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The Trap Set By the FBI For Half Life 2 Hacker

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the well-deserved-shadenfreude dept.

Security 637

eldavojohn writes "You might remember the tiny news that Half Life 2 source code was leaked in 2003 ... it is the 6th most visited Slashdot story with over one kilocomment. Well, did anything happen to the source of the leak, the German hacker Axel 'Ago' Gembe? Wired is reporting he was offered a job interview so that Valve could get him into the US and bag him for charges. It's not the first time the FBI tried this trick: 'The same Seattle FBI office had successfully used an identical gambit in 2001, when they created a fake startup company called Invita, and lured two known Russian hackers to the US for a job interview, where they were arrested.'"

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First You Fuckers!!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754713)

Smoke on this bitches!!

Kilocomment? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754715)

How many kilocomments are there in a Library of Congress?

Re:Kilocomment? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754741)

None.

Re:Kilocomment? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754893)

depends ...

Is a kilocomment 1000 or 1024 comments ?!?

If i am supposed to slow down...about telling me how slow

Re:Kilocomment? (2, Informative)

aywwts4 (610966) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755263)

1000, the story received 1003 comments.

Re:Kilocomment? (4, Informative)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755283)

A kibicomment is 1024 comments.

Re:Kilocomment? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755301)

There's a difference between a Kilobyte(1000) and a Kibibyte. (1024)

The Kibibyte was coined to distinguish the former from the latter.

For more information, please refer to this chart: http://xkcd.com/394/

An infinite number (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755285)

I can use information theory to prove that the answer is infinity...

Information content of library of congress: I(lib) = 1 bazillion bits.

Information content of one kilocomment: I(1kc) = 0 bits.

kilocomments in a Library of Congress = I(lib)/I(1kc) = 1 bazillion / 0 = infinity.

QED

Re:Kilocomment? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755405)

"over one kilocomment" turns meme in 3, 2, 1

Old News (5, Informative)

VoltCurve (1248644) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754717)

Really, quite old news. This was reported on right after it happened. If I remember right though, Gabe claimed that they had succeeded in tricking the hacker. They did speak with him on the phone

shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754721)

I don't care what the guy has done, tricks like this should not be legal.

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Interesting)

eison (56778) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754799)

Why not?

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754913)

Why not?

Because of style.

Re:shouldn't be legal (3, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754943)

Wasting money protecting source code after the event. I'm a taxpayer - I don't give a shit about it. If someone releases a game based on it, follow the money. Some guy with some source code - big deal.

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755201)

It's not an issue of protecting the source code -- I think even the FBI is minimally competent enough to realize that cat's out of the bag -- it's an issue of punishing the guy for the computer tresspass etc..

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Interesting)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755333)

It depends on where he committed the crime. He's a german citizen commiting a crime in germany (and he was punished for it under german law) then that FBI can GTFO as far as I'm concerned. If they were that bothered they could have applied for extradition rather that using underhand tricks.

No different from the Dimitri Skylarov case, except he was arrested for something that wasn't even a crime in his home country.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0, Troll)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755417)

Uh, if the crime was commited on US soil, it is the jurisdiction of where the crime was comitted. The FBI had to resort to such tactics because for whatever reason the German Authorities could not capture this person. FYI, if you dont know the crime was commited on Valve computers, meaning the original crime was performed in the USA. I wonder what your reasoning is... criminal is my guess.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755295)

"If someone releases a game based on it, follow the money"

that's some great advice right there- right up until companies stop investing in producing the newest games because everyone turns a blind eye when their work is stolen and exploited for profit

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

qbzzt (11136) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755325)

Wasting money protecting source code after the event.

Any time the police arrests a criminal, it is by definition after the event. Sometimes the damage can be undone, as in theft. Sometimes it cannot, as in murder. We still want criminals punished to deter others.

If you truly don't want source code leaks punished because it's a waste of your tax dollars, you're welcome to lobby to change the law. However, I'm sure other tax payers, such as corporations that own source code, would lobby to keep it.

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

LateArthurDent (1403947) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755359)

Why not?

Because it bypasses protections established by extradition treaties (or lack thereof). How would you like to be tricked into visiting Iran, and then be prosecuted for posting some offensive comment on slashdot?

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755461)

"Because it bypasses protections established by extradition treaties (or lack thereof). How would you like to be tricked into visiting Iran, and then be prosecuted for posting some offensive comment on slashdot?"

I wouldn't be stupid enough to go to Iran.

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755447)

Because fraud is illegal. Con games in order to deprive someone of something are illegal. The government should never partake of otherwise illegal means in order to "catch" anyone. If you can't get them playing within the rules, let them go. If the government is willing to set up someone, what makes you think they won't set you up? They have proven they are willing to lie and cheat to get what they want. Are you ok with that if it is what you want, but not ok if it isn't what you want? I find that a inconsistent and hypocritical stance, and I take the one where they shouldn't lie ever. If I were emperor of the universe, I'd pass a law that any police officer that lies, any judge, prosecuter, or such that misleads a suspect, anyone that "tricks" anyone through deception to reveal something should be immediately sacked. If there is a proven history of it, they should be prosecuted for deceiving the public. Those in the positions of authority should not be allowed to abuse it. Cops have fought in court for the right to lie. As such, they are self-confirmed liars who will abuse the law in order to uphold the parts they think important (without ever making it official what is and isn't important, and that may change at any time). That's not a very good job of "protecting and serving."

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754875)

You really thought you were getting that free boat, didn't you?

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

alxkit (941262) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754887)

they're not

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrapment/ [wikipedia.org]

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Insightful)

SoapBox17 (1020345) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754921)

From wikipedia: "Entrapment is the act of a law enforcement agent in inducing a person to commit an offence which the person would not have, or was unlikely to have, otherwise committed."

This is not a case of entrapment because the person was not induced to commit an offense. He was induced to come to the country after the offense was committed.

A good example of entrapment would be if the FBI tricked him in to coming in the country and then arrested him for coming in to the country illegally (invalid visa or some such).

Re:shouldn't be legal (0, Redundant)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755121)

I'm not arguging with your point, however let me get this right..

The damage is already been done, the source code is useless anyway as any company found using it would have been breaking the law. However, they thought it was wise to waste money getting this guy over to the US so they could spend more money on him for a trial, lawyer and place to live?

Way to waste the tax payers money, not that it matters at this point. I guess Gabe feels better now that he got his own back after being the idiot that let him steal the code in the first place.

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Insightful)

bunratty (545641) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755197)

The damage has already been done? Huh? You are aware that in most cases arrests occur after the commission of a crime, right?

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755327)

My point is that it's a waste of time, effort and money getting a 21 year old kid over to the states to arrest him.

Valve should have better spent that money on securing their networks, however that's what happens when you're an "all microsoft shop" as ex-microsoft employee Gabe is.

After finishing the article they didn't get him anyway, they failed. He's still not in prison to this day so I'm finding the whole article kinda pointless.

The title should have been "Half Life 2 hacker gets away with it", but that's what happens when timothy posts a story.. : /

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Baton Rogue (1353707) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755387)

Way to waste the tax payers money, not that it matters at this point.

Are you serious? So then they should not waste taxpayer's money arresting a bank robber? They've already gotten away with the money, so what's the point?

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755411)

I agree completely. Unless they can prove that it's likely to be a repeat offense, there's no benefit to the American taxpayer.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754957)

It's OK that you screwed up the meaning of entrapment [wikipedia.org] since your link is broken, but since the law enforcement officials didn't induce him to do something illegal, your comment is just dumb.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755259)

So flammable means INflammable???

Should read your own link. (1)

Inominate (412637) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755297)

Entrapment is not illegal(in the US), it's a defense strategy.

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Interesting)

sampson7 (536545) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754897)

One of my favorite law stories ever:

The judges in the small county I used to work in (Charles County, MD) were notoriously tough on cocaine dealers. The neighboring jurisdiction was so overwhemled with drugs that drug dealers in that county were typically given much lighter sentences. The disparity was so great that smart dealers refused to deal in Charles County. Instead, they would arrange deals next to the border without actually ever crossing into Charles Co.

So when the Charles County Sheriff's Office wanted to mount a major drug sting, they moved the "Welcome to Charles County" sign back a hundred feet or so, and would arrange deals just across the border. We put away a lot of bad people for a long time. Brilliant.

Um... Yeah. I have no problem with this.

Re:shouldn't be legal (2, Insightful)

citylivin (1250770) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755029)

"We put away a lot of bad people for a long time. Brilliant. "

While an interesting story, I hope you don't believe that anyone put away for dealing illegal drugs is a "bad" person. Drugs are by and large a choice that effects no one except yourself. You can get into debates using crackheads (who are universally hated) if you'd like, but the point still remains. If all drugs were legal, these "bad people" would simply cease to exsist, or at worst become coca farmers.

Dont even get me started on the "evilness" of users, whom im sure you had no moral problems in also arresting.

thanks (1, Offtopic)

ClintJCL (264898) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755071)

I shall consider your comment a personal favor to me by saving me the time of having to make it myself :)

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755095)

so you dont have a problem with crackheads breaking into cars and homes to steal money for drugs ? or driving high on meth and running over innocent bystanders ? or going on murderous rampages high on coke ? if they were legal, they would do the same thing. but more often. drugs are bad for society..just look at the havens of crime lax drug policies have caused in some communities.

Re:shouldn't be legal (4, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755139)

if they were legal, they would do the same thing.

Why didn't this happen back when all drugs were available over-the-counter?

-jcr

Re:shouldn't be legal (0, Troll)

Maguscrowley (1291130) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755377)

Where are the studies saying it didn't. Saying it did or didn't happen this way before though does not provide direct evidence that it will or will not happen today.

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

duguk (589689) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755165)

that's a problem of money, not of drugs :o)

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755199)

I hear Amsterdam is a horrible place to live. Oh wait..

Re:shouldn't be legal (3, Insightful)

MadnessASAP (1052274) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755241)

I have a problem the same way I have a problem with someone stealing for booze. or getting drunk and driving over someone, or going on a murderous rampage while drunk. All of which happen far more often then the crackhead equivalents.

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755307)

I think breaking into cars and homes, and running over innocent bystanders, and going on murderous rages are all illegal acts in most states in the US (can't account for Alaska). I could be wrong though.

Re:shouldn't be legal (2, Insightful)

karlwilson (1124799) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755331)

I love how this was modded down. What a joke. The parent is exactly right. Drugs like cocaine, meth, etc. all distort the perception of whoever takes them to the point where they can and DO harm others around them with or without realizing they're doing so.

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Insightful)

kingrooster (966028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755351)

Haha, you're funny. On the whole, drug users do commit more crimes than non-drug users. I'll give you that. On the other hand, poor people commit more crimes than rich people. Young people commit more crimes than old people. Punish the crime and treat the addict. Don't ignore illegal drug trafficking, regulate it. Drug use and sale in and of itself should not be a crime.

Re:shouldn't be legal (2, Insightful)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755367)

two words: personal responsibility. If they break into cars, they should go to jail. Not because they were on crack. If the drugs are impacting their life and other people's lives, then its their responsibility to get off drugs or face the consequences, not the state's responsibility to make them. People get arrested for drunk driving all the time; it doesn't mean drinking should be illegal, it just means that drunk drivers should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

Hmmm....so it would be like big Tobacco companies? (1)

thaig (415462) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755171)

. . . except that the cowboy in the advert will be "doing a line" on horseback?

Re:shouldn't be legal (3, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755343)

I hope you don't believe that anyone put away for dealing illegal drugs is a "bad" person.

Dealing drugs is different from using them. Drug dealing is often associated with other crimes: robbery, assault, murder, etc. While I agree with you that choosing to sell drugs is not necessarily indicative of a bad person in itself, and I preemptively agree with you that a lot of that ancillary crime is caused by the very fact that drug dealing is illegal, the fact that the dealer is willing to accept the circumstances and participate in that crime in order to deal makes him a bad person.

If all drugs were legal, these "bad people" would simply cease to exsist, or at worst become coca farmers.

I disagree: if all drugs were legal, the people currently selling them would move onto some other lucrative, illegal activity. For example, the Mafia didn't cease to exist when Prohibition ended and they couldn't run their speakeasys anymore; they just stepped up their extortion, money laundering, etc. to compensate.

In other words, people are not inherently bad because they choose to deal drugs, but the illegality of dealing drugs attracts bad people to it.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755369)

Are you really that naive?

Re:shouldn't be legal (2, Insightful)

hcgpragt (968424) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755107)

Well Sir, I like my government to be trustworthy. They 'won' a few bad-guys but send out a very significant signal: don't trust us.

by the way: What is wrong with one county talking to the others to get their politics more into one line? democracy at work :)

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

onefriedrice (1171917) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755363)

Well Sir, I like my government to be trustworthy

And I want free icecream sundaes and ponies.
Personally, I'm much more concerned that my government is trustworthy with me, so let's start there.

They 'won' a few bad-guys but send out a very significant signal: don't trust us.

Yeah. So? Is it bad that "bad guys" don't trust us? They already know what will happen to them if they get caught by us, so what does it matter if they trust us or not? I think it's safe to assume that most "bad guys" probably don't trust us already, or at least the smart ones.

Are you also against under-cover officers tricking drug dealers into dealing with them? This is real life, and sometimes you have to lie to catch the bad guys.

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

ijakings (982830) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755381)

If you trusted a government to begin with you have a naive view of the world.

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

qbzzt (11136) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755431)

Well Sir, I like my government to be trustworthy.

You do realize you're talking about an organization run by politicians, don't you? Do you really think that's a realistic option?

I don't want my government to be at a disadvantage compared to criminals. When the government commits to something, it should follow through. But when what appears to be a private organization does it, it's OK.

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755413)

Im glad you don't make the laws or "enforce" them.

Re:shouldn't be legal (5, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755097)

If the perp is stupid enough to travel to a country where he's wanted, that's evolution in action.

-jcr

Re:shouldn't be legal (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755193)

I have no problem with this sort of trap. Stupid criminals deserve to get caught.

There is a guy in Australia who fled to another country to get out of being punished for crimes he committed in Australia. He was extradited back to Australia and is now appealing the process leading to his extradition. Now _that_ is wrong.

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755257)

Imagine yourself in the situation where your source code got stolen?
If I'd have the opportunity to catch the thief by sending a couple of mails, I'd try to catch it myself.

why can't you lie to catch criminals? (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755279)

it's not waterboarding

a society functions when its members obey simple moral codes. when you break those codes, you hurt society. you have given up your side of an obligation. therefore, society owes you no more obligation to honor the code of honorable treatment towards you anymore. you broke an agreement. why do you expect society to continue honoring its side of an agreement you ignored?

Re:shouldn't be legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755393)

Unfortunately it is legal. If they invite them to do some hacking for them in the USA then arrested them for it it would be illegal, but because it's only visiting the USA.

The real issue I see is where the crime was committed. Was it committed in the USA because the server/network was in the USA or was it overseas because the internet connect used was overseas.

We can't keep doing this kind of ad-hoc job of policing the internet. Global leaders need to have a carefully planned out management for laws to govern the internet. Until we have a set of laws that can be applied to the internet we will continue to have problems like hackers and the mega spam groups.

a fun bit of trivia (2, Interesting)

Digitus1337 (671442) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754725)

So many people heard that the Half Life 2 engine source code was taken, that they started referring to the engine as the "source engine", and it's been known by that name ever since.

Re:a fun bit of trivia (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754777)

Not quite the story, if you happen to believe Wikipedia

Re:a fun bit of trivia (3, Informative)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754935)

Except according to this wikipedia entry [wikipedia.org] it's called src/source because it was forked of the GoldSrc engine [wikipedia.org] and they just shorten the name of the new dir to Src.

Your story seemed to unlikely that I just had to check it up somewhat.

Re:a fun bit of trivia (5, Informative)

shadow42 (996367) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754941)

From the talk page [valvesoftware.com] of a Valve developer on their developer wiki:

When we were getting very close to releasing Half-Life 1 (less than a week or so), we found there were already some projects that we needed to start working on, but we couldn't risk checking in code to the shipping version of the game. At that point we forked off the code in VSS to be both $/Goldsrc and /$Src. Over the next few years, we used these terms internally as "Goldsource" and "Source". At least initially, the Goldsrc branch of code referred to the codebase that was currently released, and Src referred to the next set of more risky technology that we were working on. When it came down to show Half-Life 2 for the first time at E3, it was part of our internal communication to refer to the "Source" engine vs. the "Goldsource" engine, and the name stuck.

Re:a fun bit of trivia (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755153)

They use Visual Source Safe?

WTF indeed

What happens when other countries do that too ? (0, Flamebait)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754753)

will you arrogant americans stomach your citizens being arrested in set traps worldwide ?

from top of my head, i know that one of the ex prime ministers of israel is gonna be arrested as soon as he sets foot on belgium soil.

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (1)

Throtex (708974) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754823)

We'll probably be too dumb to figure out where Belgium is and give up. /pandering

Besides, we have reputable citizens that are arrested abroad for far less insidious reasons. You don't need to lecture us; we know how it is.

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (5, Interesting)

Derkec (463377) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754927)

If you are wanted for a crime in some country, you should avoid:
1) Going to that country
2) Going to countries with extradition agreements with that country

If you are dumb enough to go to the country, you deserve to be arrested.

How would I feel if someone tricked dumb American criminals into getting arrested? Pretty good. We could use less criminals on the streets. Feel free.

This isn't exactly a civil rights issue.

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (1, Troll)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755213)

If you are dumb enough to go to the country, you deserve to be arrested.

Thankfully I'm smart enough never to set foot in the US. _Everyone_ there is a criminal according to their RIAA government!

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754977)

Or if for instance EULAs are decided to be valid in EU but not in USA. Just send all people over .. (Except it doesn't make sense since it would cost a lot of money to keep them imprisoned, guess we better fine them heavily instead.)

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (1)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755399)

You're seriously going to compare breaking a EULA to writing worms and infiltrating a large company's network and releasing the source code of one of their most lucrative pieces of software?

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (3, Funny)

CorporateSuit (1319461) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755133)

will you arrogant americans stomach your citizens being arrested in set traps worldwide ?

A friend of mine is set to be drafted immediately into their military if he ever sets foot in Turkey, since he was born in a Turkish hospital. That said, do you think he's dumb enough to accept a job interview for a Turkish company? It doesn't matter how delicious it sounds, he's not biting.

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (4, Interesting)

puto (533470) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755385)

Americans get worse treatment in other countries then visitors to the US do when they come here.

I can say this because I hold citizenship in three countries. And have lived in all three would rather tangle with the american law enforcement then the other two.

When Michael Fay was caned in Singapore for vandalism, the majority of the USA cheered, because he acted like an ass in another country, and he deserved what he got.

I had the misfortune of meeting the prick years later, and he almost got caned again with a pool cue.

But in the US there is a saying. IF you can't do the time, do'nt do the crime.

Nothing arrogant about the way they were caught.

Re:What happens when other countries do that too ? (1)

qbzzt (11136) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755467)

will you arrogant americans stomach your citizens being arrested in set traps worldwide ?

As long as after the arrest they are treated no worse than citizens of the country where they got arrested, no problem.

If you get arrested in a foreign country, your consul can try to make sure you're not treated worse. There is no requirement to treat you better. US citizens have been arrested, jailed, and even executed in foreign countries.

Charged in Germany anyway (4, Informative)

Pinckney (1098477) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754767)

The article mentions that this trap failed. Apparently he suspected something.

Anyway, Gembe was sentenced to probation in Germany for the breach and leak. Interesting that the FBI apparently took this so much more seriously than the German courts.

Re:Charged in Germany anyway (3, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754917)

Well, just before 09/11, the FBI retasked most of their anti-terror team to work on copyright. Says something about their priorities. Or rather, the priorities of those in charge of their budget.

Re:Charged in Germany anyway (1)

Spatial (1235392) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754987)

I don't see why it would warrant any further action. Apparently the guy didn't even damage anything. The source code got released to the public... Big deal?

Re:Charged in Germany anyway (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755407)

Analogously, they shouldn't bother going after attempted murderers because they didn't manage to kill their victim.

Right?

myg0t (5, Informative)

Digitus1337 (671442) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754769)

The group named in the article is "myg0t" not "mygot." They developed some of the first hacks for Counter-Strike (the original). They became so well known in game as cheaters that a lot of servers are set to automatically kick any playing wearing their tag.

Re:myg0t (1)

Onymous Coward (97719) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755143)

Fuckin' cheaters.

Re:myg0t (1)

Tains (865481) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755469)

In the article they have actually typed "myg0t" but unfortunately their font makes it *look like* they've typed "mygot".

How is this news? (1)

tergvelo (926069) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754773)

The story is four years old. The only 'news' is the little blurb at the end of the article where it says the feds added his name to an old case.

Remember, this is supposed to be news for nerds.

~t

Note to self (5, Funny)

yo303 (558777) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754785)

Do not go somewhere where I'm wanted. Stay in the countries where there are NO warrants for my arrests.

Re:Note to self (2, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755195)

Sigh! I'm not wanted anywhere.

Two minds (1)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754827)

Wife thinks this is despicable.

I think it's hilarious.

In this job market (5, Funny)

KalvinB (205500) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754843)

that's just cruel.

cruel but apparently funny (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754995)

Says a lot of about us really doesn't it.

Mind you, what would be worse in this job interview. Finding yourself handcuffed when signing the contract or getting a rejection letter. "Thank you for your intrest in joining our Federal "PitA" Program but at this time we feel we are not going to make use of your services, kind regards, FBI."

Re:cruel but apparently funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755449)

In the most basic sense, everything funny is cruel. Laughter is what humans do to help cope with pain. The more painful it is, the more we need to laugh.

Show me a joke that isn't a play on misunderstandings, loss, embarrassment, death, pain, or ridicule.

What's truly tragic, and therefore funny, is that people have so little understanding of how their own minds work.

Re:In this job market (2, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755003)

The dumbass got greedy. Instead of informing valve of the methods of his breach and then securing a high-paying job with them, dumbass done stole the source and then bragged about it and now he's probably being watched 24/7.

Re:In this job market (1)

NoobixCube (1133473) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755453)

He'd still have been charged with some crime or other - unauthorised access to a "secure" computer system or something. People don't like to have their idiocy revealed to the world (I don't like the phrase "made to look like an idiot". People rarely need help with that). If someone reverse engineered Norton Antivirus to find it's a total sham, and then revealed as much to Norton, I doubt they'd be happy.

Re:In this job market (1)

dedazo (737510) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755141)

Things like these are proof positive that intelligent != smart

Re:In this job market (1)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755465)

In the navy, the people who run the nuclear reactors are called Nukes. It's also common knowledge in the navy that while the Nukes are some of the brightest minds in the military, they have an incredible lack of common sense. I mention this only because I think it parallels the rest of the world. intelligent != smart indeed.

deca post (0, Offtopic)

Frostalicious (657235) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754869)

first deca post!

i call bullshit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754945)

death to america

Ruh Roh (0)

mothore (1382155) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754959)

"And I would have gotten away with it to. If it weren't for you meddling federal agents and your dog..."

Ah, how we've grown (1)

IorDMUX (870522) | more than 5 years ago | (#25754979)

I know it was a big deal six years ago, but, as Slashdot has grown, 1000 comments has ceased to be such a grand milestone. Just look at our big issues from the past month:

Press Favored Obama [slashdot.org] -- 1588 Comments
Obama Launches change.gov [slashdot.org] -- 1470 Comments
(Useful) Stupid UNIX Tricks [slashdot.org] -- 2356 Comments
Barack Obama Wins US Presidency [slashdot.org] -- 3705 Comments
Discuss the US Presidential Election [slashdot.org] -- 1912 Comments
Discuss "" and Health Care [slashdot.org] -- 1270 Comments
Discuss "" and The War [slashdot.org] -- 1211 Comments
Discuss "" and Education [slashdot.org] -- 1515 Comments

I... I seem to notice a theme...

Gabe Newell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25754985)

What I remember is Gabe Newell's pathetically lame excuse that the hacker had gotten in through an Outlook buffer overflow. He had no freakin' clue how it had happened; could have been the Pepsi guy, the creepy new intern, someone's pissed-off ex-girlfriend. But off went his mouth. Dork.

Re:Gabe Newell (0)

Nimey (114278) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755235)

Yeah, the moron should have never put the HL2 source on a computer with an Internet connection, but he did.

Maybe it's just as well, though; HL2 might not have been as good without the delay.

Now, just imagine (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755353)

A similar sting for Bin Laden.

I'll let you guys suggest drafts for the job advert.

Double Jeopardy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25755409)

Just how many times can one be convicted for one crime? Isn't there a law against this?

Apart from the HL2 Source Code (4, Insightful)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 5 years ago | (#25755451)

Apart from the HL2 source code being realease into the wild (which I agree was a big thing), the stuff this guy did to get the source code is probably a bigger deal. He compromised Valve's machines. He broke into their network. He installed keyloggers. He hijacked email accounts. He (maybe) initiated DoS attacks on their servers. Even if he did not steal and release the HL2 source code (trade secrets) what he did was pretty damn wrong... and illegal in most places of the world. The FBI, in my opinion, has every right to chase this guy (no, I do not live in the US). Chase the guy, catch him and let him rot in jail. Summary: the HL2 source code release, at this point in time, is not the big deal; it's all the other laws he broke.

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