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China's .cn Now the Second Most Popular TLD

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the more-the-merrier dept.

Networking 86

darthcamaro writes "In case you needed further proof of China's breakneck pace of growth on the web, InternetNews is reporting on data from Verisign that the .cn Top Level Domain (TLD) has now become the second biggest TLD worldwide, surpassing Germany's .de and second only to .com. The number of .cn sites grew by 76 percent in 2008, which is significantly more growth than .com and .net, which only grew by 16 percent combined. A graph in the Verisign report (PDF) shows how quickly China's internet presence has grown in the past two years."

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Well... (1, Insightful)

orudge (458780) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022469)

That'll be all the nice cheap phishing domains.

Re:Well... (1)

Divebus (860563) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022517)

That explains the uptick in spam.

Re:Well... (3, Insightful)

NeverVotedBush (1041088) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023517)

Maybe the uptick in everything. Checked your logs recently?

I know they could be spoofed, but I used to get scanned constantly by various IPs in China. I doubt those are any kind of friendly port scans.

One nice thing, though. I recently updated my DSL modem's firmware which gave me the option to drop ICMP requests. Now that my IP address no longer pings, the port scans from China have stopped - or at least have for now.

Re:Well... (1)

Divebus (860563) | more than 5 years ago | (#26028917)

Yes... a month ago, my mail server was attracting 750,000 pieces of spam per week until I blocked five groups of addresses based on the logged sources - they get no answer from the server. It's down to about 150,000 attempts per week now. Two blocks were APNIC and three were RIPE:

  • 77.0.0.0 - 89.255.255.255 (61,300/wk - RIPE)
  • 90.0.0.0 - 95.255.255.255 (7,100/wk - RIPE)
  • 202.0.0.0 - 203.255.255.255 (26,000/wk - APNIC)
  • 210.0.0.0 - 213.255.255.255 (40,700/wk - APNIC)
  • 217.0.0.0 - 222.255.255.255 (18,500/wk - RIPE)

Now that I look at it, more spam was coming from RIPE than APNIC, but the number of network and server attacks are definitely higher from APNIC.

Re:Well... (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041109)

Hmm... those ranges include all three IPs I know (mine, my parents', my server's). And my ISP's mail server.

(But maybe you are 100% sure you don't want any mail at all from a big chunk of western Europe, since that's what you seem to have blocked.)

Common != Popular (1)

JonTurner (178845) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023809)

Need to choose words more carefully, editor. Just because something is common, doesn't mean it's popular (which implies something is liked, admired.)

Spam and phishing is very common, but it's not popular. And it frequently comes from .cn domains.

Re:Common != Popular (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26033733)

I think it's fair to say that when millions of people willingly 'buy' .cn domains to represent their companies and their blogs and other sites, then it's popular.

I like .com's because it's a norm that I'm comfortable with. I'll first get creative with a .com everytime before I even try the .net/.org's

Especially if I'm working on a community site...

I feel that if you give the webernet another 10 years, the general population will probably feel more comfortable throwing .nets and .orgs and .mes out there.

domain parking (1)

ed.mps (1015669) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022473)

ok, I dind't bother to RTFA, so, any guesses of how many of these domains come from domain squatting/parking?

Re:domain parking (1)

elronxenu (117773) | more than 5 years ago | (#26026927)

I couldn't find any analyses online, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's more than half.

yes we cn! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022477)

yes we cn.

Re:yes we cn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022809)

They took our jobs!

Re:yes we cn! (1)

a_claudiu (814111) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023133)

Worse, they took our jokes!

fp spongge (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022515)

The mobo blew and building is t4e fruitless Obvious that there have the energy FreeBSD used to are a few good

Re:fp spongge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26023067)

Approximately one out of every two hundred people is schizophrenic. The parent post could quite possibly be from one of those people. It certainly does read like a diatribe written by someone in the throes of psychosis... specifically, Schizophrenia, Disorganized Type.

In which case, labeling them as a troll is somewhat cruel.

Thoughts?

Re:fp spongge (1)

kdemetter (965669) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023283)

I think it's some sort off cryptic message . Maybe a google translate to Chinese and back ?

So the biggest ccTLD then? (3, Informative)

Nursie (632944) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022539)

Seeing as how .com is international?

Re:So the biggest ccTLD then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024841)

That's a good argument. We'll need this when .cn overtakes .com ;) Way to think ahead!

Re:So the biggest ccTLD then? (1)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 5 years ago | (#26029855)

Don't tell the Americans, they'll never believe you that .us is their ccTLD ;)

No surprise at all there... (5, Interesting)

Zocalo (252965) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022573)

... given the volume of clearly throw away domains in ".cn" consisting of five or six random letters for domain and subdomain being used to spam replica jewelry, pills and porn I've been seeing for the last few months. It might well be the world's second most popular .TLD, but it's also quite probably the world's biggest virtual sewer as well.

I wonder where it would rank if countries saw their ccTLDs in a similar vein to the more tangible aspects of their country like cities, natural features and the like. I'm pretty sure we'd see a little more care being taken to prevent such obvious abuses of ccTLD registration processes for a start...

Re:No surprise at all there... (1)

NickBuzzica (1426033) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023009)

I second that.

Re:No surprise at all there... (2, Informative)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023015)

... given the volume of clearly throw away domains in ".cn" consisting of five or six random letters for domain and subdomain being used to spam replica jewelry, pills and porn I've been seeing for the last few months. It might well be the world's second most popular .TLD, but it's also quite probably the world's biggest virtual sewer as well.

I wonder where it would rank if countries saw their ccTLDs in a similar vein to the more tangible aspects of their country like cities, natural features and the like. I'm pretty sure we'd see a little more care being taken to prevent such obvious abuses of ccTLD registration processes for a start...

But how can you tell if the yrtdvdvhwg.cn is a random phishing site, or an ASCI representation of Chinese characters? I am sure that the .cn domain is heavily represented by both.

Re:No surprise at all there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26023791)

But how can you tell if the yrtdvdvhwg.cn is a random phishing site, or an ASCI representation of Chinese characters? I am sure that the .cn domain is heavily represented by both.

Domain names that contain Chinese characters would use IDNA ToAscii which uses an ACE prefix of xn-- (see RFC 3490, section 5), so yrtdvdvhwg.cn can't contain non-Latin characters. But your dichotomy is false anyway, since a site may very well use Chinese characters and still be a phishing site.

Re:No surprise at all there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024269)

It's not that hard to tell, if you see yrtdvdvhwg.cn in an email about penis enlargenment, it *is* a random phising site (besides it's not that hard to see that yrtdvdvhwg is not a Chinese word in pinyin).

In the latest months, I've seen a large explosion of spam using this kind of domains. I have not meassured it, but I bet it's, at least, 50% of my spam (of ~10000 spam emails per month).

Re:No surprise at all there... (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025385)

But how can you tell if the yrtdvdvhwg.cn is a random phishing site, or an ASCI representation of Chinese characters?

By process of elimination. I know of two "ASCII representations of Chinese characters": domain names in Hanyu pinyin [wikipedia.org] and internationalized domain names [wikipedia.org] . It doesn't look like pinyin, and IDNs always start with the four ASCII characters "xn--".

Re:No surprise at all there... (1)

mathnerd314 (1212880) | more than 5 years ago | (#26029839)

What about stroke-based representations of Chinese characters like the Wubi Xing method, where the individual strokes in a character are inputted using the keys on a Latin keyboard? Then a seemingly random string like "yrtdv.cn" could actually be the input code for some Chinese character.

Simple explanation (1)

a_claudiu (814111) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023255)

The explanation is simple, the investors are trying to buy all short .cn domain names up to 5 letters. Chinese ones.

In other news... (3, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022579)

è±èçZåoeæ#2åoeä'è"ç½'çsåsæç"é"åæçsèèï¼OEåoeæ±èäåZã

As well, English is now the #2 most widely used language on the Internet, behind Chinese.

Re:In other news... (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022767)

I know it is a debattable idea but to measure this, I would check the number of wikipedia articles in the various language. I think it gives an idea about how much people contribute to Internet in the various languages of the global village.

Re:In other news... (1)

Clairvoyant (137586) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022827)

This measurement is definitely very debatable. I for one am not a native English speaker but do only read the English Wiki. And I know I'm not the only one over here who does that.

Re:In other news... (1)

Clairvoyant (137586) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022855)

(I hate replying to myself) ..there is also no one "Chinese" language, which makes measuring Wikis on one language even more dodgy.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022971)

There are many Chinese dialects, but only one written language which can be expressed in one of two character sets, simplified and traditional.

Re:In other news... (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023139)

and engrish

Re:In other news... (1)

tacarat (696339) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023205)

Engrish is English slaughtered by Japanese speakers. Get your stereotypes right.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26023311)

Mod parent up, the correct slur is chinglish.

Re:In other news... (1)

EyelessFade (618151) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022859)

I second that.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26030543)

not thery usefull, the various local editions of wikipedia have different convetions regarding the notability of articles, for example on the German wikipedia we have much fewer articles with stuff that is spread among several articles on the English version covered in several sections in a single article.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022869)

That is certainly an interesting measure, but IMHO it isn't the most important metric. The importance of English is that it is the language most often spoken as a second language. More people speak Chinese, but almost all of them live in China. People speaking English live all over the world. I wouldn't be able to discuss this here without this de facto Esperanto. You would be talk ing to your people, I would be talking to mine, and we would be wondering (and fearing) what goes on beyond our respective borders.

Re:In other news... (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024709)

English isn't my first language either but it is the main language I am confronted with on Internet. That is what is important while measuring a language importance. I don't really care what the native language of people are when talking to them on /.

Of course Chinese rises on Internet. The thing with Chinese is that comparatively very few people use it as a secondary language. It is not effective as an international communication tool, what Internet is all about.

Re:In other news... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26030795)

>>> Chinese is not effective as an international communication tool, what Internet is all about.

"Perfect. A firewall and a language barrier. We have effectively protected the people from foreign ideas. Wonderful!" - Communist Chairman

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26027815)

I'd doubt that, China now has the largest number of "internet users" but considering that includes very hazy numbers and "mobile devices" that are effectively useless here, along with the significant % of them doing something or other in English online vs. the effective 0 doing it the other way around.

With the amount of shit they talk and massive # of BBS/forum/whatevers, #2 in terms of sheer volume perhaps, but I would doubt it for actual activity of users or sites, etc.

Wikipedia count is a pretty stupid idea though given the political issues they have; Chinese domwikis can rival it in terms of size within months of opening without much difficulty.

Hmm (3, Interesting)

wmbetts (1306001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022633)

I wonder what the ratio of phishing to legitimate sites is.

Re:Hmm (1)

carlzum (832868) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022893)

McAfee wrote an article called Mapping the Mail Web [siteadvisor.com] and found China's ccTLD was abused more than most. Of course this looked at email scams and it was before the spike in registrations. I suspect the recent increase in .cn sites hasn't improved the situation.

Can't read (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022653)

As far as I am concerned, these domains might as well not exist. I can't read Chinese. The value of the internet is communication. As problematic as the limitation of names to the ASCII character set may be for old people, it has been a boon for international communication as young people had to and therefore could consistently use English to communicate world-wide.

Re:Can't read (1)

jandersen (462034) | more than 5 years ago | (#26030743)

As far as I am concerned, these domains might as well not exist. I can't read Chinese.

But your children or grandchildren are likely to be able to. Like it or not, China is already one of the major players and will continue to grow in influence. Chinese will continue to become increasingly relevant to everybody; after all, there are more Chinese than any other single cultural group, and the advantage of speaking Chinese is already significant, not least in research. They are already very close to the top when it comes to mathematical research, and I doubt they produce all of that in English.

I don't think it is bad, really. English is just a language, and a language is only a tool.

Cheap domain price plays a role as well. (2, Interesting)

All_One_Mind (945389) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022679)

While I'm sure that most of the growth is largely due to actual Chinese sites, it should be noted that anyone can buy .cn names, and some places offer them for as little as $1.99 for the first year. I should know because I purchased 350 of them this year to try and target various competitive terms in the search engines. In short, a lot of the money that webmasters spent on shitty .info names is now being spent on .cn names instead, and that shouldn't be overlooked.

What about Unicode? (1)

NinthAgendaDotCom (1401899) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022695)

Forgive my ignorance, but is there such a thing as a Unicode TLD? Like instead of the Western characters "cn", is there something that's rendered in Chinese characters for a fully Chinese domain name?

Re:What about Unicode? (1)

lothar97 (768215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023413)

Forgive my ignorance, but is there such a thing as a Unicode TLD? Like instead of the Western characters "cn", is there something that's rendered in Chinese characters for a fully Chinese domain name?

Yes, one can register domains that are full Chinese equivalent, without any Latin characters. They work in China and outside of China, however Latin character .cn domain names are more widely used.

I for one... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26022761)

...welcome our new Chinese overlords.

dotcn bubble plum (1)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022775)

Chinese telecom infrastructure and investment may not be up to scale of US pre-dotcom bubble era, but this bubble is just another repeat waiting to happen.

Calling in "Re-Run", 'cause it's gonna be DY-NO-MITE!

brevity (1)

GeoVizer (724140) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022805)

It does have just two characters... nice....

Re:brevity (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022987)

sort of like having a short domain name prefix

Most are parked with typo magnet type pages:
yes.com [yes.com]
no.com [no.com]

a few are borderline, actually having something of a topic:

go.com [go.com]

And only a very few actually have a purpose:

me.com [me.com] (how did they get that?)

Because everyone thinks of "nisson" when they see "Z" (Z [z.com] )

Hey this is kinda fun.

Paypal of course reminds everyone of "X" (X [x.com] ) Makes you seriously wonder if it's legit doesn't it?

OK found one that makes sense. Say Q for Qwest! (Q [q.com] )

And for reasons I cannot begin to fathom, NO other domains (A-Z).com are in use. Just Q, X, and Z.

Re:brevity (1)

Ambvai (1106941) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023309)

Well. The Z makes sense-- it's the page for the Nissan Z. Not that it's a link that inherently leaps to the mind, but if I was actually interested in the car, it's a page that's easy to remember.

Re:brevity (1)

Kalriath (849904) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023787)

Actually, it's because ICANN has reserved a.com through z.com, with the three existing ones only being there because they were grandfathered in.

Re:brevity (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024631)

figured as much

History of X.com (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025515)

Paypal of course reminds everyone of "X" (X [x.com]) Makes you seriously wonder if it's legit doesn't it?

I type x.com into English Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] and it gives me PayPal. It turns out that X.com Corp., an online bank, bought PayPal's then-parent company [wikipedia.org] after about half a year of operation. The combined company ended up dropping the "X.com" brand in favor of "PayPal" when marketing discovered potential pr0nographic connotations of "X.com".

Re:brevity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26026637)

Because everyone thinks of "nisson" when they see "Z" (Z [z.com])

Heh. It redirects to a domain called "niss anus us".

(expert sex change, anyone?)

b

I just get penis size growth spam, not TLD size. (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#26022995)

I have never saw one guaranteeing a "substantial growth" of my TLD.

Although, comparing penis size, to TLD size, does seem somewhat appropriate.

Re:I just get penis size growth spam, not TLD size (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26029949)

What, because both TLDs and your penis size aren't physical entities, just some abstract thing that people pretend are real?

Typosquatting it is... (5, Interesting)

lothar97 (768215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023161)

I am in-house counsel with a U.S. based company that has a large presence in China. We have a large number of domain names and trademarks in China (in English and in Chinese), and our brands are big on the Internet there. I review our domain name watch service reports, which monitors newly registered and renewed domain names worldwide- including .cn.

By far the largest amount of similar domain names I see in the report is .cn, and most of those are typosquatted domain names. If our trademark is WIDGET, then I see wodget.cn, widgit.cn, wiidget.cn, etc. A large number of the Internet users in China use pinyin (writing Chinese words with Latin characters) than Chinese character when online (e.g. writing "zhong guo" for China instead of the Chinese characters).

My hunch is that with so many people in China typing with letters which they may not be completely familiar (and where there may be different ways to transliterate from Chinese to pinyin), there is a large number of people who make mistakes when directly navigating to domain names. I do not see these typosquatted domains showing up in search engine results, but I do see a large number of them being renewed (and thus they are generating a large enough pay per click revenue to be reregistered.)

It gives me a lot more work to do to monitor these. We don't really file the .cn UDRP equivalent, because there are literally hundreds of these domain names out there. I thus suspect that the large number of .cn domain names are for typosquatted domains for known domains, and not for actual legitimate commercial/personal use.

Re:Typosquatting it is... (1)

lysergic.acid (845423) | more than 5 years ago | (#26026059)

typosquatting is pretty scummy, but as long as they stay out of search engines and aren't distributing malware it's not that bad. what's really annoying to me is when people in China/Hong Kong or Japan squat/steal correctly spelled domains that they have absolutely no use for.

i work at an indie metal label. most of our bands are black metal, death metal, grindcore, (old school) punk rock, etc. our bands aren't at all mainstream (most of the music is just comprised of a lot of angry incoherent screaming), so you'd think we'd be pretty safe from squatters. but in the past 4 years we've had at least 2 domains stolen from us. and these are domain names like "vampiremooose.com" or "acidbath.com" which really nobody except our bands have any business registering.

i think the owner of acidbath.com used to have pictures of his dog up on the site (but now it's just spam, i think)--why he needs "acidbath.com" for that, i don't know. but the vampiremooose.com domain was stolen after the (not so smart) band members accidentally let the domain expire. it wouldn't be so upsetting if the site actually had something to do with Vampire Mooose, or heck, even just moose/vampires. but it was registered by a domain squatter who is managing it through some professional domain auctioning service specifically catering to domain speculation/squatting.

of course, it's all done overseas, so there's not much we can do about it. but the last thing we're going to do is to actually pay this jagoffs. but apparently enough people are buying domains from squatters to make it profitable for them to continue operating.

Re:Typosquatting it is... (1)

Bossk-Office (1025872) | more than 5 years ago | (#26028383)

(and where there may be different ways to transliterate from Chinese to pinyin)

It's a minor point, but there's only one way from Chinese to pinyin. Because pinyin is the name of one specific way to transliterate from Chinese to the latin alphabet.

Spammer's haven, too (2, Interesting)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023271)

While people mentioned the phishing implications, the spamming importance of the .cn domain should not be overlooked either. I know I am not the only person who has seen a lot of spam on behalf of .cn domains, and I would say the WHOIS data is part of the reason why. For example, look at abcde.cn:

> whois abcde.cn
Domain Name: abcde.cn
ROID: 20030311s10001s00024435-cn
Domain Status: ok
Registrant Organization: æ±åÂÃ¥ÂååÂææéåÂÃ¥Â
Registrant Name: ÃÂæÂÂå¥
Administrative Email: domain@abcde.cn
Sponsoring Registrar: Ã¥ÃÂÂæÂýÃÂÃÃÂææéåÂÃ¥Â
Name Server:ns1.dns.com.cn
Name Server:ns2.dns.com.cn
Registration Date: 2003-03-17 12:20
Expiration Date: 2010-03-17 12:48

Now how on earth does one contact the owner - or more importantly - the registrar of this domain? Even if you can make sense of the unicode, that is no guarantee that you'll find someone to talk to about this domain.

disclaimer I chose this domain at random, it may or may not be spamvertised or in any way evil.

In contrast, look at the same domain in a .com:

Registrant:
Yinan Wang
Apartment 127
51 Whitworth Street West
Manchester, Lancashire M15EA
United Kingdom

Registered through: GoDaddy.com, Inc.
(http://www.godaddy.com)

So if you were someone looking to set up a spamvertised site to sell discount v!@gra, herbal supplements, knock-off watches, designer shoes, counterfeit handbags, and/or pirated software, which system would you choose for your domain registration information?

Re:Spammer's haven, too (1)

lothar97 (768215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023565)

While people mentioned the phishing implications, the spamming importance of the .cn domain should not be overlooked either. I know I am not the only person who has seen a lot of spam on behalf of .cn domains, and I would say the WHOIS data is part of the reason why. For example, look at abcde.cn:

> whois abcde.cn Domain Name: abcde.cn ROID: 20030311s10001s00024435-cn Domain Status: ok Registrant Organization: æ±åÂÃ¥ÂååÂææéåÂå Registrant Name: ÃÂæÂÂå¥ Administrative Email: domain@abcde.cn Sponsoring Registrar: Ã¥ÃÂÂæÂýÃÂÃÃÂææéåÂå Name Server:ns1.dns.com.cn Name Server:ns2.dns.com.cn Registration Date: 2003-03-17 12:20 Expiration Date: 2010-03-17 12:48

Now how on earth does one contact the owner - or more importantly - the registrar of this domain? Even if you can make sense of the unicode, that is no guarantee that you'll find someone to talk to about this domain.

Try a different whois service. A registrant certainly has the right to register .cn domain names and provide only Chinese characters, without having to convert to Latin characters (which they may not know). Try: http://whois.domaintools.com/abcde.cn [domaintools.com]

Re:Spammer's haven, too (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023685)

A registrant certainly has the right to register .cn domain names and provide only Chinese characters, without having to convert to Latin characters (which they may not know)

Which is exactly my point. A spammer can register a domain in .cn, then host a site in English in that .cn domain, and spamvertise for it in English as well. But because it is from a .cn domain, the spammer has no obligation to provide sensible contact information in English.

I don't oppose the Chinese doing registrations in their TLD in their own language. Rather, I want to point out that their ability to do so is an opportunity that spammers can and will exploit to conceal their own identities.

Re:Spammer's haven, too (1)

level4 (1002199) | more than 5 years ago | (#26028867)

I don't oppose the Chinese doing registrations in their TLD in their own language. Rather, I want to point out that their ability to do so is an opportunity that spammers can and will exploit to conceal their own identities.

Huh? That's how their names are written. And you wouldn't be able to communicate anyway. Go find a Chinese speaker, it's not exactly hard.

And in case you haven't noticed, spammers just use fake names - when they register domains at all, that is. So what's the difference?

You better get used to seeing Chinese characters around, by the way, with no effort being made to transcribe to english-equivalent. There's a lot more of them than there are us. Why should they bother?

Re:Spammer's haven, too (1)

ub3r n3u7r4l1st (1388939) | more than 5 years ago | (#26027783)

If you are using Windows XP, by default you should be able to read REAL Chinese characters instead of the one you listed. (No, those are NOT Chinese characters.) Try websites like yahoo.com.cn and see if you can see legit characters.

If you can, that means something wrong with the WHOIS database that you are using. Try a different one.

Governance? (1)

Luke O'Connell (1046942) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023529)

Makes for interesting reading... even if it is Verisign's! I would have thought China would take a more proactive role in monitoring its domain names, especially being such a closed and censored country.

I've had to register some pretty interesting domains in the past; some country level registrars will make you jump through exorbitant amount of hoops before processing your application while others will simply refuse unless you can prove physical residency.

It does make you wonder whether China has fallen into this trap accidentally, or if they have been enjoying the revenue a little too much?

Re:Governance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26029339)

Maybe it's not as closed or censored as you make it out to be?

Quite insulting to the .nl (1, Flamebait)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023703)

Once upon a time the Dutch [nationmaster.com] had a unique connection to the -then- internet, we were the first [godfatherof.nl] outside of the USofA.

This was at a time the USSR [godfatherof.nl] and China were still very People-minded and refused to even think of such connections.

Maybe the subject of today has something to do with the size of the population [nationmaster.com] ?

Re:Quite insulting to the .nl (1)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 5 years ago | (#26023979)

I don't get what's insulting about this. They just said .cn is currently the 2nd most popular ... nobody said it was the first.

Re:Quite insulting to the .nl (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024595)

There isn't.
Just my failed attempt at humor, I wanted to show how relative these numbers are, especially when time (history) is a factor.

Re:Quite insulting to the .nl (1)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024679)

Well, it's true that the article is little more than another way of saying "damn, China is HUGE!"

And you're right, that's just not news at all.

Whoever modded you "flamebait" really squandered their mod point, lol.

Re:Quite insulting to the .nl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26105269)

With respect, zorac.arpa was connected full-time to ARPANET in at least 1987. I am sure you can google "zorac.arpa" yourself and see that it was (a) directly on the ARPANET, (b) owned and administered by the Canadian Department of National Defence and (c) was physically in Canada (specifically at CFB Downsview, Toronto).

Full CSNET/ARPANET gateway connectivity to the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario, The University of Waterloo, the University of British Columbia, and McGill University also predates the connectivity to mcvax/mcsun by at least many months.

Indeed, the Israeli CSNET partner (Hebrew University) experimented with full TCP/IP gatewaying over Phonenet/CSNET in 1984, although they were not connected full time until some years later, primarily because of X.25 costs.

EUNet (which arose from mcvax et al.)'s more accurate (and imho more interesting) claim to "first"ness was in setting up the first no-AUP dialup SLIP (and some PPP) limited to within Europe, and being the first such network outside the USA to be connected to the fledgling Commercial Internet. (...via an organization that the same Rick in your linked email established, which expanded to Toronto with a partner beginning in early 1989).

(Feel free to confirm all of this with Piet, Per, or Monika, or alternatively Rick (if you can find him) or indeed Drs Wolff or Goldstein).

Re:Quite insulting to the .nl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26105397)

Also, for that matter, UCL, in London UK and NDRE (Norwegian Defence Research Network, in Tromso NO) in were fully connected via SATNET directly to the ARPANET in at least 1982, as is seen in this very handy map made by Dr Postel. RSRE (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern UK) is also on the map (via UCL).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Internet_map_in_February_82.jpg [wikipedia.org]

Shortly after that map was drawn, DREA/DREO the Canadian Defence Research Establishments in Halifax (Atlantic) and Ottawa, respectively, and CNUCE (Pisa, Italy) were added to the early ARPANET.

With respect to early R&E Internet history the Dutch were latecomers, and were home to e.g. EARN, which was BITNET (IBM RSCS and NJE) based, and RARE which was much more interested in ISO-OSI networking technology. Indeed, most European IP networkers can tell you horror stories of the frosty reception

There is a nice button out there that says "RARE: Networking For Europe" that was edited by some of the EUNET/NORDUNET crowd to say "RARE or Networking For Europe".

The established R&E and military research in NL was, like just about everywhere else in Europe, largely uninterested in TCP/IP, figuring it would be rendered obsolete by OSI or JANET Coloured Book (X.25) like projects. Many of these people are still alive and pushing IPv6.

Implications of "Popular" (1)

OffTheRecord (1426083) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024161)

In english "Popular" can imply being "well liked" or "favored". I think that most /. readers are probably upset at the notion that .cn is well liked or favored for any other reason than being a cheap haven for phishing, spam and un-registered domain names.

Re:Implications of "Popular" (1)

IBBoard (1128019) | more than 5 years ago | (#26029883)

Popular is a subjective term, though. Anyone with a sufficient knowledge of English to know that "popular" means "well liked" or "favoured" will also have a sufficient grasp of the language to see that those words are obviously true for the registration aspect - large numbers of spammers like and favour .cn domains as a cheap, easy and probably uncontrolled way to get a disposable domain.

The .CN registrar scam really helped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024263)

There's a scam going on where Chinese registrars email .COM domain owners and claim that a "big company" requested to register the .CN version of the domain. So "as a courtesy" the contact the .com owner to let them know "their trademark could be at risk" and they can register the .CN with them.

It's a fairly legit sounding scam until you do a little research on the net and find SO many similar stories.

Re:The .CN registrar scam really helped (1)

FLEB (312391) | more than 5 years ago | (#26026807)

Sounds like those "Domain Registry of America" "NOT A BILL" mailings I get all the time telling me that I need to pay to renew my domain, forgetting to mention that I don't actually have to pay *them* to do it.

Is it possible to measure infinity? (2, Interesting)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 5 years ago | (#26026037)

When you have people globally registering garbled crap names for domains in the almost infinite TLD namespace, what's the point in throwing statistics like this out there?

Besides, I really didn't know this was a race. Hell, if you want to see a TLD race to the top of the list, allow .xxx out there...

And my forum it's the #2 deleted domain (2)

gelfling (6534) | more than 5 years ago | (#26026049)

China is the #2 source of spam and crap, after .RU (Russia) domain. Higher even than Slovenia.

For all the complaints about the Great Firewall of China, I believe we need a Great Firewall FROM China. I call for blocking most if not all unauthenticated traffic from .CN

If they don't like it, so sorry.

Re:And my forum it's the #2 deleted domain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26029279)

You realize that a lot of the registered domains have nothing to do with the Chinese right? .cn domains are sold world wide and very cheaply too. Erecting a GFW from China won't stop the bulk of spam from .cn as the spammers merely use .cn as it is cheap and readily available.

Because they were cheap (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26026401)

"In case you needed further proof of China's breakneck pace of growth on the web"
Yeah, and this has nothing to do with the fact that most registrars were selling .cns for $2.99 -- the cheapest of any TLDs -- for a year.

This might actually mean something (1)

Strep (956749) | more than 5 years ago | (#26027841)

if there were actual private ownership therein. Hell, they can come up with all-sorts-of-random-crap.cn and wow, they're wickedly huge now.

oh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26036109)

I thought China was .zh ?

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