There are varying conventions for whether bits are written right or left, and if you take that raw image data and open it up in a piece of off-the-shelf image processing software, the image might be backwards." As Emily says, the error is not really important.

Wow, who fucking cares. Just flip it, who cares how their internal format represents the image. The BMP format is vertically flipped, does anyone care or convert BMP images so that they appear flipped vertically? No, nobody cares, god damnit, so why make half of the bloody article about it?

The Chandrayaan can (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689013)

Because he mixes it with love and makes the world taste good.

Posted as AC for reasons that should be very very obvious.

Re:The Chandrayaan can (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691051)

* chuckles *

Massive rift (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689035)

I know that there is a lot of talk about India going into space when so many millions of Indians are living in poverty. When the US went into space, it was one of the most prosperous countries in the world. It truly was 'surplus wealth' that sent the Americans into space. Russia could hardly have afforded it, except communist leaders wanted it (just like the Beijing Olympics --money is literally no object). Its good that India is going into space. But addressing the rich/poor gradiant, the (still alive and kicking) caste system, and other social issues really should be more front and center. India has climate change issues too, which they are quick to dismiss 'we are a poor country' just like China, but not too poor to go into space. If you are rich enough to go into space, you are rich enough to be slapped for having a crappy record on climate change.

three lunar orbiters .. all asian (4, Informative)

savuporo (658486) | more than 5 years ago | (#25689125)

There are currently three spacecraft orbiting the moon. Japanese Kayuga/Selene, Chinese Chang'e and now Chandrayaan. Approximate budgets:

# Chandrayaan-I (India) - $86m
# Chang'e (China) - $187m
# Kayuga (Japan) - $480m

NASA is about to follow up with its own, mid-2009
# LRO - around half a billion ?

China and Japan have announced followup lander missions as well, and there is Google Lunar X-Prize card too, so the next lunar landing will be likely be done by one of these parties ( The last one was by USSR, back in 1976 )

Moon, while basically neglected for past few decades ( with notable exceptions of ESA Smart-1 and american low-budget Clementine and Lunar Prospector ), is about to get quite crowded.

Chandrayaan-2 (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689421)

Actually, just to remind, India has already commenced work on Chandrayaan-2, which will soft-land a rover on the Moon.

http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/chandrayaan2/index2.html [chandrayaan-i.com]

This mission should happen in just over 3 years. Here is the countdown clock:

http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/chandrayaan2/when2.html [chandrayaan-i.com]

aliens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25689753)

Can we now safely assume there are no obvious alien artifacts on the Moon, which are kept secret?

Why's the far side of the Moon so neglected? Intuition makes me think it would have its uses like the near side, because it's shielded from Earth. Though, I suppose communication would need a satellite router.

Re:three lunar orbiters .. all asian (1)

gouthamv (1402991) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690231)

India flies to the moon economy class!

Pictures of US stuff (2, Funny)

gr8_phk (621180) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691603)

Great, so now if anyone can get a picture of the US landing site we can put that whole conspiracy theory to rest.

Hope in other nations (3, Interesting)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 5 years ago | (#25689155)

Since NASA seems to be stuck in the tar pit of safety, security and budget cuts, it's highly unlikely to see any of 'minor but constant' progress from them - they can only afford a few highly outstanding projects that must be polished till they shine, because any failure is unacceptable, and which are scheduled for dates like 2015, 2030 or so. They can't afford what was a standard 'in the early days', 50 failed tests in a row, a lot of improvisation and fixing problems as they appear. Back then, when a $1mln piece of equipment got destroyed, you built another and slapped an additional $500 subsystem on top of it. Currently you build a $1mln piece of equipment with a $20mln fault-prevention subsystem and it will not fail, at least in theory. Which takes maybe half the money but 10 times as much time than 40 iterations of the $1mln 'retry' method.

Russia is stuck with commercial. They do a lot of it and are great at it, cheap, fast, simple, tested thousands of time in practice, with small iterative improvements but without any huge breakthroughs, not much science is being done.

It's China and India that push for scientific advances, big and fast. They took a sprint in the race to catch up, and they are really the motor of the progress, budget is subject for negotiation, deadlines are not, if it fails, that's okay, we just try again, prevent 90% of expected accidents and hope for the best about the remaining 10%, make prayers and sacrifices to Murphy and prefer to have a half-working solution in a month than a fully-working one in five years.

Some astronauts will lose lives.
Billions of dollars worth of equipment will become junk.
But the science will be getting done, and on good schedule. (for the people who are still alive)

Re:Hope in other nations (3, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 5 years ago | (#25693007)

Russia is stuck with commercial. They do a lot of it and are great at it, cheap, fast, simple, tested thousands of time in practice, with small iterative improvements but without any huge breakthroughs, not much science is being done.

You might find this [chandrayaan-i.com] interesting:

"The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roskosmos) have signed an Agreement on joint lunar research and exploration. This cooperation envisages Chandrayaan-2, a joint lunar mission involving a lunar orbiting spacecraft and a Lander/Rover on the Moon's surface. ISRO will have the prime responsibility for the Orbiter and Roskosmos will be responsible for the Lander/Rover."

Re:Hope in other nations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25700511)

India and Russia are good allies. They go way back.

Apollo 11 pic in article (1)

JackCroww (733340) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690689)

The pic in the first linked article is a shot of the Apollo 11 lander approaching the orbiter while returning from the lunar surface. Besides, how does the Chandrayaan orbiter take a picture of itself in lunar orbit?

Re:Apollo 11 pic in article (1)

JackCroww (733340) | more than 5 years ago | (#25690721)

Yup. I was right. Picture #5 in this [bbc.co.uk] series:

Congratulations to our friends in India! (2)

symbolset (646467) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691495)

It's good to know that although the US has surrendered the leadership role, progress will go on.

The Trolls (1)

ashwinds (743227) | more than 5 years ago | (#25691881)

on this page do not know what pride is.
I dont get the frequent reference to India's poverty in this context. This mission did not dent India's poverty statistics for better or worse. So get over it really!

A short summary of my expert opinion: (1)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | more than 5 years ago | (#25692259)

Awesome AWESOME AWESOME!!!
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