Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Slackware 12.2 Released

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the hiya-patrick dept.

Linux 351

pilsner.urquell submitted a quote from the announcement saying "Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.2! Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.2 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.1) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user."

cancel ×

351 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Great work! (5, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073921)

I'm sure both of you still using Slackware will be very pleased! ;)

Re:Great work! (5, Funny)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073949)

I'm sure both of you still using Slackware will be very pleased! ;)

There's somebody else? ;)

Re:Great work! (5, Funny)

adamjaskie (310474) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074019)

We can make it if we try, building castles in the sky; just the two of us, you and I.

Don't forget me! (4, Funny)

Gazzonyx (982402) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074103)

You make me feel like a third wheel!

Re:Great work! (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074457)

Ha ha, yeah! Unh! Unh!

(with apologies to Will Smith and Lionel Ritchie.)

Re:Great work! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074427)

You might be surprised how many people use this easy to re-configure distribution.

I came to slackware seeking a clean and simple distro (10 yrs ago now)! I was in the middle of building a custom diskless cluster for CFD and grew tired of Redhat's complex init scripts made even more so by the need to Guify everything.

My only complaint is that there is no (official) slackware 64bit build. If this does not change soon, I will be forced to move on....sadly.

Re:Great work! (4, Informative)

cab15625 (710956) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074841)

I know it's not "official" (in that it is not overseen by Pat) but slamd64 runs quite nicely. I've been running it for almost a year now on a core2 system with almost the same ease as official slackware on older systems. Just in case anyone is looking for 64 bit slack.

Now if only I could get an install that works easily on my PS3.

Re:Great work! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26075257)

My only complaint is that there is no (official) slackware 64bit build. If this does not change soon, I will be forced to move on....sadly.

Meh.. I've been getting along so far with PAE on the desktop. Yeah, I know there's overhead, but with a modern multicore processor I don't care.

Re:Great work! (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074627)

Shhh! Dont tell anyone! I'll lose my street Cred if they find out I'm using slackware!

Re:Great work! (4, Funny)

cab15625 (710956) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074863)

Actually, you will strike fear and awe into the hearts of all those redhat (linux equiv of gingers in southpark?) and ubuntu users. Telling people you use Slackware even makes gentoo users gasp in amazement. By using Slack, everyone around you will know that your kung-fu is the best kung-fu.

Re:Great work! (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075167)

By using Slack, everyone around you will know that your kung-fu is the best kung-fu.

Actually, everyone around knows that your Slack kung-fu still can't beat my LFS [linuxfromscratch.org] karate, punk.

Re:Great work! (5, Funny)

TheSovereign (1317091) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074009)

i still use Slackware and i still find it superior to any Distro out their.

Re:Great work! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074591)

Which raises the question, out their what?

Now if you could just learn English. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074617)

Their = of or relating to them or themselves especially as possessors, agents, or objects of an action

There = in or at that place

Next time, please use the correct one.

Re:Great work! (0, Redundant)

hitest (713334) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074061)

"I'm sure both of you still using Slackware will be very pleased! ;)"
LMAO, funny stuff:-) Congratulations, Mr. V! I've been Slacking since 10.0:-)

Is Obama's buddy Blagojevich insane? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074159)

The short answer: yes. He suffers from an acute form of a widespread mental and ethical deficiency known as Liberalism:

http://cbs2chicago.com/governor/Blagojevich.mental.health.2.884667.html [cbs2chicago.com]

This is just the tip of the iceberg. The honeymoon is over, Barry Soetoro.

Re:Is Obama's buddy Blagojevich insane? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074195)

Go look at CNN, China just got attacked by nukes!

Re:Is Obama's buddy Blagojevich insane? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074919)

The thing is, Barry S. isn't particularly connected to blagojackoff. So why is he lying and rewriting history? His senior strategist, David Axelrod, claimed they had talked about the vacant senate seat. Oops, he misspoke. At the time, newspapers mentioned they were planning on discussing it. Oops, they must have been mistaken too. A couple weeks ago, they were photographed shaking hands at a governor's meeting. Shit, better pull out the racist card.

Why is he making these ridiculous denials when it doesn't matter? There's no "there" there. More importantly, what will he do when it does matter?

Re:Great work! (1)

stuntpope (19736) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074643)

I'm sure I will be.

Re:Great work! (1)

222 (551054) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074819)

Ha : P

I dual boot Ubuntu and Windows at home, but my firewall still runs Slackware. (It's an old 233 Mhz HP PC!) The choice of Slackware wasn't anything zealous, it was simply the distro with which I was most familiar at the time. I love Ubuntu, but Slackware has a certain elegance that's hard to find. Considering I built the box around 6-7 years ago and it's still chugging away just fine, I'd imagine they're doing something right.

On a side note, is it just me or is Slackware one of the most source friendly distros out there? I've been using Linux for a pretty good while now, and I've had the least trouble building stuff under Slackware.

Re:Great work! (1)

Zashi (992673) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075113)

It's because pat throws in everything 'cept gnome and the kitchen sink. Yeah, I too have found building under slackware a breeze compared to some distros. I used lunar linux for a while, but I got tired of the problems that arise when you're on the bleeding edge. So back to slack I went. For those of you who like slack, but want a little more eye-candy and dependency handling, I recommend kateOS. It's basically enhanced slackware.

Re:Great work! (1)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075185)

I use Slackware your insensitive cloud! :)

(At work and at home)

It's really too bad... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26075205)

It's really too bad they couldn't have sat down and taken the time to code it right in the first place. Then they wouldn't have to release a new version every few months.

Ha! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26073959)

They'll be more pleased than all the rugged individualists using Ubuntu.

The Only Reason This Distro Exists (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074045)

As far as I can tell the only reason this distro exists is to hinder Linux adoption by Windows users.

Windows User: I'm looking to try out Linux but I don't know which distro I should use
Ubuntu Fanboy #1: Ubuntu
Ubuntu Fanboy #2: Ubuntu
etc, etc, etc...
Ubbuntu Fanboy #1323423: Ubuntu

And then some idiot pipes in because he feels he needs to 'throw his props in for Slackware' and confuses the fuck out of the potential Linux convert.

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (2, Insightful)

TheSovereign (1317091) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074089)

wow. are you assuming that every person from a windows backround does not have the mental facilities to actually learn how to use linux as he goes? Slackware actually taught me to use linux instead of its interface. you may aswell be a Mac user.

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (2, Funny)

tsalmark (1265778) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074239)

Not that there is anything wrong with that. I find OSX makes a far better SSH client than Windows.

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (2, Informative)

multisync (218450) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074593)

I find OSX makes a far better SSH client than Windows.

PenguiNet FTW!

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (1)

tsalmark (1265778) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074729)

As much as I love Putty, both the client and the silly stuff, I think I'll give PenguiNet a try. Thanks

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (1)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074283)

Me too. Of course at the time, it was hard to learn since I've never been good at sanskrit...

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074387)

Kind of how you assume that every OS X user doesn't have the mental facilities to learn the UNIX core of OS X? You may as well be a Windows user.

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (4, Funny)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074437)

Not everyone from a windows background...just everyone left after all of us smart guys moved on.

pffft! (1)

cab15625 (710956) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075009)

If my Dad can use Slackware, anybody can. The real fun is when my step-mom can't get XP to recognize her camera so my dad had to DL the pictures and copy them to a USB stick.

Folks who haven't tried Slackware since the mid '90s really have no busness commenting about the distro. It's come just as far as all the rest, but somehow managed to stay true to the idea of being stable and reliable that has been there from day one.

If you want to be a point-and-click drone and only need to do email, then Slack will work just fine. On the other hand, I rarely have any problems compiling stuff either (haven't had to google for strange libs since I left redhat in the dust).

Total. Fucking. Loser. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26075181)

It is retards like you that make it clear that Linux will continue to be a complete joke on the desktop.

Go fuck yourself retard. The sooner the Linux/open source community tells idiots like you to fuck off the better.

Re:The Only Reason This Distro Exists (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075225)

If I could get even Ubuntu to work satisfactorily I'd make the switch today, but I can't. Linug geeks just don't grok how hard it is for somebody coming to it cold. (FWIW, Ubuntu 8.04 installs ok and works fine -- except for WiFi -- until I restart the system, at which point X insists there are no screens and drops me back to the command line).

Re:Ha! (5, Interesting)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074149)

The rugged individualists all left Slackware and went to Gentoo. After the fighting got out of hand, those that didn't move off to one of the Gentoo forks went to one of the BSDs.

The rest of us got sick of spending most of our waiting for our system software and applications to compile and moved Debian. Some of us got sick of Debian's lack of polish and went to Ubuntu. Probably a few went back to Slackware.

In the meantime, predictably so, a bunch of n00bs started using Ubuntu mostly because we told them it was a good idea. Now the Ubuntu forums are filled with n00b posts flaming the world because 'Ubuntu sucks' and 'it ate my computer', etc.

Personally, I'm getting sick of the whole mess. Slackware is looking cooler by the minute... ;)

Re:Ha! (1)

adamjaskie (310474) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074177)

I stuck with it. Mostly because it works for me and I haven't seen a need to change. Switched to Slackware because Mandrake 7.1 sucked.

Re:Ha! (4, Funny)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074289)

"Ubuntu ate my computer" is a great phrase. I've got to figure out how to work it into daily conversation ;-)

Re:Ha! (3, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074339)

In the meantime, predictably so, a bunch of n00bs started using Ubuntu mostly because we told them it was a good idea. Now the Ubuntu forums are filled with n00b posts flaming the world because 'Ubuntu sucks' and 'it ate my computer', etc.

Well yes, because the Linux zealots discredit or moderate down any part that states that Ubuntu isn't as user friendly as Mac OS X in any area. So when a person who wants to, or forced (via system crash and lost CD's or key) to get off Windows they read up and see oh Ubuntu is the second coming of Jesus. Install it and shortly after using the basic features (Grandma Level computing) they find they hit a wall where they need some more expert level to do things that in other OS's were either automatic or a right click away.

Re:Ha! (1)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074479)

Such as? Can you give me a few examples in ubuntu 8.10 that require expert level of skill that an average computer user would want to do and would be able to do on windows or mac?

Re:Ha! (5, Insightful)

deroby (568773) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074969)

One simple example would be : getting the hardware to work. Followed closely by getting the wifi to work.
Ubuntu is getting much more user-friendly with every incarnation, but it still has a rather long way to go before it will reach the ease-of-use of a recent Windows platform IMHO.

Seriously, I like Ubuntu and I have 2 portables running myself + have put it on my mom's computer since she wanted a localized OS. The personal ones are for me playing around with it a bit since I'm curious what's all the fuss about. The other one is in use by my toddler-girl who enjoys to play GCompris on it or watch some DVD-rips of Dora The explorer on it. My moms is being used solely for a bit of mailing (Thunderbird) and browsing (Firefox).

In the old days, those 3 computers (all dell portables btw) ran Windows2000 Professional. Setup was simple : put in Wind2k cd in the tray, startup, go through the setup, download the driver installations from Dell and run those too. At worst you had to fiddle around a bit with tcp settings. After that the system was up and running and I'd lost half a day at most per machine... (format + setup + setting up mail accounts etc takes a bit of time).

Getting Ubuntu running on them has been a hassle for all 3 of them.

* getting video running has been HELL : with only 1 out of 3 I managed to get the nvidia blob to run after reading days and days of forums, trying out every single trick they propose. The two others still run in 'software' mode, which is fine for firefox/thunderbird or GCompris (more or less), but has cost me several days trying anyway.
* wifi wasn't always (properlty) recognized : pcmcia went mostly fine, usb was hell. Finally got it working via ndiswrapper
* each time there is an upGRade something breaks and I'm back in the 'problem-chasing' game =(

As a side-note : people always complain about Windows Update pushing lots of bytes, but boy oh boy, same is true for ubuntu IMHO. Not that I find that a bad thing per-se, but then again, stop complaining about Windows.

Re:Ha! (0, Redundant)

digitig (1056110) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075333)

* getting video running has been HELL : with only 1 out of 3 I managed to get the nvidia blob to run after reading days and days of forums, trying out every single trick they propose. The two others still run in 'software' mode, which is fine for firefox/thunderbird or GCompris (more or less), but has cost me several days trying anyway.

Somebody mod that insightful or informative, please.

* wifi wasn't always (properlty) recognized : pcmcia went mostly fine, usb was hell. Finally got it working via ndiswrapper

Somebody else mod that insightful or informative, please.

* each time there is an upGRade something breaks and I'm back in the 'problem-chasing' game

And somebody else...

Re:Ha! (2, Interesting)

Nursie (632944) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075353)

I was considering flaming you, then I remembered that Ubuntu did the same to me. I'm a fairly hardcore linux user (Software Engineer, posix threads, C and crypto, amatteur and professional Linux sysadmin) and *I* got pissed off with it.

Could not get any of the nVidia blobs playing nicely with my laptop, alsa sound needed rebuilding to detect the headphone jack, a bunch of other stuff. And then on upgrade it would undo all the work I'd done to get it going and I'd have to solve the same problems again.

I solved it by switching to Debian, but then I'm not afraid of getting my hands dirty, just annoyed when I can't see how or why things are broken.

Re:Ha! (2, Insightful)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074465)

My solution. Use ubuntu, ignore the forums. File bug reports and use man pages. WHy bother even reading the noob posts.

Re:Ha! (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075109)

My solution. Use ubuntu, ignore the forums. File bug reports and use man pages.

Now if only Ubuntu would get a decent bug reporting system. They really should pick up Debian's.

Re:Ha! (1)

caution live frogs (1196367) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074573)

First Linux distro I tried for my own box was Slackware 9, and I did it on purpose after installing a RedHat build for a server I had been asked to maintain. I wanted to run Slack on my own box because I felt it would make me learn more about Linux than RedHat did.

I stuck with it through Slack 11, and it was a pain in the ass - my beat-up crusty Dell PowerEdge server gave me fits trying to install, because it would boot from the CD-ROM and start the installer, but the install program wouldn't mount the CD it was running from to finish installing after launch... talk about a WTF. It took me forever to figure out a workaround, and every upgrade I dealt with the same issues.

I finally said to hell with it, installed Ubuntu Server and haven't had an issue with the machine since. I admit it was painful to dump the work I'd put into making Slackware work on that computer, but not as painful as keeping it working.

Re:Ha! (2, Interesting)

jmyers (208878) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075037)

First Linux I tried was Slackware. I downloaded a slew of 1.44 diskette images, 14 or 15 I think over a 14.4 modem connection on a 386sx25 with 4 meg of ram running win 3.1. My ISP had a usage limit except from midnight to 8 am. It took we over a week to download because I would start a disk downloading at midnight and maybe stay up to start the second disk and go to bed. Once it was all downloaded I used rawwrite to write all the images to disk, put in an extra 20 meg hard drive to avoid trashing my system. I installed with no problem and was able to connect to the net and access email and Usenet, I was impressed.

That was the last time I installed Slackware.

Re:Ha! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074741)

Now the Ubuntu forums are filled with n00b posts flaming the world because 'Ubuntu sucks' and 'it ate my computer', etc.

Have you looked recently?
After running RH9, Fedora 2/4/6/8 and now Ubuntu (because it really does 'just work' on my hardware) over the years I decided a few weeks ago to try to 'give something back' by answering 'n00b' questions on the Ubuntu forums. They seemed remarkably free of the sort of thing you mention and generally quite intelligent.

Re:Ha! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074993)

In the meantime, predictably so, a bunch of n00bs started using Ubuntu mostly because we told them it was a good idea. Now the Ubuntu forums are filled with n00b posts flaming the world because 'Ubuntu sucks' and 'it ate my computer', etc.

This is why redhat said linux isn't ready for the desktop and everyone flamed them. They knew exactly what would happen and that would ruin their name. So they made fedora now "fedora ate my computer!" still leaves RedHat with a solid brand name. They were right.

Re:Ha! (2, Interesting)

nametaken (610866) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075031)

This is the lesson for all linux distros. When forums are full of "it ate my computer", figure out why. Don't be so quick to get pissy with the user.

I started with slackware in the late 90's and have been using various distros ever since. I use Ubuntu now. I still get pissed when I run updates in Ubuntu and have to spend another 30 mins fixing my vid driver.

All the silliness about binary drivers aside, we're talking about a VERY common video chipset here, and honestly, the vast majority of video cards in the world come from a very short list of manufacturers who only release closed binaries. It's time to start being a little more realistic about making sure the upgrade processes account for that.

Re:Ha! (1)

orasio (188021) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075095)

Same here. Only I never thought of Gentoo as such a good idea, only messed around with LFS.

Re:Ha! (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075097)

Now the Ubuntu forums are filled with n00b posts flaming the world because 'Ubuntu sucks' and 'it ate my computer

I can't understand you people. There are noobs everywhere, and I personally think it's a good thing that some of them start using Linux. And the idea of popularizing Linux to the average user is one of the main questions here in SlashDot.

What I think you really want is to feel smarter than the average user. "Bleh, you're using Ubuntu, it's too easy."

What's still missing (5, Insightful)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073963)

As a 10 year veteran of Slack, I really like that Patrick is still doing the work, but I don't even have to go to the page to know that PAM still isn't supported, and that there's not a package manager that can compete with yum/apt-get/ports.

Last year I switched to Ubuntu on the desktop and CentOS on the server. I look back at Slackware with a lot of fond memories, but managing even a medium sized installation of Slack machines was just too time consuming to continue.

Re:What's still missing (4, Interesting)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073979)

I'd also like to note that we continue our Slackware subscription because we appreciate what Patrick and Slack has done for us.

Re:What's still missing (4, Informative)

adamjaskie (310474) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073991)

Pat doesn't like PAM, which is why it isn't in Slackware.

Re:What's still missing (3, Funny)

schon (31600) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074119)

Pat doesn't like PAM, which is why it isn't in Slackware.

And it's also why I'm still using Slackware. :)

The power of the simpleton (1)

DiegoBravo (324012) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074827)

Right... despite PAM is a powerful system and concept for a lot of things, for people that 1) is just learning the OS and 2) really wants to have full control of a handy and simple OS, PAM is overkill, as a lot of other subsystems on most distros.

The last Slackware distro I used was 3.4 (in 1997/98) and the tgz packages, few boot scripts, etc. were a nice (and attainable) challenge for anybody interested in understanding the main user level OS components.

Now I use Ubuntu, and I will continue using it (specially since I no longer do sysadmin) but the last time I tried to change some static IP route, it was a real mess with all those DHCP daemons and network applets trying to be too wise and resetting my manual changes... I missed a "plain" Linux like Slackware.

Re:What's still missing (1)

Sfing_ter (99478) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074243)

But has he seen Polythene Pam?

Re:What's still missing (1)

j79zlr (930600) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074665)

She's so good looking she looked like a man?

Re:What's still missing (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074909)

Pat doesn't like PAM, which is why it isn't in Slackware.

What doesn't he like about it? I quite like it. It's especially great if you want to add different authentication mechanisms or use the normal ones in unusual ways. A couple of years ago I implemented smart card-based authentication for a handful of PAM-based distros, and I was really impressed with how flexible and powerful PAM was, and how consistently the right decisions had been made security-wise.

Re:What's still missing (2, Informative)

McDutchie (151611) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075081)

Pat doesn't like PAM, which is why it isn't in Slackware.

What doesn't he like about it?

From the Slackware 9.1 ChangeLog as quoted [l0k1.free.fr] in the alt.os.linux.slackware FAQ:

If you see a security problem reported which depends on PAM,
you can be glad you run Slackware. I think a better name for PAM
might be SCAM, for Swiss Cheese Authentication Modules, and have
never felt that the small amount of convenience it provides is
worth the great loss of system security. We miss out on half a
dozen security problems a year by not using PAM, but you can always
install it yourself if you feel that you're missing out on the fun.
(No, don't do that)

I don't know if this criticism is still valid or not, since this is old, but it's still true that nothing stops you from installing it yourself.

Re:What's still missing (1)

nightwaves (1421241) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074497)

Same with Gentoo. I'm a desktop Gentoo user but I will never use it on a production environment. Too time consuming and risk-taking. I populated two racks of servers with Gentoo and I moved to another linux after 2 weeks.

Re:What's still missing (4, Insightful)

evilviper (135110) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074931)

PAM still isn't supported,

Does what's "supported" or not really matter? It's a fairly standard Linux system, to which you can add-remove anything you like.

and that there's not a package manager that can compete with yum/apt-get/ports.

That all depends on what you're looking for in your package manager. I certainly like Slackware's package manager more than any other, because you can very, very easily install any mixture of binary packages and code compiled from source that you want. No other system includes the (tiny) -dev headers necessary for compilation in their binary packages, nor do they reasonably easily allow you to ignore listed dependencies and handle it yourself with eg. a source package.

I also appreciate Slackware's init scripts... Just about every other Linux distro has at least 3 levels of indirection to their scripts, just making for needless hassle. On a similar note, never have I seen a note in an important config file on Slackware suggesting: "Do not edit this file. It will be automatically overwritten." But that's sadly common practice everywhere else.

I'm glad Slackware has pushed against Linux stupidity, and stayed away from the PAM mess. I just wish Patrick had been able to hold back the switch from OSS to the clunky mess that is ALSA as well. Oh well... Linux looks a little more like Windows every day. Luckily Slackware resists. But then there's always the BSDs... they all do just fine without PAM, ALSA, sysV, apt-get/yum, etc.

Re:What's still missing (1)

McDutchie (151611) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075247)

As a 10 year veteran of Slack, I really like that Patrick is still doing the work, but I don't even have to go to the page to know that PAM still isn't supported, and that there's not a package manager that can compete with yum/apt-get/ports.

I am thankful I use Slackware every time I want to add something of my own to the system and I can do it without having to fight with dependencies and other stupid nonsense (like countless tiny -dev packages) to get it to compile and into the package system.

Windows and Mac OS X both do fine without that kind of ultra-fine-grained automatic dependency resolution. It's a bad idea and just makes life needlessly complicated.

Last year I switched to Ubuntu on the desktop and CentOS on the server. I look back at Slackware with a lot of fond memories, but managing even a medium sized installation of Slack machines was just too time consuming to continue.

Automated package downloading and upgrading does exist in Slackware, you know. Why would something like slackpkg (in /extra) not make this as easy as with any other distro?

Re:What's still missing (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26075383)

slackware missed 2 or 3 remote vulnerabilities just becouse it doesn't use pam(one was in sshd)

so, pat has an excuse this time :)

Wow. Still chugging... (3, Funny)

Slartibartfast (3395) | more than 5 years ago | (#26073985)

It's nice to know that some things just don't change. Niagara Falls keeps falling, the New England Atlantic is always just a bit too cold to really enjoy swimming in, and my first Linux distro keeps on going.

Kudos, Patrick! Long may you release! (And, since I just found out about 20 seconds ago that he's a month younger than me, I look forward to seeing Slack releases into my nursing home years. "Why, when I was your age, youngster, we used xf86cfg to set up X; none of this X.org junk! You kids have it so easy!")

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

adamjaskie (310474) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074099)

xf86cfg? LUXURY! I remember using xf86config. Make a typo entering your monitor's scan rate? Too bad. Try again from the beginning, or edit the file with vi.

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074261)

I remember the 30 floppy disk set - Just for the base installation. If you wanted to install the entire system, you needed about a hundred floppies.

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074355)

Ah yes, the horrible memories of downloading, copying to floppies and installing from said floppies because the machine in question didn't have a CD-ROM drive (and no spare drives around). And on dial-up....

/Mikael

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (2, Funny)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074685)

Thank god there was a floppy option. Can you imagine downloading a 640MB CD image at 14.4?

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

SaDan (81097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074957)

Oh, I don't have to imagine it... Thanks for bringing back the memories.

*shivers*

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (5, Funny)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074291)

Make a typo entering your monitor's scan rate? Too bad. Try again from the beginning, or edit the file with vi.

After procuring a new monitor, natch.

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074347)

+1 LOL

I remember those days, and the warnings involved

"You *can* physically break your monitor if you set the values wrong"

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

msuarezalvarez (667058) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075145)

Yeah. And figuring out the correct frequences by trying to minimize the noise made by the monitor! When kids these days talk about how hard installing Ubuntu or Fedora or whatever is, I want to hit them with a big bat...

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (3, Insightful)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074367)

xf86config is old-school now? I guess I'm getting old, when I started using *nix the standard practice was to run through xff86config as accurately as possible and then manually editing your config to make everything work properly (trying to run X immediately after running xf86config generally resulted in some pretty odd behaviour or if you weren't so lucky, broken hardware).

/Mikael

Truth in advertising: (1)

Slartibartfast (3395) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074385)

Okay, the truth of the matter is that I've forgotten some of the XFree86 nomenclature; I, too, hand-edited the /etc/X/XF86Config (?) file with emacs the first time I used it, to set it up to run on my 16 MHz 386SX, 8 MB of RAM (I fully populated that MO(B|F)O) with my Hercules mono card (I had an amber monitor: neener. No greenscreen here, baby.), and my two 20 MB drives -- 40 MB of storage!

Man, did that machine rock.

Re:Wow. Still chugging... (1)

Random Walk (252043) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074769)

Actually, on my first notebook I used brain and pocket calculator to set up X. There was just a tiny bit of memory lacking to run it at a better depth with the standard resolution - so I tweaked /etc/X11/XF86Config to get better depth with a rather odd resolution. Basically sacrificed a few lines at the bottom of the screen.

Excellent! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074113)

Hey slackware users, how's that russia economic crisis? Fixed that y2k bug yet?

Will it still run on '386 machines (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074121)

One of the plusses of this distro was that it was able to run on ANYTHING from the 80386 on up... with the move to the 2.6 kernel, is that still possible or do I need a Pentium as a minimum machine?
(yes, I have 25 80386 machines out in the wilderness (solar powered) of Canada doing remote sensing work all running Slackware)

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074281)

Out of curiousity, how do you protect those 25 PCs against bad weather/animals/people ?

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (5, Funny)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074669)

Use a strong root password, DUH.

The Bears and Elk up in canada cant hold down shift, so using any punctuation in the password will protect the computers from the majority of the animals.

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074975)

Quite sure the GP meant physical harm.

inb4 WOOOOSH

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (2, Insightful)

Bandman (86149) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074381)

Stuff like this is the textbook example of the ideal use of Slackware, imo.

Not in giant server farms, but in places where you need something solid that can run for 3 years and not hiccup.

Just remember to rotate your logs ;-)

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074513)

Slackware is compiled for the 486 architecture, so some of it may be compatible with the 386, but a 486 would be the minimum guaranteed system it would run on.

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074647)

I once booted Linux on a 33MHz 486 and that took a very long time. I never actually booted any 386 generation board with it. On the other hand, I still have some 200MHz Pentium Pro boards operating in some roles.

As far as your question, you'd probably have to compile your own kernel at the very least. I see that the default kernel uses a config for i686 (i.e. Pentium Pro, and later). So, Pentium itself may be outdated, too.

# CONFIG_M386 is not set
# CONFIG_M486 is not set
# CONFIG_M586 is not set
# CONFIG_M586TSC is not set
# CONFIG_M586MMX is not set
CONFIG_M686=y
# CONFIG_MPENTIUMII is not set
# CONFIG_MPENTIUMIII is not set
# CONFIG_MPENTIUMM is not set
# CONFIG_MPENTIUM4 is not set

One other thing you'd likely run into, is a memory limitation. Those old 386 motherboards often had a 16MB upper limit; some had a much lower capacity. Common memory in the 386 generation was very expensive and required 9 physical chips per meg. Comare that with 2G for $50 (DDR2) in the slightly out-of-date current generation.

I wouldn't fool around with Slackware with anything less than 128M RAM and a Pentium Pro 200MHz CPU (and dual CPUs are better). YMMV.

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (4, Informative)

xZgf6xHx2uhoAj9D (1160707) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074705)

Slackware 9.0 was the first Slackware to officially not support the 386, sorry. You need a 486 [slackware.com] now. (I know, technically all you need is a recompile to get it working for a 386, but that's a lot of recompiling. This isn't Gentoo here :P)

Re:Will it still run on '386 machines (2, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075093)

Why upgrade?
If they work and are on a private network why change the OS?

mod 3own (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074125)

about 700 Users [goat.cx]

This article should be tagged "nostalgia" (4, Informative)

Nicopa (87617) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074231)

I started with Slackware, from my memories, Slackware is from a time when "distribution" had another meaning. The idea was: "here, I compiled the main stuff for you", and from that point you were alone, compiling almos everything (gcc, libc, making the ELF transition by hand)...

Re:This article should be tagged "nostalgia" (2, Informative)

trashbird1240 (1149197) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074329)

Well, although I do use Slackware for what some could call nostalgia, I have to point out that you're wrong about all that: none of it is true anymore. By nostalgia I mean a system that is generic, doesn't get in my face, and is familiar to a user of older UNIX systems. That's the goal of Slackware, and Pat succeeds at providing that.

Furthermore, there are package sites like slacky.eu, Slackbuilds.org and others. Also there's slapt-get and swaret that deal with dependencies for packages downloaded from sites like slacky.eu. You can download a whole Gnome distribution using slapt-get, without compiling anything.

However, if you do want to compile something, Slackware won't get in your way.

Re:This article should be tagged "nostalgia" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074557)

Nonsense. Slackware still has great value to the linux newbie.

The fact that Slackware is maintained by a single person puts a reasonable upper bound on its complexity. This makes it more suitable for someone interested in learning about the 'guts' of the OS than the distributions with greater engineering effort behind them.

Re:This article should be tagged "nostalgia" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074945)

If you bothered to read the ChangeLogs and/or look through some of the source directory, you'd see that Slackware is not maintained by just one person. There are several people involved in its development, although "several" 15, so yeah, perhaps there is an upper limit on its complexity. Now your task is figuring out a way to explain how that's a *bad* thing.

Re:This article should be tagged "nostalgia" (2, Interesting)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074713)

You would be surprised how many large workstation, server installations use Slackware. A very big example could be weatherunderground.com

I am on OS X and I still use my knowledge from Slackware. If I had to use a x86/Linux, it would be either Slackware or Debian.

Some of us still want to use Linux in Linux way.

I'm a recent slack user (2, Insightful)

rsayers (987262) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074525)

Used it many years ago and recently installed 12.1 on my eeePc. Surprised to see nearly nothing had changed, but I think that's a good thing. I like the fact that I essentially get a base system that I can just take over and manage myself. It doesn't install a bunch of stuff I don't want, and installing new software from source is pretty simple. Maybe it's just me, but package managers always end up giving me issues with certain software (ruby comes to mind) and I end up having to build certain things from source anyhow.

Dictionary Check (-1, Flamebait)

kenp2002 (545495) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074555)

I looked up irrelevant in the dictionary:
-adjective:
1. not relevant; not applicable or pertinent: His lectures often stray to interesting but irrelevant subjects.
2. Law. (of evidence) having no probative value upon any issue in the case.
-Synonyms:
1. (Linux Distributions), Slackware: His new release has totally gone Slackware on us.

2fuckner (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26074571)

be 'very poorly Disc0ssion I'm and that the floor that comprise for *BSD because 'You see, even

It Is Still Relevant Today (5, Informative)

mrpacmanjel (38218) | more than 5 years ago | (#26074787)

Slackware was my first experience with Linux many years ago...(1997/98ish?). Especially installing from floppy disks.

However, I now use Ubuntu & Mint linux on my pcs at the moment.

The way to look at the Slackware "distribution" is to see it as a bare bones, vanilla-type system.

Not having a "package" system is a *feature* of Slackware and it still uses tarball-type packages to this day.
Slackware is based on a different philosophy from today's distributions and I think it's refreshing to see this.

As far as I know there are no "corporate sponsors" funding Slackware's development - Patrick does it in his spare time.

One thing that most people on Slashdot seem to miss is that this is the original spirit of Linux and any software associated with it.

In fact I may install it on an old 450mhz PIII laptop I've got kicking about.

Good Luck Patrick you have my utmost respect and I hope Slackware continues for a very long time.

Queue the n00bs (4, Insightful)

kwabbles (259554) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075261)

"Slackware sucks, it has no package manager."
"Slackware sucks, it takes so much time to get an uber elite desktop with avant and spinning cubes."
"Slackware sucks, it's so much harder to install than Ubuntu."
"Slackware sucks, you spend way more time on the CLI than other distros."

There are still some of us left that don't think the primary goal of every linux distro is to become a clone of the Windows desktop. There are less and less of us left that want to kick the hell out of anyone that thinks the command line should go away or be used as little as possible. Slackware is what it is - a robust linux system that tries to be as unix-like as possible.

If you want your hand held for you, and you don't understand what *nix truly is and can do and don't really care - if all you want is a simple drop-in replacement for Windows - go download Ubuntu. Each distribution achieves a different goal. THAT's the real beauty of linux, not its potential to become "grandma's operating system".

Re:Queue the n00bs (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 5 years ago | (#26075373)

I find most Slackware users to be the most knowledgeable Linux users I come across usually.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?