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iPhone App Pricing Limits Developers

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the you-get-what-you-pay-for dept.

Cellphones 437

HardYakka writes "According to this post in the Fortune blog, the iTunes app store has been a boon for users but some developers are saying the number of free and 99 cent apps make it difficult for developers to create complex, higher priced apps. Craig Hockenberry of Iconfactory says the iPhone may never get its killer app like the spreadsheet was for the Mac. If Apple does not do something, the store will be left with only ring tones and simple games. Some are suggesting that overpaid developers are the problem and the recession will soon lower the wages and costs for complex apps."

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Spreadsheet (5, Informative)

penguinboy (35085) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069763)

Visicalc was an app for the Apple II, not the Mac.

Re:Spreadsheet (4, Insightful)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069969)

Yeah, I have no idea why people think the 'killer app' for the Mac was the spreadsheet. The Mac's killer app was desktop publishing and, later, graphic design. To this day, there is still no better platform for DTP and graphic design than the Mac.

Re:Spreadsheet (1, Flamebait)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070021)

Umm, Linux does quite a bit better for graphic design. Especially bigtime movie producers (pixar, etc) don't run Mac. They run linux.

Jeez, when will people accept that the only thing the mac is good for is paying for things that other people get free? It used to be premiere for DTP and graphics design. No longer.

Re:Spreadsheet (2, Funny)

Evanisincontrol (830057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070055)

(Score:0, Troll)

To be fair, you shouldn't have been modded troll -- you should have been modded flamebait.

Re:Spreadsheet (2, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070143)

Ah, it is a bit flamey but the intended statement remains, that Mac is not superior for design. People just like to use it. That's fine and all, but it doesn't mean it's the best or worst solution or something. Just a competitor just like every other brand.

Lots of people are hanging on the 10 years prior mentality of "mac is superior for design".

Re:Spreadsheet (3, Insightful)

Evanisincontrol (830057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070235)

Oh, don't get me wrong, I agree with you. I'm just pointing out that exclaiming the truth is often flamebait. For example, I can start up a discussion about Scientology, but we all know what a steep hill that would be...

Re:Spreadsheet (1, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070263)

I hear you :)

The thing is though, if nobody speaks up, no voice is heard. And people do hate truth and logic, but you have to just be willing to take the hits as you walk forward, so to speak. It does indeed suck at times, too though. People are impressively malicious overall.

Re:Spreadsheet (1, Insightful)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070059)

Jeez, when will people accept that the only thing the mac is good for is paying for things that other people get free?

Jeez, when will people accept that time is valuable and sometimes Mac's "just work" while other systems take more time to maintain.

Re:Spreadsheet (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070109)

Jeez, when will people accept that the only thing the mac is good for is paying for things that other people get free?

Jeez, when will people accept that time is valuable and sometimes Mac's "just work" while other systems take more time to maintain.

Isn't this advantage almost exclusively for those entirely new to each respective OS? When I can do everything you can do better and faster than you can do it, and your only response is, "But if neither of us had any experience I could do it faster with my system," I think you need a new system.

Re:Spreadsheet (5, Interesting)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070241)

Isn't this advantage almost exclusively for those entirely new to each respective OS?

No. My company switched from all linux desktops to all Mac desktops and laptops about 3 years ago. We're all software developers and very experienced on linux desktops. Our productivity is way up because we spend so little time fussing with the Macs compared to how much time we spent maintaining the linux desktops.

I'm not saying the case will be identical in every situation. But sometimes linux just takes more time to maintain.

Re:Spreadsheet (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070119)

all OS's tend to "just work". Linux not excluded, windows not excluded.

Re:Spreadsheet (1, Insightful)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070335)

Jeez, when will people accept that Macs are designed by people who themselves are designers and the OS is built around the typical workflow of designers and not that of code geeks and techies?

Re:Spreadsheet (2, Insightful)

ishobo (160209) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070133)

Umm, Linux does quite a bit better for graphic design. Especially bigtime movie producers (pixar, etc) don't run Mac. They run linux.

Graphic design is not computer animation.

Jeez, when will people (like you) get a clue before posting comments?

Re:Spreadsheet (2, Funny)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070171)

If you think all pixar does is animation, and that animation is not a category of graphic design, then maybe you need to break out a dictionary.

Re:Spreadsheet (4, Informative)

ishobo (160209) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070353)

How about I ask my wife? She works as an artist. Honey, is computer animation a form of graphic design. She says no. You would get no animation training in a BFA or MFA graphics design program. The field is about typography, print and editorial design, branding, information design, and packaging.

Re:Spreadsheet (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070289)

I would believe that he meant designing 2D things in various Adobe apps and such and not animate movies, which probably few of both the Linux and mac users do ..

Re:Spreadsheet (5, Informative)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070357)

As others pointed out to you, what Pixar and other movie studios do with Linux is CGI, not graphic design or DTP. Those are completely different and unrelated concepts.

Additionally, I'd like to point out that while you can certainly do professional graphic design on Linux these days (I do, personally. Surprise! I don't even own a Mac!), there isn't much depth in terms of software choice, and the software that does work is still immature.

You have two good illustration programs -- Inkscape and Xara. Inkscape isn't too bad and it's gotten lots better, but is still missing key features like automatic drop shadows. Xara is okayish, but uses a non-standard file format, is limited in some ways and is pretty unstable.

You have one good photo editing application -- the GIMP. And it lacks a lot of Photoshops really slick 3rd party plugins and the ability to modify photos in CMYK mode. -- But note that it does do CMYK seps, which is really all you need.

There's only one good DTP layout package, and that's Scribus. Scribus is still lacking in some areas compared to major closed-source apps like QuarkXPress and PageMaker -- mostly in the prepress area. It's also less stable than I would like. It does output to PDF, which is good enough for many service bureaus, however.

Now let's compare with the Mac: You have industry standards like Adobe Illustrator and Macromedia Freehand on the illustration front. Plus, you can run Inkscape on OS X. You have Photoshop, you have QuarkXpress, you have PageMaker. And you have Scribus and GIMP.

And that just touches the surface. There are so many more applications on the Mac. Plus, Macintosh fonts tend to be rather better than their Windows/Linux equivalents -- the font designers pay much more attention to kerning details and such on the Mac than they do on Windows for some reason.

After having said all that....I don't own a Mac, though I have used one in the course of my professional graphic design work. I use Linux because I prefer the concepts free and open source software over closed-source, proprietary stuff ripe with vendor lock-in, etc.

Re:Spreadsheet (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070461)

If I wanted to read thread after thread of flaming, I would go to some script kiddie website. Come on, I know this is slashdot, but stop acting like a bunch of twelve year olds with nothing better to do, preaching about your platform in this case.

Re:Spreadsheet (4, Interesting)

FishWithAHammer (957772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070501)

For crunching, yes, Linux tends to be used (in part because it makes the boxes doing the crunching cheaper). But the individual artists' workstations are extremely rarely Linux-based, sorry.

I mean--are you seriously going to try to say that Linux beats either platform capable of running Adobe's software when it comes to actually doing the graphics design part of the job? (And if you say GIMP, I'm just going to laugh at you. It's nice if you haven't got anything better, and that's about it. Cinelerra is okay for what it does, but unfortunately for your argument it runs on OS X, too. I'm not enough of a video editing guy to say whether I prefer it over Premiere/After Effects, though. And I will call the men in white coats to take you to be fitted for a very long-sleeved jacket if you try to compare Inkscape with Illustrator.)

Re:Spreadsheet (4, Informative)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070309)

Pagemaker (or Quark), Freehand (Aldus), Authorware/Director, and Photoshop v1.0 were the killer apps back in the late 80s and early 90s. Those programs are what made the Mac "insanely great" and the IBM compatibles go "beep" in all their mono-color glory.

Re:Spreadsheet (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070349)

I guess it's possible to do color management in Windows even if support for that isn't there in the OS from the beginning, or? Except from that shouldn't most apps be available for Windows to? And Wintel offer faster machines for a lower price?

Re:Spreadsheet (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070387)

Ha! Back in the day I had VisiCalc for the ZX81 with 1k RAM. Loaded by tape recorder...

Add Top Apps for more price ranges (5, Interesting)

justcauseisjustthat (1150803) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069769)

Simply add Top Apps categories for more price ranges...
$1-$5
$5-$10
$10-$50
$50- ??

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (5, Insightful)

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069921)

I'm more worried about the usage of the oxymoron "overpaid developer".

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (4, Insightful)

frosty_tsm (933163) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070033)

Agreed. Especially when you consider the low product quality that results and higher developer-count required to deliver with lower-cost developers.

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (5, Insightful)

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070131)

And if thats not bad enough, Apple may at any time remove an app designed by us "overpaid developers" just because it may conflict with an existing (or to be existing) Apple app, or if it just pisses Apple off (IAmRich).

I've joked ever since I found out about this that Opera, the Mozilla Foundation and Sun should release their software for the jailbroken iPhones only, in addition to an Android port.

Mobile platforms are the new platform wars: Android (representing Linux), iPhone (Mac), and Windows Mobile (Win). The next generation developers will have to port apps painfully across these platforms, or pick and choose at the cost of some customers. Not to mention other platforms like Blackberry and the like that don't fall into those categories, save Sun's JavaME portability.

If I were ever asked to write a mobile client for any application of mine by anybody, public or not, I would probably shoot myself at the first thought of "But I have this phone". You can have it, spare me until the dust settles.
</rant>

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (5, Insightful)

tapehands (943962) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070477)

oy. Seriously...if I were a developer that was considering writing an app that could be construed as "killer", the #1 turnoff would be Apple's ability to cannibalize my work.

What recourse, if any, would there be if Apple decided to yank my $XX app off the store, only to have the same functionality trumpeted in a new firmware release? (like they already have done) [engadget.com]

Futhermore, Apple chooses when and where to enforce their store rules. Google [cnet.com] is allowed to break rules. Would a small development firm be so lucky?

There just isn't enough incentive or security to develop something much more useful than a game, ringtone, or eggtimer.

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070045)

What makes it an oxymoron? There are plenty of developers who get paid way more than they are worth. Heck, some developers actually have negative value, because they can damage projects and cost money to clean up after.

Re:Add Top Apps for more price ranges (4, Insightful)

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070205)

No I wasn't talking about the same developers you are, e.g. coders that throw function pointers in directly with raw input and similar shit and wonder where the bugs/exploits come from (and get paid a wad to write those patches).

I'm talking about the high quality, underrepresented programmers that get stuck in a low-end job that not only underminds their ability, but pays much lower than the quality of code is that they write, which would be much more suitable for the big companies the shitty programmers get put in. When they would hear "overpaid developers", the first thing they would think of is "Yeah, all I need is less pay".

What a whiner. (5, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069775)

Iâ(TM)ve been thinking about whatâ(TM)s causing this rush to the 99Â price point. From what I can tell, itâ(TM)s because people are buying our products sight unseen. I see customers complaining about how âoeexpensiveâ a $4.99 app is and that it should cost less. (Do they do the same thing when they walk into Starbucks?) The only justification I can find for these attitudes is that you only have a screenshot to evaluate the quality of a product. A buck is easy to waste on an app that looks great in iTunes but works poorly once you install it.

Why not release a free, crippled version of your app that allows people to look at it, evaluate it & decide if it's worth $2.99? Now where have I heard of that business model [wikipedia.org] before?

Honestly, there's so many development restrictions on iPhone apps, why bother publicizing this non-story.

Re:What a whiner. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26069923)

Tag the article 'BAWWW'

Re:What a whiner. (1)

MrNonchalant (767683) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070043)

Iconfactory, the company this Craig Hockenberry guy is from, does that. They have Twitterific (free) and Twitterific Premium.

Re:What a whiner. (4, Insightful)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070065)

This is what most of the developers are doing. I have bought a ton of full priced games (that are $5-15) as well as a few apps after trying the free versions.

I think the article could be slightly amended to read: "Poor quality high priced apps won't sell for iPhone" or even "high priced apps without a demo version won't sell on the iPhone" and it would be much closer to the mark.

Re:What a whiner. (1)

Sparton (1358159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070525)

You call $15 high priced, compared to the $20-$60 of every other handheld or console game?

In addition, I don't think I've heard about any game on the App store that has sold decently and hasn't either launched at $10 or has had a price reduction to lower than $10.

Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (5, Informative)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069779)

What the Hell? spreedsheets were the killer app for PC's period.

it was not mac-specific-- it was a much earlier dawn of the PC age.

"VisiCalc was the first spreadsheet program available for personal computers. It may well be the application that turned the microcomputer from a hobby for computer enthusiasts into a serious business tool.[1] VisiCalc sold over 700,000 copies in six years.[2]"

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (3, Funny)

Anpheus (908711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069927)

If we're going by sales, StarCraft and Half-Life crush VisiCalc :)

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (4, Insightful)

jackbird (721605) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070209)

Not if you adjust for the number of PCs in the wild at the time.

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26069953)

VisiCalc was first released for the Apple (not Mac), and sales skyrocketed. Apple's were the original business desktop computer.

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (5, Insightful)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070157)

VisiCalc was first released for the Apple (not Mac), and sales skyrocketed. Apple's were the original business desktop computer.

And not only that, they were a key part of getting IBM to consider the microcomputer more than a toy. Enter the IBM PC.

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (1)

rampant mac (561036) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070531)

Indeed, someone mod this up.

Re:Like spreadsheets for the MAC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070135)

what exactly do you think MAC stands for? the name of the computer company is not an acronym, and should not be in all capitals like that

Right (5, Insightful)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069781)

Some are suggesting that overpaid developers are the problem and the recession will soon lower the wages and costs for complex apps."

Because in the Shitty New Economy, people will be blowing all kinds of money on applications for their overpriced smartphones.

Re:Right (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069891)

It is not so over priced. the iPhone is actually a very well designed phone, and it replaces well say an iPod Nano, a decent Cell Phone and a PDA. Plus you also have Wi-Fi and a bunch of apps and a usable interface. So say you pay $50 for a good phone on a contract, then $100 for an iPod Nano, and an other $100 for a PDA. and still not have all the features of the iPhone.

As for over priced developers, being that these people are developing apps from scratch from a new platform you have about 150% added to the cost of development as you need to add the R&D time learn best practices, and any glitches that iPhone development gives to you. I doubt it will the the poor economy but the fact that people will be getting better at making these apps which would make the next killer app more affordable.

Re:Right (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069917)

Because in the Shitty New Economy, people will be blowing all kinds of money on applications for their overpriced smartphones

as opposed to, "In Shitty Old Economy, smartphone blows you"?

Sorry. Couldn't resist. But that's an app I'd pay more than 0.99 for.

Re:Right (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070009)

But that's an app I'd pay more than 0.99 for.

They have that. But for some reason, you can only get it Nevada...

Re:Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070161)

I'm in Michigan, and you can get that here too. You just have to drive on the right streets of the right cities (cops may give you something extra, but you can still get what you were requesting).

Re:Right (1)

plover (150551) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070485)

Because in the Shitty New Economy, people will be blowing all kinds of money on applications for their overpriced smartphones

as opposed to, "In Shitty Old Economy, smartphone blows you"?

"In Shitty Old Motorola, smartphones blow."

Re:Right (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069929)

And they will be paying for these apps with their credit cards. Already tens of thousands of dollars in debt? Hell, what's another $1000 here or there, the media says we're fucked anyway ;)

Prices will go up (3, Interesting)

omeomi (675045) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069785)

I think a lot of these free and low-priced apps will eventually go up in price. With the exception of the ridiculously simple apps like all of the various flashlights, I have a feeling that companies are putting apps out for free to get a lot of great reviews, and then plan to eventually jack up the price. I have to admit, though, there are so many free apps out there, it's difficult to find a niche that is likely to have a reasonable pay-off. That's life, though, I guess.

BS (4, Interesting)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069787)

This is utter crap on behalf of any developer. If you make a decent software app and it sells to 100,000 people for $0.99 then how much have you actually made. Yes it is a competitive market, but you sell your app for 0.50c and let people go with it. 100,000 people buying an app for 50c each should more than pay for it. An idea could be as complex as you like and I still can't see spending more than $100 Grand on it for an iPhone app.

Unless you're a shitty developer or you're not writing a good app.

Re:BS (3, Insightful)

pseudonomous (1389971) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069943)

It might not be that you're writing a shitty app, you could be writing an app that appeals to a limited market segment. Suppose you wrote a great app for the iphone that transcribed single melody line audio input to classically notated sheat music. Your target market would then be people who can read sheet-music, have an interest in transcription, and own an Iphone. How many people fit that description? Suppose further, your software just outputs finale files, now you're market is the subset of music enthusiasts who own both Coda products and an Iphone. Suppose further that your software actually only transcribes bowed string instruments well, great now your market is for people interested in transcribing music played by strings who also own Coda software.

Re:BS (3, Insightful)

lucas teh geek (714343) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070201)

i think if your product is as niche as the examples you've laid out, you shouldnt have a problem with competitors undercutting you to the $.99 price point. in fact, if you're writing software that niche you can pretty well set the price to whatever you want since there's nobody else for people to buy such a product.

on the other hand, if you're writing throwaway software (eg. todo lists) expect a lot of competition and that you're not going to be able to change as much as you want

Re:BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070261)

here is your answer [wikipedia.org]

Bravely Stupid? (4, Insightful)

Gary W. Longsine (124661) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070425)

Your hired. You'll be paid $100k a year, and you'll write a new iPhone app for me every six weeks. An idea could be as complex as I like, and I still can't see it taking you more than six weeks to implement, unless you're a shitty developer or wasting time, in which case, you're fired.

Well, that is the problem right there (4, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069791)

One developer said:
"Both developers and designers cost somewhere between $150-200 per hour."

That's too much. I haven't used iTunes, but if it isn't based on simple popularity but has some kind of after-the-purchase rating system, there shouldn't be too many worries. If there isn't, they should implement one. With reviews and ratings like Amazon.

I also have a hard time believing that only the most simple apps will get made, there seems to be a "10 Most Useful" iPhone App list every other week popping up at some social sites like Digg.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (4, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069861)

Exactly. It's a bunch of really whiney people complaining they are not making Millions overnight on the iphone.

Guess what. Cellphones APPS DO NOT SELL IF THEY ARE EXPENSIVE.

This is a fact that has been around ever cince the cellphone could run apps. Now we have a bunch of whiney babies complaining about the prices they can sell their crap apps at.

What's next? They going to ask Washington for a bailout as well?

IF Haji can write a app and sell it for $1.99 that you want to write and sell for $29.99, Haji is going to kick your ass in sales. Whining like little crybabies will not change that fact.

not exactly (2, Insightful)

Gary W. Longsine (124661) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070521)

No, you have definitely got it wrong. Most of the iPhone developers I know are exactly the opposite of whiny. They are energetic, hard working, play by the Apple defined rules, and working really hard to justify their really expensive hobby of making cool software. They tend to do this because they have experience with lots of other technologies, and they like the Apple technologies better, they are more fun for developers, but they are, often, less profitable.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (1)

mathx314 (1365325) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069931)

I haven't used iTunes, but if it isn't based on simple popularity but has some kind of after-the-purchase rating system, there shouldn't be too many worries. If there isn't, they should implement one. With reviews and ratings like Amazon.

There is.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069945)

200 dollars an hour designing or developing Yet Another iPhone application in this economy? Lol, you are shitting me right? Whoever is smoking the weed and handing out the VC money needs to be fired and you need to move shop to a reasonable place where glorified programmers aren't considered kings. The problem is this bloated development model that puts these sort of idiots in charge in the first place will never produce anything remotely close to the crap Google gives away for free. The model is bad and it won't matter how much money you have to throw at it.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070037)

One developer said:
"Both developers and designers cost somewhere between $150-200 per hour."

$150 to 200 dollar an hour?

If someone wants to make that kind of money I've got just the job for them. It involves my penis and their mouth.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070257)

Wouldn't it get raw after a few hours?

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (1)

vena (318873) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070231)

of course the problem IS that the top apps are listed by purchases, not by ratings. there are several apps in the top apps list that have bad ratings, but finding their competitor product is often difficult. apps are categorised very simply and simply thrown into a bucket.

remember, there are no refunds on app store purchases. the cheapest of competing apps are invariably the most visible.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070483)

$150-200 per hour

That's $400k per year. Where can I get *that* job?

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (1)

merreborn (853723) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070489)

Both developers and designers cost somewhere between $150-200 per hour.

That's straight bullshit. The median wage for programmers is well under $50/hr [payscale.com] . Only expensive consultants bill anywhere near the rates quoted.

It's not hard to find developers here in the U.S. for half the rate quoted in TFA. And that's before you consider the fact that much of the shovelware in the iTunes store is outsourced.

nope, that's not it (3, Interesting)

Gary W. Longsine (124661) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070497)

There are lots of issues with making complex apps under this pricing universe, and it's definitely a deterrent to making more interesting complex apps. People seek technical support for complex apps. If the app costs $0.99, and they ask you a single question about a problem they caused themselves, they have burned enough time to tank a whole day's worth of sales.

Another issue is that Apple doesn't provide software vendors with contact information for our customers, but does allow (and with iPhone OS 2.2 actively encourages) them to complain in the app store, under essentially anonymous handles, about issues that they caused themselves. For example, an app we make is highly praised by most users, but a few complain vociferously that it's "unstable" or "crashes a lot". Yes, in fact our QA tells us this is definitely true -- but only if you run it on a Jail Broken iPhone. Doh! So sorry you didn't contact us for support. So sorry you don't understand you shot your foot off and we neither gave you the gun nor pulled the trigger.

iTunes App Store is basically an ongoing experiment. It's not clear that third party software developers can devise a business model on it which will make a profit.

Re:Well, that is the problem right there (4, Insightful)

p0tat03 (985078) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070507)

Well, contract developers *do* cost that much. I think the real headliner here is: "Useless People Who Must Contract Everything Out Find There's No Profit"... which is kind of a no-brainer. The people who can do their own design, code, and whatnot can operate in the iPhone space. If you're a PHB type who can't code, can't design, and just can't do anything except cook up wacky iPhone application ideas, then there's no room for you. Seems like there's nothing wrong here :)

Skin pliancy limits Ball-sac capacity (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26069831)

I buy my saline kits from Chase Union Ltd in Movi, Michigan. The cost of a 1000 cc bag of sterile saline, drip tubing, sterile wipes (to wipe down your sac and all around) and catheter needle is with shipping around $25.
You can call them at +01 (248) 348-8191 and ask for item "MF 100" a scrotal inflation kit.

To do the saline, take the bag of saline and put in a microwave for about 5.5 minutes at low heat to warm to a bit above body temperature;about 100 degrees or so. Unwrap the outer plastic packaging and put the saline bag aside. Unwrap the drip tubing which comes with the kit and move the clamping system down toward the end opposite the vial type thing and CLOSE IT SHUT. Take the larger end of the drip tubing and uncap the protective cap........open the warmed bag of saline and remove the clear cap. Insert the drip tubing nozzle into the saline bag opening. Find a curtain rod, pot rack (which i have and use in the kitchen) shower rod or something elevated above you. Hang the bag of saline with the tubing attached and shut off. THEN VERY IMPORTANT. SQUEEZE SOME OF THE SALINE INTO THE VIAL ABOUT HALF WAY -THEN OPEN THE CLAMPING DEVICE AND BLEED ALL AIR OUT OF THE TUBING. YEAH YOU LOOSE A LITTLE BIT OF SALINE BUT THIS IS A MUST. YOU DON'T WANT ANY AIR OR AIR BUBBLES IN THE DRIP TUBING! REPLACE THE CAP ON THE WORKING END OF THE TUBING.

Before hand, while the bag of saline is warming either take a hot shower, or fill a basin or kitchen sink with very warm water sit in it for 4-7 minutes. The idea is to warm your ballsac skin up and let it get loose and hang.

When you have finished warming your sac, and you have the bag of saline (BLED FROM AIR), you are ready to grow.

With your sac still very warm use the wipes provided with the kit to wipe down your cock and ballsac. By the way, you will want an adjustable leather cock ring , nylon rope, or other type of removable cock/ball ring to wrap around cock and ballsac after inserting the catheter needle.

With you sac still warm and wiped down with antiseptics, sit in a chair with a towel underneath. Open the catheter needle don't get pansy here but with one hand, take the catheter needle and the teflon sheath that covers it and WITH THE OTHER HAND TAKE YOUR BALLSAC MOVING YOUR COCK OUT OF THE WAY AND DECIDE ON THE LOCATION OF THE INTENDED CATHETER NEEDLE. YOU NEED TO FOCUS ON THE AREA EITHER TO THE LEFT OR RIGHT SIDE OF YOUR BALLSAC AND UP CLOSE TO WHERE THE COCK CONNECTS. YOU PLACE THE CATHETER NEEDLE RIGHT BELOW THE COCK OR A LITTLE LOWER BUT TO ONE SIDE OR THE OTHER OF THE DARKER SKIN DIVIDING SKIN WHICH IS IN THE MIDDLE OF YOUR SAC.

DON'T GET SQUEEMISH BECAUSE THIS DOES NOT HURT. BUT INSERT THE CATHETER STRAIGHT DOWN CAUTIOUSLY INTO YOUR SAC. MOVE YOUR TESTICLE ASIDE YOU ARE GOING TO GO INTO THE BALLSAC CAVITY NOT THE TESTICLE.

YOU WILL EXPERIENCE A PRICK SENSATION,THEN A POP SENSATION AS THE CATHETER NEEDLE PIERCES THE MUSCLE TISSUE OF THE SCROTUM.

KEEP PUSHING THE CATHETER NEEDLE IN. IF IT GOES IN AND YOU FEEL FROM THE OTHER/OPPOSITE SIDE OF YOUR BALLSAC THAT THE NEEDLE IS THERE, THEN STOP.

Pull out the needle itself leaving the teflon sheath inserted into you sac. Tie yourself (cock and balls) off with some sort of removable cock ring or rope or robe tie or whatever.

Sit down, don' t plan to move around too much for the next 30 minutes - hour. Have your beers/soft drinks or whatever already out of the fridge. You will want to stay idle and focused while you do this.

While sitting, and close to the hanging bag of saline and the drip tubing, remove the protective cover of the end of the drip tubing, connect the drip tubing to the catheter sheath in you sac. THEN START ADJUSTING THE CLAMPING DEVICE OPEN TO ALLOW SALINE DRIPPING TO APPEAR IN THE VIAL UP BY THE BAG OF SALINE. ADJUST FOR AN EVEN DRIP DRIP DRIP FLOW AND NOT A STEADY STREAM OF SALINE.

If the saline doesn't drip at first, try pulling the catheter sheath out a bit until you at first experience a small burning sensation;it goes away almost immediately.
Work on the sheath depth and the clamp until you get a good flow of saline going into your sac.

Don't move around too much......or be cognizant of how much you move around while the saline drips into and starts to bloat out your sac. You can always shut off the flow of saline with the clamp, disconnect and move around take a p, whatever......
If you disconnect, take the small stopper thing that is still attached to the needle and plug the teflon sheath to prevent leakage.

I like to use liquid vitamin E on my sac while it stretching and expanding;you should / can put oil or handcream on your sac while it is expanding. The sac is very stretchable but to expand up to 18-20 inches within an hour or so stresses the tissues,so things need to be lubricated somewhat..

GO SLOWLY.DON'T TRY TO REACH A MAX THE FIRST TIME. GO WITH WHAT YOUR BODY/SAC IS FEELING THEN STOP.

When you have finished doing the amount of saline you want to, feel comfortable with, can accept, close off the saline bag with the clamp, and disconnect.

Over filling/stress of the sac can cause osmosis leaking/sweating.. Do an amount of saline at first that is comfortable and not stressfull/hurting by all means. I have over done before and.you don't want to walk around with your sac dripping water out of it.and the after results cause chapping etc which takes a few days to peel and recover from.

Some of the saline is going to migrate into your cock. Your cock girth is going to become much larger than you have ever experienced.

AFTER YOU DISCONNECT FROM THE SALINE BAG, SIT AND WITH "SUPER GLUE", YES SUPER GLUE ON HAND, WITHDRAW THE CATHETER SHEATH.
AND WITH A TOWEL, PLACE SOME PRESSURE OVER THE HOLE THE NEEDLE CREATED......YOU MAY HAVE SOME BLOOD OR BLOOD MIXED WITH SALINE TRYING TO EXIT YOUR SAC! THEREFORE THE TOWELS

DON'T WORRY KEEP PRESSURE OVER AND DOWN ONTO THE HOLE FOR A COUPLE OF MINUTES TO LET THINGS REST AND ANY BLOOD COAGULATE.

REMOVE THE "PRESSURE" TOWEL AND WITH SUPER GLUE, PLACE A FEW DROPS ON THE HOLE TO HOPEFULLY SEAL IT UP QUICKLY. KEEP THE COCK RING OR EQUIVALENT ON DURING THIS AND CONTINE TO LUBE YOUR SAC.

IF ALL IS GOING VERY WELL, IN A COUPLE OF MINUTES, YOUR SAC AND THE HOLE IS SEALED AND YOU ARE DONE.

IF ALL THINGS ARE NOT GOING WELL, YOU MIGHT NOT GET A GOOD SEAL THE FIRST TIME JUST PEAL OFF THE SUPER GLUE RESIDUE AND START OVER.

At first your sac will be very tight,but over the next few hours or over night, keeping the cock ring on less tightly or without a cock ring your sac will relax and begin to stretch.

The saline will take a couple of days or more to absorb into you body. That is okay,Saline is sterile water adjusted to normal body PH.

Enjoy it, flaunt it if you are inclined, watch the perm stretch and sac tissue growth that happens over time.

You will need to p a little more often than regular as the saline absorbs into your body, but just enjoy the weight and feel of what is between your legs.

I hope this helps....If your nuts and sac are normally pretty big or even small and you want more, this will blow you away with the results.

Take care

Re:Skin pliancy limits Ball-sac capacity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070219)

I for one welcome our scrotal-inflating overlords.

competition? (5, Insightful)

arbiter1 (1204146) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069841)

Another limiting factor on iphone app's is fact apple will kill off any app that competes with their's or anything they are about to put out.

Re:competition? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070185)

That is exactly what has kept me away. I signed up as a developer and Apple hits me up every once in a while asking me to pay for their SDK. So far I have given them nothing but a big Fuck You because I can't develop anything I want (or I develop it and they steal it and release the official "Apple" version).

Fuck Apple, Fuck Jobs.

It needs open apps no store lock in like Symbian p (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069847)

It needs open apps no store lock in like Symbian phones.

Cry me a river... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26069855)

I think the article can be summed up by one phrase used often in MMOs:

QQ

Maybe if the devs could spend time writing apps people might want to buy as opposed to emo /wristing all over blogs and the rest of the Internet, maybe they would get somewhere. Should someone write something that people use, they can easily charge $15, $25, or more. However, if they write yet another Tetris clone, they shouldn't expect much.

The iPhone is the first and foremost platform for cellphones these days. Windows Mobile, Symbien, Android, and others have been relegated to niches or bit players. With this wide a market, even just a little bit of market penetration would gain an iPhone app developer a lot of marketshare. With all this laid out for iPhone devs on a silver platter by Jobs himself, they really can't complain.

Now where did I put that smallest violin...

Re:Cry me a river... (5, Informative)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069985)

The iPhone is the first and foremost platform for cellphones these days.

[citation needed]. Truth is, Symbian still dominates the mobile platform market, with RiM in second (though Apple is closing in on Rim).

Apple's market share is about 1/4 that of Symbian. [cnn.com]

Please, don't talk out your ass about market share without doing your homework.

Re:Cry me a river... (3, Interesting)

c_forq (924234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070249)

While the iPhone may have a fraction of the marketshare as symbian, I would have a hard time arguing against Apple's strategy to reach that marketshare. The App store is on every iPhone, meaning any app you get into the App store is easy to access on every iPhone. If I have a symbian handset how do I know about your app? How do I get your app? How do I pay for your app? How do I read reviews for your app? When it comes to marketability of an app, I think the iPhone wins over the phones with bigger market share.

Trism (2, Insightful)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069893)

Trism is a very simple example of an app that proves that developers can make money, and a lot of it. Last I hear, the guy that wrote the program has made over $250,000 on an app that he sells for $4.99. Why? It's really simple - it's a great game that's well worth the price. Free is fantastic and a majority of apps on my iPod Touch are free apps but, if the content is of quality and worth it, I'll pay for it. And so will thousands and thousands and thousands of other people. Complaining that some people are willing to do some coding for free isn't a way to make money. Make a quality product. If the people who complain about free apps making it hard for people to make money spent more time coding and making a quality app and less time complaining, they might make more money...

Re:Trism (3, Insightful)

BigZaphod (12942) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070207)

No, he made a bunch of money because he was there on day one with a ton of press lined up and ready to go and managed (against all odds, IMO) to actually be one of the more decent games at launch. (The prices were a lot higher back then, too, since no one knew how the market would evolve.) He either got lucky or was a marketing genius... The app doesn't sell for $4.99 anymore, either. I'm leaning towards luck.

iPhone Darwinism (3, Insightful)

actionbastard (1206160) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069941)

Code something that is 'insanely great' and you will survive to charge $4.99 for your app. Otherwise, perish in flame.

It's a stupid rant (5, Insightful)

tkrotchko (124118) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069955)

It's a stupid rant. Look at the market for PC software.

There are a lot of *free* applications. Lots. More than I can every use.

Then there are inexpensive shareware stuff. $5-15

Then there are the mainstream shareware apps. $40-60

From there, applications go as high as you want to pay.... $100-500 $1000, $5000

All are available on the internet. Do free applications limit the abilities of developers to churn out $50 software? Or $100 software? No. People will pay what the software is worth.

This guy seems to be making the argument that somehow a low price sets the expectation of low prices. It's a dumb argument. If developers come up with an application that's worth $500 guess what... they will pay $500.

What he's really saying that the $1 applications are so good that he can't compete. And that's probably true. What he needs to do is make his applications worth more than $1. It's not the platform that's holding him back. It's not the price of cheap software holding him back, it's his own inability to write valuable software that commands a premium price. Seriously. Does he even understand that you can't write a general purpose iPhone app and expect to get $50 for it? He's going to have to hit some vertical market software (highly specialized) to command premium dollars. How about a full-blown VST/Softsynth app that will accept plugins for the iPhone? I'd pay $200 for that. How about working with a high-end electronics company to write apps to control lighting/music for home-automation? He could probably get $300-500 for that.

Just being a good programmer isn't good enough. He should know better.

Seriously, he's all wet.

Re:It's a stupid rant (1)

shivamib (1034310) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070295)

It's a stupid rant. Look at the market for PC software.

There are a lot of *free* applications. Lots. More than I can every use.

Then there are inexpensive shareware stuff. $5-15

Then there are the mainstream shareware apps. $40-60

From there, applications go as high as you want to pay.... $100-500 $1000, $5000

All are available on the internet.

PC software in this case is a bad analogy. All are available for FREE on the Internet, legalities aside.

It doesn't scale to higher apps because the business model is closed-source retardedness.

Re:It's a stupid rant (1)

tkrotchko (124118) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070411)

I wasn't assuming copyright violations. What I was pointing out was that there are a wide variety of applications available for purchase on the Internet (much like the iTMS) and that the availability of legal, free software doesn't preclude a developer from making a $5,000 application and being successful with it.

Re:It's a stupid rant (4, Insightful)

c_forq (924234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070313)

To add to your point, I work at a company that uses a wide mix of programs (FOSS and closed source). Our company also staffs over 30 programmers (we are not a software or computer-related company, the programmers just do in-house stuff). There are still programs we pay for that are $3,000+ a seat [plus the worker that runs it, who gets $60,000/yr plus benefits, in the midwest (where the cost of living is WAY lower than the coasts or large cities)]. Something that gets the job done, and done well is worth that.

Non-sequitur? (1, Insightful)

micheas (231635) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069957)

This seems like a complete non-sequitur.

If an large expensive app will make me money what does the existence of 99cent ringtones have to do with my purchasing decision?

It sounds to me like developers of useless, unusable, and or badly marketed applications are not finding buyers and blaming free cheap apps for their failings.

Personally I have a hard time seeing many cases where it is worth signing the apple developers license (or whatever it is called, I cannot remember and cannot be bothered to download it again.)

As I recall the license that the developers agreed to basically said: All Your Base Belong to Apple, Suck it up.

OpenMoko, Symbian, and Android seem to have much better terms for developers. If you have a killer app and someone will buy the phone for your app, why put yourself at Apples mercy?

BSD Networking Release 1 was $1,000 per tape. and sold several hundred copies.

If you can sell BSD licensed software for $1,000 a pop, don't tell me you can't sell a high priced useful program on the iTune app store.

High priced crap on the other hand . . .

Half truth (5, Informative)

cpct0 (558171) | more than 5 years ago | (#26069981)

I'm an iPhone developer. My company have been in the top sellers in US and Canada. And I agree, with some reserve, to what is being written.

If you look at the games that are produced on the iPhone, they are very good, frankly, many of them have many hours of replay value, many of the apps are top notch, and compared to other phones, they are of insane quality. And for a game that we sell more than $20 on any PC, and even more on consoles, we can only barely nudge a $5 on the iPhone, for nearly the same production quality. That's thousands and thousands of man-hour of work, sold at $5. Think about that. Even then, we got average results: either the comments were raving on our game, either people were giving one star and saying it was way too expensive. That's total bull. And that's what's pissing off people creating solid applications.

When the iPhone started, some games (like Monkey Ball) were $10. Some productivity apps were $10 to $15. I paid for a few $10 software, and they were with ample merit. Omnifocus is such a tool, real great, well made, even the v1 was excellent. Then, the top sellers became $5 software. Now it's mostly $1 software.

And that's where I put my grumpy developer shell on the shelf. Frankly, I congratulate $1 games and free games and $1 leisure and productivity tools. They make sure we are not paying $5 like on other phones to get a total piece of crap snorted out by a subcontract firm in 2 weeks. They make sure if we want to pay $5, it's for a good reason. That a software becomes a meme and gets sold by the thousands for 2 weeks and then get replaced by the following meme, I congratulate them. The only reason we are noticing these is because the way the ITMS works "free" and "pay" tops, and nothing else.

Many good applications cost much more, and hopefully they are getting their own crowd and their own push, with their own publicity. Like on PC with freewares and sharewares and commercial software, you pay mostly by merit.

Re:Half truth (1)

Zarf (5735) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070211)

I am not an iPhone developer ...yet. I am a Linux developer but I have just picked up the iPhone SDK and I fully intend on writing a few free apps. I fully expect my apps to be total garbage next to yours. Honestly. I'll be spending a few nights and weekends on banging something out and you've spent full time on something. Naturally my work will pale.

But I would think that if you really can't expect to sell an iPhone app for more than $5 a pop you would try and find other ways to get people to spend money via the app and get some kind of kick back that way. I'm not sure what that would be... but I'm sure there's something that would be fair and simple that people would shell out an extra buck or two here and there for via your app. I guess it depends on what that something is...

Re:Half truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070479)

Thousands of man hours of work for $5? Then stop developing for the bloody platform and do something more productive with your time.

If no one shows up to the party, I'm sure apple will do something to encourage developers. Whining about it while you continue to develop and sell your products only encourages them.

Sweet Reptillian Christ, you idiots deserve to be exploited. Go work in a Nike factory or something.

Re:Half truth (3, Insightful)

Kent Recal (714863) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070533)

I don't get the whining. You can whine about apple banning apps that they don't like but whining about pricing? C'mon it's a free market (unless you step on apple's toes) and it works like every other market: People buy what gets the job done for as cheap as they can get.

If you build a top notch app that people want and that has no competition then it will most certainly sell for $5, maybe even for $10 or $50.

Spreadsheet? (1)

cowdung (702933) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070013)

Wasn't the spreadsheet the killer app for the Apple ][?

I thought the killer app for the Mac was desktop publishing.

iElephant in the Room? (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070027)

Sure, having to compete with el-cheapo apps isn't anybody's idea of fun; but I find it very odd that their presence would act against complex apps. If the simple stuff is a mass of cheap and/or free, then the profit motive will lead developers to try to build products that distinguish themselves from the mass and can command a higher price(or, y'know, lobby for new laws, RIAA style).

Rather than "OMG cheap competition!" I'd be inclined to suspect a couple of things: First and foremost: Uncertainty over App store approval rules. Apple can, and sometimes does, just yank the rug out from under an app during the approval process. The rules are underdetermined and don't seem to be followed terribly consistently, and there is no real appeal. This is Apple's right, legally speaking; but is it any huge surprise that people are not rushing to make large investments in highly complex products?
Secondly, cellphones, even nice ones, are mediocre platforms for big highly complex stuff. Apple has done a substantially better job than usual; but nothing(presently available) can really disguise the fact that you are working on a tiny screen, with very limited input options.

Somehow, those terrible, terrible, innovation killing people who give software away have failed to destroy large, complex applications on the PC, I strongly doubt that they are managing that here.

Re:iElephant in the Room? (1)

Zarf (5735) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070129)

Somehow, those terrible, terrible, innovation killing people who give software away have failed to destroy large, complex applications on the PC, I strongly doubt that they are managing that here.

Basically, this goes back to the old saw about how we get developers paid for their work. The answer might not be in charging for the end application if you can't jack the price up beyond a certain level. You may have to go for other funding sources like advertising, subscriptions, service tiers, and sale of enhancements and support. If you can't sell an iPhone app for $5k ... you'll just have to figure out how to get the other $4,999 from some place else.

Of course, I'll admit that's easier said than done.

How about an "Open market" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070035)

Hmmmm,

How about an open market? The "other" smartphones which were around much earlier than the iphone and are still more functional have open application markets. I have a Blackberry and have found that the free apps are the best anyway. Even the $50 apps don't even come close to the functionality and complexity of the free Google apps or even some of the open source ones. I would not mind paying you guys if you did not produce utter crap ware. I saw one application that was an icon that launched the weather in the blackberry web browser for the low price of $30. What a joke!

Produce real applications that do useful things and sell them at a reasonable price. Most of the apps out on the market are useless "gee whiz" apps that take a very short time to "hack" together and are useless.

This guy is bitching? He has the gravy train of vendor lock in and a single marketplace to peddle his wares. I wonder how he would react with a market full of free open source apps and overpriced crap ware aimed at dumb executives with too much time and money on their hands.

Right on my cornflakes... (1)

Zarf (5735) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070075)

overpaid developers are the problem and the recession will soon lower the wages and costs for complex apps.

wizzed right on my cornflakes! Come over here and say that real slow sonny. Mr. Knuckles doesn't hear so well.

What is this? (3, Funny)

AceofSpades19 (1107875) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070077)

Is this "Please give me a bail out because I can't figure out how to compete" week on slashdot?

Stop Crying... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070237)

...and vote with your wallet. You people buy iPhones like they're going out of style and then spend your days complaining. Buy a Blackberry, already.

Good software can demand higher prices (1)

redfood (471234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070297)

I spent $20 on omnifocus and couldn't be happier with the purchase. Good software can demand higher prices.

m&od down (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26070303)

disturbing. If you of aal legitimate This is consistent subscribers. Please series of debates opinion in other

Craplication...the new (1)

Organic Brain Damage (863655) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070351)

buzzword for the 2nd decade of the century. Usage: "I just downloaded another craplication for my smart phone."

How is this different? (2, Insightful)

olddotter (638430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070401)

How is this different from other for pay software? I walk into a store and buy shrink wrapped software and 99% of the time I can't return it if I've opened it, much less decided I don't like it. They need something called MARKETING. And all they want is free marketing on the itunes store, but word of mouth or actual ads might work as well or better.

Would a digg like site for the app store help?

Do people really only list apps by lowest price? (2, Interesting)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070427)

I think it would be far more interesting to list apps by highest price. If someone wants $1-$2 for a puzzle game, that's cheap. But not crazy, I suppose.

But if you were selling something more substantial, like many of the utility apps seen on Palm (databases, pdf viewers, word processors, spread sheets, electronic checkbooks, etc). I don't see why people wouldn't fork out $10 for it. Obviously in smaller numbers, because that $1 price barrier is soo easy.

Are people really buying 10 games/ringtones instead of 1 power app that offers something important? I find it hard to believe.

Apps that I would like to see, that could be worth something:
* Spending program, you can take a picture of your paper receipt and it logs the total(using simple OCR) and the time. And then lets you organize the data in powerful ways.
* Generic Inventory Database, store lists of any old thing. the obvious DVD library, CD library, etc has been done to death. Being able to track inventory of any widget with custom fields would be great. How many ming vases do I have with jade? I should be able to list them all immediately and include photos.
* Password keychain
* RSA SecurID softtoken - turn your iphone into a securid fob. get rid of that little keychain you need to log into your work's VPN. (this is indeed possible, I had them for other OSes)

(I'm tired of coming up with examples, but I think there are 20-30 solid utility apps that were done in one form or another for PalmOS that I haven't seen yet on iPhone)

free market (1)

shitzu (931108) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070487)

It all boils down to free market. This is like complaining that all those cheap apples ruin the market for selling an apple for 10$ - "We used to sell the apples for 10$ a piece. And we can still charge 10$ per apple in some markets, like Iceland where they do not grow. But somehow our 10$ apples dont sell very well here, i wonder what that is. It must be those hippies that give their friends an apple or those who sell it by the pound!"

Supply and demand (1)

GiMP (10923) | more than 5 years ago | (#26070509)

This is a matter of supply and demand, equilibrium prices, etc. The economic theory is that if vendors and customers will naturally settle upon a price that is both mutually agreeable and in a way that maximizes profits at a price agreeable to the consumer. Customers that feel the prices are too high, or vendors that feel the prices are too low will have to either wait until prices meet their expectations or will leave the market. A case in point, on the consumer side is waiting another year before buying a new television because your reasonable expectation, based on trends, is that the price will decrease.

If this application developer isn't willing to supply at the current equilibrium price level, then they can charge more but will likely see a decrease in overall profits versus selling it for the equilibrium price at which they can move more units.

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