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Australia To Block BitTorrent

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the who-saw-that-coming dept.

Censorship 674

Kevin 7Kbps writes "Censorship Minister Stephen Conroy announced today that the Australian Internet Filters will be extended to block peer-to-peer traffic, saying, 'Technology that filters peer-to-peer and BitTorrent traffic does exist and it is anticipated that the effectiveness of this will be tested in the live pilot trial.' This dashes hopes that Conroy's Labor party had realised filtering could be politically costly at the next election and were about to back down. The filters were supposed to begin live trials on Christmas Eve, but two ISPs who volunteered have still not been contacted by Conroy's office, who advised, 'The department is still evaluating applications that were put forward for participation in that pilot.' Three days hardly seems enough time to reconfigure a national network."

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*sigh* (5, Insightful)

siyavash (677724) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200223)

All I can say is "*sigh*" ...They really, truely do not get this "Internet thingy". :)

Re:*sigh* (5, Insightful)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200387)

What do you expect?

1) Most politicians are lawyers, philosphers, judges, etc. Thus they will see these sorts of things from their perspective.

2) Techies have a serious communication problem. They believe in free without copyright, right to pirate, etc, etc. Take that attitude to lawyers and guess what answer you are going to get.

3) Techies don't get the business world. They don't think in terms of ROI, etc. And last I looked that is how the world turns, ROI, etc.

Techies need to start policing themselves. Yes BitTorrent has a real need, but until these protocols are managed to stop piracy nothing will change.

Here is the thing, I hate the drug laws, despise them actually. But I can't go out and start smoking pot because today it is STILL ILLEGAL.... The solution is to legalize pot, not smoke it and yell at the top of my lungs and say how dumb the laws are (they are...) How do I legalize pot? Work with the system and get it legalized.

Re:*sigh* (5, Insightful)

Nursie (632944) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200573)

"Work with the system and get it legalized."

Good luck with that. Meanwhile, those of us that have given up on the political process, given up any thoughts that "we, the people" will ever do anything about the daily abuse of our rights by politicians, given up any thoughts that most people even have a clue about any political issue beyond which candidate has the best hair, given up on the populace showing any sign of intelligence at all... we'll be having a quiet smoke somewhere out of the way, if you'd like to join us, because life's too short to wait for society to sort itself out.

Re:*sigh* (2, Insightful)

xonar (1069832) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200693)

I second this, just got this bad-ass new ash-catcher yesterday.

Re:*sigh* (5, Insightful)

moxley (895517) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200967)

I totally agree....If my mod points weren't gone I'd + insightful on that....

The problem is that we don't truly have a functioning system - what we have could be described as forms of institutionalized corruption.

With this precious life that I have I have decided that I am not going to let tyrants deny me of freedoms I wish to undertake that meet my personal ethics, which are partly informed by things such as "the golden rule" etc.

Re:*sigh* (5, Insightful)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200985)

This is a crap attitude...

The real problem here is that people become disenfranchised because they don't involve. After all why should I care about you because all you do is complain, whine, etc.

When you say people don't have a political clue, I would argue what you are saying is that people don't have a clue because they don't agree with you.

Well guess what this is a democracy (representative in most) and if you don't make yourself heard then it is your FAULT, not the politicians, nor the "clueless" voters who do vote and make themselves heard.

Re:*sigh* (1)

Hordeking (1237940) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201037)

"Work with the system and get it legalized."

Good luck with that. Meanwhile, those of us that have given up on the political process, given up any thoughts that "we, the people" will ever do anything about the daily abuse of our rights by politicians, given up any thoughts that most people even have a clue about any political issue beyond which candidate has the best hair, given up on the populace showing any sign of intelligence at all... we'll be having a quiet smoke somewhere out of the way, if you'd like to join us, because life's too short to wait for society to sort itself out.

You could always just secede. But then they'd have you against the wall for something.

Re:*sigh* (5, Insightful)

pipatron (966506) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200609)

What have HTTP done to prevent the massive filesharing through HTTP GET downloads?

What have the FTP protocol done to prevent it for being used as the central hubs for all cracker groups?

There's nothing else going on here than some politicians trying to get some free goodwill from the RIAA (A=Australia?) and the panicking parent crowd.

Re:*sigh* (3, Informative)

grarg (94486) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200727)

Random point of information: Australia's equivalent of the RIAA just jumbles the letters around a bit to make ARIA.

Re:*sigh* (2, Insightful)

KovaaK (1347019) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200781)

The reason that BitTorrent is getting more attention is because it's more practical for the illegal spread of such files. HTTP/FTP involves the use of specific servers that have limited bandwidth, so it can't send to unlimited users. BitTorrent doesn't have that problem since the users are sending the data as well (assuming that enough people don't mind seeding for a small period of time after they finish their download).

Re:*sigh* (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26201033)

You do know that Bittorrent is the last mile of distribution of scene files, right?

The fastest 0day share by topsites is still done with really fast FTP servers.

Re:*sigh* (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26201053)

http/ftp have done, wtf? Is english your second language?

Re:*sigh* (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200645)

1) Most politicians are lawyers, philosphers, judges, etc. Thus they will see these sorts of things from their perspective.

Also known as, they don't listen to people who know the subject, they listen to lobbyists.

2) Techies have a serious communication problem. They believe in free without copyright, right to pirate, etc, etc. Take that attitude to lawyers and guess what answer you are going to get.

I'd have to say this isn't just a problem with techies/geeks/nerds/whatever you want to call us, the problem is also with people who have a "the nerd is talking so I might as well zone out and think about banging my mistress until he's done" attitude.

3) Techies don't get the business world. They don't think in terms of ROI, etc. And last I looked that is how the world turns, ROI, etc.

No, I'm pretty sure what makes the world turn can be explained much more satisfactory using physics than economics, that business = all that matters is some sort of universal truth is actually a fairly recent trend... At least outside the US

/Mikael

Re:*sigh* (5, Funny)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200785)

The solution is to legalize pot, not smoke it and yell at the top of my lungs and say how dumb the laws are (they are...) How do I legalize pot? Work with the system and get it legalized.

Like slavery!

Re:*sigh* (1)

johnsonav (1098915) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200845)

How do I legalize pot? Work with the system and get it legalized.

The arguments for drug prohibition are mostly moral, while the arguments for copyright are mostly pragmatic. Even the US Constitution spells out the purely practical justification for copyright's existence.

Because of its moralistic justifications, drug prohibition cannot be fought through "civil disobedience". Hard-core drug warriors will only see that widespread violation of the law as caused by the drugs, not the existence of the unjust law itself. Its hard to make the argument that drug use does not necessarily lead to criminal behavior, when it does 100% of the time.

Copyright, on the other hand, is primarily a practical invention. If enough people violate its protections, its usefulness will be questioned. If you want to modify or repeal copyright, you have to show society that it isn't necessary, or that it is actually harmful.

Re:*sigh* (1)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200855)

We live in a world deprived of high quality information. It is rather like buying a copy of PC Magazine and being bombarded by nonsense that is supposedly computer oriented information. The entire rag is nothing more than sales oriented junk. Yet people can not sort out bad information from good information so some of it sticks.
          Busting up torrents is one example. Given decent encryption and using anonymous proxy servers one could transmit all kinds of torrents without the ISP having a clue as to what is happening. If any government gets in the way to the extent that people are upset you can bet your last penny that invisible torrents will become really popular. And if that fails to do the job there has been progress on "dark nets" that could do an even better job.
          So the real deal is getting great info in the hands of PC users. That is not going to happen with magazines that own their soul to the almighty dollar. Free men will find a way.

Re:*sigh* (1)

tgatliff (311583) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200863)

Actually history shows (Prohibition Era) that the best way to get something like marijuana legalized is to wait for a depression type event, and then extoll all of the taxing potential. Chances are you will get at least one insolvent state to "bite" at the potential.

In short... The root of all things political is money, and not reason. If it was about reason, then corporate lobbying would have been banned decades ago...

Re:*sigh* (1)

drdewm (894886) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200897)

What is this "techie" label that you're throwing around? Do you have annoying labels for the lawyers, philosphers and judges too mentioned in your post? I have some news for you the lawyers, philosphers and judges are some of the "techies" that you're talking about.

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200983)

Hi, i am a lawyer, and my first thought was, "wtf? australia have a CENSORSHIP miniser?" thats a new concept for me.

anyway, this banning of p2p really sucks ...if it goes into practice. But i think that this will not work as i believe things are all about money. The only money here is the ISP's, why would they accept these changes if only asked and not force by the law (i assume this is the situation as you wrote "..but two ISPs who volunteered have still not been contacted by Conroy's office..."

this is just a lawyers point of view, i genuinly thing that this ban won't happen now, but it will in future, when they can actually figure out how to stop it (but based on these p2p trends, the pirates always find a way around it, napster revolution/evolution ..historical shit etc.... )If they want p2p to stop, they might not be able to now, but like a crying baby eventually someone will have to satisfy them :) its all about the money!

Re:*sigh* (2, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201003)

Here is the thing, I hate the drug laws, despise them actually. But I can't go out and start smoking pot because today it is STILL ILLEGAL.... The solution is to legalize pot, not smoke it and yell at the top of my lungs and say how dumb the laws are (they are...) How do I legalize pot? Work with the system and get it legalized.

When has that worked? If everyone had your attitude, the drug warriors would simply argue that the drug war is working well, because everyone is obeying the law, and declare it a success. There's no reason to change a law that works. You have to break unjust laws, or no one will see that they are unjust. Do you think alcohol prohibition would have been repealed if everyone obeyed it?

Just remember the words of St. Augustine, "An unjust law is no law at all."

Re:*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200737)

No, it's that they are simply very very stupid.

Why is it that everyone in power are retarded morons?

I feel bad for Obama... H'es not going to like the labotomy that is required to be president of the USA.

BitTorrent for cocksuckers (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200227)

Fucking Linux piece of shit... Thieves and fags, the lot of them!

Re:BitTorrent for cocksuckers (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200361)

Arrrr, it doesn't make you gay if it happens on a ship!

What about my own content (5, Insightful)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200235)

Be that software, video or music -- why should I be prevented from sharing it with world ?

Re:What about my own content (5, Funny)

Voyager529 (1363959) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200299)

Be that software, video or music -- why should I be prevented from sharing it with world ?

Support the Australian Post Office and mail everyone CDs.

Re:What about my own content (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200349)

Because you are using Evil Technology(tm). You should switch to good wholesome technology like selling CDs. Otherwise you are a criminal, silly.

Re:What about my own content (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200421)

Clearly, we're in a global economic recession. It's unpatriotic for you to give away something for free in these dark and brooding times.

Or, at least, thats how it was sold to certain politicians. Like flag burning and disfunctional forms of prohibition.

Re:What about my own content (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200497)

Nothing's preventing you from sharing your works with the world. The fact that some people in Australia might not be able to get them doesn't stop you from sharing them.

I'm surprised that someone with such a low UID has made such an error in reasoning, but am unsurprised that you got modded up for it, as it seems to be the exact same sloppy appeal to emotion to which so many here now ascribe.

Re:What about my own content (5, Insightful)

De Lemming (227104) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200501)

The article indicates they want to filter peer-to-peer traffic, not completely block it. That would require an enormous effort and a lot of resources, to do content filtering on p2p connections. I'm wondering if it's even possible at all, as the original files are split up in blocks which are transferred between different peers. Seems to me a case of big words by government officials who don't know the technology...

Re:What about my own content (3, Insightful)

SQL Error (16383) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200969)

Yes, that's what it sounds like, which is even crazier than just blocking P2P traffic outright. I don't think Conroy is listening to anyone at this point.

Re:What about my own content (1)

owen_b2 (660177) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201049)

Nah, the packet inspection software's around - try googling 'Ellacoya' - some UK ISP's that oversold their 'unlimited' bandwidth (Plusnet being one) - have been using it for a while now.

Re:What about my own content (5, Insightful)

Mille Mots (865955) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200629)

Be that software, video or music -- why should I be prevented from sharing it with world ?

Because you aren't sharing profits with the people who make the laws.

Re:What about my own content (0, Flamebait)

msormune (808119) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200955)

I have a photocopier - why should I be prevented from copying money with it?

World of Warcraft and p2p... (5, Interesting)

ILuvSP (625676) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200255)

This does not fair well for all the World of Warcraft players in Australia. Blizzard "legally" uses p2p to distribute patches and such. I guess only one question remains to be asked to all Australian WoW players...Can I have your stuff? Sorry, it had to be said.

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (4, Informative)

MasterOfMagic (151058) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200331)

<pedantic nitpick>TCP/IP is a P2P protocol. It was designed so that anybody could be a client and anybody could be a server - there were no special addresses that were client-only or server-only. Anything that flows over TCP/IP is using a P2P network, and I would guess that there is plenty of legal content flowing over TCP/IP.</pedantic nitpick>

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (4, Funny)

mollymoo (202721) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200689)

We're talking about application-level protocols (layers 5-7 in the OSI model), you pedantic git.

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (4, Insightful)

cromar (1103585) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200397)

You're right, and I'm glad they chose that distribution model because it will certainly get a lot of people's attention when they can't update their favorite game. Hopefully Blizzard will make some effort to point out the stupidity of this law, although I'm sure they will fix the updates in Australia if they are forced to...

Also, a nitpick, quotes aren't used that way. They are legally using bt, or *legally* using bt, but "legally" using bt implies that they aren't really using bt legally, or that they are using it in a way that is hardly legal or only pretending to be legal.

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (5, Funny)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200401)

Blizzard will introduce a new achievement: death to the labour party.

A million aussies will charge the halls of parliament on horseback screaming "FOR THE HORDE!"

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (4, Insightful)

oahazmatt (868057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200409)

True, this does not bode well for WoW players, or people distributing files legally. This ban may serve as a wake-up call. File sharing has a very negative association with it, and many in Government positions will just take it to mean "piracy", as groups such as the RIAA and MPAA (and their overseas counterparts) imply it to be synonymous.

Now, Australia blocks bittorrent. So, you've got a lot of pissed off WoW players and hopefully at least one of them will stand up and say the block is not right at all. And what about the Australian ISPs who download linux distros through bittorrent?

This block is being put into effect by someone who clearly doesn't understand exactly what bittorrent or file sharing is. I'm sure he will be thoroughly informed soon enough.

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200555)

The thing about politics is generally the loudest voice with the most $$s wins... Being thoroughly informed by who is the question.

Re:World of Warcraft and p2p... (5, Funny)

ZarathustraDK (1291688) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200581)

- Darkrogue hits Bennygnome for 400 damage.
- Australian Officer casts search-warrant on Darkrogue.
Darkrogue says: "What the h..."
- Darkrogue dies.
Darkrogue has left the game.

goodluckwiththat (3, Insightful)

hcmtnbiker (925661) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200285)

The thing about P2P that's not the same for the rest of the internet is it's protocols are always evolving. Sure you'll be able to stop some stuff today, but you'll always be one step behind in a feudal battle against users, and in this case registered voters who may not fully agree with your ideas.

Re:goodluckwiththat (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200391)

You'll always be one step behind in a feudal battle against users

Australians far and wide gather beneath their lords that promise to give the serfs back their torrents. The war for torrents has begun.

Re:goodluckwiththat (5, Insightful)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200413)

There was Napster, but the centralized servers shut it down.
Then there was Kazaa, but it was a crap fast.
Then there was Bittorrent, shared bandwidth by all.

Our school tried to block BitTorrent too (back 2004-2005 era). One of my friends wrote a simple proxy server than injected a fake HTTP header into every new connection. Went straight through the 'firewall'. You block BitTorrent, it'll move to port 80 and look like HTTP traffic, or port 443 and then you won't know what the hell it is. Maybe it'll look like VOIP next. Maybe all of them.

"Strike Me Down and I Will Become More Powerful Than You Can Possibly Imagine".

Re:goodluckwiththat (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200641)

how do those mangled pseudo-http packets not cause havoc on the other end?

VoIP is next indeed (2, Insightful)

Nicolas MONNET (4727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200799)

Cue last week's news about BitTorrent going UDP ...

Re:goodluckwiththat (0)

domatic (1128127) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200935)

You're school's admins were morons. That trick wouldn't work on a default deny firewall that only allows monitored proxies and a small whitelist of machines outside. Add a proxy that disallows connects to IPs without domain names and variations on the trick are still possible but risky since the proxy will log all and many places are motivated to monitor those logs and will act on what they see in them.

Re:goodluckwiththat (3, Insightful)

ChienAndalu (1293930) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201051)

You're school's admins were morons.

Most are.

Re:goodluckwiththat (4, Insightful)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201027)

"The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it."

- John Gilmore

Right thought, wrong conclusion. (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200429)

The thing about P2P that's not the same for the rest of the internet is that it's the same as the rest of the internet, which is fundamentally p2p

In other words, he's declared war on the entire internet. He may as well quit with the pussy-footing and shut the whole lot down.

Re:goodluckwiththat (4, Insightful)

TehZorroness (1104427) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200493)

To compress what you said into one sentence; Banning the openly specified protocol with endless legal applications just because it may also be used to illicitly send copyrighted material will only serve to generate 20 new protocols which will only be used to share copyrighted material illicitly and do nothing legal or beneficial.

I'll admit that I'm no angel. I download albums over bittorrent from time to time, but I also download plenty of legal content over it, including a bunch of creative commons works, and plenty of free software distributions.

When will this die???? (5, Informative)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200287)

Government report shows censor ship scheme is flawed [theage.com.au]

When will this thing finally die? Every man and his dog acknowledges that it is a steaming pile of political rhetoric, yet it still goes on and on and on.

From the article I linked to:

Australia's largest ISP, Telstra, and Internode have said they will not participate in the trials. The second largest ISP, Optus, will run only a scaled- back trial of just the first tier while iiNet, the third biggest provider, has said it will participate simply to show the Government that its scheme will not work.

Re:When will this die???? (4, Funny)

Davemania (580154) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200425)

pfft, common sense or logic is no match for Senator Conroy or the Australian Government

Re:When will this die???? (1)

megamerican (1073936) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200937)

That will just encourage governments to adopt Internet 2, where you won't have free speech because you'll have a sub-domain on some corporate server and own nothing. Of course that won't stop most people here from circumventing things. However, if you use an "unauthorized" network you'll be labeled a terrorist.

I'm just waiting for a government to stage an attack on the internet so they can bring in the i-patriot act [google.com]

Re:When will this die???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200961)

HMS Censor?

Four scores... (1)

SrWebDeveloper (1419361) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200293)

"Three days hardly seems enough time to reconfigure a national network."

But four days is plenty of time, however. Noooooo problem. Piece of cake! You know our motto here in the IT department, if it can't be done in four........ (sigh)

Wow Must Suck To Live Down There (1, Offtopic)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200301)

The most poisonous spiders and snakes on the planet and a government full of fucktards. At least up here we don't have the most poisonous spiders and snakes. We just replaced a bunch of the fucktards with a new batch of fucktards too. Maybe you guys should give that a try.

A while back the freeswan project was trying to implement opportunistic end-to-end encryption with the eventual goal that all traffic on the Internet would be seamlessly encrypted. Whatever became of that? It seems like it's a good time to pick that project up again...

Re:Wow Must Suck To Live Down There (1)

imroy (755) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200713)

We just replaced a bunch of the fucktards with a new batch of fucktards too. Maybe you guys should give that a try.

We did, last year. Our previous bunch of fucktards had been in power for eleven years. They were a royal bunch of fucktards but stuff like this isn't making the new bunch of fucktards look much better.

World of Warcraft patches? (1, Redundant)

oDDmON oUT (231200) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200323)

Aren't those distributed through BT technology? Won't this adversely impact the gaming segment? Or will they find that it's been automagically exempted from filtering?

Re:World of Warcraft patches? (1)

pipboy9999 (1088005) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200369)

I think if I remember right Bliz reverts to a more traditional download source if the P2P is not working for some reason, but it takes for ever.

Re:World of Warcraft patches? (2, Insightful)

aaron alderman (1136207) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200441)

Warcraft sounds like witchery and the Christian nuts behind this won't allow that.

oh really? (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200345)

Expect the newest blocking-filtering avoiding P2P technology to go live within hours of this filter going up, ensuring that your influx of music and porn will be virtually uninterrupted.

Forcibly held Downunder... (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200353)

Citizens of Orwellstralia, it's about time you rose up and revolted. It may be already too late.

Ministry of Censorship (4, Interesting)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200411)

> Censorship Minister Stephen Conroy announced

What is a "Censorship Minister"? Is there a "Ministry of Censorship" in Australia??

Re:Ministry of Censorship (1)

ryanchappell (1003972) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200577)

Sounds so 1984ish! "Ministry of Censorship"

Re:Ministry of Censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200677)

Would be called MiniCens? Double plus ungood

Re:Ministry of Censorship (1)

Constantine XVI (880691) | more than 5 years ago | (#26201061)

No, 1984 would be Ministry of Speech

Re:Ministry of Censorship (5, Funny)

wall0159 (881759) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200661)

The summary is inaccurate, he is actually minister of
"Censorship", "Civilian Pacification" and "Eugenics for a better Australia".

Stopping P2P (0, Troll)

Wowsers (1151731) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200435)

In stopping P2P, Australia would stop Linux distribution, Microsoft would be able to crush all other operating systems as their more efficient P2P distribution model is cut off. Thus Australia prove they are anti-choice in the market place. The message is clear, pay Bill Gates or else!

Re:Stopping P2P (2, Insightful)

loonycyborg (1262242) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200823)

Pirated versions of Microsoft's software are also distributed through bittorrent, so this will crush Microsoft too :)

what happened to you, Austrailia? (3, Funny)

spidercoz (947220) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200459)

you used to be cool

Re:what happened to you, Austrailia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200705)

I don't care how big your knife is when the rest of the world is now using guns. And Yahoo Serious was never cool...

Re:what happened to you, Austrailia? (3, Insightful)

grarg (94486) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200797)

Imagine "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells" as a redneck and you'll get an insight into the mentality of a sizeable portion of the Australian electorate.

Re:what happened to you, Austrailia? (1)

Ecuador (740021) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200835)

Why funny? I grew up in Europe and I can tell you in the 80s you couldn't go much cooler than Crocodile Dundee...
Then it was Vanilla Ice's turn...

Re:what happened to you, Austrailia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26201005)

A bunch of morons voted K.Rudd in...that's what happened.

"Censorship Minister?!?" (1, Interesting)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200467)

So, like, if I am applying to also become, um, like a "Censorship Minister" somewhere, like, what needs to be on my resume or CV?

Spent college years with a big fat magic marker, blacking out a lot of stuff in the university library?

Maybe he duct-tapped up the mouths of protesting fellow students.

He should least have to pedigree to call himself the "Minister of Information" instead.

Re:"Censorship Minister?!?" (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200665)

He's the "Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy". "Censorship Minister" is just a lovely /. nickname.

Question (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200483)

If they have tiered internet services, how many people who presently pay for the high end will no longer need said services if they have no P2P?

The ISPs may well find themselves with the same users, but the users paying less (lower tier) if they have no P2P.

Encryption? (1)

ryanchappell (1003972) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200549)

If switching to encrypted does not help, I would imagine it is just a matter of time before someone figures out ways around their filters. P2P is a force of nature. Eventually the Colorado river is going to defeat the Hoover Dam, it is just a matter of centuries of natural forces. In this case it will take weeks not centuries.

And in other news... (5, Funny)

leamanc (961376) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200567)

Australia reports a rise in connections to proxy servers in the USA.

This will be bad for http://www.futurepinball.com/ (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200585)

As they want you to use bit torrent to save on sever bandwidth to download it.

Where is he saying that? (1)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200595)

Could someone find the blog? I found this post [dbcde.gov.au]

To give Australian households the necessary confidence, the Government is working to promote an online civil society through its $125.8 million Cyber-Safety Plan. This contains a comprehensive set of measures to combat online threats and help parents and educators protect children from inappropriate material.

It includes funding for:

* education and information measures

* law enforcement

* helplines and websites

* ISP filtering

* consultative arrangements with industry, child protection bodies and children

* further research to identify possible areas for further action.

Re:Where is he saying that? (4, Informative)

Andr T. (1006215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200627)

Found it [dbcde.gov.au] :

The Government understands that ISP-level filtering is not a 'silver bullet'. We have always viewed ISP-level filtering as one part of a broader government initiative for protecting our children online.

Technology is improving all the time. Technology that filters peer-to-peer and BitTorrent traffic does exist and it is anticipated that the effectiveness of this will be tested in the live pilot trial.

There is (5, Funny)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200643)

Only one way to block [slashdot.org] BitTorrent.

A Good Thing? (5, Interesting)

splodus (655932) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200683)

I think the sooner an 'important' state does this sort of thing the better.

The current situation is a chaotic cat and mouse game that's gradually playing into the hands of the publishing industry.

If a big state blocks and censors parts of the internet, they can probably make it stick. The result might be an incentive for people to start encrypting data by default, and I kind of think that would be a good thing for the whole world.

Here in the UK the government is up to all sorts of tricks - the RIP Act gives them the power to monitor all internet traffic and store it for up to 2 years. Even your local council can request to see which web sites you've been visiting - no need to involve the police or the courts, just a 'senior official'.

I think there's just not been a good enough reason so far to encrypt more than the bear minimum. This sort of thing might shove things in the right direction...

Despite massive security holes, they dont listen, (3, Insightful)

faldo (1436633) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200709)

And yet there are so many ways that this could comprimise internet security. [banthisurl.com]

Why the hell aren't Conroy and his cronies listening to the people who know what they're talking about? All social points asside for a moment, there are huge risks with a system like this. Security for one.

You could man in the middle attack everyone in Australia if you wanted to, and nothing that is being proposed will help stop child porn. The blacklist will leak as was proved yesterday (there's a story about it on the site I mentioned) and when combined with proxies, the very people this plan claims to stop will be given the keys to their perverted kindgoms.

Is this all just the illusion of safety for the technically illiterate, or is it just me?

oh man (3, Funny)

Drumforyourlife (1421647) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200723)

Australia gets some serious point deductions from my book. seriously. also, -1 for kangaroos.

Filter != Block (1)

Hanners1979 (959741) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200743)

Despite the article headline here, it appears that the plan is to filter certain items of "objectionable" content, rather than outright block peer-to-peer traffic.

Of course, this doesn't make the entire concept of filtering that is currently going on in Australia any less ridiculous (particular in terms of P2P and BitTorrent), but we might as well at least discuss what they're doing in the correct terms.

EVERY SPERM IS SACRED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200887)

Conroy is Catholic. Nothing wrong with that, but it explains why he believes everyone is addicted to porn. Especially child porn.

Will they ever learn ? (1)

slb (72208) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200789)

Just an other incentive to design a tracker-less Torent protocol ...

Peer to peer a Misnomer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200849)

By who's definition?
Peer to peer doesn't mean computer to computer.
  To politicians, it mean any computer not in their Big league ball club member list.
. In other words , servers will be blockaded as well and at the whim of the politician .
Peer to peer blocking also kills small or unwanted internet telephone companies who wont pay Rico taxes or cooperate to the mainstream telco political mobsters you see?

Australian politicians: Ignorant hypocrits? (4, Interesting)

Jonas Buyl (1425319) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200853)

The idea of blocking P2P traffic is flawed in a lot of ways. What defines P2P traffic? TCP protocol IS a P2P-based protocol. Obviously they want to stop the illegal traffic going on but this is not the way and like any type of crime you can't stop it from happening at all. Furthermore, banning the in essence legal means to perform a crime implies that they also intend on banning cars because they can be used to kill people, computers as they can be used to intrude one's privacy and many more examples. The Australian government seems nothing more than a group of hypocrits. Yet again only the honest people will be punished by this because people will always find a way to get what they want. Either through paying for payed hosting services (like Rapidshare), by setting up a proxy or in other ways that will unquestionably discovered soon enough if they choose to push their plans.

one week (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200857)

I give it one week after they implement this that someone will come out with a fully functional work around.
What's the point every time someone tries to block or deny access to something the faster people work to exploit it.

and the land of the.... (5, Insightful)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200869)

At least they don't sing about their freedom while it gets taken away.

what is it with aussie politicians? (1)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200875)

every story about .AU is somehow tied into aussie politicians acting like parents/guardians over a bunch of children that can't control themselves. I've never had a problem with the people "down under" but the politicians they elect do, by some measure, reflect the attitudes of the general populace... maybe the average joe in .AU manifests this inner need for a security blanket in their vote? Are they insecure? What is the divorce rate down there? Maybe they're all looking for a father figure they never had when they grew up...

Time Enough (1)

DynaSoar (714234) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200893)

"Three days hardly seems enough time to reconfigure a national network."

It's not. OTOH it's about 3 times longer than I expect it to take for a work-around patch to appear on one platform or another, and the same amount of time it'll take to get it ported to most of the others, as well as other common work-arounds such as proxies to become common knowledge.

IMO the Minister of Information Blockage simply refuses to admit the effort has failed before launch and is trying to scare those who don't have the savvy to realize this.

considering the topic, (1)

memnock (466995) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200899)

i thought he actually was a "Censorship Minister". it's actually Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy. [dbcde.gov.au] regardless of that title, the blatant corporate cronyism is appalling.

is a whole ministry for broadband, communications and the digital economy really necessary?

Wonderful (1)

geekstarr (1112945) | more than 5 years ago | (#26200909)

this is going to make sysadmins lives a bit difficult if they can't use BT (i know it will make my life a hell)

Over 9,000. What?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26200939)

And in other news, over 9,000 [slashdot.org] is not enough people to overturn a piece of legislation. Australia, you need to start thinking in millions, not thousands.
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