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Oil Exploration Leads To Video of a Mysterious Elbowed Squid

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the that-is-one-freaky-cephalopod dept.

Earth 256

eldavojohn writes "A rare glimpse from Shell Oil of a giant squid brings to light the strange relationships some deep sea marine biologists have with drilling companies. The video of the squid (Magnapinna) is very rare as this creature remains largely a mystery to science. While some are concerned of a conflict of interest, biologists and big oil sure make for strange bedfellows. The video is from 200 miles off the coast of Houston, TX and about 4,000 feet down." Looking at this creature gives me the willies, frankly.

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256 comments

Nice animal (4, Interesting)

KasperMeerts (1305097) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911575)

Damn, mother nature is really infinitely more inventive than every sci-fi movie director or write in the world. I mean, this is something I would expect to find on some alien planet or something.

Re:Nice animal (4, Funny)

flacco (324089) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911811)

A rare glimpse of the Aquatic Chupacabra.

Terror from the deep! (3, Funny)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911897)

It actually made me want to fire up XCom 2 and go destroy some underwater aliens! FWOOSH-BLEAH!

Re:Terror from the deep! (1)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912121)

"Terror From The Deep" was a lame name, but dang if that game wasn't fun! It was missing giant tentacle monsters, though...

Re:Terror from the deep! (1, Offtopic)

Jabbrwokk (1015725) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912245)

I actually liked it better than UFO: Enemy Unknown" but the ship terror missions made me swear. A lot. Plus your guys literally started the game with pyjamas and blowguns.

I do seem to remember some tentacled critters, it's been a long time though.

Re:Terror from the deep! (0, Offtopic)

apostrophesemicolon (816454) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913245)

INFORMATIVE? Funny maybe, but informative?
In that case, this post actually made me wanna eat some calamari!!

Mod me informative, baby!

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn (4, Funny)

DrYak (748999) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913287)

In other news, Cthulhu ask us if we could go drilling for Oil at another place rather than at Rlyeh, because He would rather like to be left alone slumbering in peace, thank you very much.
All this noise gives Him maddening head aches....

Re:Nice animal (5, Informative)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911911)

yea, that video gave me the chills. at first it looked sorta like the alien from Independence Day, but about 100 times creepier. but once i actually understood what i was seeing, i was just in awe at the beauty of such a bizarre living creature. these kinds of discoveries just emphasize the reason we need to support ecological conservation all the more. imagine all of the millions of other bizarre and beautiful creatures out there still unknown to science.

for those who are interested in other video clips of Magnapinnidae, here's a page [si.edu] with several short clips and screen captures. most of them are poor quality, as they seem to be VHS-rips, but the 6th and 8th clips are pretty amazing.

Re:Nice animal (5, Funny)

kumanopuusan (698669) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912765)

The Japanese have a word for the sensation you get looking at this sort of otherworldly monstrosity. They say oishisou, which literally means, "that looks delicious."

Ecological conservation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913375)

But if we keep polluting, these fantastic creatures will die and their corpses will float to the surface! Surely this is a much more efficient method than poking a camera into the ocean and hoping it sees something!

On a more serious note, if we weren't drilling for oil under the sea we'd never know about this squid in the first place...

Re:Nice animal (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25912009)

Probably would think the same thing about us...

Shoot the cameraman. (-1, Flamebait)

Dan541 (1032000) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912165)

Someone please shoot the asshole controlling the camera!

Re:Shoot the cameraman. (4, Informative)

magarity (164372) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912259)

Someone please shoot the asshole controlling the camera
 
Chill out - the camera's servo only has one speed as should be obvious from the panning when the view zooms out versus when it zooms in. You would not have done any better.

Really? (4, Insightful)

Entropy98 (1340659) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911581)

biologists and big oil sure make for strange bedfellows
 
Really? I would think that they (deep sea drillers and deep sea biologists) have learned quite a bit from each other over the years.
--
  IP address Finding [ipfinding.com]

Re:Really? (5, Insightful)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912231)

Seriously. Environmentalists need to set the jihad switch to off and try rational discussion with the deep sea outfits for a change.

I'm fairly sure they'd be quite happy to load all of their deep sea platforms up with tethered, submersible, camera-wielding drones and drastically increase the amount of deep water footage and readings scientists are able to gather.

Re:Really? (4, Insightful)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913071)

Not while there's the risk of discovering an endangered species, thus threatening their drilling rights.

Conflicts, always conflicts. (5, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911593)

While some are concerned of a conflict of interest, biologists and big oil sure make for strange bedfellows. The video is from 200 miles off the coast of Houston, TX and about 4,000 feet down."

Research is research. The data doesn't 'care' who paid for the camera. Besides it is in Shell (or whomever's) interest to understand as much as possible about the location they plan on dumping large amounts of money on.

What happens if there is an alien colony down there? Wouldn't you like to know? Don't go expecting Shell to fund a study of these things, but why wouldn't they show it to people. Looks pretty cool actually.

And didn't the camera say about 7500 feet (not 4000 as in TFS)?

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (5, Insightful)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911661)

The data doesn't care, but oil drillers are unlikely to give information that harms their potential to drill, and can afford to be "selective" on what they provide. They also have more than enough technical equipment and expertise to "improve" the data, if it is in their interests to do so. That is why it is generally bad science to get information from those who have a vested interest in your conclusions being what they want them to be. It has nothing to do with the camera and everything to do with the eyes far behind it.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911747)

The data doesn't care, but oil drillers are unlikely to give information that harms their potential to drill, and can afford to be "selective" on what they provide.

The conflict is potentially deeper than that. The oil drillers, by providing the hardware, may be able dictate the direction science takes.

Its no different really than the cigarette companies providing the labs for cancer research. Any scientist working in the lab who finds that 'cigarettes cause cancer' is out of work... any scientist who finds that cigarettes and cancer is unrelated gets increased funding and access to better equipment.

THAT is the real potential conflict of interest here.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Funny)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911807)

So, if they take submersible time from the oil companies they're at risk of spuriously deciding that giant squid cause cancer? Or that they cause global warming? :)

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911839)

So, if they take submersible time from the oil companies they're at risk of spuriously deciding that giant squid cause cancer? Or that they cause global warming? :)

At risk of concluding that the oil companies presence is destroying an ecosystem, or otherwise negatively impacting it. And then deciding not to pursue that area of research, for fear of losing access to submersible time and other resources.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25912079)

speaking as someone in that industry, you have no fucking idea, so much so that it's amusing.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912215)

speaking as someone in that industry, you have no fucking idea, so much so that it's amusing.

I never said this was happening. I simply outlined where the argument for a conflict of interest arises.
There =is= indisputably a conflict of interest here, however, that doesn't mean there is any actual corruption or abuse, or even that anyone is trying to abuse it.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Insightful)

tomhath (637240) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912785)

What you say is true, but same can be said for any other organization that funds research. Everything from global warming to offshore drilling to nuclear energy has scientists on both sides proving their case.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

FooGoo (98336) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913125)

This is a possibility no matter who owns the gear or provides the funding. The point is we know something exists that we didn't know before and there is value in that no matter what. Whether it's Shell Oil or Greenpeace both will try to get the best possible spin on whatever they create/discover. No matter where it comes from there is value in knowing...

If you think that organizations who oppose the oil companies don't direct their research towards specific ends you are mistaken. Money is rarely provided for pure independent research....most people no matter what their ideology expects a return on their investment.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1, Troll)

aevans (933829) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911753)

The oil drillers actually believe in science, they have to, to find the oil, to build the rigs, and to convert it to gasoline to run in vehicles that use combustion. Completely unlike the environmentalists with their superstition and ignorance-based mythologies and hysteria induction strategies for manipulating people's emotions and fears into giving them money.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (3, Informative)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911829)

So you believe that atmospheric pollution, oil spills and groundwater contamination are myths and hysteria? Perhaps incidents like the Bhopal disaster [wikipedia.org] and the Exxon Valdez spill [wikipedia.org] could demonstrate that the risk to human and animal survival is very real, and based in observed fact.

Dude really, you're on the wrong forum. Perhaps www.RavingPsychoticIndustryDrones.com would be more to your liking.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (3, Interesting)

Tenebrousedge (1226584) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913047)

The Exxon spill may not be the best example. The cleanup efforts were probably more harmful than the spill itself, and the environment has completely recovered since then. My authority on the subject comes from having lived in Valdez, AK for nearly my entire life; I can provide further sources if need be.

This criticism should not be taken as arguing against your point in general.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Insightful)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911947)

The oil drillers actually believe in science

The oil drillers believe in science as long as it supports their worldview. That is, drilling for more oil. As soon as a scientific finding conflicts with what they want, however, you can bet said belief wavers considerably.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Insightful)

tompaulco (629533) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912171)

The oil drillers believe in science as long as it supports their worldview.
The wonderful thing about this truth is that you can replace oil drillers with environmentalists, politicians, religious leaders, nazis, whatever, and it is still true.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912185)

No argument there. I wasn't picking on oil drillers specifically, just anyone with an agenda that can either be proved or disproved by science.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912175)

The environmentalists believe in science as long as it supports their worldview. That is, not drilling for more oil. As soon as a scientific finding conflicts with what they want, however, you can bet said belief wavers considerably.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Informative)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912105)

"The oil drillers actually believe in science...unlike the environmentalists with their superstition

Warning, this [bbc.co.uk] could cause your politically biased head to explode.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (4, Informative)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911755)

While I am as cynical as the next slashdotter about corporations, Shell have donated submersible time for researchers to gather their own information at this (and other) sites. Without that generous donation the researchers concerned would have squat.

This video was just something the oilmen spotted and thought was interesting enough to film.

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. But hope also (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912055)

True, although increasingly many large international organisations are paying more than just lip service to sustainability etc. Yes, beacuse they see this is key to making a buck, or just survival, still, it's progress.

Sometimes serendipity intervenes too. On the 'swords into ploughshares' front, look at what they're using SOSUS for these days - whale watching!

Re:Conflicts, always conflicts. (1)

tfiedler (732589) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912867)

Not to defend the oil companies, but there are certainly examples of scientists publishing data that supports their positions and leaving out data that does not... I know the standard liberal/conservative reality doesn't allow for shades of gray, but the real world isn't black and white.

Hmm yeah... (4, Funny)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911599)

This is why I don't eat creatures from the ocean.

Hopefully they'll return the courtesy.

Re:Hmm yeah... (5, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911611)

Anything that lives that far down must be tough, it'd be like eating prawn flavoured tyres.

Re:Hmm yeah... (1)

grassy_knoll (412409) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912257)

Boil it in oil.

Seriously. With very tough flesh, use enough oil to cover the flesh and heat the oil just to below it's smoke point.

And yes, as soon as I saw the video I thought "calamari".

Worse, probably. (1)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912293)

Giant squids use ammonia salts to provide buoyancy. I can't imagine just how awful that must taste.

At least, Architeuthis [wikipedia.org] species do. I know nothing about whether this kind of squid does, but it wouldn't surprise me since several other, smaller, deep sea squids use ammonia for buoyancy as well.

Re:Worse, probably. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25912329)

Are you sure that means much as far as what food would be made from the squid? I mean, sharks have urea running through them but people manage to get palatable meat from them.

Re:Hmm yeah... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913113)

Anything that lives that far down must be tough, it'd be like eating prawn flavoured tyres.

Except of course that things from that far down do tend to disintegrate when you bring them up. So it's really just another kind of strange soup.

Re:Hmm yeah... (2, Funny)

TheRequiem13 (978749) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911625)

Stay tuned for footage of another poorly understood creature: Deep Sea Elbow Macaroni

No less elbowed and worm-like, but probably a little more appetizing.

I can hear the conversation from the video... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25911627)

Oil...oil...oil... wtf? Holy shit! Wait Bill, go back, go back, you missed it. Wait. Cut it out! Your screwing up the joystick!

I, for one... (1, Funny)

Darundal (891860) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911631)

...welcome our new 10-tentacled elbowed cephalopod overlords.

Re:I, for one... (4, Funny)

jd (1658) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911691)

This is clearly a new branch of Homeland Security for Cthulhu. Tired of people carrying around copies of the Necronomicon to dispell him, he has invested in an army of multi-jointed drifters to act as a lynch mob should any deep sea fish try to exchange knowledge of his whereabouts for a reduction in EU tuna quota.

Cthulhu (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911633)

"That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die."


And while we're on the subject. [infinityplus.co.uk]

Re:Cthulhu (4, Funny)

cjfs (1253208) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911653)

Not Cthulhu, but possibly a distant cousin of something else:

He speculates that Magnapinna passively waits for prey to bump into the sticky appendages

Could these sticky appendages also be... noodly [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Cthulhu (3, Funny)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912683)

Great, now we have Pastafarianism: Terror From The Deep, the same as regular Pastafarianism but underwater and with a lot of bugs.

Re:Cthulhu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913479)

Sure, it looks ready to go old testament on your ass, but I wouldn't worry too much. Salty water makes good pasta.

Re:Cthulhu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25911779)

Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!

Of course it gives you the willies! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911643)

It has a bunch of willies hangin' there! Who loves tentacle porn?!

Re:Of course it gives you the willies! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25911705)

the japanese stereotype!

Essentially this shows.. (1)

powerslave12r (1389937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911645)

..that humans are working nicely towards disturbing yet another 'ecosystem'. Who'd have thought, these creatures, existing for god knows how many million years, were actually waiting to drink some leaked oil.

Re:Essentially this shows.. (1, Informative)

MrMista_B (891430) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911685)

Um, I dunno if you noticed, but... squid float, and swim in the water. Unless they stay suidicially still while one of the drilling beams is slowly lowered onto them, there's nothing to worry about.

Re:Essentially this shows.. (2, Insightful)

powerslave12r (1389937) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911771)

Really? You thought of squids getting hit by the drill bit as the disturbance to their ecosystem? Of course, you were joking.

Re:Essentially this shows.. (1, Informative)

Lershac (240419) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913023)

Get a grip. Ever been to an actual oil rig?

They provide an artificial reef and are little islands of life. Fishing around them is a full time industry in the Gulf of Mexico.

Most of them are very very clean and scrupulous about keeping the sea uncontaminated... as in everything a few bad apples have given the whole barrel a bad image.

Who knows what else is down there? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25911651)

Squid with elbows? What's next, jellyfish with knees and octopi with nipples?

In all seriousness, we should be a little concerned about the effects that our deep drilling is having on biodiversity. If we're just now discovering new species at the bottom, them maybe we shouldn't be drilling down there until we've explored more fully, if not just for the sake of protecting our ecosystems from us, then for the sake of protecting our oil rigs from the unknowns in our ecosystems?

Re:Who knows what else is down there? (5, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911699)

...elbows? What's next, jellyfish with knees and octopi with nipples?

Oil Shmoil, I smell a new revenue stream for porn.
   

Re:Who knows what else is down there? (5, Funny)

Repton (60818) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912265)

But how would the giant squid be able to pay?

Re:Who knows what else is down there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913335)

Providing fishermen with smaller squid for sushi?

Re:Who knows what else is down there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913403)

with how much he can ink? The squid is a star!

Parent is truth (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912863)

we have NO idea what kind of role do these squits play in ecosystem of the world.

i said world. if you noticed, these squids are in every ocean of the world. apparently they are a common species.

that makes their situation more integral to world ecosystem.

Size? (1, Informative)

freedumb2000 (966222) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911663)

I missed any mention of the approximate size of the squid. Does anyone have an idea about how large this creature might have been?

Re:Size? (4, Informative)

Takichi (1053302) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911683)

Based on analysis of videos not unlike the one captured at the Perdido site, scientists know that the adult Magnapinna observed to date range from 5 to 23 feet (1.5 to 7 meters) long

From the second page of the article.

Re:Size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25912155)

Yeah but that is for all of this type of squid. I think they are asking if anyone has speculated how big this particular specimen was. I mean they should have an approximate range and based on that plus the magnification they should be able to calculate the approximate size. I would think that would be incredibly useful information that surely someone has tried to figure out.

Mother of all viruses? (3, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911677)

Looks like a giant virus:

http://50milesmore.blogspot.com/2008/03/prepare-to-be-assimalated.html [blogspot.com]

Squiddy will give you a flu like no other.
     

Re:Mother of all viruses? (2, Funny)

Kenoli (934612) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913173)

On the right is the cold virus which looks like its from another planet.

Now I know what life on other planets looks like!

Giant Alien Squid? (3, Funny)

TrickFred (231420) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911749)

Someone tell Zack Snyder, maybe he can get some budget footage for the Watchmen movie, give it a proper ending.

Truth/Fiction (4, Informative)

Digital End (1305341) | more than 5 years ago | (#25911865)

You never hear the full quote, but it is so much better then the shortened version:

Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.

Bimimetics anyone? (1, Funny)

Plazmid (1132467) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912033)

So this squid drifts just above the bottom of the seabed dragging its tentacles along the bottom to pickup yummy tidbits. Why not put a similar system on that Titan balloon probe for sampling the ground/lakes.

It was filmed at around 1.5 miles in depth... (2, Informative)

Fierlo (842860) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912173)

Not to be picky about the summary, but that video wasn't shot at 4000 feet. It was shot at 1.5 miles, which is about 7900 ft. It's the first sentence of the article.

A mile and a half (two and a half kilometers) underwater, a remote control submersible's camera has captured an eerie surprise

Anyhow, very creepy.

Alien? (2, Interesting)

ThierryD (217773) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912199)

Actually, is it me or does it kind of look like the queen mother from the Aliens movie? Argh.

Nearly the perfect article! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25912225)

Damn, a giant squid, a robot submarine AND big oil!
Now if only;
* The robot ran BSD, but formerly ran Vista
* The MAFIAA was claiming copyright on the film
* On close inspection, the squid had a google logo but was in fact an alien species
* Some jerk had just been granted a lame patent for 'swimming at great depths with tentacles'

We'd never need another!

Discovery Channel has had a few shows on this (2, Interesting)

CFD339 (795926) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912357)

I've seen at least three different shows on Discovery Channel about these squid that until a few years ago were considered by most biologists to be nothing by a myth.

One was about the first ever captured specimen of a Giant Squid -- it was almost microscopic and they couldn't keep any alive.

Later, one was about actually getting fleeting video of one in the wild.

Most recent was one about another kind of giant squid that's even bigger and was caught in a net accidentally. The fishing trawler was smart enough to quickly freeze it. In the show, they were able to thaw it carefully and do a dissection. Apparently one of the problems with scientists working with these is that thy decompose extremely rapidly.

Oil exploration is pushing serious camera time deeper than ever. At the same time, an awareness of the value to science of creatures that we don't know about is making inroads into fishing crews in even the most remote places where in the past such a find might simply have been discarded as waste.

There is a LOT of volume in the oceans, and we're far from understanding it in the kind of depth we one day will.
 

Re:Discovery Channel has had a few shows on this (1)

Opyros (1153335) | more than 5 years ago | (#25912933)

Most recent was one about another kind of giant squid that's even bigger and was caught in a net accidentally. The fishing trawler was smart enough to quickly freeze it. In the show, they were able to thaw it carefully and do a dissection. Apparently one of the problems with scientists working with these is that thy decompose extremely rapidly.

You mean the Colossal Squid. The team that dissected it has a blog about it here [tepapa.govt.nz] .

It's the goddam robot aliens! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913165)

Sorry, it was all I could think of. :P

glitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#25913277)

in the matrix.

Its just a squid... (2, Funny)

kwantar (1398143) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913307)

to me it looks like a squid which just ate a rather large king crab. either that or it really is an alien searching for oil. Thats my story and I'm sticking to it.

Amazing, and Ordinary (4, Insightful)

gordguide (307383) | more than 5 years ago | (#25913585)

Truly awesome video and a truly awesome creature visible for the first time. Awesome might even be a bit understated.

But, the manner in which it was discovered? As ordinary as dirt. Face it ... imperial expansion, military exercises and exploration of the furthest corners of the earth, and beyond, and below, are all pretty much the province of the miner, the soldier, the geologist, the imperialist paying those salaries. There is nothing new about how this was found ... it's how EVERYTHING is found. The hunter finds the range and extent of the animals in the local area. The mapping of America was done by fur traders and those seeking treasure. You could go on and on.

There are those who oppose commercial enterprise, who oppose war and the exercises that preparation for war entail, who find man is essentially unkind to both man and the world he lives in. But, they learn from the adventures and the wallets of the "Bad Man".

That Shell released this video is hardly a surprise. Our entire knowledge of the world around us is essentially paid for by those like Shell Oil and those who came before them. Shell Oil is as interested in advancing our knowledge as anyone; perhaps more so because they intend to live in this world where this particular creature was found.

To imply evil intent is really off base ... they have plenty of opportunity to be evil the markets, on Capital Hill, at the UN, or the WTO. Note that few endangered species are likely to be found in those places, that is the environment of man, and is also the place where you are most likely to encounter the environmentalist, PETA, and the like.

They don't go a mile or more under the ocean's surface ... Shell Oil does, though.

I have never met anyone who works in the field for companies like Shell who is not far more aware of the world around them than those who occupy the cities and rail against the destruction of our environment. They have tremendous respect for the environment and the absolute wonder of the world we live in. Those who sit at their computers or write letters about banning plastic bags have no concept of the outdoors, usually. In fact, they rarely go about exploring the very city they live in.

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  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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