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World's First 21Mbps EHSPA/HSPA+ Data "Call"

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the faster-than-a-bounding-kangaroo dept.

Networking 95

gadgetopia writes "Although data 'calls' on 21Mbps networks and equipment have been made in the labs and in demonstrations, Australia is the first place in the world where such a call has been made on a commercial, deployed 21Mbps eHSPA network, with a full commercial launch due early 2009."

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Bring Lysol with me... (2, Funny)

AmigaHeretic (991368) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041641)

...for bathrooms everywhere I go. I mean 21Mbps? That's crazy! "More porn in more places."

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

exabrial (818005) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041681)

If my wireless was as fast this, I would have had first post.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (2, Funny)

weirdo557 (959623) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041695)

if my wireless was as fast as this, i wouldn't be here.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (3, Funny)

AmigaHeretic (991368) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041733)

What? I'm on my C64 with a 300bps modem downloading a 16 color porn GIF from a BBS at the same time as I posted that and I still beat you?

Yeah, might be time to get the "new" iPhone. It's "3"g :-)



/just kidding Apple fans don't punish me too bad!! :-)

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26045955)

Ha! Funny. :-) Unfortunately Commodore 64s don't multitask so it would not be possible to download a porno photo & post to slashdot "at the same time". The C64 does one thing at a time. Shoulda used "Amiga" for your joke.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (2, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046205)

If he's connected his C64 to the Internet, he is almost certainly running Contiki on it. Contiki can multitask using protothreads (stackless coroutines) and can handle multiple concurrent TCP connections (where multiple on a C64 is around 8). The newer versions also support IPv6, although since the v6 stack needs 2.5KB of RAM and around 11KB of code memory, you'd probably want to run it from ROM or upgrade to a C128.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (2, Interesting)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046359)

And here's an image of Contiki multitasking on a C=64 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Contiki-C64.png [wikipedia.org]

Amazing. I thought the old Commie was too slow and too small to run multiple programs at the same time.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26048743)

P.S. This Contiki OS is pretty cool. I ought to dump Windows 98 off my old K6 laptop and use Coktiki instead. All I need is something to surf the web, run Utorrent, and play back videos.

Why can't Microsoft produce an OS small and efficient as this one?

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041685)

seriously thats almost enough to stream HD porn.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

Poltras (680608) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043061)

seriously thats almost enough to stream HD porn.

HD porn, when TMI meets reality...

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (2, Insightful)

davester666 (731373) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042315)

But it's in Australia... With the new netfilters the gov't is mandating, you won't be able to access porn. Hell, SlashDot will be filtered because it mentions porn.

Next stop for the Aussie net patrol...cutting all links with the rest of the world. Once they find out this 'web filter thingie' doesn't prevent people from accessing 'bad' things, the only other solution will be to prevent them from accessing anything that cannot have the Aussie legal system applied to it.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (3, Informative)

BazilBBrush (1259370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042617)

Forget the porn filters, they are just another politicians wet dream...

And forget the glitzy hey look at us and our new tech marketing.

The real issue here is Tel$tra's obscene data pricing on their mobile networks - even on their fixed line ADSL.

While the majority of ISPs in Oz shape you once you exceed your download cap, Tel$tra are still charging 15c / MB for excess on ADSL.

You think that's bad. How about 15c / KB for excess on mobile data plans. There are plans that avoid that rate, but not the stock plans that they push. So they sell you the (not so cheap anyway) base plan with a measly download limit, and the next thing those who are not aware of what they are doing (most) get a huge bill. Then they switch you to the higher per month plan to avoid the excess, making out that they are good corporate citizens. Truth is they set it up that way to deliberately catch the ignorant.

There are plenty of people here paying $130 / month for 3G mobile just to get a decent bandwidth / download connection coz they can't get ADSL. Telecoms / Internet pricing in this country sucks. All because of one dominant more or less monopoly Telco.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042937)

You say 15c/KB like it's a bad thing, yet here in the states we're being charged 20c (or is it 25c now?) for 140B of data if you want to send it to another phone.

Telcos are greedy. This is not news. And please let me assure you that America having "competition" in this arena doesn't make a damned bit of difference for pricing (if anything it's worse - they avoid the monopoly laws, but there are so few of them that collusion is trivially easy and always overlooked by the powers that be). So while Netflix and Blockbuster fight over delivering the lowest pricing for us, Verizon and AT&T work together to fight with their customers, instead of fighting over those customers.

Of course my bit about text messages isn't too relevant in the context of data transfer, and I'm well aware that Oz is notorious for having unfair telcos, but you're not the only people that get screwed. Anyone that has a telco is getting screwed by that telco.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043273)

Yeah, we pay pretty much the same rate for SMS here. I believe it is 25cents a message on most Aussie carriers.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046139)

>>>collusion is trivially easy and always overlooked by the powers that be

The powers that be did not overlook the collusion that happened between the Record Companies. The States' General Attorneys sued the companies for forming an illegal cartel and fined them accordingly (with refunds to customers who purchased CDs or cassettes). If the cellphone companies were colluding to pricefix their plans, I expect the States would drag them to court too.

The truth of the matter is that erecting antennas all over the place, and keeping those antennas operational, is very expensive. That is the real reason for the high cost of data transmission. Even wireless calls are expensive - about 20 cents a minute for my plan - it's just the real cost of an expensive operation.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26048309)

Your provider should be able to disable texting. I don't agree with the pricing, but it does go over a different communication channel than data (with much more limited bandwidth), so comparing bits for bits is a little disingenuous.

That said, there's no reason texts can't go over normal data channels. And I sign into AIM on my phone, and just ignore the whole thing when I can.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043553)

There are plenty of people here paying $130 / month for 3G mobile just to get a decent bandwidth / download connection coz they can't get ADSL. Telecoms / Internet pricing in this country sucks. All because of one dominant more or less monopoly Telco.

What monopoly [youtube.com] ? The breakup worked.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

Starayo (989319) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044651)

As much as I hate telstra (WITH THE PASSION OF A THOUSAND THOUSAND DYING STARS) I have to admit their outright refusal to participate in the filter testing was pretty cool...

But yeah, they suckered my friend's technophobic mum into a broadband contract that cost her four times more than mine for about 1/100th of the usage.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

Gumbercules!! (1158841) | more than 5 years ago | (#26045493)

Although I, like all good Australian's, hate Telstra, you're comment is incorrect on two issues, that I cannot let slide.

1. Broadband in this country is not bad because of "no competition" - the monopoly Telco you speak of (Telstra). Broadband in Australia lags behind the World (actually, we do rank reasonably high) because the market allows it to. And the market allows it to because of two reasons. Firstly, we have 22 million people in a place the size of Europe or the continental USA. The distances are too vast and the population to sparse to have 1gbps links running all over the place. Comparisons to Japan, where a million people all live in a shoe box are not valid. Secondly - because not enough people care or want faster. The majority of home users are happy with 512/128k links.

2 - Leading on from my last point (about people not caring enough). You say the net filter doesn't matter as much as Teltra's monopoly. This is dead wrong. The net filter is the #1 biggest problem our country currently faces. It stands poised, if it goes ahead *in full* (included the ridiculous man in the middle attacks on HTTPS and packet inspection) to seriously destroy our economy (imagine what happens when no HTTPS traffic can pass in the entire country, when that govt server goes down). For once, Telstra is fighting the good fight here.

I know internet pricing in this country isn't the best on Earth but I am happy paying my $100 odd a month for 6 static IP addresses, 1.5MB uplink and 24mb downlink (which admittedly only gets about 10mbit), on a 120GB limit. Frankly, I can find very few places in the world that can deliver to me as fast as I can eat, other than torrents, of course and I have never once exceeded that 120GB limit.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046291)

>>>we have 22 million people in a place the size of Europe or the continental USA.

I made that argument yesterday and I was told it's bogus... that sparse population is not an excuse for Australia to only have ~4 megabit/s average when places like Japan have 18 megabit/s. Well, I agree with you that comparing Australia to a tiny nation like Japan or Korea is stupid, but most slashdotters disagree. (shrug) Anyway quoting some statistics from memory, here is how Australia compares to other continent-sized federations:

(1) Russian Federation - ~7 megabit/s
(2) European Union and USA - ~6 megabit/s
(3) Australia and Canada - ~4 megabit/s
(4) China - ~2 megabit/s

I don't think Australia is doing poorly at all. It's only 2 megabit/s behind Europe or America... and twice as fast the Chinese.

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046051)

>>>With the new netfilters the gov't is mandating, you won't be able to access porn.

No but you'll be able to see that "Sorry Big Brother is watching. Access denied" popup in just 1/100th of a second instead of 1 second! :-) That's technological progress for you... now if we could just get some progress on the freedom front, we'd be all set. Approximately 250 years since the Americans and French wrote their respective Declarations of Human Rights, and yet we still don't have freedom of thought or speech* in the privacy of our homes.

*
* (Re: the Australian decision that naked Simpsons drawings are "child porn", even though there are no victims in this so-called crime.)

Re:Bring Lysol with me... (1)

raju1kabir (251972) | more than 5 years ago | (#26047259)

But it's in Australia... With the new netfilters the gov't is mandating, you won't be able to access porn. Hell, SlashDot will be filtered because it mentions porn.

More to the point, because it's in Australia, transferring data at 21Mbps will cost about $500 per minute.

Single call on an unloaded network is meaningless (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041713)

In theory HSDPA, the predecessor of HSPA+, provides 14.4Mbit/s, not that far off the data rates being advertised here. In practise it is virtually unuseable [apcmag.com] . Call me when HSPA+ is working at those data rates with a full customer base, though I doubt you will be able to because the network will be gridlocked.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042017)

This is not true. Ericsson solution supports full 21M, NSN is bringing out their RBS year to support 14.4M

Read the fine print (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043155)

That must be why Telstra adds the following disclaimer [telstra.com.au] at the end of their press release:

"Speeds represented are peak network downlink speeds. Actual customer download speeds will be less and will vary due to network configuration, congestion, distance from the cell, local conditions, hardware, software and other factors."

The 21Mbit/s number is pure grandstanding and PR puff [itwire.com] . The Ericsson press release [ericsson.com] , of which TFA is basically a clueless rewrite, doesn't include the disclaimer since Ericsson isn't actually providing a service and so cannot be hauled before an Australian court for misrepresentation under the Trade Practises Act, like Telstra can.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042045)

You're confusing the failure of an ISP with the failure of a technology.

HSDPA works fine on everyone else's network.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (0)

Swizec (978239) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042179)

Uhm ... not to be a killjoy or anything. But was that perhaps supposed to be MBps? Because we've had commercial 20/20 (Mbps) FTTH in Slovenia for a few years now and it does in fact work at those speeds in real-life examples.

Hell, even the government owned telco began offering 20/20 this year, we've had up to 100/100 available from private companies since about 2005.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (4, Funny)

inzy (1095415) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042267)

yeah, but the cable might reduce the mobility of your phone, not to mention the problems caused when you get on a train

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042411)

I didn't read that the network was unloaded. I think you will find that Telstra's Next G network does have traffic on it. Either that or they are spending a fortune on adds that aren't achieving anything.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (1)

mcbridematt (544099) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042875)

Parent post inaccurate.

Optus is not a model 3G network, nor has its GSM
network that preceded it ever been. Posts from current and former Optus employees like this one [whirlpool.net.au] exhibit this. Back when I was on them a few years back, GPRS latency was regularly in the 600-1000ms range with regular connection timeouts*. Switched to another network, and boom, down to 300ms. My understanding is Optus runs GSM calls at half-rate bandwidth as well.. Definitely noticeable if you answer if you answer an Optus GSM (not 3G) call from a landline.

Telstra's network looks far superior in operation. (Of course, they have also priced their 3G broadband options to keep hordes of users off the network unless they don't have a choice)

* The latency sucked so much that the Treo 600 I was using at the time often froze momentarily while surfing the web with Blazer or AvantGo. Didn't happen as much when I switched networks.

Re:Single call on an unloaded network is meaningle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26046207)

mate,
the cell the test calls were made on was a normal cell in the CBD taking normal call traffic, i was closeby at the time....sorry to pop that balloon.

Tell the Wikitruth! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041719)

Now you got almost the whole of the United Kingdom banned Jimbo "i fucked Rachel Marsden" Wales, it's time to stop violating BLP [wikipedia.org] .

Wikipedia's going to being covered in several layers of shit over these incidents!

All networks are fast... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041769)

...when only 1 user is on. Let's see some real world results. And since its coming from Australia, you won't be able to download anything as it will most likely be blocked.

Re:All networks are fast... (2, Informative)

Lachlan Hunt (1021263) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041901)

Not everything will be blocked. Only the really dangerous stuff like cartoon porn!

Re:All networks are fast... (5, Funny)

ijakings (982830) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042321)

The australians have been angry ever since that Giant Boot joke, anything simpsons related is a testy subject with them.

Re:All networks are fast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042533)

HAHAHA, if only I had mod points :( it's so true...

Been like that in Scandinavia for quite some time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041829)

3 in Scandinavia announced this long ago. The service is able to handle 21 MBps, but the terminals do not really exists yet. See, e.g., http://www.telecompaper.com/news/article.aspx?cid=648923

Too bad about the filter (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041847)

21Mbps will become 21Kbps once the government is done with it

Re:Too bad about the filter (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041963)

Won't somebody please think of the children?!

Re:Too bad about the filter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26041995)

But Young Sebastion must be protected from the Internet!

Contents of the call (5, Insightful)

sphealey (2855) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041873)

> Although data 'calls' on 21Mbps networks and equipment have been made
> in the labs and in demonstrations, Australia is the first place in the
> world where such a call has been made

Contents of the call:

"Hello. [Censored by Australian Internet Censorship Agency] home and then [Censored by Australian Internet Censorship Agency] and he said [Censored by Australian Internet Censorship Agency]. Thanks"

sPh

Re:Contents of the call (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042001)

[Censored by Australian Internet Censorship Agency]

Australian Communications and Media Authority [acma.gov.au]

Re:Contents of the call (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042163)

Please visit NoCleanFeed [nocleanfeed.com] for more information on the proposed nationwide ISP-level filter.

Re:Contents of the call (1)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042529)

It makes compression very efficient when all you have to do is return "BLOCKED CONTENT" for any traffic outside .au

Re:Contents of the call (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042731)

Yeah, but look on the bright side: message delivery was super fast at only 17.4 seconds. That's broadband, baby! Yeah!

Re:Contents of the call (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043639)

I hear and see more censorship on American TV than I ever do on Australian TV.

Even cable is neutered in the grand ol' US of A. It's almost like Freedom of Speech is an optional extra you have to buy (except you can't.)

Pick any movie with a lot of swearing in it, watch it on American TV (especially free-to-air) and then watch it on Australian TV. You'll wonder how the two shows could be the same.

Re:Contents of the call (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044517)

It's sad that we've become the laughing stock of the world (that's if we weren't already) now that our government has decided to filter our Internet. We've completely lost whatever dignity we had...

Re:Contents of the call (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046275)

I have one thing to say to that: [Censored by the Australian Internet Censorship Agency]

I mean, wouldn't you agree? (Sorry about this my Australian friends, but everyone ELSE reading this knows what it says. )

Woohoo! (1)

Veni Vidi Dormi (975178) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041979)

MFA to learn.

"Network", not "Call" (4, Interesting)

IorDMUX (870522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26041999)

Perhaps the title could more accurately read "World's First 21Mbps EHSPA/HSPA+ Data "Network"", as 21 Mbps HSPA+ calls (which, though the summary downplays them, are really big breakthroughs) are "old news" [qctconnect.com] .

Yeah, it's good to see this technology taking root out there, but don't forget about the engineers who made the tech happen in the first place! (In fact, given that Telestra's HSPA+ is not yet an active commercial network, I'm wondering what makes this trial so different from the dozens of "laboratory calls" made so far?)

Re:"Network", not "Call" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042215)

I'm wondering what makes this trial so different from the dozens of "laboratory calls" made so far?)

Well, one of the engineers discovered he had run out of dunny paper... a real world situation and called someone using the new fangled phone to bring him some. A so called "lavatory call".

Re:"Network", not "Call" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042339)

In fact, given that Telestra's HSPA+ is not yet an active commercial network, I'm wondering what makes this trial so different from the dozens of "laboratory calls" made so far?

Huh? Telstra's HSPA network IS active, or it will be at the start of next year.

Biggest problem is that nobody really has Next G phones yet, though, so most peops will experience 7 mbps max. However, they may still experience speed increase due to more network capacity (decreased congestion).

Telstra are planning 42 mpbs soon, as well.

Re:"Network", not "Call" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042589)

Telstra's HSPA+ network is currently active, though *only* capable of 14.1Mbps (the articles states 7.4Mbps which is wrong). This is simply an upgrade from 14.1 to 21Mbps.

While US and EU people might this it would be wonderful to have such a fast cell data network, keep in mind the cheapest data rate is $0.25 per MB

Re:"Network", not "Call" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044423)

I'm one of these engineers - working for Ericsson WCDMA department as software developer.

Best regards, /Joss

Went something like this (0)

Kratisto (1080113) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042013)

So what are you wearing?

Is it a breakthrough? (3, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042061)

I ask because I have heard of faster speeds than the 21Mbps somewhere in Japan or Korea. What is in this for me anyway? I am just an ordinary slashdotter.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (2, Informative)

Bios_Hakr (68586) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043107)

Standard lines in Japan are 100mbps up/down with 24 people sharing a head-end switch. That switch has 100mbps going back to the ISP. The price is about $20 for the fiber-optic line lease and $50 for the ISP service.

Typical rates are 20mbps down and 5mbps up [speedtest.net] . They are higher in the city, but I live out in the boondocks of Japan.

If you want, you can pay $75 per month and they will move you to a head-end switch with 12 users and 1gbps link back to the ISP. Then, you are almost guaranteed the full 100mbps service.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

jaxtherat (1165473) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043169)

O_o

*scrabbles for passport*

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

IorDMUX (870522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043651)

But HSPA+ is cellular!

We're talking 21 Mbps downstream with far more mobility even than WLAN, once they get these networks operational. That's more bandwidth than I get from my cable internet connection on a device that can go anywhere the towers are without breaking connectivity (thanks to CDMA's no-drop handoff style).

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

Bios_Hakr (68586) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044043)

Okay, but if it's cellular, then it's 21mpbs *shared* with everyone else in your cell.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 5 years ago | (#26046329)

No it isn't. It's some number nshared with everyone else in the cell, where n is greater than 21Mb/s but likely less than 21Mb/s times the number of people who can use the cell at once. Exactly what value n has depends on the configuration of the cell (how many channels it supports, the signal strength, and so on).

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

Erich (151) | more than 5 years ago | (#26047137)

Incorrect. 21mbps for a user in a 5MHz band of spectrum. Multiple spectrum bands per cell, multiple reuse of the frequency bands per cell using directional antennas (eg, 120 degree partitioning). And reuse of the spectrum band for multiple users using code division.

You're sharing the backhaul from the tower to whatever it talks to, though.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

hankwang (413283) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044377)

Standard lines in Japan are 100mbps up/down with 24 people sharing a head-end switch. That switch has 100mbps going back to the ISP.

Is there any QoS in those switches? I mean, what happens to the other 20 people's VoIP connection or PDF download when four people are running bittorrent with 100 open connections each? 100 Mbps shared over 401 TCP connections is 250 kbps per connection.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

Bios_Hakr (68586) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044897)

I have no idea how the back-end deals with throttling users.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26048383)

...you aren't talking wireless, are you? Because this article is about wireless speeds, not wired.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043243)

This is wireless, using the same network as cellphones.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044639)

I may be wrong, but I think this is 21Mbps through the phone line.

Re:Is it a breakthrough? (1)

Hamish910 (1271062) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044757)

I may be wrong, but I think this is 21Mbps through the phone line.

Yes, you are wrong.

No Point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042113)

Your email attachments costs three-hundred-and-fifty-seven dollars, spank you.

Until Australia get affordable internet. It is pointless.

frickin' telstra (5, Informative)

lucas teh geek (714343) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042297)

Telstra are renowned for rolling out awesome networks and coupling them with the worst plans known to man. tiny quotas, and huge excess charges. in this case excess is charged at $250 per gigabyte, which at that speed you can consume in just over 6 minutes.

Re:frickin' telstra (5, Informative)

enoz (1181117) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042575)

Before any mods mark this as a troll, let me point out that Tel$tra still charge $150/GB for excess downloads on their broadband plans [bigpond.com] .

Re:frickin' telstra (1)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043751)

Except for their "liberty" plans, which comprise 2/3rds of their available plans. Those plans that - being shaped without charge once reaching their limits - are the plan that any sane person would choose.

But I guess that wouldn't be *quite* as dramatic to say now, would it?

Having said that, I will wholeheartedly agree the 'entry level' plans are a nasty trap for inexperienced grandparents or something. 200MB download at 256kbps for $29.95 with a 15c/MB excess is not a plan that most internet users would pick however. Especially seeing that the next plan up (and only other plan on that speed) can give you 12GB for $59.95 with no excess usage.

Re:frickin' telstra (1)

hsu (970167) | more than 5 years ago | (#26056361)

That's cheap! In ITU world, where wireless speed is measured by price/minute, or the speed of money flowing out of your account when downloading at full speed or infected by spam-spewing worm. For example, when I would be traveling in Australia, roaming on HSPA network capable of 21 Mbps, my network speed is calculated as follows: 21000000 bps / 8 * 60 = 150.20 Mbytes/minute and for the roaming price for me in Australia, that would make 150.20 Mbyte/minute * 9.80 euro/Mbyte = 1471.96 euro/minute. That would be 88317.60 euro/hour, or in German currency, 1 Porsche/hour, or in real estate, 1 seafront villa/day. In some other countries, it may be much cheaper, even less than 1000 euro/minute. However, soon they will introducing even faster versions of HSPA, doubling the speed to 3000 euro/minute!

Re:frickin' telstra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26117341)

It's like comparing night and oranges, but at that rate($0.15/MB), solid state drives are currently over 100 times cheaper.
Instead of using the internet it'd be cheaper to fedex overnight your god damn hard disk.

Re:frickin' telstra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043731)

But..but people on slashdot say flat rates are bad,and companies should charage exactly
how much we downloaded.

So, actual data rate is.... (1)

NerveGas (168686) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042357)

... what, 750 kbps unless you're standing right next to a tower/

Re:So, actual data rate is.... (1)

GenP (686381) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042559)

I'm not sure I'd want to be anywhere near a microwave transceiver that can even pretend to do 20MBps at 2-5 klicks.

Re:So, actual data rate is.... (1)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043589)

It depends entirely on how many other people are using the cell at the same time. If you're the only one, and you have decent reception, you'll get pretty close to the full amount. Oh, you also need a device capable of that connection speed, which doesn't really exist quite yet (but will soon).

Re:So, actual data rate is.... (1)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 5 years ago | (#26045007)

Well, with Telstra's current HSPDA network, I can get consistent, sustained rates of 2-3Mbps with my phone (and laptop) to random sites on the internet. This is in a variety of places - some inner city, some where I can guarantee that I'm pretty much the only person in that cell using data.

Distance-wise, it doesn't really seem to matter much - I have been some 60km away from the only tower with a 6dBi broomstick antenna attached to my phone and still get the same speeds as if I was in town. At the very edges of reception, in places where I can't hold a call, I can still get bursty data at 100-300kbps.

Say what you want about Telstra's prices, but their network is well beyond anyone else's in Australia at present.

Grandma! (1)

webword (82711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042421)

So, when's this kind of crazy a55 speed going to make it's way down to the street? You know, when is grandma going to see wild speed when she's calling the grandkids? 1-2 years? More?

"2009" doesn't mean it makes it to grandma, at least in any affordable sense of the word. 1-2 years. Move along.

Re:Grandma! (1)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042567)

Grandma doesn't need 21mbps, nor would she care to pay for it!

VOIP is measured in dozens of kilobits per second. I believe with modern algorithms, 40 is ok to make a signal and get an OK signal, and 100 kbps is plenty. This signal is two hundred times faster.

Re:Grandma! (1)

maglor_83 (856254) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043599)

It's supposed to be rolled out by the end of the year, so even if it is delayed, it'll be more like 1-2 months than 1-2 years. They're currently talking 42Mbps by 2010.

Yes, this is fast. (1)

gobagoo (1427153) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042459)

I think an excellent use of such amazing technology would be to revive the use of Morse code, so we can inquire about the weather in Cairo.

It's pointless in Australia.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042965)

What is the point of such fast speeds when Telstra only gives a few hundred MB and charges 2.2c per KB (yes KILOBYTE!) when you go over your cap.

Shit, 1.5mbps is fast enough at home. Having a low speed stops me using my measly 25GB cap in 2 days.....

ha ha (1)

smash (1351) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043015)

And let me guess, the bandwidth charges are still going to be 15c/megabyte, on top of your monthly subscription fee.

No, i'm not kidding - i haven't checked the rates for a few months, but mobile data rates here are in that sort of ballpark...

Re:ha ha (1)

Dwedit (232252) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044431)

15c per megabyte? More like 15 DOLLARS per megabyte at the rates AT&T charge (1 cent per KB)

It's like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043301)

Before 21mbps Connection...

Butthead: Hello Beavis, its Butthead calling how are you?

(15 minutes later)

Beavis: Hey Butthead whats up buddy? I'm doing great except, we have to wait for our messages to transfer for a while.

After 21mbps Connection...

Butthead: Hello Beavis, its Butthead calling How the hell are you doing?

(.01 seconds later)

Beavis: Hey Butthead whats up buddy? I'm doing wicked great man. This connection is freaking unbelievably lighting fast.

*insert random firewall joke here* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043955)

Now come on, don't be so smug you American folk. There would be at least a few people in the American government that are creaming their pants over the thought of implementing an American nationwide filtering system. I'm sure the same issues that Australia is facing at the moment will be faced by Americans in the near future too.

This is bullshit! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044045)

Yeah this 21Mbps is meaningless, you will never actually see that in real world usage.

I have an Optus mobile broadband thingie and I think its rated to 3.6Mbps which would be fine except the best I have seen it download at is maybe ~600Kbps, and that was an occasional spike. Average is closer to 40-50Kbps.

And thats in the middle of a capital city with reception of 99%. Who the fuck ever see's 3600Kbps, let alone 21000Kbps...its a joke!

Re:This is bullshit! (1)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044327)

HSPA bandwidth is shared with everyone else in your cell so of course you don't generally see top speed, especially not in a crowded city, but with this the total bandwidth shared is increased so you should see an increase in speed.

I can't even imagine what Sprint would charge (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 5 years ago | (#26045615)

$500/month? A thousand?

IMHO ironic (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 5 years ago | (#26048507)

New more speed just in time for the new more censored web.

what a shame... (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26053661)

...the only page that'd load for them was Google's cover.

Darn censors...

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