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What The Banned iPhone Ad Should Really Look Like

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the truth-in-advertising dept.

Cellphones 463

Barence writes "To demonstrate just how misleading the latest (and now banned) iPhone television ad really is, PC Pro has recreated it using an iPhone 3G and a Wi-Fi connection — with laughable results. Apple was forced to pull the advert today after the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) decided it exaggerated the speed of mobile browsing. 'In the 30-second clip the iPhone is shown loading a webpage, finding its current location in Google Maps, opening a PDF from an email and finally taking a phone call. The ASA concluded that the iPhone cannot do what was shown in the mere 29 seconds afforded in the advert, ruling that it was misleading.' Try it for yourself and you'll undoubtedly agree."

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This is tipical for apple (5, Interesting)

brejc8 (223089) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909027)

Apple should really be slapped for repeatedly misrepresenting [brej.org] their products. I will buy a beer to anyone who can find a single photo of any of their products on the store website. Every single one has been hand generated usually with incorrect proportions.

No, this is typical for virtually anyone selling (4, Insightful)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909113)

Apple should really be slapped for repeatedly misrepresenting [brej.org] their products

Who doesn't? Went to Wendy's the other day and got a #2 combo because it looked pretty awesome on the order board. Got back to the office and opened it up to discover something pretty gross looking, a mash of squashed bun and grey meat. Yum. This isn't a rare case, and is pretty much the norm of advertising.

Are you as awesome as your resume paints you to be?

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (5, Funny)

LearnToSpell (694184) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909207)

Are you as awesome as your resume paints you to be?

I'm even awesomer! I left off all the parts about how I can play drums, my massive Spawn toy collection, and my mad pepper-growing skillz.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (2, Funny)

neBelcnU (663059) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909465)

You're HIRED!

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (5, Insightful)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909269)

Uh their ad showed it to be 4x as good as it really is. If i went to wendys and got a 1/16th pounder i'd be pretty pissed. If on my resume I said I could build a bathroom to finished in 4hours they would likely be disappointed. Beyond that their speed was the WHOLE advertisement.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (3, Insightful)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909313)

Uh

Don't start replies with Uh. It's combative and makes you look like a dink.

their ad showed it to be 4x as good as it really is. If i went to wendys and got a 1/16th pounder i'd be pretty pissed

I'm hardly defending Apple here, but I think "4x as good" is rather ridiculous. While you seem to think a 1lb'r would be "4x as good" as a 1/4lb, in the Wendy's example I consider what I got 1/10th as satisfying as what's promised on the board (and it would be even worse if they just stuck more meat on it). Instead of a burger bursting with delicious veg, I got some piece of crap that I considered just tossing.

The ad had someone doing tasks at a rate that no one would ever do them. No, people don't jump around pages like that generally, scrolling a PDF for a second and looking up an address (with zero text entry) in milliseconds, instantly absorbing it.

Which is why it was an obvious exaggeration, which is pretty much the case for virtually all ads. I'd rather all ads were a lot more honest (in the case of fast food restaurants it should require random photos of randomly served dishes at regular intervals), but it seems a bit laughable to make such a big deal out of Apple.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (0, Troll)

that this is not und (1026860) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909435)

it seems a bit laughable to make such a big deal out of Apple.

I've been saying that for decades now. Since even before 1984 and the wonderful Macintosh.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (5, Funny)

denzacar (181829) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909473)

I'm hardly defending Apple here, but I think "4x as good" is rather ridiculous.

Quite right.

It was 4.86 times faster, cooler and better. In the PC Pro video it looked like celebrities in one of those "with&without makeup" slideshows. [youtube.com]
De-glamored and like just another mobile phone. Which nobody really needs.

Not at all like something hand-sculpted from pieces of the true cross and philosopher's stone by (female) virgins gently rubbing their pelvises over the aforementioned imaginary artifacts.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909611)

Not at all like something hand-sculpted from pieces of the true cross and philosopher's stone by (female) virgins gently rubbing their pelvises over the aforementioned imaginary artifacts.

Son, if this is how you think a good cell phone is created... well, lets just say you appear to have a few serious issues that would be best dealt with in long term counseling.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (4, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909603)

Don't start replies with Uh. It's combative and makes you look like a dink.

Just to make sure I have this right, do you mean to imply that telling people how they should express themselves is not combative and does not make you look like a "dink"? Or is this more of an "it's okay when I do it" situation?

Which is why it was an obvious exaggeration, which is pretty much the case for virtually all ads. I'd rather all ads were a lot more honest (in the case of fast food restaurants it should require random photos of randomly served dishes at regular intervals), but it seems a bit laughable to make such a big deal out of Apple.

I think the only reason why Apple might appear exceptional is because they were required to pull the ads. Normally advertisers use various propaganda techniques to give a certain impression that may be true or false but they do it without actually making verifiably false statements. They might say "9 out of 10 dentists recommend brand X toothpaste!" instead of "9 out of 10 dentists recommend brand X toothpaste after we paid them a large amount of money!" even though both would be true and even though they only asked 10 individuals instead of doing anything remotely like a proper study of a representative sample.

I very much like your idea about fast-food advertisements. I don't think the burgers in the ads are even edible most of the time (lots of plastic or other things you really wouldn't want to eat) although I regret that I don't have a source/reference handy. Advertising in general, or at least the way it is currently done, is something that I believe a more enlightened society would view as either a great evil or at least a corrupting influence. It's a happy smiling face on what is straight up manipulation and the power of its influence is often underestimated. If it were otherwise, then why the need to exaggerate, misrepresent, and selectively omit facts (not just talking about Apple)?

Healthy people who can think for themselves don't need to be constantly told what to eat, what to drink, where to go, what to buy, for whom to vote, etc. They just need to know what their options are, which is a far simpler affair. To give what I hope isn't a bad analogy, it would be more like "client pull" and less like "server push". I consider obsolete or irrelevant any business model that would collapse if this were the norm, no matter how large or widespread it may be.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (0, Troll)

ktappe (747125) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909479)

their ad showed it to be 4x as good as it really is

No, it really doesn't. First, you are exaggerating, considering that the ratio between the Apple ad and the PCPro recreation is lower than 3:1, not the 4:1 you're claiming. Second, the PCPro recreation is unfair because they attached a rather large file to e-mail which slanted the results--had they used a real-life attachment it'd have been very close to 2:1.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (4, Informative)

Niffux (824706) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909597)

Lower than 3:1? It's 4.86:1.
PC Pro / Apple Ad = (2*60+21)/29 = 4.86.

That's closer to 5.

True, but shouldn't be. (4, Insightful)

linuxwrangler (582055) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909371)

It is the norm. It should not be.

I believe that the standard should be that the advertisement must show an accurate representation of the average product as it will be delivered to the consumer. To do otherwise, is fraud.

That includes Wendy's and all the rest of the fast-food crowd. In fact, pretty much all food advertising. (Many years ago the Wall Street Journal had a very funny article about making food adverts. Jello was mixed at several times the usual concentration to keep it solid under the lights. Tensions got high on the set and someone hurled a jello chunk at someone else. The other person ducked and the jello rebounded off the wall like a superball.)

How about stores? I sure wish the nearby Safeway were bright, clean and open instead of old, dingy and cramped.

The before/after pics for weight-loss schemes would be pretty funny.

Oh, sorry. Lost myself for a moment there. Forgot that it is our Patriotic Duty to buy into the advertising fantasies in order to keep the economic fantasy growing.

Re:True, but shouldn't be. (1)

that this is not und (1026860) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909509)

The really rich thing is that people are defending Apple's advertising by comparing it to ads from a Hamburger Stand.

But anyways, Steve Jobs has been 'selling sugared water' [quotationspage.com] (iTunes) for about a decade now....

Re:True, but shouldn't be. (2, Insightful)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909567)

The really rich thing is that people are defending Apple's advertising by comparing it to ads from a Hamburger Stand.

I'm not defending Apple's ad. I'm also curious what makes it "really rich" comparing it with a "hamburger stand" (if a worldwide network of food retailers can be called that...) -- false or overstated advertising is the *norm*.

Show me a resort ad that doesn't show a couple with seemingly kilometers of empty beach to themselves (versus the reality that it's a tourist trap full of thousands upon thousands of people just like you).

Ads *should* be honest and real. But they aren't, and people somewaht get use to that.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (1)

hlh_nospam (178327) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909393)

"Are you as awesome as your resume paints you to be?" Oh, much more so :)

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (1)

springbox (853816) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909507)

Are you as awesome as your resume paints you to be?

Yes. I tell the truth. ("Telling the truth" doesn't mean bad in any case.)

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (0)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909535)

Yes. I tell the truth. ("Telling the truth" doesn't mean bad in any case.)

That's very noble of you. However the whole spirit of the resume is, at its core, lying by omission. Which is why companies don't really put much credibility on it.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909623)

i didn't read what ASA said, but I watched the ad. What puts it over the edge is that the voice-over is entirely about how 3g is great because it makes everything "really fast." The words "really fast" are repeated 3 or 4 times, and used as the tag-line at the end of the commercial. so the commercial isn't just advertising the iphone in general; it's specifically advertising how fast it is, along with a demonstration of how fast it is. except that demonstration is fake.

for the wendy's comparison, imagine if wendy's ran a commercial with the pictures of the food that you saw and had a voice over saying "wendy's has great looking hamburgers. they look really good. they are fantastic looking hamburgers." Whereas the pictures on the menu are just representing their food in a ludicrously positive light, that commercial would be outright lying.

Re:No, this is typical for virtually anyone sellin (1)

BigJClark (1226554) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909649)


I routinely purge my resume of unnecessary jobs/references... I prefer to keep it short and concise.. my current job as a DBA isn't dependent or related to the years I spent as a C/C++/C# programmer, but it *ahem* does make me more awesome ;)

Re:This is typical for apple (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909125)

Err, what? Your link is to your own blog, where you have a post containing nothing but the same unsubstantiated claim you made in this post, followed by a picture of an iPhone that you have mislabeled as a picture of an iPod Touch.

Re:This is tipical for apple (5, Funny)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909157)

Well done ASA. Now go after adverts that gave me impression I could get hold of a chick in 30 seconds if I use their products!!!!

Chick? (5, Funny)

TheLink (130905) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909591)

KFC?

Re:This is tipical for apple (1)

liquidsin (398151) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909659)

i was wondering when i would get flocked by underwear-clad bitches for dousing my body in the stink of axe, as their commercials clearly show. turns out advertising needs to be catchy, and so things may be exaggerated a bit. can't they just put a small-type disclaimer at the bottom of the screen like everyone else does with every other product ever? i mean, shit, microsoft ads show people actually using vista, and nobody's banning those...

Not much different from (1)

mmu_man (107529) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909191)

ads for washing powder where you see dirty shirt, powder, water, and oh! it's clean :)

"you take the shirt, you put it in the water, you wash it you wash it... you riiiince, you riiince. you smell... it smells like a flower!
you take the underwear, you put it in the water, you wash it you wash it... you riiiince, you riiince. you smell... you put it in the water, you wash it you wash it..." :)

Re:This is tipical for apple (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909221)

And who really thinks that what they show in the ads are the truth?

Re:This is tipical for apple (1)

John Betonschaar (178617) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909233)

Great, I'll remember that next time I buy a frozen pizza that doesn't even resemble the picture on the packaging...

Citroen has a commerical of one of there cars transforming into a robot, don't see many of those on the streets either. And in broadband commercials I see people downloading full HD movies in about 3 seconds over a 20Mbit connection.

There's nothing Apple about this, everything in marketing and advertisements is fake, exaggerated or just outright untrue and misleading.

Goes over most people's heads (2, Interesting)

yog (19073) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909273)

Most people would view this commercial and think, wow, you can do all that with a phone? I want one!

By the time they have bought it and figured out how to run it, they'll long since have forgotten how speedy it looked in the advert.

Ads aren't supposed to be starkly realistic. Just think how awful they'd all be if they were.

For example, most car companies don't show you the sad realities of operating their vehicles in traffic. I think a realistic portrayal should include an occasional collision ("note how our driver is relatively unhurt, versus the critically injured passengers in the competition's car!").

GM would be more honest if they illustrated "fit and finish" problems in their vehicles. For example, driver gets in new Chevrolet Malibu, turns it on. Engine dies. Cut to scene at dealer's--"We back up our cars, sir; we'll have you out of here within two hours, and at no charge!"

Similarly, show a grandmother trying to turn on her new HP laptop and this "CHECKSUM FAILURE, PRESS F1 TO CONTINUE" screen appears. She calls HP and a nice man with a south Asian accent talks her through the problem (which involves reseating a SIMM).

In general, you almost NEVER encounter the kind of courteous, perfect service and incredible product quality as illustrated in ads. Ads don't reflect reality; they're a kind of allegorical story designed to make you want to buy the product while lying as much as they can get away with.

I think overall that they were just picking on Apple and the ad should have run.

Re:Goes over most people's heads (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909467)

I'd interpret it as "all those other adds shouldn't have run"
It's still false advertising even if everyone is doing it.

Askcrapdot about crapdot (0, Offtopic)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909031)

  • Why are the new CSS themes butt-ugly?
  • Why is it that not only did somebody consider that shite newsworthy, but a bored editor decided to publish it to this front-page?
  • Why cannot we refute published stories and downmod those Fuquepaille's bonking editors?
  • Why is it that Crapdot's moderators looks as retarded as Digg's commenters? Are they the same?
  • BTW, why has one to be willing to engage in a furious zoophiliac suckfest in Cobolkneel's basement in order to get moderation points? Can't heteros apply?
  • When will Crapdot adopt K5's voting system instead?

So what? (5, Funny)

LibertineR (591918) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909063)

My friends tell me that an iPhone will certainly increase my penis size, with the only drawback being that I will need one of those fancy Apple carrying cases to keep it in.

SOLD, bitches!

Average iPenis size increased.... (1)

afc_wimbledon (1052878) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909195)

...to 4 inches, apparently!

Re:Average iPenis size increased.... (1, Funny)

LibertineR (591918) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909291)

Your point?

That would make me a Porn star in Japan, you insensitive clod!

Re:Average iPenis size increased.... (1, Funny)

onkelonkel (560274) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909643)

A whole new meaning to "We're big in Japan"

Re:So what? (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909461)

I don't know about penis size, but Apple convinced me I'd be cooler with an iPhone. So I bought it and... strangely, no friends - except the ones I already had from online games and RPG conventions.

I want my money back so I can pay my phone sex bill.

Re:So what? (1)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909483)

So they are adding fresnel case now?

Re:So what? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909601)

Your penis size may increase, but you'll only be using it on men.

Jeez... (4, Insightful)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909085)

The commercial is done by the time they finish with Google.

Maybe if they'd put a warning similar to "screen images simulated, not really an iphone, 5x speed, etc." it wouldn't have been pulled.

Re:Jeez... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909193)

Maybe if they'd put a warning similar to "screen images simulated, not really an iphone, 5x speed, etc." it wouldn't have been pulled.

No, you can't get away with that sort of sneaky trick in the UK either.

Re:Jeez... (1)

M-RES (653754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909347)

Yes you can. Next time you see an advert for loans check out the masses of smallprint on screen all the way through stating that all the spoken narrative is lala-land. If you display the caveat, you're covered.

Re:Jeez... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909515)

No, there are rules over what you can and can't get away with in the small print. You can't give the impression that something can, say, cure cancer but flash a 2px high disclaimer on the screen for 1 second and get away scot-free. In your example, any advert for financial services is required to display certain legal information, which is what is generally contained in the small-print.

1 million dollars for reading this post! (4, Interesting)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909351)

This ruling was made in the UK. We have slightly different advertising standards to the US. In the UK, the sort of thing you're suggesting is not allowed:

I will give you all 1 million dollars* for reading this post!
.

.

*1 million imaginary dollars

App store (5, Insightful)

pzs (857406) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909091)

There's a similar advert for the app store here in the UK. It has some guy instantly downloading and using games, location software and so on. It has an amusing "actual sequence speeded up" disclaimer at the bottom, rather like those cosmetics adverts that say "some post-processing done on model".

Why don't they just say "this advert is a total lie, but it looks pretty and you're a gullible moron, so buy buy buy!"

What bugs me about the app store advert is that it finishes saying "this is going to change everything!" No, it isn't - it's another incremental improvement on smart phones, which is quite similar to many competing products. Ever since I found out about the reality distortion field [wikipedia.org] I've started noticing that Apple try to use this in all their advertising.

Re:App store (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909203)

Apple is no different than any other company in that regard. Haven't you ever seen a MSFT commercial where they say Vista is fast and secure?

You can't use your desktop that fast either. It just takes time to actually use the products they are showing. And over 3g connections it is slow.

Re:App store (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909395)

Last hack-off test had the Mac getting popped way before the Vista machine. Don't be a dumbass and try to deflect.

Re:App store (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909547)

Haven't you ever seen a MSFT commercial where they say Vista is fast and secure?

No. I did see a Microsoft one about shoes though [1] [youtube.com] .

Re:App store (0, Redundant)

that this is not und (1026860) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909563)

Yep. Apple is no better than Microsoft.

We've known that for ages.

Re:App store (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909215)

rather like those cosmetics adverts that say "some post-processing done on model".

We don't have those disclaimers here across the pond yet. I find mascara adverts most annoying in their false eyelash using false advertisementness.

Re:App store (3, Informative)

jeremyp (130771) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909505)

It is the UK advert that has been banned.

Re:App store (0, Troll)

ktappe (747125) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909531)

There's a similar advert for the app store here in the UK.

Why don't they just say "this advert is a total lie, but it looks pretty and you're a gullible moron, so buy buy buy!"

Nice hate posting. First of all how on earth do YOU propose Apple show the App store when the simple reality of life in 2008 is that you cannot download an app during the time it takes to show an advert on telly? Go ahead--if you're going to call Apple buyers "gullible morons" and be a complete Apple hater, then toss your hat in the ring and tell us what you'd do.

[insert sound of crickets chirping here]

That's what I thought.

Not a good example (1, Insightful)

mini me (132455) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909097)

Notice that PC Pro had to unlock the phone, whereas Apple already had the phone unlocked. There are other instances in the video where the PC Pro demonstrator fumbled to press the right button. All of these things add up the time significantly. Apple didn't need any special effects at all to cut down on the time PC Pro gives us.

Re:Not a good example (4, Insightful)

SchizoStatic (1413201) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909159)

The "actual" time was move twice the time of the commercial. Hard to believe a few fumbles could cause that much of an increase of time. It mostly was waiting on the web pages to load. Or the picture to load as it was moved.

Re:Not a good example (-1, Troll)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909365)

the pc "pro" people must have replaced their wifi connection with a 2.4k modem. I followed through part of it on my ipod touch with similar times as Apple.

Re:Not a good example (1)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909407)

followed through part of it

This is where I stopped reading.

Re:Not a good example (-1, Flamebait)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909477)

Uh.. is a cell-phone data network, that you share with other users in your cell, as fast as the 802.11(x) connection your iPod Touch uses? 'Cause the iPhone doesn't have WiFi.

Re:Not a good example (1)

attonitus (533238) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909581)

the iPhone doesn't have WiFi

Yes it does [apple.com]

Re:Not a good example (2, Informative)

multipartmixed (163409) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909607)

> 'Cause the iPhone doesn't have WiFi.

You sure about that, chief?

'cause I can somehow connect to the AP in my house, and I'm pretty sure it's not a 3G base station.

The grandparent DID miss one thing, though -- the location test. He can't do it properly on his touch, since AFAIK the touch doesn't have an adaptive GPS unit. It just tries to guess based on known locations of nearby WiFi APs.

I just tested mine, it took about 15 seconds to narrow down my location to a region about 1/2 mile in radius. And it won't do any better than that unless I stand near the window or go outside.

Re:Not a good example (3, Interesting)

dave420 (699308) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909249)

The guy spent over a minute and a half fumbling around on keys? I don't think so. If I were a betting man I'd put a few cents on you owning an iPhone. I'd also put a few more cents on you posting the above message to rationalise your purchase to yourself. But then I'm cynical like that.

Re:Not a good example (1)

Neoprofin (871029) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909257)

Great! You should contact ASA and tell them that PC Pro's demo was flawed so obviously their banning of the ad (which is why there was a demo made in the first place) is completely without merit.

Re:Not a good example (2, Insightful)

NitroWolf (72977) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909263)

Notice that PC Pro had to unlock the phone, whereas Apple already had the phone unlocked. There are other instances in the video where the PC Pro demonstrator fumbled to press the right button. All of these things add up the time significantly. Apple didn't need any special effects at all to cut down on the time PC Pro gives us.

Oh please, you freaking shill. So he fumbled a few buttons... did he fumble FIVE TIMES AS LONG as the advert? Hell no, don't be an idiot.

The ad is a lie. Just like "It just works" campaign is a lie. Apple is full of lies.

Re:Not a good example (0, Troll)

mini me (132455) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909337)

In now way did I claim that the advertisement represents real-life conditions. What I did say was that Apple could have done a real-life test faster than PC Pro.

Re:Not a good example (1)

k33l0r (808028) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909517)

Advertising is full of lies.

There, fixed that for you.

Re:Not a good example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909325)

And he didn't load the same webpages, the attachment may have been a different size, and 3G may be faster than WIFI.

Still, Apple did speed up the action in the commercial, and they do imply that the work done in the commercial is being done real-time. The comparison may not be 1:1, but Apple still lied.

Re:Not a good example (3, Funny)

mcvos (645701) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909359)

And he used wifi instead of Apple's lightning fast 3G network!

Re:Not a good example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909409)

I'm pretty sure that you're one of those gullible people that the ad is aimed at.

Wait, wait, wait... (4, Insightful)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909111)

You're telling me there's an organization that actually checks advertisements for false and misleading information, and has the power to pull blatant lies off the air? When did this happen?

Re:Wait, wait, wait... (2, Informative)

thermian (1267986) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909211)

You're telling me there's an organization that actually checks advertisements for false and misleading information, and has the power to pull blatant lies off the air? When did this happen?

I was going to mod you funny, then I saw your sig. Since there is no '+5 listened to H2G2 Series 2', I had to comment instead :)

Re:Wait, wait, wait... (2, Funny)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909297)

'Well, actually, RedBull helps temporarily restore wakefulness when experiencing fatigue or drowsiness.'

Re:Wait, wait, wait... (1)

mr_stark (242856) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909413)

This is in the UK/Europe:

http://www.asa.org.uk/asa/ [asa.org.uk]

Their website claims they've been around since 1962.

Re:Wait, wait, wait... (3, Informative)

EricTheMad (603880) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909447)

You're telling me there's an organization that actually checks advertisements for false and misleading information, and has the power to pull blatant lies off the air? When did this happen?

1962. [wikipedia.org] That's in the UK, though. I don't think we have anything like that in the U.S.

Re:Wait, wait, wait... (1)

robotbebop (607734) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909485)

When did this happen?

When the check from Apple got lost in the mail.

Beauty treatments (3, Insightful)

MrMickS (568778) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909115)

Its a shame that the ASA doesn't come down with the same force on the incessant bombardment of beauty treatments we have with obviously fake material in them. I mean there is one for getting rid of deep set wrinkles, in the before shot the actress is frowning, in the after shot she's not. Viola! The wrinkles have gone!

I guess the problem is that the there isn't the degree of competitive scrutiny going on. All of the beauty companies pull the same trick so no one wants to upset the Apple cart.

Re:Beauty treatments (1)

pzs (857406) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909245)

I wonder where it should end? In some ways, I wish the ASA would actually take a moral stance on adverts too.

You're right that cosmetics adverts are appalling, but in my view perfume adverts are even worse. Since all scents are basically a matter of preference and cost nothing to produce, all you're paying for is the marketing and the image you feel it projects. This is a bit dubious to a geek like me, but I accept that this is an aspirational lifestyle product and therefore must be advertised as such.

What I object to is what we aspirations they depict. All the adverts for men's perfumes seem to think I want to be a brainless hunk flexing on some beach or strutting through an extensive wardrobe. All the women's adverts seem to expect women to want to be tall, insanely skinny women who look wasted on drugs and are highly sexually provocative and available. One advert seems to consist entirely of women aiming for the "please jizz on me" expression.

Does nobody aspire for anything beyond the physical? How about people succeeding at other goals? Conquering in the board room? Passing their degree? Climbing a mountain?

It really bugs me that all these pure aspiration/lifestyle products can only sell physical attractiveness as a worthwhile quality for aspiration.

In conclusion: the human race is doomed. (why do all my Slashdot posts seem to end with this conclusion?)

Re:Beauty treatments (1)

stjobe (78285) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909455)

In conclusion: the human race is doomed. (why do all my Slashdot posts seem to end with this conclusion?)

Because it's the truth.

Re:Beauty treatments (1)

AlterRNow (1215236) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909495)

You might as well just put it in your signature and be done with it then :)

Re:Beauty treatments (4, Funny)

pzs (857406) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909577)

That's a stupid idea.

--
The human race is doomed.

News at 11! (4, Insightful)

cosmocain (1060326) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909129)

Advertisements not telling the truth.

Next up: Giant footsteps in Alaska not done by Yetis - Signs of prehistoric giantmice found.

Vodafone Blackberry Storm (1, Interesting)

MrMickS (568778) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909131)

In the UK Vodafone are running an advert for the touch screen Blackberry Storm. They show the guy using it to fix a broken neon light he can see on a building opposite. Does this mean that it can do that? Wow!

Seriously the ASA needs to get a grip. The Apple advert was showing the things that could be done with an iPhone 3G. All of the things are possible, perhaps not within the time, but possible. The Blackberry Storm thing isn't possible. Which is banned?

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (1)

AlterRNow (1215236) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909183)

I've not seen either of the commercials but maybe it is because one doesn't claim or imply to be able to do the thing it is showing in the advert?

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (5, Insightful)

AlterRNow (1215236) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909241)

Just to clarify, if the Apple advert says "Fast browsing" then you will most likely focus on the time it takes to browse in the advert, so it isn't immediately obvious that that might not be "true".

On the other hand, it's pretty easy to guess that you couldn't fix a light in another building from your phone. And that a Citroen C4 doesn't transform into a dancing robot

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909501)

No, it's NOT easy to guess that the Citroen C4 doesn't transform, because the byline for the ad is 'Alive with technology' which suggests it HAS an innate lifeforce. If it doesn't suggest this, then Apple's ad doesn't suggest that the speed shown is accurate. The VO in the Apple ad clearly states these tasks as being 'really fast' but doesn't quantify what 'really fast' is. At no point does it state 'browse the internet as fast as we're showing you here'. To be honest, it's not impossible to get much closer to Apple's ad speed than the satirical video in TFA, but it helps if the browser pages are cached, your broadband connection is v fast and you've rehearsed the button presses so that you've not got seconds of thinking time and fumbled navigation. Adverts don't set out to depict reality - anyone that truly still BELIEVES anything they see in an advert should be taken outside and shot for not having the common sense to see through the cynical bullshit of Corporatist western propaganda!

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (2, Funny)

dkf (304284) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909541)

On the other hand, it's pretty easy to guess that you couldn't fix a light in another building from your phone. And that a Citroen C4 doesn't transform into a dancing robot

Noooooooooo!

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25909557)

you mean ... I can stop searching for the MORPH button in my C4? Damn .. now I feel like I've been riped off.

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (1)

TeacherOfHeroes (892498) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909661)

Now someone tells me that it won't turn into a dancing robot! I've been trying to figure out how to do that for ever, now!

Theres some money I could have spent better.

Re:Vodafone Blackberry Storm (1)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909315)

The point was they were advertising the speed of the product which was a total lie and they made it seem realistic. Its not like the slogan for blackberry is 'Blackberry Storm - it can magically fix neon lights from across the street' if it is I take it back. Plus the magic is not realistic... like why axe commercials aren't banned.

Whatever... (2, Insightful)

Bentov (993323) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909133)

Yea, well some of us don't believe most of the things we see on TV, so I have to ask, why is this news? I don't really think I can drive 60mph on a sheet of ice like I see in BMW commercials all the time, I don't think they should pull their commercials because they are not true.

Re:Whatever... (4, Funny)

thermian (1267986) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909253)

I don't really think I can drive 60mph on a sheet of ice like I see in BMW commercials all the time

You can, its just the ending that would differ somewhat from the commercial. More crunching sounds for one thing...

French version shows (0, Troll)

mmu_man (107529) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909169)

a little "sequence shortened" white on white text, but it's still misleading, but eh, it's Apple ;)

Re:French version shows (1)

M-RES (653754) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909527)

a little "sequence shortened" white on white text, but it's still misleading, but eh, it's advertising

There - fixed that for you.

Pfft, whatever (0)

jayhawk88 (160512) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909197)

Next thing you'll be telling me is that the lettuce on the Wendy's Double Stack isn't really that impossibly green and crisp, and the Glade plugin won't instantly make my entire house smell like a rose garden.

It's a commercial people. They have 30 seconds to show you what it can do. It's your responsibility as a consumer to research the product if you're interested in buying it, determine what it's strengths and limitations are. Not just run right out (literally) and buy it because it looked fast and shiny in a commercial.

In the UK (3, Interesting)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909271)

Thats weird, because I saw the UK advert last night and it states quite clearly at the bottom of the screen that operations have been sped up etc, and does not appear to make any claims to the advert being true to life.... Is this the British ASA or is there an ASA elsewhere in the world (i.e. the USA)?

Re:In the UK (1)

prefect42 (141309) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909331)

I noticed that too, but I don't remember seeing that previously. It was probably a change apple made in advance of the ASA ruling to show willing.

Re:In the UK (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909405)

The complaint is that even under ideal conditions could the phone not carry out the actions demonstrated in the advert.

like all of them? (1)

Tom (822) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909317)

So there's a line for "acceptable lies" and "too much of a lie"?

Because, if you know any TV ad that does not paint the product in a better light than the real world, I'd really like a youtube link. Yes, it is misleading. That's what advertisement is all about, isn't it? Yeah, that supermodel has really great hair after using that shampoo... and two conditioners (not shown), a very expensive hairdresser (not shown) and two hours in the make-up room (not shown). Let's not even get started about car ads.

I guess the only reason this is news is that the iPhone is hot and shampoo isn't.

PC Pro news and "acceptable advertising". (0, Troll)

argent (18001) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909379)

Given that PC Pro News uses Vibrant "mouse over" pop-ups and does not allow them to be disabled, they are in absolutely no place to complain about ANYONE's advertising.

Something else the advert didn't reflect... (4, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909383)

... was the instability of Safari - I'm currently away from the office on a week long business trip, with my iPhone acting as my primary browsing device during the day (while I'm away from the hotel - London has fairly extensive 3G and wifi coverage), and I have to say that I am getting at least one crash per browsing session.

I would expect this if I was visiting weird websites, but I'm talking about sites like Slashdot, BBC News etc. The entire page can be loaded, and I can be halfway through a Slashdot comments page and Safari will crash, I haven't even hit anything that should trigger Safari to do anything other than scroll down the page!

On another note, on every iPhone or iPod Touch device I have used (one first gen iPhone, one 3G iPhone and two iPod Touches), Safari has one hell of a difficult time picking up link clicks on the BBC News website - I haven't had any problems elsewhere, just on the BBC News site. It manifests itself as a total lack of registering the fact that I am clicking on a link, with Safari only reacting at all either after I have held down the click for several seconds, or zoomed right in and clicked then. Has anyone else experienced this?

Is that for real? (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909513)

In the 30-second clip the iPhone is shown loading a webpage, finding its current location in Google Maps, opening a PDF from an email and finally taking a phone call.

What??? You can actually use it to make phone calls? I'm off to an Apple store!

Maybe if Apple added ad blocking... (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909613)

Most major sites with slow-loading pages suffer from "Web 2.0 overload". Page loads usually hang not because the requested URL isn't being served fast enough, but because some additional file is needed and isn't being served fast enough. When Slashdot pages are loading slowly, for example, you'll usually see "Waiting for pagead2.googlesyndication.com", "Waiting for ad.greenmarquee.net", "Waiting for ad.doubleclick.net", "Waiting for ad.yieldmanager.com", or "Waiting for m1.2mdn.net". That's where the load delays come from. Cacheing doesn't help, because those services want to serve a different ad every time.

Then there's CSS. The business about CSS speeding up page loading was crap. We're seeing pages that load ten or fifteen CSS files, often from sites that don't load all that fast. Handheld devices don't have the cache capacity of desktops, so the odds that something big, like Google Widgets, will have to be reloaded is reasonably high.

Then there's "onload", where, after the base page is loaded, an XMHHttpRequest is made to get more info. Now you have serial delays; the browser can't parallelize the loads. A good example is RushmoreDrive [rushmoredrive.com] , the "black search engine" Ask is trying as a niche product. Slowest loading home search page in the industry. Look at the HTML and you'll see why.

If Apple wants faster load times, they should put ad blocking in the iPhone's browser. That would cut page load times way down on ad-heavy sites.

Nicely executed. (1)

jovius (974690) | more than 5 years ago | (#25909657)

We should now all go and test these awesome features at the nearest store. It's Nokia vs Apple, and I'm seeing a holiday coming up. I'm hearing there will be a lot of sales around tomorrow too.

Two minutes and 21. That's, like, an eternity.
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