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Toshiba To Launch First 512GB Solid State Drive

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the bits-o'-plenty dept.

Data Storage 256

designperfection9 writes "Toshiba said Thursday that it will show off a new line up of NAND-flash-based solid state drives with the industry's first 2.5-inch 512GB SSD. The drive is based on a 43 nanometer Multi-Level Cell NAND and claims to offer a high level of performance and endurance for use in notebooks as well as gaming and home entertainment systems."

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frozty piss (-1, Offtopic)

Helen Keller (842669) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164419)

Gnmeh!

Newegg Special Price! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164437)

Just $2,001,099!

Re:Newegg Special Price! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164507)

That's not much, if you're jewish.

Re:Newegg Special Price! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164563)

Any self-respecting Jew wouldn't buy something at that price...but they sure as hell would sell it at that price!

Re:Newegg Special Price! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164593)

Any self-respecting Jew wouldn't buy something at that price...but they sure as hell would sell it at that price!

Like the way the Torah or whatever it's called forbids them from lending money at interest to other Jews, because that would be usury, but it's okay to lend money at interest to Gentiles. I always thought that was real convenient ...

Re:Newegg Special Price! (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165147)

Like the way the Torah or whatever it's called forbids them from lending money at interest to other Jews, because that would be usury, but it's okay to lend money at interest to Gentiles. I always thought that was real convenient ...

I'm Ferenghi. We don't loan money out to anyone unless it's at interest. It's all spelled out in the Rules of Acquisition.

Re:Newegg Special Price! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165203)

for the record - the torah is the same is the 'old testament' xtians called it the 'old' testament to put emphasis on the 'new' testament.

regardless, all three major religions believe that book to be the word of god - Islam, Christianity, Judaism. i would assume you do not fall into these categories but its probably safer to assume that you do but you're just ignorant.

Re:Newegg Special Price! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165255)

No, it was a Christian tradition not to loan out money at interest, which is why the Jews became moneylenders in the first place. In Islam, it's still forbidden to lend money at interest.

And the cost is what? (-1, Redundant)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164451)

$1200?

If so I'm not going to go run and buy one. I can buy a USB disk drive that has twice as much for 1/10th the price.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

xcyther (656630) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164753)

$1200?

I can buy a USB disk drive that has twice as much for 1/10th the price.

You can buy 1TB USB disk drives for $120?

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

Gat0r30y (957941) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164845)

Pretty close - newegg [newegg.com] has one for ~ 129.99

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165007)

Pretty close - newegg has one for ~ 129.99

And 1 in 4 reviewers rated it 2/5 or less. I tend to avoid products where that high a percentage thought the product sucked.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

Mistah Blue (519779) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165073)

Your link goes to a Seagate Free Agent.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

Gat0r30y (957941) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165139)

Yes, it does.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

Ythan (525808) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164867)

In fact, you can. [newegg.com]

Re:And the cost is what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164889)

Yes.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

knight24k (1115643) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164943)

You can buy 1TB USB disk drives for $120?

You betcha! [pricewatch.com]

Even cheaper if you get them sans enclosure.

Re:And the cost is what? (2, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164797)

$1200?

If so I'm not going to go run and buy one. I can buy a USB disk drive that has twice as much for 1/10th the price.

I think this is like many other computing/electronics items in that the early adopters pay a lot more than the rest of us are willing to pay until the prices come down. Remember how expensive the earliest CD burners were? Really I'm glad that there is more interest in non-volatile solid-state storage. Over the years I've seen so much vaporware (like the 3D gelatin cubes that are written to and read from with lasers, like a hologram) in this area that it's good to see something that is actually going to be available. Even if solid-state drives are expensive as hell and not much better than current mechanical/magnetic hard drives right now, I don't expect them to stay that way so this is a step in the right direction.

Re:And the cost is what? (3, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164987)

Early adopters are just paying more early(unless its someone/thing that needs cutting edge technology). They aren't paying the way to make it cheaper for us. It's just an early indicator of interest and a short-term way to start recouping costs. When people make more than the cost it is profit, not discounts that we see. This would be because the MFR makes the same profit either way.

In reality the cost of something is generally (not completely, but generally) far lower than the original price...this is because they know that most things start expensive and get cheaper. Competition brings it down.

When manufacturing costs find a way to make the same item cheaper, do you really think that cost savings is passed on to retail or the consumer? Absolutely not. Consumer's don't even know, for the most part.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165195)

When manufacturing costs find a way to make the same item cheaper, do you really think that cost savings is passed on to retail or the consumer? Absolutely not. Consumer's don't even know, for the most part.

Yes I do think that cheaper manufacturing brings lower prices. When one company figures out a cheaper way to manufacture something, they can sell it for less but keep the same profit margin. Since it costs less, they'll sell more, and thus, get more profit. That's ONE way to do business. Of course another way is to keep the price fixed as production costs go down and make a greater profit on each item sold, but sell less items. I think more companies lower their prices in order to sell more units though. Luxury brands don't, but most others do.

Re:And the cost is what? (2, Informative)

adamjgp (1229860) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165477)

That is correct, but don't forget to include economies of scale. Companies will want to lower the price on their product in order to sell more. Once they start selling more, they are able to purchase/manufacture the parts in bulk and at a cheaper price therefore lowering the price of their product even more. This increases demand, allowing the company to sell more and purchase/manufacture the parts at a cheaper price, and lower the cost of their product which increases demand...

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

causality (777677) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165381)

Early adopters are just paying more early(unless its someone/thing that needs cutting edge technology). They aren't paying the way to make it cheaper for us. It's just an early indicator of interest and a short-term way to start recouping costs. When people make more than the cost it is profit, not discounts that we see. This would be because the MFR makes the same profit either way.

In reality the cost of something is generally (not completely, but generally) far lower than the original price...this is because they know that most things start expensive and get cheaper. Competition brings it down.

When manufacturing costs find a way to make the same item cheaper, do you really think that cost savings is passed on to retail or the consumer? Absolutely not. Consumer's don't even know, for the most part.

Sorry but I think you're reading things into my previous post that I never actually said.

Regardless of how it happens, why it happens, or for whom it is profitable, computer storage generally becomes faster, cheaper, and more capacious over time. So, I see that solid-state drives are very expensive and not much better than magnetic hard drives right now and I don't doubt that this will change over time. I'm glad for this. That's all I was saying, full-stop.

I wasn't making a claim about the economics of early adopters and how they affect the market, I was merely observing that if you want one of these right now you're going to pay a lot of money for it (at least, compared to other forms of storage). When I say that early adopters pay more "until the price comes down" I was not claiming that they are doing the rest of us any favors, I was accounting for the simple fact that when the price of a formerly cutting-edge item comes down, it comes down for everyone, previous early adopters included. I appreciate your elaboration of this process but I think it was a bit misguided.

Re:And the cost is what? (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165441)

When manufacturing costs find a way to make the same item cheaper, do you really think that cost savings is passed on to retail or the consumer? Absolutely not. Consumer's don't even know, for the most part.

Unless there's, you know, competition in the market. If Company A and Company B are both selling a widget that does job X (they can replace each other), for $Y, if Company A figures out how to make their widget cheaper you can be damn sure the consumer will get a lower price, because Company A wants more of the market, and thus, more money.

The problem is when you run into monopolies and oligopolies, which is a different discussion.

Re:And the cost is what? (0, Offtopic)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165791)

Why was my post labeled "redundant"? Redundant of what? As far as I know I did not repeat anything; I posted an original message.

Price (1)

JamJam (785046) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164471)

I guess if you have to ask that usually means you can't afford it, but how much would something like this cost??

Re:Price (4, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164627)

You can't afford it.

Re:Price (4, Informative)

d3ac0n (715594) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164965)

All jokes aside, I'd imagine quite a bit.

As an example, 150GB solid state hard drives are selling around the $7-800.00 US range on Newegg.com I have no idea if those are NAND drives or the older flash drives.

A new NAND tech drive with around 5 times the capacity? Oh geez that's gonna be expensive! Methinks you'd be better off spending the money on a 3Ware RAID card and some really good standard drives.

Re:Price (-1, Offtopic)

martin_henry (1032656) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165089)

more than a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks? I would imagine so....

Re:Price (5, Informative)

nabsltd (1313397) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165347)

As an example, 150GB solid state hard drives are selling around the $7-800.00 US range on Newegg.com

I think you mean that 250GB SSDs are in the $700-800 range.

128GB (the closest I can find to 150GB) are around $250-350.

Re:Price (1)

d3ac0n (715594) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165411)

Oops, my bad. I was remembering the GB amount incorrectly.

Still, my point about the likely extreme cost of the new drives remains valid, if slightly less impressive in comparison.

Re:Price (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165525)

128GB (the closest I can find to 150GB) are around $250-350.

For ones so pathetically bad, you're better off using pencil and paper to store your data. Look again. Intel's SSDs are nice, but you'll find them at $620 for only 80GB.

Re:Price (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165491)

I've found it is frequently difficult to install a raid in a laptop.

Re:Price (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165521)

Have you actually been to Newegg? They're selling a 250 gig SSD for $699 and 128 gig for $249.

A raid card won't help a laptop save power or stop it from getting damaged from being dropped or shook about.

Re:Price (1)

tknd (979052) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165615)

Unless I missed something a 250GB SSD [newegg.com] is going on newegg for $700.

Random read/write? (4, Interesting)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164487)

I only see numbers for sequential access (240MB/s read, 200MB/s write). I don't suppose anyone knows how it does for random read/write speed?

Re:Random read/write? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164521)

Unless the design is broken (they did not add cache features for accesses), the numbers will be still fast enough to saturate the capabilities of most of the crappy'n'cheap notebook and desktop sata-2 controllers.

Re:Random read/write? (5, Insightful)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164595)

Except that previous drives have well-known severe problems with random IO, so I'm kinda suspicious that they specified sequential speeds rather than take the opportunity to say "see, we don't have that bug that everyone else does".

Re:Random read/write? (2, Informative)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164619)

Unless the design is broken

That's the problem; almost all SSDs on the market are broken and have worse write performance than hard disks. Just look at all the "JMicron rage" out there.

Re:Random read/write? (0)

creepynut (933825) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164553)

Since SSDs don't have any seek time (or if they do, it's probably not measurable) the sequential and non-sequential I/O should be indifferent.

Re:Random read/write? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164755)

Random writes are problematic for SSDs because Flash memory writes are done in two steps: erase and write. The erase step always blanks a relatively big block of Flash memory, so to write a 4K sector, a big block of Flash memory has to be read, erased and then written back with the modification. Randomly writing small blocks is therefore several times slower than continuous writes.

Re:Random read/write? (3, Informative)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164787)

There is a small latency with loading a new address walk through in these high density flash devices. Also it takes additional sata/scsi commands to issue I/O at a new address. If you spend 50% of the time issuing and waiting for the drive to lock on to a new address, then your performance will be cut in half (simple). But on SSD you need to seek extremely rapidly to get to that point. on a spinning disk drive the rate you need to keep seeking to heavily impact performance is a much slower rate.

It's definitely measurable on SSD though. Especially if you issue the I/Os in the least efficient way possible, such as treating each as a single transaction, rather than doing a scatter-gather with a long list of sectors to fetch. But that is more a limitation of the interface of sata/scsi/everything-else than with the medium, but it does have a real world impact.

Re:Random read/write? (2, Informative)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164811)

Since SSDs don't have any seek time (or if they do, it's probably not measurable) the sequential and non-sequential I/O should be indifferent.

Yes, should. But most current SSDs have buggy controllers that can't really handle random IO.

Re:Random read/write? (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165581)

Dunno about their drives but my EEE 901 isn't that bad at all I've got NetBeans and Tomcat running on it.

I've uninstalled a lot of stuff and installed other bits. I'm sure my data is mixed around but appears to perform just as well as when it was new.

Doesn't address fundamental problems (1)

hamburgler007 (1420537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164495)

These articles on SSDs seem to pop up once or twice a week, with news on how much more space they provide, but there haven't been any articles recently addressing fundamental problems for long term practical use. Until these problems are hashed out, I wouldn't consider getting a device that utilizes such a drive, whether it be 1 GB or 1 TB.

Re:Doesn't address fundamental problems (3, Informative)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164525)

there haven't been any articles recently addressing fundamental problems for long term practical use.

I wasn't aware that there were any, just a few implementation issues with the early drives (bad wear leveling and f-ed up controllers that can't multitask).

Re:Doesn't address fundamental problems (0)

nabsltd (1313397) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165471)

Even a drive with good wear-leveling quickly becomes one with bad wear-leveling in ordinary use.

Imagine a 32GB drive with a normal OS plus application install of around 15GB, then add in 5GB for mostly static user data (music they want to carry around, etc.). That means that you now only have 12GB left for wear-leveled writes.

The only way around this is to move into the "insanely smart" wear-leveling that will actually move data when the drive is otherwise idle to re-balance the sector write counts. You wouldn't want to do this during actual write requests, as it would slow them down even more than they are now. AFAIK, no SSD does this.

Re:Doesn't address fundamental problems (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165577)

The only way around this is to move into the "insanely smart" wear-leveling that will actually move data when the drive is otherwise idle to re-balance the sector write counts. You wouldn't want to do this during actual write requests, as it would slow them down even more than they are now. AFAIK, no SSD does this.

Intel claims that they do this, balancing the wear across all the flash, not just the part that is frequently rewritten.

Platter drives (1, Flamebait)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164515)

Is there any reason to buy a platter drive anymore, aside from cost? Id rather have speed, reliability, and long life.

Re:Platter drives (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164793)

Drive erosion. Flash based memory can take only so many rewrites at one physical place. I think the figure is about 200.000. Quite alot, but some system or swap files might exceed this easily.

Re:Platter drives (2, Informative)

bunratty (545641) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164813)

Two big reasons:
  • high capacity
  • high random write throughput

Don't buy an SSD to store a large database that gets lots of updates!

Re:Platter drives (2, Informative)

wgaryhas (872268) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164915)

But this is a laptop drive, and the largest capacity available for a laptop drive, or 2.5 inch drives in general.

Re:Platter drives (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164843)

yeah, i think that you nailed all of the reasons to buy a platter-based drive right there.

Re:Platter drives (1)

Gat0r30y (957941) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164905)

aside from cost?

Not really. HDD's can compete (they aren't totally blown out of the water) on most of the metrics though. And seeing as cost is usually the #1 consideration when purchasing, I wouldn't look for these to take over any significant market share until they can compete on cost with HDD's (right now they are generally an order of magnitude more expensive for the same space).

Oh, and (1)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164529)

PS - Imagine a beowulf cluster of these.

MythTV (3, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164533)

It's my intention to grab one of those Toshiba systems once they start shipping. I hope that a Solid State Drive will be able to handle the constant read/write operations associated with MythTV.

Some folks here at Slashdot, have suggested that SSDs are not a good choice for applications like MythTV. This time, I will prove for myself.

Re:MythTV (3, Insightful)

qoncept (599709) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164597)

I don't understand why you would do that. The only upside that I can see to a spinning disc would be noise, and if you're watching TV, how could you hear it? I'd spend a whole lot less money and get a whole lot bigger hard drive.

Re:MythTV (2, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164913)

I don't understand why you would do that.

I currently run my computer system off solar panels. They (SSDs) consume less power as compared to systems that have hard disks. FYI, I live deep in the country.

Re:MythTV (5, Funny)

Daimanta (1140543) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165027)

"I currently run my computer system off solar panels. They (SSDs) consume less power as compared to systems that have hard disks. FYI, I live deep in the country."

Well, I etch my data into massive stone tables. FYI, I live even deeper in the country.

Re:MythTV (3, Funny)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165141)

Moses? Is that you?

Re:MythTV (3, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165219)

You have stone tables? Damn are you lucky! I live much, much deeper in the country than you, apparently. We have to use sticks to etch our data into the sand. Unfortunately, every time it rains, we lose everything. So we have memorize the data, and re-etch it after the rainy season.

Re:MythTV (5, Funny)

alta (1263) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165613)

I live much, much deeper in the woods than you. We have yet to evolve sufficiently to maintain those so called memories. We are destined to repeat the same mistakes over and over again.

Re:MythTV (5, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165797)

So you're from Texas?

Re:MythTV (3, Funny)

blhack (921171) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165309)

Well I release butterflies into the atmosphere. The flapping of their wings changes the flow of the eddy currents in the upper atmosphere. These cause momentary pockets of higher-pressure air to form, which act as lenses that deflect incoming cosmic rays, focusing them to strike the drive platter and flip the desired bit..

Re:MythTV (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165519)

Well, I etch my data into massive stone tables. FYI, I live even deeper in the country.

So you're saying I shouldn't whine about the write speeds of my RAID5 array? =)

Re:MythTV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165803)

You must be using the wireless specification known as RFC Carrier Pigeon protocol to send the bits. Which begs the question, how many pigeons does it take to fly a stone tablet 3000 miles out of deepest country?

Re:MythTV (2, Insightful)

Surt (22457) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165601)

Not a huge difference though ... you'd be better off spending the price difference elsewhere in terms of wattage. Buy a more expensive power saving cpu or display and you'll save way more than the 1-2 watt difference between a conventional hard drive and an SSD. Though I suppose if money is no object, you do both.
But if money is no object, why not just buy a few more solar panels?

Re:MythTV (2, Funny)

vertinox (846076) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165153)

The only upside that I can see to a spinning disc would be noise, and if you're watching TV, how could you hear it?

I watch silent films you insensitive clod!

Re:MythTV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165199)

My mythtv box is completely fanless and has just one drive, namely a laptop drive chosen specifically for minimum noise, which has been acoustically damped and shielded... and yet you can still hear it during quiet points in a movie, especially if it happens to coincide with a read/write hit. A minor irritation perhaps, but still something I'd prefer to not have to deal with. Now I obviously can't speak for the gp, but that is why I'll be grabbing a SSD just as soon as they hit my affordability point: a genuinely silent mythtv box.

240 MB/s read, 200 MB/s write, AES encryption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164539)

FTA: It has a maximum sequential read speed of 240MB per second and maximum sequential write speed of 200MBps meaning faster boot and application loading times. The drive also offers AES data encryption to prevent unauthorized data access.

Nice, but does someone have the details about the AES implementation? What mechanism is used to change the AES key on this drive?

Terrible Article (3, Insightful)

neoform (551705) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164557)

Who wrote this garbage? The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.

Re:Terrible Article (5, Funny)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164635)

The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.

Apparently slashdot editors.
Apparently slashdot editors.

Re:Terrible Article (1)

McNihil (612243) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164681)

Go easy on the kid... obviously he found out about copy-n-past a couple of seconds ago ;-)

Re:Terrible Article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164691)

"Marge, how many kids do we have? Never mind, there's no time, i'll just estimate"

Re:Terrible Article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164703)

Who wrote this garbage? The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.

CTRL+C
CTRL+V
CTRL+V

Re:Terrible Article (1)

I.M.O.G. (811163) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164713)

Blame Timothy, he's the "editor" that frontpaged the garbage.

Re:Terrible Article (1)

cgfsd (1238866) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164715)

What! You read TFA?

Your Slashdot account has been suspended.

Re:Terrible Article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164887)

What! You read TFA?

Your Slashdot account has been suspended.

Re:Terrible Article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164745)

Who wrote this garbage? The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.
Who wrote this garbage? The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.
Who wrote this garbage? The article repeats itself about 3 times on one page.

hmm... (2, Interesting)

kabocox (199019) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164661)

I hate not to be all positive about this, but I'd much rather the prices drop rather than the sizes get bigger. Then again this is a huge sized solid state drive. I wonder if it is actually worth it. I'd like to see some real numbers comparing these drives to normal laptop drives.

A part of me also wonders when something like this will be thrown into the next ipod or DVR. It'll most likely be a price thing that determines it.

Re:hmm... (1)

D Ninja (825055) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164709)

512GB hard drive in an iPod?! At the risk of (mis)paraphrasing Bill Gates, who needs that kind of space on an iPod? Even if you ripped your songs at an extremely high quality, that's a lot of music. (Yes, I realize you can put other things besides music on iPods...)

Re:hmm... (1)

Pulzar (81031) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165765)

(Yes, I realize you can put other things besides music on iPods...)

If you do, then why do you ask who needs that kind of space? Video files are quite large, it's pretty easy to fill up 40GB or so...

Re:hmm... (1)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165377)

The leading edge ALWAYS takes the brunt of the cost. That's how it's always been... 2GB of RAM used to cost thousands, now you can get it for less than $100. I know you want everything and want it now, but an expensive 512GB SSD will force the prices of the 128 and 256GB SSD's down.

Re:hmm... (1)

dropadrop (1057046) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165499)

I hate not to be all positive about this, but I'd much rather the prices drop rather than the sizes get bigger. Then again this is a huge sized solid state drive. I wonder if it is actually worth it. I'd like to see some real numbers comparing these drives to normal laptop drives.

A part of me also wonders when something like this will be thrown into the next ipod or DVR. It'll most likely be a price thing that determines it.

I've found the price of smaller drives generally goes down when larger ones are released. If the smaller ones having their price fall are large enough for sensible use their popularity might grow enough to get some good competition lowering the prices even further. I think I's pretty clear that the new 512GB model won't be cheap for a while, but maby the 128GB one... (would be fine for my laptop)

It may say 512GB now (2, Insightful)

Alzheimers (467217) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164747)

It may say 512GB now, but we all know that once marketing gets a hold of it, it'll be

Tosiba's Brand New 550GB* drive.

*1GB = 1,000 MB

Re:It may say 512GB now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26164897)

I too enjoy misusing metric prefixes to approximate binary numbers. Hurf Durf.

Re:It may say 512GB now (1, Insightful)

thue (121682) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165083)

So you mean that product specs get reported more accurately, using internationally recognized and consistent units, once they have been vetted by marketing.

Then more power to marketing, I say!

Re:It may say 512GB now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165201)

No, he means that marketing uses the excuse of sticking to "standards" to lie to people.

Pull your head out of your ass. When working in base-2, those SI prefixes mean nothing. In fact, everything about SI falls apart in base-2. That's why SI is shit. It completely fails at context.

Re:It may say 512GB now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165671)

Or it is really a 476GB drive already...

And the sad thing is... (1)

enharmonix (988983) | more than 5 years ago | (#26164877)

... didn't I read something about SSDs working best in Windows 2000?

Re:And the sad thing is... (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165453)

What is sad about that? Win2K Pro still runs most of the software out there, is low on resources, and with timestamps turned off hits the drive VERY little. I am typing this on an old 1.1GHz Celeron running Win2K Pro on 512Mb of RAM and it makes a really great netbox. So don't knock old Win2k, she still has her uses.

Straight from Toshiba (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165123)

http://www.toshiba.com/taec/news/press_releases/2008/memy_08_550.jsp

MTBF? (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165213)

How long will drives like this last?

Surely longer than mechanical drives with platters, but has anyone actually verified it?

Also, when they fail, what is the most common reason for failing? Is it something that you could recover the data from?

Maybe it is way too early to know the answers

Just give me a cheap fast 64GB already (4, Insightful)

ChienAndalu (1293930) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165251)

When are the small SSD drives coming? I just need to put my operating system on the SSD-drive, the mp3s and movies are doing fine on the spinning platter. 512GB are total overkill.

Re:Just give me a cheap fast 64GB already (2, Interesting)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165497)

16GB is available on microSD, and I've seen adapters which allow them to slip into a USB slot with almost zero protrusion (http://www.amazon.com/DATA-MICRO-Reader-microSD-interface/dp/B000VE2PCG). Speed isn't great - 48Mbps - but your just booting the OS, and maybe a small app or two, right? If you can go a smidge bigger, 64GB SD are expected "soon." Speed is still low, but many lappys have an SD specific slot (which would also work with a microSD-SD adapter, of course)

Finally if you really need more space, 100GB is available on CF (http://www.dpreview.com/news/0809/08092306pretec_64gb_100gb_cf.asp). Speed is much better - up to 400Mbps. You can even get a CF to SATA/2.5HDD adapter (http://www.buyextras.com/criococsaadr.html?gclid=CKrE2LWLy5cCFQsaHgod5TIDTQ) for $15. There are 2-CF options out there, but the ones I saw were maxed at 32GB/CF.

So go out there and fire up that system with what exists. No need to wait for the manufacturers to put all the pieces together.

Re:Just give me a cheap fast 64GB already (4, Informative)

tknd (979052) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165779)

They're almost here. $70 for 30GB SSD [newegg.com] is currently out of stock but I'm sure they'll get a new shipment within the week. With each new drive that hits the market profit margins are getting squeezed out. MLC NAND flash chips spot prices are about $1 a gigabyte so I wouldn't be surprised if there was a healthy 100% margin still built into these product prices.

Warning Multilevel Cell ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26165361)

So they'll use MLC instead of SLC.

Multilevel Cell (MLC): The cheap and more error prone.

Single level Cell (SLC): The reliable and expensive.

FS's made for rotating platters (1)

Maguscrowley (1291130) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165623)

Correct my ignorance please if I am wrong, but isn't there a foreseeable problem in how file systems and disk drivers are optimized to deal with problems of rotating disks and not writing to NAND based storage? File system programming isn't something I know much about, but I thought that FS were always engineered with the physical problems of working with a spinning disk in mind.

From what is sounds like, the problems of a SSD device warrant a differently designed file system.

At the Data Recovery Centre (1)

trydk (930014) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165661)

Sorry Sir, but it seems that a transistor has gone in the controller circuit and your data cannot be retrieved!

Apple? (1)

Jab25 (982624) | more than 5 years ago | (#26165801)

Companies just love to mention cool new Apple products in any of their product briefs: "it can be used in laptops such as the Macbook Air". The all-new Diet Coke, can be drank while listening to Apple's iPod!!! Utterly irrelevant... And in this case- FALSE. The Macbook Air uses 1.8" hard drives, this drive will NOT fit into it. Maybe they could get some other tie-in to look cool. "This drive can be used in an external box connected to Apple's iMac!!!".
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