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Cold Sore Virus May Be Alzheimer's Smoking Gun

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the you-must-remember-this dept.

Medicine 285

Science Daily is reporting that the virus behind cold sores has been found to be a major cause of the insoluble protein plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's disease sufferers. Researchers believe the herpes simplex virus is a significant factor in developing the debilitating disease and could be treated by antiviral agents such as acyclovir, which is already used to treat cold sores and other diseases caused by the herpes virus. Another future possibility is vaccination against the virus to prevent the development of Alzheimer's in the first place. The research was just published in the Journal of Pathology (abstract).

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285 comments

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I may have herpes but at least I don't have herpes (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024363)

I just lost my train of thought.

Re:I may have herpes but at least I don't have her (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024939)

Nastiest Alzheimer's joke ever:

Guy brings his wife to the doctor. Doctor tells him "We screwed up the lab results. She either has AIDS or Alzheimers."

Guy says "great, what should I do?"

Doctor says "Drop her off about a mile away from home. If she finds her way home, don't fuck her!"

Re:I may have herpes but at least I don't have her (1, Funny)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025233)

There's something about jokes that require improbable/impossible setups that just makes them not worth the effort...

Re:I may have herpes but at least I don't have her (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025359)

What you said reminds me of when I told a friend a stupid joke. He responded by saying, "It sounds like someone just made that up."

Strange... (5, Funny)

Der Huhn Teufel (688813) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024365)

Man my mouth hurts but I don't remember why.

Re:Strange... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024407)

It sure wasn't from deep throating CmdrTaco's 3" pecker.

Re:Strange... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024625)

That's why he whistles on it, you insensitve clod! No more mod points for you.

-- Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda

Re:Strange... (1)

TeXMaster (593524) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024801)

That's why he whistles on it, you insensitve clod!

That should probably read âoeyou insensitive coldâ.

Re:Strange... (1)

etnoy (664495) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024983)

That's why he whistles on it, you insensitve clod!

That should probably read âoeyou insensitive coldâ.

That should probably read "you insensitive cold!"

Re:Strange... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025011)

Hey TexMaster see this? ---> "
Yes this: --------------> "

It's somewhere on your keyboard. Use it. Nobody here cares that you are a TeX master because you obviously don't know enough about typesetting to hold down your SHIFT key and press ' which results in the beautiful --> " .

Re:Strange... (3, Funny)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024701)

You coded in brainfuck without a condom and got cerebral herpes, obviously.

Re:Strange... (0, Redundant)

KermodeBear (738243) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025117)

For those who don't know, the above comment is in reference to the programming language Brainfuck [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Strange... (1)

ChrisMP1 (1130781) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025361)

Thanks for the information, Sherlock.

he was a wise man... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024387)

whomever invented aids. i'm glad that someone out there has enough sense to see that faggots should die by the score and that they found a great way to push it out there. fucking faggots are just a bunch of used tampons. they have urinal cakes that are pink triangles. any time i piss on one it makes me think that i'm pissing on a faggot and i just laugh about pissing on fags. it's likely that at the same moment a faggot out there is dying of aids. the guy who invented aids should be proud of his accomplishments. die faggots die.

faggots eat shit out of the asses of other fags. they are a drain on society and deserve to die for it.

I'm safe (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024389)

Cold Sore Virus May Be Alzheimer's Smoking Gun

Woohoo! Looks like I have a full, productive life ahead of me since I have dick herpes and not mouth herpes!

What about heredity? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024427)

Alzheimers runs in families, which is particularly worrisome for me since I have it on both sides of my family. If it is caused by a virus, then why is it passed down in genes? Are some people more sucseptible to this virus, thus there is a gene for vulnerabilty to this virus, instead of a gene for Alzheimers??

Re:What about heredity? (4, Insightful)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024461)

Or "virus only does this to people with gene X".

Re:What about heredity? (1)

Sam36 (1065410) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024881)

Possibly, My friend is the only one out of a family of 4 to not suffer from cold sores

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

BeanThere (28381) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024475)

From the article: "The team had discovered much earlier that the virus is present in brains of many elderly people and that in those people with a specific genetic factor, there is a high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease."

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024483)

If you live together as a family even for the most briefest of time, wouldn't you think the virus could be transmitted easily?

Also if your mom has it, there are lots of fluids passed between one another during the pregnancy and childbirth. And if your father had it, he would have infected your mother when he impregnated her.

Re:What about heredity? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025149)

If you live together as a family even for the most briefest of time, wouldn't you think the virus could be transmitted easily?

Also if your mom has it, there are lots of fluids passed between one another during the pregnancy and childbirth. And if your father had it, he would have infected your mother when he impregnated her.

A lot of fluids? No. There is a reason that only 25% of children born from HIV infected mothers also are infected by HIV. In fact, the probability of being infected with HIV is higher from breastfeeding than it is from gestation and birth. Study human biology buddy. The placenta develops for a reason.

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

Courageous (228506) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024545)

You're an AC so prolly won't see this response, but Herpes infection is endemic. I believe that 90% of all adults are infected with the virus that causes Herpes. I know this is confusing, because of the confusion with genital herpes, which can be caused by at least two variants of the Herpes virus.

C//

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

similar_name (1164087) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024765)

I believe that 90% of all adults are infected with the virus that causes Herpes.

Yep, Herpes comes in at least 8 varieties in humans and over 80 in the animal kingdom. So if you've ever had chicken pox...

"Chickenpox is a highly communicable disease caused by the varicella virus, a member of the herpes virus family"

New York State Department of Health [state.ny.us]

Re:What about heredity? (1)

Burnhard (1031106) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024979)

That's true. Some of us may be carriers but never show symptoms (I've never had a cold-sore but am pretty certain I must have been exposed by now!). None of my grandparents have had Alzheimer's, but one of them currently has Vascular Dementia, which is also common but unrelated.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025129)

Just because you have been exposed doesn't mean you are a carrier. You're exposed to lots of viruses all the time and most often your body fights them off immediately or they don't even get into you in the first place. Our bodies are tougher than what some people seem to think (why else do you think we have survived this long).

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025641)

I believe that 90% of all adults are infected with the virus that causes Herpes. I know this is confusing, because of the confusion with genital herpes,

There are two types of herpes simplex virus: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Historically, HSV-1 has been called "oral herpes" and HSV-2 "genital herpes." But in fact, either can infect either location -- or other locations -- and both cause similar symptoms. (In industrialized nations, particularly among college students, most new cases of genital herpes are actually HSV-1. Ah, fellatio!)

Statistics: 50% of adults are seropositive for HSV-1. 25% of adults are seropositive for HSV-2.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024559)

Another possibility is that the virus is more likely to trigger the Alzheimer's response in people with certain genetic factors. Either way, reducing the prevalence of herpes in the population will help.

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

spectecjr (31235) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024721)

Yes. There's a gene called APOE-1. If you have a specific form of that gene, you're more susceptible.

Also, herpes immunity varies from person to person. Babies without any of the immunity typically die shortly after birth. Your immunity varies depending on a specific combination of genes.

I've been researching this stuff for a while... Inferring results from about 500 different medical papers I've read, Herpes viruses are responsible for:

Alzheimer's Disease
Type-II Diabetes
High Cholesterol, including high HDL and high triglyceride levels
Heart disease, including atherosclerosis (aka arteriosclerosis)
Cancer of the gallbladder (cholangiocarcinoma)
Colon cancer
Crohn's disease
Multiple sclerosis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Arthritis
Osteoporosis
Multiple myeloma
Glioblastoma multiforme
Bipolar disorder
Schizophrenia
Hodkin's Disease
Lymphoma
Breast Cancer
Kaposi's Sarcoma

http://www.accidentalscientist.com/2008/01/public-enemy-1-herpes-viruses-as.html [accidentalscientist.com]

Re:What about heredity? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025147)

It's the great thing about statistics, if 90% of adults have it then a 100% of all people will die with it and some prematurely. Unless there's a factor that stands out the numbers can be spun to back most agendas. Unless they find that Alzheimer's is rare to nonextistent in people that don't have the herpes virus then it's hard to confirm anything when 90% of the population has it. Even then given the fact everyone for the most part are exposed to it an immunity to herpes might also protect you from other conditions that cause Alzheimer's. Odds are we'll never know unless some one comes up with an antiviral that will kill herpes.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025187)

Babies without any of the immunity typically die shortly after birth

Not exactly. All babies are born with immature immune systems, and those that are infected at birth do very badly.

Better re-read your 500 papers.

Re:What about heredity? (1)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025201)

Is Epstein-Barr a herpes virus? Because that is the only virus I have ever heard has had any link identified to Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

Re:What about heredity? (5, Informative)

Khaed (544779) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025329)

Yes, it is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epstein-Barr [wikipedia.org]

"The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), also called Human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4), is a virus of the herpes family (which includes Herpes simplex virus), and is one of the most common viruses in humans."

The herpes family of viruses is certainly one of the most "successful." It's everywhere.

Re:What about heredity? (1)

reverius (471142) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025369)

Yes [wikipedia.org] .

Re:What about heredity? (1)

KermodeBear (738243) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025207)

I read your posts and found them to be very interesting and informative. I'd like to see more, when you have the time to write them. Thanks.

Re:What about heredity? (2, Interesting)

repapetilto (1219852) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025461)

From your part 3: Apparently HPV does its magic by interfering with the expression of gene P52, a factor in cell death (apoptosis)... Most likely you meant p53, just sayin.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024851)

If the original article is true, my guess is that it runs in families because parents pass the virus onto their children. Parents kiss their kids, share glasses with them, etc. so it seems like it would be fairly easy to pass the virus onto them too.

Re:What about heredity? (5, Insightful)

osu-neko (2604) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025427)

Rule of thumb: When someone is trying to explain the "cause" of something, and they have mentioned less than a dozen different things, they're oversimplifying.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025435)

From this source, http://www.herpes.com/hsv1-2.html

80-90% of people age 50 have HSV1.

From the story above, 90% of those with Alzheimer's have HSV1.

What is the average age of people with Alzheimer's? 65 or so?
Plus HSV1 resides in nerve cells.

I don't know about you, but I don't think finding HSV1 in 90% of those with Alzheimer's is really any different than what would be expected in the general population around age 65.

Re:What about heredity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025489)

The virus is passed at birth from mother to child.

Re:What about heredity? (1)

Omnifarious (11933) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025519)

HSV I and HSV II (cold sores and herpes) are actually passed extremely easily by skin-to-skin contact. Condoms are not actually that great a way to protect against them. So they are very easy (well, cold sores anyway) to get from someone in your family even if you don't have sex with any of them.

It's estimated that between 60% and 80% of the US population has HSV I.

There is apparently also an additional genetic factor.

Re:What about heredity? (2, Informative)

lbbros (900904) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025555)

Alzheimer's Disease is what is being called a "multi-factorial" disease. That means that there isn't a single source of the disease, but rather a combination of them. In this case, the presence of the herpes virus is one of such factors. I've read and researched a bit myself on the subject during the course of my scientific career: there are loads of papers that try to link particular genetic patterns to susceptibility to AD, but aside for APOE (mentioned by another poster) and some familial forms (which are a minorty among AD cases), the findings are often hard to reproduce, or even inconsistent among them. BTW, regarding the herpes virus: you don't quite eradicate it when you get a cold sore and treat it, because in fact it usually lies in a dormant state after the acute phase (IIRC, I haven't touched virology in a long time and I may be totally incorrect) and factors such as stress or other events can "awaken" it again, causing the recurrences in cold sores and other herpes-related infections.

Re:What about heredity? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025693)

Please note that a virus transcripts its genetic material into the host cell's genetic sequence in order to reproduce. There is a very high probability that sometimes transcripted viral DNA or RNA sequences can remain dormant. Some biologists go so far as to even suggest that a significant portion of our DNA structure is caused by this phenomenon.

Herpes virii remain dormant while transcripted into a nerve cell's DNA, and are brought out of this dormancy whenever the host's immune system is compromised (ie, cold or flu, hence the likage of this outbreak with the cold or flu that the person suffered from in the first place, naming the herpes labiolis as a "cold sore"). It would not be a far stretch to discover that this could be a moer systemic infection, rather than localized to just the region of outbreak, and that, over time, the entier nervous system could be affected.

Re:What about heredity? (1)

endothermicnuke (1307123) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025707)

HSV-1 is transmitted by shared towels, utensils and kissing on the lips. That's why even children can get HSV-1.

Anti-vaccine crowd? (4, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024437)

Let's wait until the anti-vaccine douchebags hear about THIS. Doesn't this vaccine turn your prepubescent daughter into a whore?

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

Frozentech (890974) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024671)

You're mixing up 'yer virii. HSV vice HPV.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1, Flamebait)

pxlmusic (1147117) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025001)

regardless, there are still fundie morons who insist the aforementioned assertion. they conveniently forget, or do not know, that it is for their daughters' protection as their future husbands are not likely to enter marriage as virgins.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025153)

You are showing no more understanding of the issue than those you mock. The group of people that are against vaccinations are a separate and only slightly overlapping group to the 'fundies' that you are talking about. Most of the people that refuse immunization do so based on what they believe is the correct MEDICAL choice. Most fundamentalists get their children immunized. Most of the fundamentalists that think HPV vaccination will lead to promiscuous premarital sex by girls, also think that premarital sex by boys is wrong. They are not against immunization, they just want premarital sex to have a heavy toll to try to stop it.

Calling people morons when you clearly do not understand the issue is kind of ironic.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

pxlmusic (1147117) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025261)

well, perhaps i was overstating. allow me to correct and clarify:

regarding the religious reasons behind the HPV vaccination, the assumption that their daughters will become instant sluts is unfounded. but i also feel that it's for the good of the women to get the HPV in the event that the man they marry (even if the women are virgins) aren't as pure as their brides.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

c_forq (924234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025457)

Clarified you are still way off. The "fundies", as you put it, don't think their daughters will become instant sluts, but they see the vaccine as lowering the risk of sex. The lower risk of sex means there is less reason not to engage in pre-material sex. They don't think Jenny will become an instant slut, what they think is Jenny will have fewer reasons to say no to Bill's requests put it in, just a little bit, just to see how it feels.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

pxlmusic (1147117) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025525)

perhaps so, but it doesn't mean that they should put their daughters' future health at risk because she might give into her natural hormonal urges and/or because her boyfriend is persuasive enough.

i just don't think that their disapproval of sex is enough to warrant the possible future health risk.

how angry would Jenny if she stayed a virgin but still ended up with cervical cancer because her parents thought it give her an excuse to have sex?

it's not necessarily on par with the Christian Scientists who refuse modern medicine for their child, but it's not that far behind.

Not to make pre-marital sex dangerous (1)

alexhmit01 (104757) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025335)

You have a BRAND NEW vaccine, where we don't have long term data on it, that prevents a disease that affects a small percentage of people with a virus... oh, and the only way to get that virus is a behavior that they don't their children to engage in. Given that vaccines always carry SOME risk, however small, it isn't necessarily irrational that they not want their young daughters given it.

I have a cousin, as secular as they come, that passed on giving it to his daughter that was 10 at the time. He thinks that it's probably a good idea in a few years, but that his non sexually active daughter didn't need to be a guinea pig, and that by the time she was 14 or 15, we'd then have 4-5 years of results, which seemed better than 0.

That said, vaccinating people "at risk" is BAD public policy, since the ideal vaccination is blanket to wipe out the virus. A 90% effective vaccine with 95% penetration is probably more useful than a 95% vaccination with 30% penetration, because you can eliminate spreading the virus, which generally wipes it out.

Herd immunity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025559)

That said, vaccinating people "at risk" is BAD public policy, since the ideal vaccination is blanket to wipe out the virus. A 90% effective vaccine with 95% penetration is probably more useful than a 95% vaccination with 30% penetration, because you can eliminate spreading the virus, which generally wipes it out.

http://www.google.com/search?q=herd+immunity

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025687)

You're mixing up 'yer virii. HSV vice HPV.

Yeah, the difference is in the statistics: While only the majority of people end up with HSV, damn near everybody ends up with HPV.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

Sam36 (1065410) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025211)

Well for one, "THIS" hasn't be proven yet.

Re:Anti-vaccine crowd? (1)

ObiWonKanblomi (320618) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025327)

Or what about those who think immunizing their kids will bring about Autism?

timely article (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024473)

in a few weeks, poor innocent little children will get visits from aunt bertha and grandma marge, and the first thing the strange smelly relatives will do is find the innocent children, exclaim "my how you've grown!" or "aren't you the cutest thing, i could eat you up!" and, approaching the children, who will now be rapt in horror, they will proceed to plant wet sloppy kisses, over the protestations and gyrations of the children sturggling to break free of the bear arm grip

and, the kids are right to object. they are trying to avoid herpes and alzheimers

kisses from old relatives is a brain mummifying disease

Re:timely article (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024681)

in a few weeks, poor innocent little children will get visits from aunt bertha and grandma marge,

Crap, I've lost to the internet.

First thing I saw was "Grandma Mage".

Second thing was "My robe and wizard hat"

Also, they will get cavities (1)

bigtrike (904535) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024723)

Those kisses will also cause caries aka cavities [wikipedia.org]

Re:timely article (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025045)

why don't you shut the fuck up you stupid fucking turd? everyone here hates your bitch ass. no one wanted to kiss the little retard baby that you were. they probably kicked your face in. fucking bitch ass trick.

Re:timely article (2, Funny)

MrMista_B (891430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025143)

Not to mention fainty pedophilic. Which kids are good at picking up on.

Re:timely article (1)

maugle (1369813) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025245)

They'll be lucky if the perfume doesn't suffocate them first.

Re:timely article (1)

TechwoIf (1004763) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025355)

The child can not say no to grandma violating the most sensitive spot of there body. So that means they can not say no to there uncle that what to touch a less sensitive area. For the clueless, parents have been training children they can not say "no" to the uncle that want to rub in between there legs. Now I can educate the parents without mortifying them by using this virus as a excuse. This is a good thing overall.

Oh crap! (1)

GomezAdams (679726) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024477)

I had a 'fever blister' about every month when I was a kid. I had better follow up on this. Although we never had any Alzheimers in the family my oldest cousin and her ex-husband both have it. There was never a case in his family either.

Re:Oh crap! (0, Troll)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024503)

Sounds like mom had the ol' pirate mouth.

Re:Oh crap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025527)

hahha

Re:Oh crap! (2, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024995)

did "uncle" gary ask you to suck his meat popsicle, by any chance?

Silver Ions in Solution Kill Viruses (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024543)

Herpes Zoster and Herpes Simplex viruses are killed with a silver ion concentration of 16ppm or more. Just hold the solution in your mouth for ten minutes, then spit it out. There is no danger of Argyria since most is discarded and very little remains in your blood stream. Estimates are 4 parts per billion, which is far below the 2 grams generally recognized as required for Argyria to show. The little that does remain is eliminated in several days, so it is wise to keep taking the solution as a preventative measure.

The ions appear to work with the immune system much the same way as other trance elements are needed, like chromium, selenium, and so on. A deficiency of silver will make you more vulnerable to pathological infections, but these disappear as soon as the silver ions are absorbed into the blood stream.

Most of the solutions sold in health stores is 3 to 5 ppm, which is too weak to do much good. You need about 16 ppm or more. With skill and practise, you can make this yourself for pennies per dose. Please see my web site at http://silversol.net63.net/ [net63.net] for more info.

Not this homeopathy BS again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025273)

Please, you people claim that it even works over the phone.

Re:Silver Ions in Solution Kill Viruses (2, Informative)

Metasquares (555685) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025433)

HSV and VZV take up residency within the nervous system, where they remain indefinitely. Even if your proposed solution does kill an active HSV infection, it will not root out the latent virus, thus the cold sores will continue to periodically recur.

Sounds like correlation not causation - yet (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024549)

The team discovered that the HSV1 DNA is located very specifically in amyloid plaques: 90% of plaques in Alzheimer's disease sufferers' brains contain HSV1 DNA, and most of the viral DNA is located within amyloid plaques. The team had previously shown that HSV1 infection of nerve-type cells induces deposition of the main component, beta amyloid, of amyloid plaques.

100% might have been a clincher. If anti-virals help, I might have rto eat my worlds.

Most people have HSV1. HSV1 DNA locates in the amyloids. So most people expressing the amyloids would have HSV1 DNA in them.

What's up with the 10% of alzhemier amyloids without the HSV1. It sounds like amyloid metabolism is the problem and HSV1 is along for the ride.

 

Re:Sounds like correlation not causation - yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025713)

The HSV theory would explain why it attacks elderly people, which tend to have weaker immunity.

Even if not the cause, antiviral therapy might prevent or slow down brain damage in AD, if it stops plaque build-up. (and they report good result in preliminary tests).

Well at least people can start taking antiviral therapy now, as acyclovir is approoved medicament.

Is this a dupe? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024575)

I don't remember :-(

I wonder... (5, Interesting)

dexmachina (1341273) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024579)

With these findings in mind, it would be interesting if someone were to do a study and see if there's a correlation between Alzheimer's incidence and people who have a tendency to get cold sores. Since only 20-40% (according to TFA) of HSV-1 carriers develop cold sores, I wonder if being susceptible to outbreaks indicates a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's later in life. You'd have to correct for all sorts of environment factors, but still, as someone who gets cold sores something awful that would be a very interesting study. Anyways, great article, it's good news if something comes out of this. HSV in its different varieties is already known to be responsible for quite a few diseases so only good can come out of more research into it.

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025379)

It could also mean the opposite - that body immune systems reacts to herpes better in people with cold sores - so AD could also be less common.

Re:I wonder... (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025419)

With these findings in mind, it would be interesting if someone were to do a study and see if there's a correlation between Alzheimer's incidence and people who have a tendency to get cold sores.

I hope not. The only time I don't have cold sores is if I restrict my intake of acidic foods (oranges, tomatoes, etc)

Re:I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025665)

RTFAbstract -- it's a nice piece of observational science which probably does, as most good observational science does, challenge assumptions and open questions. It doesn't really say what the Herpes virus does or how to cure the disease.

Can one be tested... (4, Funny)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024739)

Can one be tested for the herpes simplex virus? I never had an outbreak, but one winter when I was cyclilng in -17C (stupid, yeah, gimme a break, I love cycling) I got a cold sore on the tip of my nose. So now I would like to be able to dismiss the idea I have herpes simplex. But if I have it, I'd like to start a therapy ASAP - I don't want to get Alzheimer's.

Re:Can one be tested... (1)

mrmcwn (566272) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024767)

You can be tested, but it's a virus. No real therapy available.

Re:Can one be tested... (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025023)

lead therapy has proven effective.

Re:Can one be tested... (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025425)

Single large injection to the brain or heart, I assume?

Re:Can one be tested... (1)

DustyShadow (691635) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024785)

Very unlikely it was a cold sore if it was on your nose. Probably just a bad pimple. There are blood tests available but some give a lot of false positives. Go to an STD clinic if you want to be tested and ask for the IGG test. It is the better one.

Re:Can one be tested... (1)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024803)

Yes, there is a blood test for it. Chances are it will show positive. Most adults have it.

Re:Can one be tested... (3, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024859)

Any chance it was simply frostbite?

Re:Can one be tested... (5, Funny)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025497)

Yes, yes it was a frostbite! Is that not the same as a cold sore, then?

See, this happens because English is not my native tongue. Never lived in an English-speaking country, either. While I do have a reasonably good command of it, there are rare instances where English fools me, just like now.

Note to self: cold sore != frostbite

Herpes Simplex... (3, Interesting)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024751)

Might not be the only culprit here. Chicken pox (V. zoster) and Shingles (H. zoster) are related to HSV1 and HSV2. Many people may have had either -or both- of these infections as children or adults and carry the virus in a dormant state in their body. The research does not address these other -possible very prevalent- vectors in AD.

Re:Herpes Simplex... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024845)

In my day, parents used to deliberately expose their children to chicken pox and mumps because they're both far more serious if you contract them as an adult (chicken pox can kill adults and mumps can render males sterile)

Re:Herpes Simplex... (3, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024873)

Exactly. There are a wide variety of diseases that are forms of or are related to HSV1/2. Chicken pox and shingles are just two. Additionally, there is viral meningitis, a form of encephalitis, occular herpes, and more.

Finally, this news isn't that exactly that new. They originally discovered a link between Alzheimer's and HSV-1 in the late 70s. This is just the latest study that confirms this.

Cause or a side-effect? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26024929)

I didn't completely understand from reading TFA, do they think that the herpes virus is the cause, or is it possible that it's just taking advantage of the Alzheimer?

trollin' trollin' trollin' (1)

pxlmusic (1147117) | more than 5 years ago | (#26024957)

this thread really brought out the trolls...

Disco Fever! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025035)

Now we know why all those disco people [gamespot.com] seemed to suffer from brain damage!

SDSU (1)

pieisgood (841871) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025109)

Everyone at SDSU is doomed to have Alzheimer's.

Good News for Slashdot (4, Funny)

pragma_x (644215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025171)

This is excellent news for most slashdotters since the herpes 'cold-sore' virus is typically transmitted by kissing.

Re:Good News for Slashdot (3, Funny)

mkiwi (585287) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025277)

This is excellent news for most slashdotters since the herpes 'cold-sore' virus is typically transmitted by kissing.

I said something like that to a doctor once at Mayo clinic. Imagine my surprise when he snapped back, "You can get it from kissing a glass."

Re:Good News for Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26025583)

That's why we're smarter than the rest!

Daaammmnnn (2, Funny)

Larryish (1215510) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025275)

No wonder the hooker never remembers me.

So... (1)

elthicko (1399175) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025491)

Let me get this straight. If I always wear a condom I won't get Alzheimer's? :p

Re:So... (1)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025741)

Let me get this straight. If I always wear a condom I won't get Alzheimer's? :p

I think you'd have to wear a condom over your face, too.

Prevention (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025495)

So eould an AntiViral, like Acyclovir help prevent Alzheimers if taken early enough (say in your 40's)

Tapped out (1)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025521)

This puts "This Is Spinal Tap" in a whole different light.

Researcher Matthew Wozniak (0, Offtopic)

macraig (621737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26025743)

If you read TFA, one of this study's researchers is a fellow named Matthew Wozniak. Mere coincidence, or relation to Steve?

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