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Boss By Day, Gamer By Night

Soulskill posted more than 5 years ago | from the how-to-excel-at-bejeweled dept.

Businesses 51

Ant writes "Computerworld queried seven executives at some of today's top tech firms to learn how they started gaming, what they play now, and how their virtual skills translate to the real world of the office. Alan Cohen, vice president of enterprise solutions at Cisco Systems, had this to say: 'Now, increasingly, games are Internet 2.0 encounters. They're all about how well you work together with others any time, any place, with players from around the world. Rock Band 2, World of Warcraft, even Guitar Hero promote the shared experience and are all about how together we can do more, be more, compete better than we can by going it alone. That's right in line with how the corporate environment is evolving: You can play (or work) anytime you want, and you have to compete and collaborate on a global basis in order to succeed.'"

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Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss atPvP (4, Interesting)

RichMan (8097) | more than 5 years ago | (#26219999)

So this brings in that old question of play vs work. Do you keep them separate?

What if your counter strike team smeared the bosses last night?

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (-1, Troll)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220037)

Challenge your boss to a crack smoking contest!

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (3, Interesting)

corychristison (951993) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220289)

Challenge your boss to a crack smoking contest!

Well, we don't smoke crack, but I had a beer chugging contest with my boss this past Saturday.

I won. He declared a rematch on New Years Eve.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229787)

Out with the boss on new years eve. Way to have no life.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

CheshireDragon (1183095) | more than 5 years ago | (#26238883)

If the boss is kewl then what does it matter? I have had bosses like this. Even when I was the boss before I changed my career, I hosted LAN parties. I supplied the equipment(minus their own boxes) and refreshments, all it took was an email and 2 weeks later people show up. If you and your boss have a good business relationship and have a few things in common, you are good to have a long lasting job. Just don't go and break that trust or screw off at work.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26223481)

Careful, if they're a Slashdot moderator, they'll have a huge leg up.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26220083)

BALLS!!!

It's all about the balls.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26220305)

Boss By Day, Gamer By Night...

Idiot by life.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (2, Insightful)

Renraku (518261) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220419)

So what?

They should have the maturity to deal with being owned. Any boss that can't handle it either needs to get out of gaming, or learn to play.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (5, Insightful)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 5 years ago | (#26221117)

There are an infinite number of cliches surrounding communication, saying what you mean, etc. People don't say what they mean, people say what they must in order to show respect and position.

For example, if you are a guest at somebody's house, it's polite to ask for what you need, rather than simply state the need. You wouldn't say "where's the bathroom" unless it's a rather close friend. Instead, you'll say something like "Do you mind if I use your restroom?".

Which, if you think about it, is pretty silly. The question might be completed as: "... instead of crapping in my pants?"? but that's not what we say.

Phrasing our need as a question establishes a sort of pecking order - we are acknowledging to the host(s) that it's his/her/their place, and that we are, for a time, subservient to their wishes. We know they don't want us to crap in our pants or on their carpet, and they most certainly don't want to offend us - they will basically *always* say yes, and then often make a point of making sure that our bathroom experience is pleasant by offering towels, etc. The host is indicating to the guest that the guest is welcome.

It's a complex dance that those who are aware of (who are "polite") partake of in interacting with other people. It's how we, as social mammals, determine pecking order and expectations for code of conduct. Guys open doors for women, regardless of age or size, and let the ladies go first. Guys open the car passenger door for the lady, but the lady had better reach over and unlock the driver's side door... etc. etc.

The question is: are video games are distinct? Is the agreement is that Video games are a different reality, having no bearing on this one? Are they are distinct from the workplace?

If the agreement for this question is "no", and your boss is pissy because you fragged him, he does not deserve to be your boss. But there could easily be circumstances where showing up the boss could carry grave repercussions, just like beating him at golf. Here you are, a guest at the boss' house, and rather than ask to use the bathroom, you walk in like you own the place...

Sorry to say it, but manners matter.

Golf's bad enough, what if I beat the boss at sex? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26222105)

"If the agreement for this question is "no", and your boss is pissy because you fragged him, he does not deserve to be your boss. But there could easily be circumstances where showing up the boss could carry grave repercussions, just like beating him at golf. Here you are, a guest at the boss' house, and rather than ask to use the bathroom, you walk in like you own the place..."

Except in cooperative games there's no location and no ownership. A social order based on merit, not a pecking order based on who's footing the paycheck.

Re:Golf's bad enough, what if I beat the boss at s (2, Insightful)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 5 years ago | (#26222397)

Except in cooperative games there's no location and no ownership. A social order based on merit, not a pecking order based on who's footing the paycheck.

Which can precisely be the problem if the natural, merit-based pecking order is at odds with the imposed hierarchy. I've known enough managers that found themselves in the difficult position of being the natural second fiddle to some of those they were supposed to be managing. One of them handled it well in paying great attention to what they were told and learning rapidly. The other was so well respected for the areas that they were more suitable to lead on that it wasn't an issue. The rest of them all handled it by being complete arseholes to their staff.

Work is an unnatural hierarchy most of the time. There is none of the evening out of status over time that occurs in natural groups. The loop of feedback is distorted by power (in both directions). That is why it is often best to keep a strict boundary between the work and life, unless one wants to consider your manager your superior in your social life as well.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

Swordsmanus (921213) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223637)

For example, if you are a guest at somebody's house, it's polite to ask for what you need, rather than simply state the need. You wouldn't say "where's the bathroom" unless it's a rather close friend. Instead, you'll say something like "Do you mind if I use your restroom?".

Which, if you think about it, is pretty silly.

Sorry to say it, but manners matter.

Pretty deep!

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223725)

Hmm... I have to take issue with this:

But there could easily be circumstances where showing up the boss could carry grave repercussions, just like beating him at golf.

Golf, like WoW or Counterstrike, is a game, and as such is a friendly contest. If the boss thinks you're "showing him up" and gets antsy when you beat him at anything (golf, counterstrike, wow) then he's insecure about his position in your company. Now's the time to strike. :P

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

manekineko2 (1052430) | more than 5 years ago | (#26224307)

Completely agreed. And also of significance in real society is the distinction between causing the base to be "owned" versus beating him in the game. If you happen to play a round of golf with Tiger Woods, you would expect to be given a handicap or some general type of advantage to compensate you for the vast difference in skill. If he blows you out and wins by 40 strokes, that just makes him a jerk.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

feepness (543479) | more than 5 years ago | (#26226631)

For example, if you are a guest at somebody's house, it's polite to ask for what you need, rather than simply state the need. You wouldn't say "where's the bathroom" unless it's a rather close friend. Instead, you'll say something like "Do you mind if I use your restroom?". Which, if you think about it, is pretty silly. The question might be completed as: "... instead of crapping in my pants?"? but that's not what we say.

I disagree. We are really asking, if we don't know the person well, if their bathroom is functional and available. Their bathroom may be under remodel. Maybe be flooding. Their water might be shut off.

In all of those cases I would hope that you don't shit yourself.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26222977)

Spoken like someone that has failed the Corporate achievement.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

kingsteve612 (1241114) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223483)

Not like they have a choice. They can't fire people for losing in a game.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (3, Interesting)

Fallingcow (213461) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220435)

So play co-op campaigns in Left 4 Dead.

He'll appreciate it when you knock that hunter off of him, and you'll keep your damn mouth shut when he fails to do the same.

Just watch the friendly fire.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

tmk (712144) | more than 5 years ago | (#26222113)

Why makes you think you could beat your bosses if they played your games?

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 5 years ago | (#26222491)

I dunno, I used to beat my boss regularly at bowling, and that's saying something as I am an absolutely shitty bowler, never caused a problem.

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26222823)

Well, the first time I ever played Starcraft I schooled my boss at it. It was about an hour long game... he was gracious about it though. :)

Then again now I work at a game dev company so it's a lot harder to do that. :P

Re:Golf was bad enough, what if I beat the boss at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26224237)

That breathes new life into an old joke:

Q: A worker and his boss are playing Counter Strike. How can you tell the teams apart?

A: The boss doesn't say "oops" when he lands a head shot.

Team Work (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220039)

That's right in line with how the corporate environment is evolving: You can play (or work) anytime you want, and you have to compete and collaborate on a global basis in order to succeed.

Almost every job requires collaboration and "team player" is a resume keyword that HRM's always look for. Unfortunately the people most successful at "team work" are the least effective at work.

Emphasis:

You can play (or work) anytime you want

In the "corporate" environment there doesn't appear to be much difference. It's just like school for most people.

Re:Team Work (3, Funny)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220249)

What? Playing Guitar Hero isn't productive? You've been smoking too many lollipops. A good air guitar session in the office always increases productivity. If you cannot play guitar with the team, then what good are you? Alan Cohen from Cisco is extra insightful.

Quote:

"Rock Band 2, World of Warcraft, even Guitar Hero promote the shared experience and are all about how together we can do more".

This guy is a corporate Overlord. If he says we must play more games at work, well you'd better listen up and do just that! Crying and whinging that WoW and Rock Band 2 are too hard isn't going to get you anywhere. He doesn't mention any FPSs, but that's only because he dies all the time. Don't let that fool you though. Big, huge, gigantic multiplayer games is exactly what corportate networks are designed to handle.

Re:Team Work (1)

seebs (15766) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233725)

What gives you the idea that people who are effective in working on a team aren't effective at getting their jobs done? The people I've seen who have been the best have consistently been great to collaborate or work with. They leave ego out of it, they focus on getting things done rather than arguing over credit, and they're quick to identify their strengths and weaknesses so that they can work most effectively.

Yeah, I've seen people who liked collaboration but sucked at their jobs, or who were good at their jobs but sucked at collaboration -- but they've never been the best at either. The best at either are usually at least decent at the other.

Re:Team Work (1)

unlametheweak (1102159) | more than 5 years ago | (#26236039)

Notice that I put "team work" in quotation marks. I was really mocking the whole concept as an HRM catch-phrase. There appears to be some science and some pseudo-science to HRM and the hiring (and promotion) process. I will go on to say that I am merely offering my observations and not portraying a fully tested and valid critique.

Fact is that everybody is a team player, by hook or by crook. Those who view themselves (or more importantly project themselves) as a "team player" are often just socialites, sycophants, influence peddlers, or hypocrites who like using popular and cliched phrases as a means to an end. Keywords and catch phrases are meaningless (to me).

On the other hand, there are people who "collaborate", but this is often little more than socialization. On this end there is some science (though I didn't read it on the Internet, so I won't give references). The people who are depressive (I'm not talking about clinical depression here), un-confident in themselves, and loners will generally get the most and best quality work done; the rest are consensus seekers and socialites. Yup, it's a big generalization. I emphasize these facts because they are generally the opposite of peoples perceptions and practices. People need to "think outside of the box" instead of merely using popular and fashionable catch phrases.

Best regards,

UTW

Work is like playing LittleBigPlanet Multiplayer (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26220047)

1) Some challenges require multiple people
2) Some tasks are easier to do alone
3) You have to communicate in order to avoid failure
4) Everyone knows who sucks the most
5) You're doing it for the stickers!

Re:Work is like playing LittleBigPlanet Multiplaye (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26221411)

lol

Common interests make for good teams (4, Interesting)

aredubya74 (266988) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220307)

As a bit of background, I'm a 100% telecommuter from my home on the East coast, with the vast majority of my company based in Silicon Valley. I don't get as much in the way of facetime with the team - in ~6 years working this way, I've met my boss (and the rest of the company) less than 5 times. We're friendly for sure, but the distance does occasionally make for strained work relationships.

A year or so back, during a weekly internal conf call, I heard several of the higher-ups talking about their WoW PvP experiences. I had no idea they were gamers, and they apparently didn't know I was either. I decided to share that, and found they were entirely cool with my gameplay, even enthused. At the time, I was a regular in a casual raiding guild (semi-weekly raids, months behind uberguilds), so I was able to share some tips with the gang about stat builds, leveling strategies etc. I even went so far as to critique the gear of my boss's boss's level 70 pally, giving him tips on what to pick up to prep for tanking for their guild.

Since then, we've all stopped WoW'ing regularly, but the experience and sharing was really worthwhile. It certainly wouldn't be appreciated at every company, but use your judgment, and perhaps discussing, even playing, with your coworkers is worth the risk.

Re:Common interests make for good teams (4, Interesting)

Dutch Gun (899105) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220651)

Yep, it's always great to talk to someone about shared interest. It's really nothing new in itself as a concept. The only thing "new" is that videogaming, for the first time, is part of the normal, adult lexicon, and so you see it emerging in the workplace now as a discussion topic, even among bosses.

For multiplayer games (play from home at least), I'd have to say the Xbox 360 is king by a healthy margin. It's sort of the place to be to hang out and game with your friends and co-workers when not at the office. Left4Dead and Gears of War 2 seem to be the current multiplayer favorites. A few of us also enjoy N+ co-op every once in a while. But we've played lots of slower online board and card games as well. In addition to video games, a small group of folks gets together after work weekly for board gaming as well.

I think it's a fantastic way to strengthen bonds with co-workers, and is applicable to nearly any business environment. Anyone under 40 is likely to have grown up gaming anyhow. It used to be a lame corporate retreat and "team-building" exercises. Why not have some genuine fun watching each others' back in a frantic game of Left4Dead instead? Makes sense to me.

Re:Common interests make for good teams (2, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223623)

For multiplayer games (play from home at least), I'd have to say the Xbox 360 is king by a healthy margin. It's sort of the place to be to hang out and game with your friends and co-workers when not at the office. Left4Dead and Gears of War 2 seem to be the current multiplayer favorites. A few of us also enjoy N+ co-op every once in a while. But we've played lots of slower online board and card games as well. In addition to video games, a small group of folks gets together after work weekly for board gaming as well.

Oh, this takes me back. I was 12, my dad was going on about how I needed to learn golf because it's the game men of business and substance played and discussed Important Things over.

"No, dad. That's the way people in your generation did it. People in my generation may have to suck up to bosses with golf but by the time we've become men of business and substance, it'll be video games. Instead of trading golf tips it'll be about playing whatever version of Mario they're up to in 30 years."

HA! I'm going to call him up this evening and gloat.

Re:Common interests make for good teams (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#26224535)

Video games are hardly in line to replace golf as the recreation of the ruling class. Half the point of the golf course and country club is that they are expensive, difficult for the proles to get into, and only admit the right kind of people. It is also a physical location...try getting a massage after your round of CS.

Re:Common interests make for good teams (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26221441)

I think you're basically right in your assertions -- it's worth the risk to reach out to a co-worker ne on a personal level and finding you have something in common with them.

My personal experience with it has been that it's more of a distraction, unless it's centered on work related discussions. While you do have good 'bonding time' that builds trust and appreciation for disparate skill sets between team members ultimately when I sit down at work I want to get work done, not talk about ancillary things.

The best managers I've had have always been friendly but didn't try so hard that they came off as people-pleasers. When it came time for them to "coach people up" I suspect that the clear delineation between 'boss' and 'buddy' worked to the benefit of them, whoever they were mentoring, and the company as a whole.

The trick to being a good people manager isn't that you have all the answers, it's just pretending like you do enough that everyone listens to you. If you get too chummy that can sabotage your office's perception of you.

Re:Common interests make for good teams (2, Interesting)

zer0that (1418047) | more than 5 years ago | (#26221637)

Agreed, networking is always important at work. A friend of mine that works for a major chain plays games (Xbox360/WoW) with his co-workers and once bosses, now also co-workers. It is pretty much a constant at any company or business that getting in good with co-workers, appearing as a team player, and being able to get time with your boss away from work, formerly a bar/dinner experience, will help you get ahead in the end.

I read all the way until Internet 2 point.... (4, Funny)

n3tcat (664243) | more than 5 years ago | (#26220515)

at which point my brain switch flipped to the "off" position and the screen went fuzzy as drool started dripping from the side of my mouth.

Re:I read all the way until Internet 2 point.... (1)

murdocj (543661) | more than 4 years ago | (#26246879)

I got a little further but the stuff about working anytime with people around the globe just activated my gag reflex. My last company (which was amazingly poorly run) had the whole "we'll farm stuff out to the India team and work 24x7" mentality. And typically the way it worked was

. Monday: you need to get some web service in India configured so you can test. So you shoot off an email.
. Tuesday: you get back a message that the guy who knows anything has quit. You ask who replaced him.
. Wednesday: you get a message asking why you need to know. You shoot off a copy of your message from Monday.
. Thursday: you get a message asking what it was you wanted again? You send a rephrasing of your Monday message.
. Friday: it's a holiday in Bangalore so maybe you'll be luckier next week.

Any time I see some exec talking about the global workforce and working anytime, day or night, I flash back to this experience.

Gaming and work can help each other - sometimes (4, Interesting)

RogueyWon (735973) | more than 5 years ago | (#26221429)

Yeah, this is an interesting one. I think the flow of skills between gaming and management is a two way thing, although only in fairly specific circumstances.

I don't honestly think that just playing the average platformer, rhythm game, first person shooter or beat-em-up really adds much at all to your work-place skills, beyond a bit of hand-eye co-ordination. Even playing team-based online shooters doesn't necessarily help.

However, once you move beyond simply playing the game and move more into the community side of things, you can start to pick up some seriously useful experience.

When I was looking for "proper" work after finishing up my post-grad (as opposed to the summer jobs I'd had while a student), I ended up passing the initial intellectual aptitude tests and getting through to the assessment centre stage for one of the most competitive graduate recruitment schemes in the UK (over 15,000 applicants for around 400 places, in the year I applied). I was up against people who'd done internships in national newspapers, travelled the world doing interesting things, been president of umpteen student societies and so on. By contast, my own experience was a few summers of boring (but fairly well paid) tech support/web design and administrative work, a bit of political canvassing and way too much time "wasted" on gaming. "Ok", I thought, as I got myself ready, "I'm in trouble now".

So, I cast around for other things I could talk about that I'd done. Pretty much the only really striking thing was that I was the (unpaid) head admin of a fairly large European-based Counter-Strike league. This was basically something I'd moved towards by degrees; from being a player in a team in the league who was perpetually frustrated by its organisational problems, to being a volunteer admin who refereed matches and mediated disputes to being the head admin, who recruited and managed the other admins, negotiated with sponsors for better server hardware and moved the league from a free-to-play to a subscription basis.

So in the absence of other options, I decided to take a huge risk and focus on this experience at interviews, hoping and praying that I would get an interviewer who wouldn't just dismiss it as some computer-game silliness. My heart sank when I found that my interviewer was a 60-ish guy in a suit. However... the interview went stunningly well; he asked me about the differences between managing a paid team and a team of volunteers (particularly in terms of dealing with poor performers), the difficulties in getting "customers" used to having something for free to pay for a product, the challenges in negotiating with financial backers and so on. And I was able to answer all the questions fluently. He didn't have a clue about computer gaming and admitted as much, but the management and business sides of what I'd done were perfectly relevant. I passed the centre and still have the same employer 6 years later (having moved up a few pay bands in the interim).

Of course, head admins of leagues are pretty few and far between and I think the old concept of the "unpaid volunteer head admin" has largely died out as fps gaming becomes more professionalised (a move which was already starting back then and which I've never been comfortable with). However, I think there are other aspects of gaming which can have a positive impact on your business skills - as well as some areas where a management post at work can have a beneficial impact on your gaming.

MMOs almost inevitably present the best examples, particularly if you have a raiding guild (or the non-WoW equivalent). A middling-hardcore raiding guild (which is to say, a guild which takes raiding seriously, but whose members have jobs and some vestiges of social lives) is an organisation held together by varying degrees of cameraderie, traditions and naked self interest. Much like the average work-place, in other words. You have the ambitious newcomers who want to change everything. You have the burned out old-timers who think the guild owes them a free ride. You have the self-centred jerks who will jump ship somewhere else the moment a better offer comes along. And you have a large mass of people who will just follow the path of least resistance. Then you normally have a small team of managers with a guild organiser at the top, who are supposed to try and keep the whole thing together and working to a common purpose.

Managing all of this is not easy. A large majority of guilds either crash and burn within weeks, or else the members quickly trickle away leaving just a desperate few who can't get into any other guild. I've learned never to join a guild that allows under 21s to act as officers, or which routinely recruit under 18s as members.

The real benefit to your management skills of trying to run a WoW guild is that it offers good analogues to many workplace situations, but on a vastly accelerated and exaggerated basis. The consequences are lower - "employees" don't need to stay put to keep paying their mortgage and "managers" can't be sued if they put a foot wrong. With the normal restrictions thus eased massively, problems that might brood for years in the workplace might only last weeks in an MMO before they come to a head. "Managers" in guilds will have to tackle poor performers, resolve grievances and "sack" people at a rate unparalleled in all but the most hellish of workplaces. A person who has significant management responsibility in real life will almost always handle these situations better than somebody without that responsibility and provided that the guild-manager in question always remembers the differences between the MMO and the workplace (as well as the limitations such as the lack of face to face contact), he can learn a lot from his game experiences that he can apply in real life.

There are, of course, a few dangers that go with treating MMOs as management training. Quite aside from the interpersonal-contact issues, there is the issue of the very task-focussed nature of most MMOs. Now, managing a team of 25 people to take down a boss requiring complicated tactics is no mean feat (I think the stereotype that MMO combat is just about auto-attacking is pretty much dead these days). However, pretty much all of your goals in MMOs are distinctly short-term in nature, with immediate rewards upon success. MMOs tend not to encourage long-term planning. There's also the fact that the low consequences of failure in MMOs compared to the real world can have the side-effect of desensitising people to risk. However, provided the gamer in question is intelligent enough to recognise these dangers, he will generally be able to leverage his gaming into something genuinely useful for his work-based skills.

Re:Gaming and work can help each other - sometimes (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26221839)

Mod parent up!

Nice read and definitely some useful info in there.

Re:Gaming and work can help each other - sometimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26232515)

I've learned never to join a guild that allows under 21s to act as officers, or which routinely recruit under 18s as members.

I was with you up till this point. Well I can see where your coming from, as someone who was a raid leader in a large advanced progression guild in both wow and eq, I have to say age is no guarantee of competence.

I've known children who were better players and/or more competent individuals then their parents/peers within the guild... I've known officers under 21 whom people both older and younger respected.

Well you are free to bias against anyone you choose... that's exactly what it is, bias. Not everyone is the same, and they shouldn't be painted with the same brush. Simply because someone is young, doesn't mean their incapable.

Re:Gaming and work can help each other - sometimes (1)

RogueyWon (735973) | more than 5 years ago | (#26235503)

I got tired of playing with children at the point where a guild I was in had to call a raid 2 hours early, because the main tank said "My stupid mum's making me do my homework".

As far as I'm concerned, I only want to spend time in MMOs with those who can pay their own way and who have a degree of freedom to decide how to organise their lives. That means adults with jobs. I'm sick of playing with children. I'll play with college-age students, but my experience is that most of them are still severely lacking in maturity and organisational skills (as I was myself at that age). Until you leave home, however, you ultimately have little to no power over your own life. You cannot demand that you always need, for example, four undisturbed hours to raid on each of Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. Now, that's not your fault. But I don't want to be stuck in a situation where 24 other people are sat around twiddling their thumbs because of it.

Re:Gaming and work can help each other - sometimes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26236673)

Adults with jobs often have work projects, families, responsibilities. They go on business trips, spend time with their families, get sick, and come to raids drunk or stoned.

There are children whose parents go so far as to make them raid, there are children whose parents don't try to control them, or young individuals whom have authority over their own life.

People are unique, simply because you lacked maturity at a young age does not mean every one does, simply because you lacked control does not mean everyone did. There are both young prophets... and old fools.

Oh suuure.... (1)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 5 years ago | (#26221883)

I've been saying this for decades but nobody listens till some fancy Cisco exec says it.

WoW: Ariel/Tigole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26222365)

Blizzard leads Ariel and Tigole were both Guildmasters of Legacy of Steel, an accomplished EQ raiding guild.

They both ran it as beneficent dictators, and the guild prospered under (with?) the skills that can easily be translated to same skills making game development, seen as a business, successful.

Holy corproate jibberish (2, Insightful)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223019)

More proof that the way you get to the top is that you are able to take any random topic and mix it with your standard corporate buzz words to make you sound like you are a genius. I couldn't get past the summary. Corporate America is a joke if they are relying on their gaming skillz to get us out of this mess and move forward. Here's a clue, we didnt dominate during/post WW2 because we sat there all day talking about WoW. Now get off my lawn.

Boss (1)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223037)

For a moment, I thought this was about the AI for the Lich King kicking back and playing some Neopets or something during server upgrades.

Business-Gaming strategery (1)

willworkforbeer (924558) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223619)

Now when I tell my employees I want to spawn kill any new competitors, they nod with understanding.

This is silly (1)

BoberFett (127537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26223699)

I'm the Director of IT at a small company and also a gamer, but I hardly consider any overlap between my pastime and my work.

Re:This is silly (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26224343)

Maybe you should.

Re:This is silly (1)

BoberFett (127537) | more than 5 years ago | (#26225109)

No, this sounds more to me like someone trying to drum up support for an idea that they can turn into a motivational seminar. They can then sell tickets for hundreds of dollars to starry eyed managers who will sit for hours listening to cliches about "fragging the competition" and "awarding your employees DKP" for their hard work.

Leadership Skills (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26224919)

One of my bosses at Fancy Law Firm was an avid gamer, and praised me after a firm-sponsored Halo night for my "great leadership skills."

Skills like "Seth, I've got the flag, get in the truck! GET IN THE TRUCK!"

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