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Astronaut Loses Tools While Performing an EVA

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the only-human dept.

NASA 445

tpheiska writes "NASA press release states that 'At approx. 3:33 p.m. EST, Piper reported that one of the Braycote lubrication guns had released grease into her toolbag. As she was cleaning the bag and wiping the tools and equipment inside, the bag floated away. Another bag carrying identical equipment is now being shared by Piper and Bowen.' Luckily they had a spare."

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I was just wondering (5, Interesting)

black_lbi (1107229) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816949)

Why isn't the tools bag somehow linked to the suit? with a strap or something ...

Re:I was just wondering (4, Insightful)

Cthefuture (665326) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816995)

I was thinking the same thing. I mean it's not uncommon to use a tether on your bag while on Earth. It would make even more sense in space.

Re:I was just wondering (5, Insightful)

Konster (252488) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817701)

Except they are not on Earth.

You don't want a tether on a bag full of stuff in orbit because it can act in pretty unpredictable ways, flailing about and risking the life of the person that's holding the bag is the first consideration. Guys, this isn't changing the oil on your car. A stray object can damage any one of the many couplings on the suit and rendering that suit inoperable very quickly. Bad news if you happen to be that person inside the suit at that time. Failure on Earth means you pick up the wrench and go back at it. Failure up there is a dead person on a mission with a multiples of billions of dollars pricetag hung off to the side.

Further, they are trained on instrument loss...tools floating off, et cetera. Again, this is not Earth wherein you can grasp around with complete impunity looking for whatever tool that just spun out on the garage floor. Space walkers especially are trained far more on what they cannot do than what they can do. They can reach out very slowly to try and recover something that is drifting off, but any large effort means that they may also join that tool bag on its long, lonely orbit around the Earth. In the small and large scheme of things, an astronaut is of far more value than a wrench or any multitudes thereof.

Also, yes, NASA knows a little bit about redundancy and especially so on space walks.

Give our astronauts a bit of credit here. Tough job. Worst pay on the planet (or near it) for the risk. Awesome view, but colossal vertigo.

A bit of trivia: space walker's microphones are muted for the first 30 seconds of their first space walk. Reason is this: in space, no one can hear you scream. And with the mic off, neither can Houston.

Re:I was just wondering (2, Interesting)

NeilTheStupidHead (963719) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817913)

Unless the astronaut imparted enough force into the object to either give it escape velocity or cause it to reenter the atmosphere, shouldn't she (in theory) just be able to wait the 90 or so minutes till the next orbit and grab it when the two orbits intersect?

There's always the chance the object will interact with another NEO and not come back, but if no other force acts on it, it should just intersect orbits on the next revolution since it seems like very little force was imparted to the object to change it's trajectory. At least, that's my admittedly limited understanding of orbital mechanics: if two objects in basically identical orbits exchange momentum, then their new orbits will intersect at the same place the original exchange took place.

Re:I was just wondering (1, Insightful)

ari_j (90255) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817963)

I like the use of the word "luckily" in the summary. Good planning is attributed to luck, but bad planning is blamed as such.

Re:I was just wondering (2, Funny)

paazin (719486) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817009)

Or Velcro(tm) the space-age adhesive!

Re:I was just wondering (1)

Whorhay (1319089) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817033)

Seriously, you'd think anything they took with them outside of the station would have a freaking tether.

Re:I was just wondering (5, Insightful)

ILikeRed (141848) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817331)

The rope came undone. What they need is a spacesuit with a magnetic grappling gun built into the arm of the suit to grab things like this before they float too far away. (Yes, like the Samus suit [samuscentral.com] - who would not want to see that in space?)

Re:I was just wondering (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817467)

Well now that the tools are lost, I'm curious to know - will they burn-up in the atmosphere? Maybe someone's house will get hit by a ball of molten steel a few months from now.

Re:I was just wondering (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817687)

i hope it hits this particular house [wikipedia.org] before the end of the year

Re:I was just wondering (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817837)

You're just begging for a Secret Service visit...

Re:I was just wondering (1)

arb phd slp (1144717) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817723)

Well now that the tools are lost, I'm curious to know - will they burn-up in the atmosphere? Maybe someone's house will get hit by a ball of molten steel a few months from now.

Eventually they'll deorbit and burn up, but probably not for a while. The tools were in a stable orbit when they were dropped and they weren't thrown very hard (just enough so they were out of reach by the time it was noticed). It takes quite a bit more delta-v than that to deorbit.

Re:I was just wondering (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25818001)

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction...

With that in mind, I'm not sure it's a good idea to be "firing" things from your space suit. Depending on the force, some dangerous things might happen.

Full disclosure: I don't really know anything about working in space - my comment might actually be really stupid and invalid (hence, I posted as ac...)

Re:I was just wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817807)

Why not some sort of tool belt where they all clip in.

Re:I was just wondering (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817823)

Strapon tools? I can see why they don't want to go that direction...

Re:I was just wondering (1)

tuxgeek (872962) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817973)

Strapon tools or Snapon tools
Unless the space walkers are lesbian, and then it's okay

Laurel & Hardy? (5, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816955)

As she was cleaning the bag and wiping the tools and equipment inside, the bag floated away. Another bag carrying identical equipment is now being shared by Piper and Bowen.

Do we have any humorous black & white silent space footage of this skit?

Seriously, NASA's gotta come up with financing somehow ... add some hokey 1920's ragtime music to the it, speed it up just unnaturally fast and they just might be sitting on a viral video here!

Come on, it practically writes itself:

Setting: Exterior of shuttle.
A lanky beanpole Bowen discovers that grease has been dispensed into her bag. Not wanting to alert the portly Bowen and face his wrath, she quickly empties the contents of the bag to wipe them off. As she cleans each tool, she sets it back down on the shuttle but soon realizes that they merely float back up. She rotates through each tool, setting it back on the shuttle but forgets about the bag! Bowen hears the heavy breathing in his earpiece and turns around in time to see the bag floating away while Piper is pre-occupied with the tools. He scowls and makes a move for the bag but slips on grease and tumbles out into space, tethered only by his life support ...

Re:Laurel & Hardy? (1)

qoncept (599709) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817035)

You forgot the part where she jumps up to grab the bag. We've struck gold with this one!

Re:Laurel & Hardy? (1)

Mushdot (943219) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817625)

Footage is here [bbc.co.uk] :)

Im assuming the astronauts are tethered to the shuttle or you must have some will power to stop the urge to lunge too hard and end up floating off yourself?

Re:Laurel & Hardy? (1)

davolfman (1245316) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817805)

That helmet-cam footage is positively agoraphobia inducing.

there is footage (2, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817707)

i saw it on nbc this morning

its a top down point of view of the astronaut. she sets the toolbag to the side and addresses some other piece of equipment in front of her, and the bag slowly drifts down, in camera view

by the time she turns her attention back to it, you can see the shock in her hand gestures trying to grab it, now below her waist. i guess space suits don't provide bend

Re:Laurel & Hardy? (2)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817729)

Seriously, NASA's gotta come up with financing somehow ... add some hokey 1920's ragtime music to the it, speed it up just unnaturally fast and they just might be sitting on a viral video here!

Yeah, I've been wondering why they don't do "NASA Presents: Space Comedy". I mean, they have plenty of hilarious material already [youtube.com] ...

I was thinking more Benny Hill (1)

fiordhraoi (1097731) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817871)

Here's your soundtrack [televisiontunes.com] !

color me unsurprised (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25816967)

that's why I don't trust my bag to any woman

Re:color me unsurprised (4, Funny)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817061)

"that's why I don't trust my bag to any woman"

Not even when it's coated with lube?

Re:color me unsurprised (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817817)

I mean, really. What's a woman doing in space? She should be at home ironing a man's shirt.

Re:color me unsurprised (2, Funny)

msu320 (1084789) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817115)

that's why I don't trust my bag to any other woman

fixed it for ya.

Re:color me unsurprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817781)

There is no unfunny rating and if I rate you overrated, I will get metamoderated into oblivion. So I will just tell you. You, sir, suck at life.

And THIS is why (5, Funny)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816973)

The Enterprise was built on the ground folks. If highly trained astronauts cant hold onto their tools, you think a bunch of steel workers can?

Re:And THIS is why (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817297)

Yes, I would definitely trust your average steel worker to take better care of his tools than your average geek or jet pilot.

Re:And THIS is why (1)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817361)

you have not been around a lot of construction workers then.

Re:And THIS is why (4, Insightful)

Tisha_AH (600987) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817501)

Pieces, parts and tools have been lost on a very large number of space missions since humanity first went into space. In zero G, if an object has the slightest amount of velocity and it is let go, it quickly is beyond your reach and irrecoverable.

Of course it goes without mention that men lost all of the previous items (including a spatula used to apply a test filler material for the shuttle tiles).

The misogyny of most of the posters to this article helps illustrate an earlier /. article on why fewer women are entering the computer sciences fields in university. Many ego-centric professionals (I use that term loosely) in the IT field still can see no use for a woman in their profession, unless we are staffing a help desk.

EVA missions during space travel are the most challenging and difficult activities of anything that NASA does. "Tim the Toolman" does not have a caddy of accessories to keep his stuff in place. Imagine how difficult it is to be standing on the end of a boom, attached to the shuttle. You have no visual frame of reference, the balance mechanisms in your ears are telling you one thing, your training is telling you something else. Now try to overhaul a bad rotary joint on one of the solar panels.

Ignorance is clearly bliss to several of the posters to this article.

Re:And THIS is why (1)

Mononoke (88668) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817697)

Ignorance is clearly bliss to several of the posters to this article.

Or perhaps they haven't endured the required sense-of-humor-ectomy yet. (No, it doesn't involve estrogen supplements.)

Re:And THIS is why (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817719)

Many ego-centric professionals (I use that term loosely) in the IT field still can see no use for a woman in their profession, unless we are staffing a help desk.

Hey! That's not true. Executive Assistant comes to mind.

"Tim the Toolman" does not have a caddy of accessories to keep his stuff in place

He wears a toolbelt, which is attached to his waist...

Re:And THIS is why (2, Insightful)

Jeff Hornby (211519) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817579)

Ummm... I don't know how to tell you this but...

You do know that the Enterprise was never actually built, don't you? All of that footage was either a 6 inch model or some cheesy computer graphics?

Re:And THIS is why (1)

d3ac0n (715594) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817733)

True.

BUT, both the model AND the computer graphics were built on Earth, on the ground (or a table). So technically, he/she isn't wrong.

However, I've often thought that once mankind DOES begin building interplanetary space vehicles, we should probably do it on the ground, in specially designed hangars. At least for ships up to a certain size. Obviously, once you reach a certain size level, the ship just becomes too massive to support it's own weight while sitting on the ground. Alternately, due to design restrictions it could be the wrong SHAPE to properly sit on the ground, or is just too damn big to escape Earth's gravity well if launched from the ground. Then having space stations with large construction bays will probably be wise.

But somehow I think that's not something we will have to worry about in our lifetimes. More's the pity.

Re:And THIS is why (1)

SleptThroughClass (1127287) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817749)

You do know that the Enterprise was never actually built, don't you? All of that footage was either a 6 inch model or some cheesy computer graphics?

Actually, it was built 11 feet long and the special effects did not involve computers.

n/t (1)

KasperMeerts (1305097) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816979)

Sometimes an astronaut loses some tools: big news!
Seriously, if there is no mechanism to keep the bags safe, like with magnets, this is only to be expected. With all the other crap in space, nobody is going to mind.

Re:n/t (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817373)

Seems like I recall an Arthur C. Clarke short story about a space station orbiting Jupiter. One of the occupants has done something reprehensible and the others take him outside [in space suits] and give him a shove toward Jupiter.

Clarke's "rest of the story" asserted that the victim would not fall all the way to Jupiter, but would instead return to the drop/shove off point, right next to the space station, after one orbit.

If orbital mechanics work as Clarke claimed, wouldn't it be possible to retrieve the tools after one orbit?

Or, perhaps not.

Re:n/t (1)

IceCreamGuy (904648) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817663)

identical equipment is now being shared by Piper and Bowen

Bowen... more like... Dave Bowman! Tool... more like... Frank Pool! They'll be found again in the year 3001 by an asteroid miner and be used to give TMA-2 a virus to become the worst series finisher in history!

Re:n/t (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817907)

If the orbit didn't intersect the planet and had the same period, yeah.

Re:n/t (1)

SleptThroughClass (1127287) | more than 5 years ago | (#25818005)

If the bag was pushed exactly toward or away from Earth, it would be back in one orbit. But it was pushed in a random direction. A sideways push makes it keep going away from the station; the orbits might later intersect after the bag's sideways travel takes it around the world. It would have to get a very strong horizontal push to go around the world in a short enough period for the astronauts to be willing to wait for it. And if the sideways push wasn't exactly horizontal, when the bag came back from the other side it might be too high or too low.

More importantly (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817427)

why is there not a small sat. that can be deployed around there to help them? Seriously, it should not be that difficult to come up with small sats that work out there, comm link to the ISS, has several small cameras, and perhaps a small hand. The most difficult part would be propulsion. Everybody wants to give it compressed gas. But it might be better to consider alternatives. This would be a useful item for selling to Bigelow. If I were one of the small space prize companies, I might consider doing this.

D'oh! (1)

conureman (748753) | more than 5 years ago | (#25816983)

I hate when I do that.

damn it whats wrong with me (4, Funny)

ionix5891 (1228718) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817011)

"guns had released grease into her toolbag ..."

That's why women don't belong in space (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817013)

Women belong at home, making dinner and babies. God has so commanded.

Re:That's why women don't belong in space (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817929)

God? Is that really you?

Typical woman (4, Funny)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817049)

More interested in cleaning stuff than getting on with the job! :o)

Re:Typical woman (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817205)

Well, cleaning stuff *is* her job... /ducks

Female to Lose Toolbag in Space (-1, Troll)

xpuppykickerx (1290760) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817079)

Much more fitting title.

Re:Female to Lose Toolbag in Space (-1, Troll)

Blice (1208832) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817131)

more like "Female to be let out of kitchen, fucks something up", amirite?

Advertisment (3, Funny)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817093)

"New, from the company that brought you Soap-On-A-Rope, we are proud to present our latest product line for extra-terrestrial encounters of the maintenance kind...
- Hammer-On-A-Rope!
- Screwdriver-On-A-Rope!
- Chisel-On-A-Rope!
- Rope-On-A-Rope!"

Re:Advertisment (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817983)

- Rope-On-A-Rope!

That's funny, actually, because there apparently were some tethers in the toolbag.

Women let out of kitchen, things go wrong.. (-1, Troll)

Blice (1208832) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817105)

They do have a kitchen on that ship, right?

Can't imagine another reason for bringing a woman up there.

Footage of the incident (5, Informative)

rawagajah (1321705) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817145)

Luckily? (4, Insightful)

holophrastic (221104) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817159)

Luckily they have a spare? Umm guys, not luck, planning. Not an accident, not for the grace of a god, simply a good thing. Give credit where credit is due: someone planned well.

Well they knew a woman was coming along after all (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817371)

And if it's one thing women can do, it's lose things, or put things where no one can find them again.

Re:Luckily? (1)

Eravau (12435) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817529)

Too bad someone else didn't execute as well as the initial someone planned.

Solution (1)

clickety6 (141178) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817171)

She shoulda had one of these:

http://www.shoptoit.ca/ss/dashindeals/en/dd_hd_belt.jpg [shoptoit.ca]

Re:Solution (2, Insightful)

JayAitch (1277640) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817851)

Guess what my girlfriend is getting for Christmas. Chicks in toolbelts nice.

Why did it have to be a woman... (2, Insightful)

mdm-adph (1030332) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817191)

Women already have it hard enough trying to "keep up with the boys." Jeebus. The 20 or so comments already on here are more than enough.

Re:Why did it have to be a woman... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817455)

Because it wouldn't happen to a guy. :P

Re:Why did it have to be a woman... (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817515)

Just wait until she loses the second one. :-)

Re:Why did it have to be a woman... (1)

SlashBugs (1339813) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817605)

The 20 or so comments already on here are more than enough.

Yeah. I actually have mod points today, but I can't find the option for "-1, pathetic bigotry".

If life had taught her anything... (4, Insightful)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817213)

Never go back for your bag.

The Grease (2, Informative)

will_die (586523) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817245)

For those interested here is some technical information [2spi.com] on the grease.

I couldn't hack it myself (1)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817253)

My every move filmed for scrutiny, any fuckup to be beamed around the world before I even realized what happened.

Do you realize how much hazing's going to come along with this incident? I hope she can take it in good humor.

Re:I couldn't hack it myself (1)

Tim Doran (910) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817507)

Plus, she's coming home to find her paycheck docked for the next 3 years to pay for the lost tools. Ouch!

they aren't lost... (1)

the4thdimension (1151939) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817261)

they landed in my pool! I got them right here. Why are they covered in grease?

An honest, mistake, but... (1)

blcamp (211756) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817267)

Not only was this expensive and preventable (erm, *tether*, anyone?)...
...the ramifications could be huge.

Which satellite is going to take the hit for this? Which future orbital mission?
Or... will the ISS itself get smacked, later on?

Oops. (1)

Theoboley (1226542) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817321)

That would've been one expensive Oops.

Figure it costs how many millions to get them up into space, just to bring them another tool belt + grease gun...

Don't give her a second one... (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817357)

Sorry... you drop the first one, you lose the right to use one. Can they not just tether it to her? Like a little kid and his mittens?

its a well known - Ladies and handbags (0)

kubitus (927806) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817359)

Ladies tend to spill either the contents or drop their handbags.

Maybe it was snatched by a alien?

What about the EVA retriever robot? (5, Insightful)

Robotbeat (461248) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817429)

NASA had a robot in development JUST FOR THIS SORT OF THING. In the early 1990s/late 1980s they were working on an autonomous robot that responds to voice commands that would fly around in space near a space station to retrieve tools or astronauts and such. It would be released and lock on to the tool or whatever and fly to it and fly back to the station. I have a picture of it in a kids book about robots, but I can't find one online.

Here's a fact sheet on the project:

http://cd.textfiles.com/spaceandast/TEXT/STATION/STF_EVA.TXT [textfiles.com]

EVA RETRIEVER FACT SHEET

Johnson Space Center (JSC)

March 25, 1988

          The EVA Retriever concept is an autonomous free flying robot
for retrieving equipment or a spacewalking astronaut drifting in
separated flight near the Space Station. The device combines the
proven manned maneuvering unit (MMU) with a robot latched in
where an astronaut normally would be. The MMU was flown eight
times from the Space Shuttle's cargo bay in test flights and for
satellite repair spacewalks.

          Responding to voice commands from the Space Station crew,
the EVA Retriever would activate and check itself out, search for
and lock onto the "target," thrust toward, rendezvous with and
grapple the target -- automatically avoiding any obstacles en
route such as Space Station structures. After grappling the
target, the EVA Retriever would search for the Space Station and
finding it, return home.

Re:What about the EVA retriever robot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817745)

robot that responds to voice commands

The program was scrapped when a young child pointed out that in the absence of atmosphere, the robot would be unable to hear the sound of voice commands, thus saving NASA millions of dollars and considerable embarrassment...

Anonymous Coward (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817475)

A woman in space.. cleaning..

Never happens to me.. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817487)

I might lose a gum wrapper in the blade server chassis now and then..

No, wait, that was the telecom tech who, being in charge of the machine room, dictated that we have no food or beverages in the room. His gum fetish was the exception, and the shard of gum foil wrapper in the Cubix box just a minor inconvenience for 500+ users.

But hey, it wasn't me! I just tripped over the T-1 cable he thoughtfully left out for me, after I had dressed them into *his* cable tray without permission.

But I'm not bitter.

Like the astronaut who's wondering who untied her tool bag... Hell hath no fury...

Magnets. I bet half the ISS is non-ferrous.

man (1)

dvh.tosomja (1235032) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817513)

That video is awesome!

Could have been worse.. (1)

mweather (1089505) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817519)

Thank god they didn't loose it while performing "The Merchant of Venice"

And in today's episode of "guess the acronym" (0)

Idaho (12907) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817541)

What's an EVA?

Come on editors, using undefined acronyms in the body of an article is bad enough writing as it is, but using them in headlines is a new low (even for Slashdot).

Re:And in today's episode of "guess the acronym" (1)

Robotbeat (461248) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817641)

EVA means "Extra-Vehicular Activity" or, colloquially, space-walking.

Re:And in today's episode of "guess the acronym" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817659)

I guess maybe they figured that they didn't need one for Extra-Vehicular Activity.

Shall we say things like:
"... using a laser (Light Amplification through Stimulated Emission of Radiation)" as well?

Re:And in today's episode of "guess the acronym" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817947)

If you're really that stupid, why not just look it up?

Wow (4, Funny)

IceCreamGuy (904648) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817565)

I think this might be the most sexist slashdot discussion I've ever seen.

Sleep time (3, Funny)

edgr (781723) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817597)

The crew is due to go to sleep tonight at 11:55 p.m. CST and will wake up at 7:55 a.m. tomorrow.

Man, that's a pretty damn regimented sleep time. I guess there's no quickly checking /. before bed.

Re:Sleep time (1)

Hanners1979 (959741) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817957)

It's not so bad once someone "loses" the alarm clock in space.

Shit happens ... (2, Insightful)

seyyah (986027) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817645)

but hopefully it wasn't "luck" that made them have a spare bag.

Wait a second... (3, Insightful)

Shaltenn (1031884) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817671)

OK I understand that the grease gun went off in the bag and covered the tools with goo and what not.

But... why not go inside before attempting to clean the stupid things off? I mean, the tools are still usable, if a little gunked up...

Kudos to NASA for having two sets of tools, one for each astronaut. ... Wait... You say they only have those two sets? No backups? ... ... -_-

Re:Wait a second... (1)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817951)

because so much better than having greasy tools is having greasy inside of a space station and air

Uhm ... what? (3, Funny)

Errtu76 (776778) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817675)

"lubrication guns had released grease into her toolbag"

Am i really the only one who thought of porn when reading this? I hope not.

Time to hire space debris collectors (3, Interesting)

Carlosos (1342945) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817741)

Maybe some other people also haven seen the anime "Planetes" that is about space debris collectors because too much stuff was lost in space that it was dangerous with all the stuff flying around.
Lets say it starts with a screw flying at high speed at a space ship that went "boom".

It might really become a problem in the future.

Re:Time to hire space debris collectors (1)

mad_robot (960268) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817935)

We could get the Chinese to blow it up.

Should've seen it coming (1, Funny)

Godji (957148) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817763)

That's exactly what happens when astronauts don't get to see "BURN-E" before going on a mission!

You tools (1)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817777)

Was it a commemorative tool release for the ISS's 10th year in space?

Porn? (2, Funny)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 5 years ago | (#25817835)

lubrication guns had released grease into her toolbag. As she was cleaning the bag and wiping the tools and equipment inside

This is the most obscene thing I've ever read here.

This... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25817981)

This is why we can't have nice things!

OH jesus fucking christ on a pogo stick (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25818003)

I would expect the newspapers to have this sort of childish ignorant reporting, but I would expect SLASHDOT to have at least some inkling of the technical difficulty of this EVA and all the things they did, and to expect that it was while she was dealing with a grease gun that had exploded everywhere.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised the Slashdot editors are fucking morons too.

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