×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

21 Million German Bank Accounts For Sale

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the black-marks dept.

Security 302

anerva writes "Black market criminals are offering to sell details on 21 million German bank accounts for €12M ($15.3M), according to an investigative report (German; Google translation) published Saturday. In November reporters for WirtschaftsWoche (Economic Week) had a face-to-face meeting with criminals in a Hamburg hotel, according to the magazine. Posing as buyers working for a gambling business, the journalists were able to strike a price of €0.55 per record, or €12M for all the data. They were given a CD containing the 1.2 million accounts when they asked for assurances that the information they would be buying was legitimate." 21 million is three in four existing German bank accounts.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

302 comments

Maybe Israel should just take them (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042649)

Since they were probably stolen from Jews to begin with...

Re:Maybe Israel should just take them (0, Offtopic)

pin0chet (963774) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042671)

"In the Jews' defense, a fool and his money are soon parted." -Oscar Wilde

So what (0)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042655)

This sort of thing has been available for years, at the same sorts of prices. Who wants a mass list anyway, you can't target spam at people just because they're German and they have a bank account, and stealing that many identities begs the question, "why?". Maybe Poland is going to invade them back or something :D

Re:So what (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042761)

Yah, ho hum. I mean, I bought my first 21 million German bank accounts YEARS AGO. Nothing to see here folks.

Re:So what (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042991)

If you talk to the Russians, I reckon they would say they "eat 21 million German bank accounts for breakfast". I guess it's only news because it's a western European country.

It's not like getting valid numbers is hard these days though. I mean just google for tons of pages describing it [google.com.au] and you can effectively have all the valid numbers you want.

Re:So what (5, Funny)

henni16 (586412) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042815)

Who wants a mass list anyway, you can't target spam at people just because they're German and they have a bank account, and stealing that many identities begs the question, "why?"

Yeah, who could have use for the equivalent of 21 million valid direct debit cards.

Re:So what (1)

RedWizzard (192002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042933)

Who wants a mass list anyway, you can't target spam at people just because they're German and they have a bank account, and stealing that many identities begs the question, "why?"

Yeah, who could have use for the equivalent of 21 million valid direct debit cards.

How do you propose to obtain the 21 million valid direct debit cards? Ring up the banks and get them to change the address of every account to your address?

Re:So what (1)

RedWizzard (192002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042947)

Sorry, I missed the "equivalent of". But an account number is not the equivalent of a direct debit card. It's not that easy to withdraw money from an account when all you have is the account number.

Exactly (5, Insightful)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042985)

But an account number is not the equivalent of a direct debit card. It's not that easy to withdraw money from an account when all you have is the account number.

Every time you write a check, you're giving the recipient your bank address, bank account number ... AND a specimen of your signature. OMG! Quick - millions of people compromised their bank accounts today!

Re:Exactly (2, Insightful)

trjonescp (954259) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043741)

In 2008, checks are the sort of thing that would be used regularly only in an ass-backward country like the United States.

Re:Exactly (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043759)

Actually, this is a serious problem. You probably should avoid giving checks to entities you don't trust!

Re:Exactly (3, Insightful)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043935)

I know nobody who uses checks anymore. That's what wire transfers are for. In theory you can order checks from your bank but, well... I haven't seen a real checkbook in at least a decade.

Re:Exactly (4, Insightful)

enrevanche (953125) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044035)

A wire transfer typically costs $25 outgoing and $12 incoming and you need to know the receiver's bank account # & routing number. I seriously doubt that it is used that much by most people.

You probably mean direct deposit/automated withdrawal. Sometimes, these can be a real pain to cancel once authorized. For a "reputable" vendor, I suppose it is OK, but using a VISA/MC debit card is a lot easier to fix.

Re:So what (4, Informative)

henni16 (586412) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043115)

You have to keep in mind the differences between countries.
In Germany, the most popular way to order stuff online is to give your bank account number to the merchant who will then charge your account.
It works just like a credit card number and stores rarely check if the number (account) really belongs to the person that's making the order.

The only time I have encountered such a check was with Paypal:
they do two small test transactions (just Cents) and you have to ..I actually don't remember right now..either enter the correct amounts into a form on Paypal's site or to send the cents back to prove that you really have access to that account.

Re:So what (1)

RedWizzard (192002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043229)

You have to keep in mind the differences between countries. In Germany, the most popular way to order stuff online is to give your bank account number to the merchant who will then charge your account. It works just like a credit card number and stores rarely check if the number (account) really belongs to the person that's making the order.

So what protection do you have if a merchant charges incorrectly? If bank account numbers can be used like credit card numbers then bank accounts should have the same sort of fraud protection as credit cards.

Re:So what (2, Informative)

trampel (464001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043459)

You can reverse the charge within a 6-8 week timeframe with no questions asked, which then puts the burden on the merchant to prove that the charge was legit.

Re:So what (1)

spoco2 (322835) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043485)

Seriously? That's a bit backwards.

In Australia you give someone your BSB (bank identifier) and your account number, and all they can do with that is put money INTO your account.

Therefor the worst someone can do with a whole host of these is to go on a mass donation binge.

Re:So what (4, Informative)

EvilIdler (21087) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043717)

Wow, that's so behind. In Norway, there's no way to charge an account without full ID. This means either approving a direct debit by showing up at the bank with your picture ID, or logging on through the (relatively) secure website.

Just allowing anyone to put a charge on a bank account number like that opens up for all sorts of abuse. Tiny transactions can go unnoticed for a long time.

Of course, debit cards in stores aren't really any safer. Nobody has ever checked the signature on one while I've used them. A signature is required when the system for some reason can't contact the bank and verify the PIN. I've used other people's cards just fine (with permission, of course, but the banks might find me signing my name a bit funky ;).

Anything but cash is broken, obviously :(

Re:So what (4, Funny)

scubamage (727538) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043801)

Plus, in Norway there were Vikings. And Vikings rank only slightly behind Pirates and Ninjas on the Cool-O-Meter (tm, patent pending).

Re:So what (1)

TCM (130219) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043891)

In Germany, the most popular way to order stuff online is to give your bank account number to the merchant who will then charge your account.

You must be pulling that out of your ass.

The vast majority of online stores want to be paid in advance or with pay-on-delivery. Stores charging your bank account are really the minority.

Re:So what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043969)

You must be pulling that out of your ass.

He's not. See Wikipedia on direct debit in Germany [wikipedia.org].

Anyway, unless one of you two brings some statistics to the table, you should just settle for direct debit being one of the most popular methods.

Re:So what (1)

ModernGeek (601932) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043981)

PayPal normally makes two deposits into your account for a few cents, and you then report to paypal how many cents were deposited so that you can verify you are the account holder. I think slashdot found a solution to the age old four step profit formula:

Step 1: Open a PayPal Account
Step 2: Verify Account Information
Step 3: Repeat Step 2 Many Times
Step 4: Profit!

Re:So what (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043995)

Actually, not all merchants offer this and I'd only give an Einzugsermächtigung (direct debit authorization) to a company I trust to not abuse it, like one of the big tradidtional mail-order companies. I know I can issue chargebacks but still.

The default mode of operations for smaller mail-order/online-order companies is advance payment through wire transfer (or sometimes PayPal) or payment-on-delivery. Advance payment is what I usually use; it doesn't grant random companies access to my account and doesn't cost me any money, unlike payment-on-delivery.

I have a credit card but that is only for international orders where a CC works better than the alternatives.

Re:So what (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043195)

Nice combo-post there. You start with a subtle misunderstanding of the topic, move to a non-sequitur, then finish with a classic "begs the question" dismount.

Re:So what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043267)

Yes, I give it a 9.7

Re:So what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043493)

If I had the name and address of known chronic gamblers it would be sweet. So if those records include that I bath in champ du pain.

How to pay... (5, Funny)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042657)

Couldn't you just buy one to begin with and then use that German bank account to buy the rest?

Re:How to pay... (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042769)

Steal 10 euros from the 1.2million they showed.

Re:How to pay... (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042917)

I think it would be much more interesting to setup a program that generates a snowball effect that starts with a dollar in the first account and makes transfers slowly until it's spread through each account in the list, and seeing how far it would get before anyone noticed.

Re:How to pay... (5, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043339)

And then we can beat the crap out of the office printer and dance to rap music!

Re:How to pay... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043433)

Isn't it cool to be a gangster?

Hmmm... (4, Interesting)

RobertM1968 (951074) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042661)

You'd think they'd have gotten the police involved instead of trying to scoop a story...

Nah, guess not.

Re:Hmmm... (4, Funny)

LingNoi (1066278) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042687)

The police are too busy raiding game developer buildings with shotguns and listening in on Skype calls.

Re:Hmmm... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042729)

That's not their job or function in society.

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042793)

How very insighful, I didn't think of that :/

Re:Hmmm... (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042905)

That's funny, I always thought it was a citizen's (of the USA at least) duty to report crimes to the police if you witness them.

Re:Hmmm... (1)

thegnu (557446) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043235)

Yeah, journalists are sort of exempt, and it allows them to provide the free flow of information without getting a cap in their ass for trying to talk to gangsters.
yeah.

Re:Hmmm... (1)

afabbro (33948) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043239)

That's funny, I always thought it was a citizen's (of the USA at least) duty to report crimes to the police if you witness them.

That would be funny. Fortunately, it's not true, at least in a legal sense. You are under no obligation to report a crime you witness.

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043745)

Uhm... no? No such thing as Good Samaritan laws here.

On your marks (no pun intended) (5, Insightful)

pin0chet (963774) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042701)

In theory, if the banking system were known to be compromised in such a huge way, and there were no way of knowing if your own bank account was compromised or not, shouldn't there be a massive bank run? Because everyone wants to withdraw their money right away to minimize the chance that this ridiculous security leak negatively affects them, right? Such a massive erosion of confidence can completely destroy a banking system.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (4, Informative)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042783)

bank account and routing numbers never was considered secure. the only thing protecting your bank account (weakly) from fraud is a paper trail.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043377)

banks continuously audit all transactions. It is this that saves the bank, as the parent stated. The banks generally believes, lets write it down somewhere, we will take care of it when we have problems. Hopefully, the criminals didnt compromise enough to sabotage all the transaction trails left over. If that is done, then the banks would be as clueless as average joe.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (1)

henni16 (586412) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042921)

In practice, it will be the banks' problem.
Instead of running to your bank to get your money, you monitor your bank account and dispute/charge back possible fraudulent transactions.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042931)

Or you could move to another bank for a new account number.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042963)

Everyone doing that then makes the news. House robberies go up to a ridiculous degree and everyone loses their money.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (5, Funny)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043165)

> In theory, if the banking system were known to be compromised in such a huge way, and
> there were no way of knowing if your own bank account was compromised or not, shouldn't
> there be a massive bank run?

This is Germany. There will be no bank run until it is properly planned, organized, and regulated.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043379)

In theory, if the banking system were known to be compromised in such a huge way, and there were no way of knowing if your own bank account was compromised or not, shouldn't there be a massive bank run? Because everyone wants to withdraw their money right away to minimize the chance that this ridiculous security leak negatively affects them, right? Such a massive erosion of confidence can completely destroy a banking system.

Takes awhile to order 20 million pizzas.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043475)

The other variation of calling attention to a pun is the pun denial, or "no pun intended," which is a less formal way of saying:

Dear Reader,

        Please direct your attention towards my pun. Admittedly I do think it's clever, but I think that you think so highly of me, that I want you to know that I would never resort to using such a commonplace literary device in my prose. Therefore, I would like to formally renounce my attempt at humor and assure you that I am above making puns as a writer, as a pupil of language, and as citizen of Earth.

        Sincerest apologies,
        D. Baggerson

The phrase "no pun intended" makes me want to band saw my dick off just in case I'm the last man alive and I have to risk repopulating Earth with some moron's incapable vagina. There's no such thing as an unintentional pun; the act of typing the phrase "no pun intended" makes it intentional. If your pun truly wasn't intended, then why didn't you erase it and write something else, asshole?

Just wanted to troll for a moment and quote some Maddox. No harm, no foul.

Re:On your marks (no pun intended) (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044041)

None of that is truly secret information in the first place. Every business prints its address, bank account number and bank routing number on each of its invoices. When you buy something on eBay, the seller will usually give you his name, address and bank account number and bank routing number: It's the information you need to send him the money.

There is a way of transferring money which is called "Lastschrift" or "Bankeinzug". Basically the recipient tells his bank that the sender has agreed to let the recipient debit a due amount directly from the senders bank account. The bank makes the transaction solely based on that promise. The bank does not require any form of proof that the sender has actually agreed to that transaction. In practice the recipient doesn't even have to get the name right. The transaction will go through even if the named sender doesn't match the bank account number. This seems like a major security problem, doesn't it?

It isn't a big problem because the sender can always reverse the charge. If the charge is reversed in a reasonable time frame (1-2 months), no questions will be asked. Reversing the charge is always free for the "sender", the sender's bank is paid by the recipient's bank for the reversal, which in turn will charge the recipient of the Lastschrift a (hefty) fee. Because of that, the recipient's bank treats amounts gained by "Lastschrift" like credit. You can't just debit someone else's bank account and make off with the money. That's exactly like getting a credit line over the same amount and making off with that.

Let's assume that you count on the carelessness of the people who don't regularly check their bank account transactions. Because the bank will not give you the money right away, unless you have a history of using the Lastschrift-system without problem with them, all it takes to stop the money from reaching you is a few people who do check their account transactions and report the fraudulent transactions to the police, which will then put a hold on the money and investigate you.

This is scary. (0, Redundant)

ohxten (1248800) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042709)

No really. This is SCARY.

Yes Virginia, there are bad people in this world.

Re:This is scary. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043497)

Need an automatic screenshot taker? Try here. [16software.com]

Is your PrntScrn key broken?

Gotta love the germans (5, Funny)

sleeponthemic (1253494) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042721)

Even their criminality is impressively efficient :-)

May I introduce you to rule 36? (2, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042847)

Rule 36 [encycloped...matica.com] states:

There will always be even more fucked up shit than what you just saw

Now, I've been saying this all along, but nay sayers think the sky will never fall, and that the government is not out to get them. I've got bad news for you: It will, and they are, and if those two problems are not enough there will always be people willing to steal your stuff. period. no exceptions.

The fact that they have not stolen yours yet is merely an oversight on "their" part. It will happen at some point. Security is myth. Do not trust those that want to protect you. The government will never shield you, only pretend to do so. This is a harbinger of dangers to come, and reason to demand with some vigor that your financial institution be held accountable by law for the protection of your information. Yes, I mean that. If they want to do business with my money, I want guarantees. You should too.

Re:May I introduce you to rule 36? (4, Insightful)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043153)

OK, so you're saying that government isn't going to protect us, so the answer is to demand that financial institutions be held accountable to laws passed by a government that you said won't protect us?

Re:May I introduce you to rule 36? (4, Insightful)

Cl1mh4224rd (265427) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043161)

The government will never shield you, only pretend to do so. This is a harbinger of dangers to come, and reason to demand with some vigor that your financial institution be held accountable by law for the protection of your information.

Bolding mine, to highlight a serious disconnect in the parent's preaching.

You're suggesting that people demand that banks be held accountable to laws enforced by the very government you said won't protect them?

Re:May I introduce you to rule 36? (1)

The_Wilschon (782534) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043461)

Rule W15 states:

There will always be a number less than 1, but greater than the number less than 1 you just saw.

Rule 36 doesn't imply that fuckedupness is unbounded above. Go make another tinfoil suit; they're about to get through this one!

Tomorrow's News (5, Funny)

Bentov (993323) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042763)

This morning the entire banking system in Germany collapsed due to 3 in 4 Germans transferring money out of the country to banks in neighboring countries....

Re:Tomorrow's News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042859)

sell sell sell

1.2 million out of 21 million (2, Insightful)

txoof (553270) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042803)

It is possible that not all of the 21 million work, or are valid. If I were in the criminal's position, I would offer a CD where about 70% were valid. And then when the payment was made, provide a data set that had only a few working accounts and a bunch of garbage.

In any case, it's pretty scary to think that there might that much personal data out there.

Re:1.2 million out of 21 million (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043607)

Or, release "honey pot" numbers to the criminals. Mix them in with the real ones (they already know that info so you aren't comprimising anything). Anyone who accesses those dummy accounts must be a criminal and can be targeted for investigation.

Ach, oh kein erstes kamen sie fur meine Bankkonten (1)

Orion Blastar (457579) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042879)

dann kamen sie fur meine Kreditkartennummer- und Provider-Kennworter.

Ich zahlte 10 Euro und aller, den ich erhielt, war Orion Blastar' Konto-LOGON und -kennwort s-Slashdot.

Just kidding, Babelfish doesn't translate it quite right.

21 million accounts on the wall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26042935)

21 million accounts on the wall 21 million accounts you take one down you pass it around 21 million and nine hundred ninety nine thousand and ninety nine accounts on the wall

Re:21 million accounts on the wall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043113)

Holy crap, in the time it took me to take one down and pass it around, 999,100 more accounts were compromised!

Re:21 million accounts on the wall (2, Informative)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043143)

That's 20 (twenty) million and nine hundred ninety nine thousand and ninety nine accounts, douchebag.

Re:21 million accounts on the wall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043419)

you closed 901 accounts?

21 million is 3/4 of accounts? (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 5 years ago | (#26042961)

Ha Ha! You have a small country !!1!

Re:21 million is 3/4 of accounts? (5, Interesting)

quarrel (194077) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043491)

I had the same reaction re the number of accounts. It is small.

However, Germany isn't all that small.

So some back of the envelope calcs:

They claim 21/.75 = 28M bank accounts in Germany

It's got roughly 80M people. Assume something like 2.2 people per househould (dunno what it is in Germany), and you get 36M. You gotta figure each household has at least one. I don't know how things really work in Germany, but I assume they're like the rest of the developed world and you essentially can't function without a bank account.

Then there are businesses. Even very small businesses will run several accounts.

I think the 28M bank accounts is just bullshit. It's gotta be heaps higher.

Surely 100M wouldn't be that big a figure even?

--Q

Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043005)

Information wants to be free. Your information is just a series of bits - and once you allow others to feel your bits you allow them the right to do WHAT THEY WANT to your bits, whether it be burning them to a CD, or moving them to another computer, or sharing them with their friends.

Down with DRM!

How to use??? (4, Interesting)

It doesn't come easy (695416) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043059)

21 million is a lot of accounts. No one person or group has time to abuse all 21 million accounts in a timely fashion. More likely, one would need to rely on the lackadaisical attitude most people have when it comes to security coupled with a low volume approach to the number of transactions to an external account in order to profit from purchasing all 21 million accounts.

The purchaser would also have to consider just how many accounts would be accessible and for how long. It might not be practical to expect to make significantly more than 12 million euros even with 21 million accounts, since most accounts would probably have low balances or have their passwords, etc., changed rather quickly if the account had a high balance.

So to use this many accounts, one would need to set up a number of new accounts in other banks (a few at a time and more than one so that the number of transactions to a given account would not be too high), then siphon a little bit of money off a few stolen accounts to some of the new accounts, withdraw the money, then close the new accounts almost immediately. The amount withdrawn would need to be random and small enough to escape detection for at least a few days. Anything faster would surely raise suspicion and cause automatic transaction blocking (at least, if the banks have some kind of working fraud prevention), especially since the announcement of the stolen data up for sale. I can also imagine adding a fraud check for a slurry of never-seen-before transactions to new accounts. Wire transfers would be quickest, yet they would also stand out more (since a bunch of new wire transfers from accounts which had never made a wire transfer before would be unusual -- the likely case for most accounts).

The 12 million price tag seems like a number arrived at by the thieves after taking into account the difficulties to be faced in exploiting the 21 million accounts while they are still exploitable. It seems likely that any purchaser would in turn sell them again in smaller blocks (a lot safer that way, relatively speaking).

Wonder if we'll ever find out what eventually happens?

you know it was the muslims! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043063)

start up those ovens, krauts. we need your wisdom today to rid ourselves of the islamic question.

Seriously, but seriously (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043073)

This is the scariest headline I've read in a long, long time. If this information allows remote access to the accounts then a concerted group effort could _completely_ destroy most German depository institutions by conducting mass withdrawals.

If German banks have reserve requirements similar to American banks (10%) then they would only have enough capitol to cover 1/6th of the potential withdrawals. Not only would this lead the banks not to have any working capitol (the life-blood of every bank. See: 02008 financial crisis), but would leave nothing left over for uncompromised account holders. Deposit insurance notwithstanding, I'm sure you know what would happen if the general public found out about this.

Organized criminals smart enough to buy 24M bank accounts are probably also smart enough to know this and take advantage of the corresponding extortionary power. I seriously cannot believe we are reading about this. If I was in German law enforcement there's absolutely no way I'd let this story see press. The fact that it was undercover reporters and not cops in that meeting amazes me.

I really, really hope that the cops and banks react more swiftly to this story than the German public. I'm also praying that the mechanism by which this information was stolen is limited to Germany...

mmm... that means that ... (4, Funny)

Jerry (6400) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043079)

the Linux desktop market share in Germany is only 25%.

Re:mmm... that means that ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043129)

what do you mean only? that would mean that there is more linux users in germany than the rest of the planet combined.

but thankfully i doubt these numbers are true. i don't think there are that many faggot bitches in germany. i hear linux has a bigger following in france and california.

Re:mmm... that means that ... (1)

russlar (1122455) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043275)

the Linux desktop market share in Germany is only 25%.

What do you mean only? Where I come from, 25% is pretty damn good!

Re:mmm... that means that ... (1)

xous (1009057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043897)

It's a play on the three in four accounts compromised.
Accounts not compromised: 1 in 4
1/4 = 25%
He is implying that they were compromised because they were running something that was not Linux.

I did it last week (5, Interesting)

ZiggyM (238243) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043307)

I live in Lima Peru. Last week a teller at my bank made me wait 10 minutes while she waited for the safe to open to give me some cash. In the meantime I went to a computer terminal without a keyboard, and access to only a webpage with the bank rates (windows, no start menu, no access to desktop etc). The machine was supposedly locked so that you couldnt navigate away or do anything except scroll the page and click a few links. Well, they forgot do disable right-click. 7 steps later I was able to access their internal network, and had access to a lot of internal information on individual machines. I went to the branch manager and showed him. He was surprised and embarassed, and took note of the steps I took. It was amazing how easy was to do it. The 7 steps were clever, but not impossible.

Re:I did it last week (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043455)

Come on, man. People may want to steal euros in Germany, but I don't think they will want baddabings, or whatever you call your currency, in Peru.
So, your 7 steps can't bring a real criminal profit, so why should they worry about it?
Your country owes money to Brazil, for G-d's sake! Who else would owe money to Brazil???

Re:I did it last week (1)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043515)

It's probably a lot easier with Internet Explorer, because typing C:\ takes you... guess where?

And if they have some trivial block on using that path mapping, you can always just do \\127.0.0.1\C$

Security Flaws... (1)

Suisho (1423259) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043331)

I'm not sure which is more of a security breach:

That the criminals were able to get 3/4 of information for German bank accounts through a call center...
Or that they were were duped into exposing their identity to a bunch of journalists.

at work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043357)

21 million is 3 in every 4 bank accounts? What do the rest of the 80+ million population use?

Re:at work (1)

dakameleon (1126377) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043427)

Yep, AC hits the nail on the head here... if 21 million is allegedly 3 in 4 German bank accounts, then there's only 28 million accounts in Germany and the remaining 82,369,552 [cia.gov] Germans (minus the 14% under 15, say) obviously keep their cash in their mattresses.

R We "Waggin The Dog" Here?? (1)

realperseus (594176) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043381)

Seriously, is this story a plant to "shove" the German banking system into the same "tornado" that the English, Irish, Americans, etc.. have been experiencing lately? Seriously.. have not the Germans been hanging onto their economy (by a thread I may add) while other EU countries have spiraled? I smell a "fish".. . Get German citizens to withdraw their money from banks and cause yet another country to collapse.. .

Hmm... (5, Funny)

sootman (158191) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043463)

21 million is three in four existing German bank accounts.

I have for sale EVERY VISA NUMBER EVER ISSUED! From 4000 0000 0000 0000 to 4999 9999 9999 9999! (Note: some numbers may not be valid.)

I will sell them for US $1,000,000 MILLIONS US DOLLARS. Contact me via this website.

Act now and I'll throw in every Master Card ever issued. (5000 0000 0000 0000 to 5999 9999 9999 9999) (Same disclaimer as above.) And no identity thief would be complete without a REAL SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER to go with it, eh? Guess what? That's right--I'VE GOT THEM ALL TOO! (001-01-0001 to 999-99-9999)

Linux? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26043487)

Didn't the German's switch to Linux recently??? Coincidence? I think not

Re:Linux? (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26044013)

Yes, we switched to Linux. All of us. We can tell because all Germans share a hive mind. That's also why we all use the same bank account (plus 20,999,999 business accounts).

Reporters? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#26043609)

In November reporters ... had a face-to-face meeting with criminals

So, where were the cops? How do you say "Denny's" in German?

Seriously, most of our local police force is working undercover at the local titty club, buying lap dances.

Germany condones bank data theft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26044069)

As the German tax office paid someone to steal all the banking details of customers of a Lichtenstein bank, they surely have condoned this type of action.
Apparently it's OK if you think someone may owe you money - or owe anyone else money as the details were also sold to other countries.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...