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Injectable Artificial Bone Developed

kdawson posted more than 5 years ago | from the no-op dept.

Medicine 105

An anonymous reader writes in with the news that British scientists have invented artificial "injectable bone" that flows like toothpaste and hardens in the body. This new regenerative medicine technology provides a scaffold for the formation of blood vessels and bone tissue, then biodegrades. The injectable bone can also deliver stem cells directly to the site of bone repair, the researchers say. "Not only does the technique reduce the need for dangerous surgery, it also avoids damaging neighboring areas, said [the inventor]. The technology's superiority over existing alternatives is the novel hardening process and strength of the bond... Older products heat up as they harden, killing surrounding cells, whereas 'injectable bone' hardens at body temperature — without generating heat — making a very porous, biodegradable structure."

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105 comments

Sounds like a grat murder weapon (5, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129121)

Inject someone, let it form a scaffold for tissue to clot and block vital organs, and then it degrades, leaving no trace. Sure beats those KGB umbrella poison injectors.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (4, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129131)

So I'm not the only one missing the "whatcouldpossiblygowrong" tag?

Bet the a-hole patents it, FUCK THAT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26130049)

Fuck that. Patent whores.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Funny)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131433)

You inject some experimental bone growth component in some random guy, next thing you know you have a rampaging monster with indestructible bone growths killing Superman and inflicting the cash-grabbing "Funeral for a Friend" crossover storyline...

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

Fumus (1258966) | more than 5 years ago | (#26136571)

Someone actually made a game [wikipedia.org] out of this idea already.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#26137315)

Been no word on a release for Prototype in ages... so it makes me wonder - is it stuck in development hell (like DNF) or in publisher limbo (like Ghostbusters until the recent pickup by Atari)?

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

Fumus (1258966) | more than 5 years ago | (#26137401)

Huh? [prototypegame.com]

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26134371)

Yes you are. The "whatcouldpossiblygowrong" tag is slapped onto EVERY SINGLE MOTHERFUCKING bioscience story. It got old even faster than all of the other moronic slashdot memes.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129169)

Just about everything from this to a piece of string could be used as a grisly murder weapon, although this seems a like a novel discovery thats a lot has interesting practical uses.

Re:Sounds like a great murder weapon (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131197)

Just about everything from this to a piece of string could be used as a grisly murder weapon, although this seems a like a novel discovery thats a lot has interesting practical uses.

Yes, but how many murder weapons then leave the crime scene picture-perfect - "They died of natural causes - a clot in a vital organ | artery | whatever"?

Re:Sounds like a great murder weapon (1)

hierophanta (1345511) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134515)

seriously? alot more than you can possibly imagine.
this line of thought is surprisingly deficient in logic

this guy has it right:

Just about everything from this to a piece of string could be used as a grisly murder weapon

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (4, Insightful)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129271)

Wouldn't killing the host cause the degradation to cease?

Plus, it wouldn't exactly "leave no trace". If it caused organs to fail, there would have to be enough to detect, and the dead person wouldn't excrete anything, so it would all be there.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (5, Funny)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130557)

Plus, it wouldn't exactly "leave no trace". If it caused organs to fail, there would have to be enough to detect, and the dead person wouldn't excrete anything, so it would all be there.

The prototype works on the honour system. When the person gets injected, they agree not to die straightaway, to give the poison time to leave the system. After a few days, when they get a certain phone call they're expected to drop dead.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Insightful)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131217)

If you manage to get tissue forming in, say, a vital artery, who's to say that they won't drop dead long after the tissue is formed? Take a look at today's obese 15-year-olds with the arteries of 45-year-olds. They'll die earlier, but it's not directly traceable to which of the 50 Big Macs a month they're eating today.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129309)

Sure beats those KGB umbrella poison injectors.

The KGB and The Umbrella Corporation are working together? That's not a good sign.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129693)

Even if transformed back to the non-hardened matter after the dead person's temperature went down, how would it get out of the person when metabolism is gone? Biodegradable materials don't just magically disappear.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131261)

It would have bio-degraded long before the person keels over from an apparent "clot" during heavy exertion. That extra order of fries isn't immediately fatal, you know ...

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

QMO (836285) | more than 5 years ago | (#26132817)

Then it's not much of a murder weapon. Might as well just buy them an extra beer after work for a couple of years and hope they die in a car accident.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

eebra82 (907996) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129823)

It also sounds like a great healing tool in battle. I'm sure many amputations can be avoided in the future if trained medics know where to apply it when it really matters.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Informative)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130573)

No, that's super glue (surgical cyanoacrolate).

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (2, Informative)

cnettel (836611) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131467)

Nah, damaged bone is rarely a reason for amputation in itself, although you can surely be incapacitated. If you manage to keep bloodflow and avoid infection, you can always try to patch it up somehow later on, with varying degrees of outside intervention to the natural healing process.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (1)

LS (57954) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130771)

Is it going to degrade after the person dies? I would assume it degrades because the LIVING person's body flushes it out of the system. If the person died while this was stuck in their artery, it probably wouldn't degrade.

Re:Sounds like a grat murder weapon (0, Redundant)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131333)

Is it going to degrade after the person dies? I would assume it degrades because the LIVING person's body flushes it out of the system. If the person died while this was stuck in their artery, it probably wouldn't degrade.

People die long after they dumped the burger that made that fatal fat deposit ... the beauty of this is that the scaffoldig breaks down, the tissue starts floating around, and who knows WHERE it ends up? If there's a brain clot, nobody's going to track its' former place of residence to a now-long-gone injection in the victims' rear end.

Hmm (4, Insightful)

fatboyslack (634391) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129155)

Apart from the typical 'viagra for your bones' innuendo gags this is actually a pretty amazing feat...

I just wonder what it 'biodegrades' into... and if you really want that in your bloodstream.

Re:Hmm (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129191)

I just wonder what it 'biodegrades' into... and if you really want that in your bloodstream.

It would be my guess that if it is considered to be "biodegradable" in the human body, they mean that it is fully and wholly metabolized by the human body without generating any inflammatory or toxic reaction. There are several polymers which fit this scenario, such as one based on glycolic acid and lactic acid. The cool thing about this stuff is its rigidity and lack of tissue damage. /me isn't close to a medical student, but google can make me sound like I am.

Re:Hmm (2, Informative)

AgentPaper (968688) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134699)

You're right - for a product to be considered "absorbable" or "degradable" in patient care, the product has to eventually break down to compounds that the body naturally metabolizes. Classic example: Vicryl (tm), polyglactin 910 (90% glycolide/10% lactide polymer) suture. Water causes it to break down into glycolic acid and lactic acid, usually over the course of 56 days in tissue (unless it's placed in a wet environment, in which case it breaks down faster.) Both compounds are things your body generates and metabolizes on a daily basis, and no trace of the suture remains in the body once it's been broken down, hence the suture is "absorbable." Absorbable products can be made of synthetic compounds (Vicryl and other synthetic absorbable sutures, hyaluronic acid preparations) or of naturally occurring substances (plain and chromic gut sutures, various preparations of collagen).

Back to TFA, this stuff doesn't look a whole lot different from demineralized bone matrix, which is already fairly common (although expensive as hell). DBX doesn't really provide any immediate structural strength to compromised bone, since it's only bone protein with no mineral structure. It just provides a scaffold for the body's own osteoblasts to build on - it allows them to skip a step in fracture repair, in other words. Calling it "injectable bone" might be a bit of a stretch.

(Full disclosure: The author is a former surgical rep turned nursing student.)

Bah - old story. (4, Funny)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129295)

This is extremely old news - The injectable bone story was covered by the Sun [thesun.co.uk] two years ago....

Re:Bah - old story. (2, Funny)

fatboyslack (634391) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129367)

Ha! funny... the sun should be the source of all my tech new from now on it seems

Re:Bah - old story. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129547)

Ha! funny... the sun should be the source of all my tech new from now on it seems

And The Jigaboo Times should be the source of all of your news on race relations.

Re:Bah - old story. (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130367)

I use the Daily Mail for all my Racial Opinions*. *May be lies

Re:Bah - old story. (1)

pallmall1 (882819) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130507)

The injectable bone story was covered by the Sun [thesun.co.uk] two years ago....

Yeah, it was covered on Page 3 [page3.com] .

Hey Beavis ... injectable bone... heh heh.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129405)

Apart from the typical 'viagra for your bones' innuendo gags this is actually a pretty amazing feat...

I just wonder what it 'biodegrades' into... and if you really want that in your bloodstream.

I do think the product name "Bonergrow" was an unfortunate choice though.

Dental Applications? (2, Interesting)

sanman2 (928866) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129775)

Okay, if they can do it for bones, can they do it for dental repair?

Re:Dental Applications? (2, Funny)

fatboyslack (634391) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129993)

I'm not sure if I would want my teeth to biodegrade just quietly.

Re:Dental Applications? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26130595)

I'm sure I don't want mine to degrade noisily, either.

Re:Dental Applications? (4, Informative)

cnettel (836611) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131483)

Bones are continuously maintained in a way quite different from most of a tooth. This is a trick to give the normal process to replenish bone and repair broken bones to a headstart and some basic structure to get the final layout right. Triggering the growth of a new tooth in situ is a quite different thing, especially to get the outer layers right, without which it would indeed be quite biodegradeable in any mouth.

Re:Dental Applications? (4, Interesting)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131533)

About 5 years ago, I had an apicoectomy to treat a chronically abscessed tooth. The abscess had been around long enough to eat away some of the bone surrounding the root. The oral surgeon replaced the missing bone with a special mixture of cadaver bone in a protein matrix. Since it was open surgery and the root end of the tooth was exposed, he just packed it in there the same way a bricklayer would pack mortar into a joint. It seems reasonable that it could also be injected if one had a wide enough needle so that the bone bits wouldn't get stuck.

Re:Dental Applications? (2, Funny)

QMO (836285) | more than 5 years ago | (#26132871)

So, when people at work call you Frankenstein, do you remind them that Frankenstein was the doctor, not the guy made out of dead bodies?

Re:Dental Applications? (2, Informative)

hierophanta (1345511) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134701)

i believe the difference is that your dentist used the cadaver bone and protein mix to create a mortar type substance (like you said) - that is just to fill the space up. but the bone is not live i.e. -- if it gets damaged it wont heal it self, there are no nerves in it, and your body wont naturally maintain it

Re:Dental Applications? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 5 years ago | (#26135737)

    I've had two teeth pulled. For the first, I went to the dentist I trust. For me, that's a hard one. I don't trust dentists, after the sadistic one I had as a kid (no anesthetic fillings, and he intentionally sliced open the inside of my cheek just to watch me scream). My regular dentist now (the one I trust) has his Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. His office is nice, clean, and professional. He'll discuss anything you'd like.

    When the first one was pulled, he popped it out, packed it in gauze, gave me cleaning instructions and a small painkiller prescription. No bone packing. I was told, I could have a porcelain implant put in in 3 months.

    The second time, I went to the dentist my insurance would pay for. Messy office. No certifications hung anywhere. Actually, no clue who the doctor was. She didn't speak english very well, and had a bad attitude. While I was sitting there in pain waiting for treatment, they gave me the used car salesman treatment. It was a long price list, including the synthetic bone packing which cost twice as much as the rest of the work. I told them I didn't want it. They insisted. I walked out before they could do the work.

    I drove straight back to the dentist that I trust instead. He saw me right away, and I told him what they told me. He confirmed the diagnosis (the tooth needs to go), but he said the synthetic bone is not necessary. It can add some strength to the jaw, but in his experience (like 20 years of it) it's not necessary. Avoid chewing hard foods for a week or two. I let him pull it on the spot. This one was worse. It took him about an hour, and a lot of hard pulling to get it out. I was groggy from the nitrous oxide, but when he finally got it out I saw how long the tooth was, so I asked to keep it. He joked "ya, that was a long one, it went all the way to the bottom of your jaw". After I recovered enough to be able to touch the side of my face, I held the tooth up beside my face, and aligned the top of the chewing surface with my other teeth. Sure enough, it went down to the bottom of my jaw. Best guess is less than 1/16" between the bottom of the root and the bottom of my jaw.

    He checked up on it a couple times, and in a pretty quick time the bone had grown back across the hole. If I push on the spot where it came out, it's hard now, not squishy like flesh grown across a hole like it did in the first weeks after it came out.

    So, in dental work, synthetic bone packing is really not necessary. Take that 2nd hand from an expert. :) I suspect there may be cases where it is necessary, probably in pulling multiple teeth that are immediately adjacent.

    Anyone in the Tampa, Florida area, I can recommend the good doctor to you.

Re:Dental Applications? (1)

stigmato (843667) | more than 5 years ago | (#26137597)

Perhaps this means Lisa won't need braces after all.

Been injecting my bone into chicks for years. (5, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129159)

Yeah yeah. It's /. Nobody believes me.

They just don't realize how ugly these chicks have been.

Re:Been injecting my bone into chicks for years. (0, Offtopic)

Kreigaffe (765218) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129239)

My mod points JUST disappeared.

You always find something worth modding once they're gone.

Re:Been injecting my bone into chicks for years. (-1, Troll)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129403)

Chicks with Dicks??

They aren't really a country and western band you know.

Re:Been injecting my bone into chicks for years. (1)

sootman (158191) | more than 5 years ago | (#26141951)

That was my first thought too. An "injectable bone" that "hardens at body temperature"? I think I've got prior art. :-)

I'm About to Inject a Bone of My Own (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129165)

u no u want it

Mr. Lubner (1)

mistercam (1345451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129199)

He'll be so excited

heh (4, Funny)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129209)

Anyone else imagine a caulking gun shoved into a guy?

Re:heh (1)

cizoozic (1196001) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129291)

It reminded me more of a certain scene from X-Men 2 involving liberal internal application of adamantium.

Re:heh (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 5 years ago | (#26135793)

    As soon as I read the story, I was curious to if they could inject titanium. :) More practically, it would seem they could inject something resembling carbon fiber. Ahh, light and very strong. How long would it be before they started doing it to the military to avoid bone breakage? It doesn't avoid the more fatal problem of bullet holes and IED's though.

Re:heh (2, Funny)

pyrrhonist (701154) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129307)

Anyone else imagine a caulking gun shoved into a guy?

Thanks to goatse, I don't have to.

-- Do you need the literal version? Here, let me draw a picture.

Your sig makes your post even more disturbing.

Re:heh (2, Funny)

Vegeta99 (219501) | more than 5 years ago | (#26133307)

--Show me on the doll where his noodly appendage touched you.

So does yours.

Re:heh (2)

nick_davison (217681) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129469)

"flows like toothpaste"

So, your wife's going to leave all your bone stuck in one end?

That suddenly seems much more pornographic than I intended it.

Re:heh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26132519)

I don't know what they're talking about anyway. I've had a natural injectable bone my whole life. Nothing new here.

Re:heh (4, Funny)

Zymergy (803632) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129725)

Actually I took "Injectable Artificial Bone Developed" a completely different direction...
Following the snicker to the Gods of obvious marketing difficulties, I imagined that a new model of the common female "Personal Massager" (AKA Dildo) was in development...

Re:heh (5, Informative)

Yewbert (708667) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131813)

You're probably not far off.

I studied this exact kind of stuff (well, very obsolete versions of it) in grad school, early 1990's. A class presentation that I gave once made the point that the three main surgical instruments used in joint-replacement surgeries were:

A saw.
A drill.
A hammer.

And these surgeries are violent.

This injectable bone idea, while not brand new, is very interesting, and I have to appreciate that a non-exothermic hardening process is a significant part of that. Some polymers used as fixatives in implants, like (very possibly obsolete) poly-methyl methacrylate, are *very* exothermic as they set, and extreme care has to be taken to use only the minimal required amount; picture a thicker-than-necessary glob of the stuff sitting in an unevenly-drilled femur as the shaft of a hip replacement is put into place, and that glob heating up as it sets, weakening or destroying the bone, and at least (I'd imagine) causing incomprehensible pain.

So, this non-exothermic stuff is way cool.

The biodegradable aspect (calling to mind poly-lactic acid artery/vein grafts, which degrade into plain ol' lactic acid, which the body knows how to deal with) is a serious bonus.

substitution (2, Funny)

bilbo909 (974603) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129253)

I wonder if they can make an adamantium version of this? X-Men Origins Trailer [myspace.com]

No surgery? (4, Insightful)

2Bits (167227) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129285)

TFA is light in details, but no surgery? How do you make the paste take the shape you want it to, then? You can't possibly let it flow just like that, can you? A little quirk (pun intended), and the patient ends up with a deformed body.

Re:No surgery? (4, Informative)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129335)

Not no surgery, less surgery.

Instead of opening someone up, pulling out the hammer and power tools and doing some serious repair work you just make a little hole or two, yank everything around to where you want it, squirt in some bone juice to bond everything, and you're done.

Innuendo ahoy (5, Funny)

copponex (13876) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129611)

...you just make a little hole or two, yank everything around to where you want it, squirt in some bone juice...

This product will need some careful marketing.

Re:No surgery? (2, Funny)

Better.Safe.Than.Sor (836676) | more than 5 years ago | (#26133145)

If I catch any surgeon squirting "bone juice" into me he better be prepared to buy me dinner and meet his new in-laws.

Re:No surgery? (4, Funny)

bytethese (1372715) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129415)

You're right, it is a little light in details. But after some searching, I found one of the key doctors who worked on this [wordpress.com] .

Re:No surgery? (1)

mrinvader (1408255) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129637)

You're right, it is a little light in details. But after some searching, I found one of the key doctors who worked on this [wordpress.com] .

that'll be the last boneheaded comment outta you, mister :) &==3 ^_~

Re:No surgery? (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130835)

I'm an evil lord of destruction, not a doctor!

Look out Pfizer (1, Funny)

bytethese (1372715) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129311)

I think your Viagra killer has just arrived.

Who needs this? (4, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129349)

We already have bone cement. Have a look: - http://www.totaljoints.info/CEM_FIX_CementStruct.jpg [totaljoints.info] , and http://www.totaljoints.info/BoneCement_microscopy.jpg [totaljoints.info]

Bone cement works poorly (5, Interesting)

spineboy (22918) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129737)

Bone cement (poly-methy-methacrylate (PMMA)) was originally invented to hold joint replacements in place. It is not a good long term solution, because it stress shields the bone, and then the bone basically dissolves away.

Bone cement can not "glue" two pieces of bone together, as it is only strong on compression, and will break in a few days if used for that.

The only long term solution for bones is a biological one, where new bone is grown. So far ALL of the attempts to "Grow" bone have failed. Yes there are many products out there that supposedly grow bone, but I've used most of them, and none work well at all - most just sit there like a lump of plaster.

Forming new bone is a "Holy Grail" of sorts in orthopaedic surgery, since many trauma patients, and "re-do" patients are missing bone, and we have no good way to reform the bone. This can lead to mega-prosthesis, or even amputations. There are a few ways to "stretch" out bone, but this often takes months with the patient walking around with circular metal pin frames protruding out thru their skin.

Re:Bone cement works poorly (1)

elthicko (1399175) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130115)

What about applying a current to induce bone growth? Osteocytes can be drawn to the place of injury and make new bone.

Electric/ultrasonic field stimulation (2, Interesting)

spineboy (22918) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134281)

only barely work, and are mostly used in desperation, and last resort.

Harry Potter reference (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129385)

Skele-gro from Harry Potter anyone?

Great, an alternative to tattoos! (5, Interesting)

pomegranatesix (809489) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129393)

It's gonna be a whopping 15 seconds before the body modification types get their hands on this, and start using it to implant horns, bumps, random appendages, what-have-you wherever they please :P

Anyone ever see the story about the guy who implanted horns on himself? http://www.ambient.ca/bodmod/implants.html [ambient.ca]

This seems like a much better alternative than silicone or teflon or whatever they're using these days. I could go for

Re:Great, an alternative to tattoos! (2, Funny)

sleeponthemic (1253494) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129407)

This seems like a much better alternative than silicone or teflon or whatever they're using these days. I could go for

Except that it isn't permanent and naturally degrades. Everybody knows it isn't a real bodymod unless you'll still be rockin' it in the nursery home.

Re:Great, an alternative to tattoos! (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130377)

Yeah, but it'd be a great prank for a Stag night.

Re:Great, an alternative to tattoos! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26130641)

Indeed. But it'll end up to be something like saline injections where the mod will go away after a bit.

http://wiki.bmezine.com/index.php/Jerome_Abramovitch

-AJK

Now if they could just... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129543)

Figure out a way to use it to make a person taller, I might have a reason to go find a plastic surgeon. Being 5'10 as a guy sucks.

Re:Now if they could just... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129601)

Maybe fat people could use it to become big boned, so they could use that as an excuse.

Re:Now if they could just... (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129827)

5'10 is a perfectly normal height for a guy. Most women are shorter, unless they're wearing heals. There's always going to be SOMEONE taller.

Re:Now if they could just... (3, Funny)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130457)

5'10 is a perfectly normal height for a guy. Most women are shorter, unless they're wearing heals.

And in case they sustain a terrible foot injury, they can use this injectable paste to heal their heals.

You mean 5.1? (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 5 years ago | (#26133011)

178 cm is average or above average in most of the world. [wikipedia.org]
Where do you live? Lost Kingdom of basketball players?

Re:You mean 5.1? (1)

LanMan04 (790429) | more than 5 years ago | (#26133223)

Yeah, I'm 5'7" and live in the US. I'm short, but not *that* short. 5'10" isn't bad at all, it's only 2 inches from being a full 6'.

I have an Indian friend (Dravidian/Tamil) who's 5'0". THAT's short. :)

This sounds gross. (1)

CarneAzada (1382153) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129585)

And what's the point if it's just going to degrade anyway?

Did anyone read the article? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26129651)

OMG, the guy that invented this stuff is named Quirk!

Well I'm (2, Funny)

nilbog (732352) | more than 5 years ago | (#26129849)

I'm developing an artificial bone right now that I'd sure like to inject into something...

Obligatory E.T. ..... (0, Offtopic)

drpimp (900837) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130241)

E.T. BONE Home !!!! the artificially intelligent bone!

Similar techniques for cartilage (5, Informative)

steveha (103154) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130317)

Similar techniques are being tried also to regrow damaged or missing cartilage.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070906104136.htm [sciencedaily.com]

It looks like the current trend is to use stem cells from within a patient's own body. That way there are no ethical issues and no worries about tissue rejection. Researchers are figuring out ways to extract stem cells from a patient's own blood.

http://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-news/Breakthrough-isolating-embryo-quality-stem-cells-from-blood-669-1/ [bio-medicine.org]

steveha

Dem bones.... (1)

SpurtyBurger (1400111) | more than 5 years ago | (#26130829)

Dem bones, dem bones, dem liquefied bones....

Human trials (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26131239)

A few months ago, after a car accident, I was asked to take part in human trials for this stuff. When I tried to decline, the doctor told me I had to grow some backbone.

Thank you. I'll be here all week. Don't forget to tip the waitress.

Sound good in theory (1)

Friendly Pyro (1360639) | more than 5 years ago | (#26131351)

This sounded great when I was reading it but it also got me to thinking, how does the stuff take shape? In short: I am missing the "whatcouldpossiblygowrong" tag

"injectable bone" == (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26132435)

world's worst pickup line EVAR

What i see this for... (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 5 years ago | (#26132629)

I see this more for in the future when they do reconstructive surgery for replacing someone's legs....
they need to add artificial nerves, as well as graft some skin and what not to make the artificial leg more believable....as when you look at real bone you see the nerves going through the bone in millions of little pin holes....so for us to make the same instead of worrying about making the holes...we would place the nerve optic fibers laying in place then fill the bone around it forming a reall leg so to speak.....this is way off though....looking at maybe another 20 years before seeing light.

Dental bone grafts (2, Informative)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 5 years ago | (#26133541)

A key piece of information left out in the article is the hardening time. If it hardened enough in a matter of minutes, so that is could be stitched over, if could be used instead of bone grafts in tooth extractions. Bone grafts used now are powdered bone tissue from cadavers, and as the extraction site heals, bits of it keep peeling off - somewhat icky and counterproductive.

Can you lengthen a leg? (1)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134051)

I know someone who was in a car accident at age ten. He damaged one of the growth plates in his left leg, as a result he now has one leg a couple of inches shorter than the other. To date, there's been no good way to lengthen the short leg to the full length of the uninjured leg, and he isn't fond of the idea of shortening the longer one. Will this be able to help him?

Yes you can lengthen a leg - Ilizarov method (2, Interesting)

spineboy (22918) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134485)

Invented by Ilizarov - a Siberian doctor who made the original circular wire frame from bicycle wheels. Nowadays they are much better. It involves cutting the bone and applying a multi-ring pin into bone stabilizer system, and then stretching the bone 1mm/day. Yes 1 millimeter per day! Takes usually a month to lengthen a leg one inch.

Injectable bone will not work, as the muscles, nerves, arteries and veins all need to be lengthened too.

This is a fairly common procedure in the USA, and is routinely done at any major medical center where there is an orthopaedics residency training program.

Re:Can you lengthen a leg? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134645)

I know someone who was in a car accident at age ten. He damaged one of the growth plates in his left leg, as a result he now has one leg a couple of inches shorter than the other.

We should be seeing him on the next season of Dancing with the Stars [go.com]

Real world experience (3, Informative)

MountainLogic (92466) | more than 5 years ago | (#26134959)

My wife had this "grout" injected on an experimental basis to fill in for a a couple crushed disks. She was in constant severe pain before, but after the surgery she has found her back get better and better. Her middle aged back will never be as strong or pain free as a 19 year old's, but at least she has a back that if she does not do any lifting over 25 pounds and is careful she is pain free. The surgery also used some tubular "spacer" to keep the joints apart until things fused. The x-rays showed her back joints fused just as planed in a matter of weeks. I don't if she had the same stuff or if we would have had the same outcome with the same good surgeon, but it has been a wonderful outcome that has vastly improved both our lives.

Old News (2, Informative)

BlueBoxSW.com (745855) | more than 5 years ago | (#26135371)

Really, there are already injectable bone fillers on the market. Many of them. Google Norian or bone fillers or Demineralized Bone.

This is so not news. It's not even Fark.

Re:Old News (1)

rothic (596907) | more than 5 years ago | (#26139675)

This new regenerative medicine technology provides a scaffold for the formation of blood vessels and bone tissue, then biodegrades. The injectable bone can also deliver stem cells directly to the site of bone repair, the researchers say.

Re:Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26140699)

Yep. It's an amazing process.

Available today right off the shelf from a variety of vendors.

This would have been news a decade ago, but today it's common.

in other news... (1)

revery (456516) | more than 5 years ago | (#26140035)

In other news, Count Aral and his Betan wife, Countess Cordelia Vorkosigan,
announced today that they are expecting their first child, a baby boy.
Rather than using a uterine replicator, the young heir, who will be third
in line to the Barrayan throne, is being gestated naturally, as is the
custom on his father's homeworld of Barrayar. Everyone here at WRMHL,
"the heart of Escobar" wishes them the best, and a safe and healthy pregnancy.
Now, onto sports, where the Komarran Raiders played the Jackson Whole
Splicers in a deadly game of...

For those who don't know: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Vorkosigan [wikipedia.org]

They should call it Skele-Grow (1)

Saberwind (50430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26142611)

But JK Rowling would probably sue them.

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