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Aussie Net Filtering Trial Delayed

samzenpus posted more than 5 years ago | from the think-of-the-children dept.

Censorship 83

hopejr writes "The Federal Opposition says it is not surprised the Government's mandatory internet filtering trial has been delayed. The trial, which was meant to begin today, has been postponed until mid-January 2009 and the internet service providers (ISPs) who will participate will be announced at the same time. ISPs iiNet and Optus both said yesterday they had not heard anything about their applications to participate in the trial, and doubted the Government would meet its own deadline."

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83 comments

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Proud to be an American... (1)

tnok85 (1434319) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229007)

Where at least I know I can break the law.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229017)

Both Australia and the USA were founded by criminals. Literally.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229113)

Criminal to another country, perhaps.
America wasn't founded by Puritans as I know your hinting upon, however. They landed and had made a bad representation of America to the natives but thankfully lots of others made impact in large varieties of locations throughout the eastern seaboard. Also, Spaniards were in the south in Florida.
When talking of "founding", you don't need to go further back than 1776.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229191)

In regards to the British, Australia was first inhabited by criminals, however America wasn't.

Australia's constitution was made by people who were not considered criminals by the British, America wasn't.

Which is unfortunate for Australia, since it means Australia did not have as noble a reason for setting up its own government as America did. Our constitution isn't based around Liberty.

Oh well, just means we don't get liberty.

(Full disclosure, I'm Australian)

Re:Proud to be an American... (4, Interesting)

shirro (17185) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229289)

Australia's constitution was not made by criminals. It was written by a wealthy land owning elite. The criminals were their parents cheap labour. Australia did not exist until federation in 1901. Transportation of convicts ended in 1857.

Prior to 1901 the states were self governing colonies. The colony of South Australia was settled by free settlers not convicts. People settled my state for religious freedom, to own land and for profit - not a convict in sight.

The reason the Australian constitution is not as noble as the US constitution is that Australia was not founded by revolutionaries. We remained part of the British empire and inherited the attitudes and structures of England. The US adopted a republic based on the French model which celebrated liberty and equality.

The filter is the result of a coalition between anti-liberal socialists and catholics. The ALP right faction is strongly influenced by catholicism and is socially conservative. The ALP left factions may have championed social change once, but it I suspect it was just a reaction to the conservatism of the times and they have no real commitment to individual freedom being socialists.

So the ALP are just as crazy as the GOP religious right but far more dangerous as there is not a libertarian amongst them to stand up for freedom.

The current government used to be a socially progressive, center left workers party but probably should change their name to the Christian Democrats as they are basically a front for Roman Catholicism these days.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

infonography (566403) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229445)

Transportation to the American colonies just ended earlier then it did in Australia and to a far lesser extent as immigration came from many countries. It was far too easy to just walk away from service and live in a colony that didn't care for the practice. Sure that temporarily gave rise to more African Slaves. With regards to the North American ones it only amounted to 10% of the total trade to the west. Many of the African Slaves did the same thing. With the rise of industry slavery was doomed, It just became a negative return beyond the moral reasons.

Score one for technology.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229525)

Transportation to the American colonies just ended earlier then it did in Australia and to a far lesser extent as immigration came from many countries.

I think you're missing some punctuation in their somewhere .... do you mean:

Transportation to the American colonies just ended earlier then it did in Australia -- and to a far lesser extent -- as immigration came from many countries.

IOW, if the 'and to a far lesser extent' is parenthetical rather than essential, then, yes, you're right.

Early America was settled by the British, but also by the French, Dutch, Spanish, Germans, etc. Most of the early settlers came here to find new opportunities -- make a good living, start a new life, etc.

Re:Proud to be an American... (3, Interesting)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229837)

With the rise of industry slavery was doomed, It just became a negative return beyond the moral reasons.

On a recent trip to Charleston, South Carolina, I encountered some interesting views on slavery. I was taking a tour of an old plantation house ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middleton_Place [wikipedia.org] ) and they were talking about their rice production before and after the Civil War. Before the war, they were able to produce quite a bit of rice. After the war, with slavery outlawed, they tried doing it using a "communal work" type of setup, but it wasn't profitable. Basically, once they had to pay their laborers, they couldn't turn a profit. It was interesting (to say the least) to hear slavery talked about in purely economic terms, as if there was no human suffering or moral quandaries involved. It was certainly different than the discussion you would have with someone from New York (like me) about slavery.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26230799)

Wow, it must have been tough lugging your pedestal all the way to Charleston.

What place would the human aspects of slavery have in an explanation of why the plantation stopped producing rice?

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

quenda (644621) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233163)

Basically, once they had to pay their laborers, they couldn't turn a profit.

Wasn't that due laregly to competition for labor from new sources?

If the Confederates had banned slavery without being invaded by the US, and maintained emigration controls, their economy might have reformed a lot more smoothly.

Slave labor is always inefficient. Slavery was less about reduced wages than bringing in labor that didn't previously exist. Plantations in Africa didn't need to buy slaves as they could hire the existing locals.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 5 years ago | (#26234503)

Honestly, I only know what I was told about the subject from the tour guide during the half hour tour. She made it seem like the plantation thrived during slavery but couldn't turn a profit during the post-slavery "communal work" setup. It wasn't spoken outright, but heavily implied that having to pay their laborers wages was a strain on the plantation's resources. They were still quite proud that the Middletons were among the first to join the Confederate side also.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26233263)

Are you kidding? Catholicism has always played a big part in the Aussie trade union movement, going back to when they were still meeting under trees in Brisbane.

More broadly, years of "godless Commie" propaganda in the U.S., as well as the Soviets' own rhetoric, gets people thinking that the socialist left tends to oppose religion, but there have been plenty of Christian socialists (especially in the U.K.) going back before Marx who have never seen any contradiction between their own religion's calls to help the poor and sick, and asking the state to do the same thing.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

ignavus (213578) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233465)

We ... inherited the attitudes and structures of England.

Only in part. We have never had a true aristocracy, with dukes and earls and stuff. We left behind a lot of England's traditional baggage, just as America did in the 1700s. Consequently, we had a more flexible social structure without the full-on classes of British society, and with a more democratic political structure (we pioneered secret ballots, women's vote, etc).

Australia was never just a slice of England transplanted to the southern hemisphere. There was a degree of filtering going on, resulting in a simpler, more dynamic society than "back home" - and one more isolated from world affairs.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

kaos07 (1113443) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233489)

Which is why, of course, the current Prime Minister and the majority of the caucus are Anglican.

Re:Proud to be an American... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229673)

For a start, England was Transporting to America before Australia was colonised - and even while they transported to New South Wales and Tasmania.

Secondly. The USA does not have "Liberty". What they have is an obsessive belief that they have "Liberty", and that everyone else in the world wants and needs their sort of "Liberty".

The USA was actually founded by freeloaders - they wanted the British government to provide protection to their settlers against the natives, even when they had crossed boundaries beyond which they had been clearly told they would be given none, then took exception when told they'd have to pay for it.
The only reason it went to war was because George III was a stubborn bastard that didn't like the idea that a bunch of colonists could make demands of him. If he'd simply said "fine, you don't want to pay, we'll withdraw all our troops and protection entirely", then things would have been very different.

Re:Proud to be an American... (4, Interesting)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229965)

Which is unfortunate for Australia, since it means Australia did not have as noble a reason for setting up its own government as America did. Our constitution isn't based around Liberty.

After European settlement, Australia was primarily inhabited by honest, law abiding colonists who were not sent there by force and did not flee seeking to practice any sort of new religion or ideology, but simply to make a good life for themselves on the land. Australia did not become independent in a violent ideological war over taxes but was given independence because all involved thought it could be governed better from Melbourne than London. We invented the secret ballot, we were the first country to give women the vote in the state level and second in the federal level. Australia's all about freedom, not as an ideal but as a lifestyle, to be able to make a good, fair life without harassment.

The Australian constitution only defines the relationship between the states and the running of federal democracy. It has done this quite well but what it does not do is impose the will of those who have died a century ago on Australia today. Look at the US which you mentioned before (and which I'm sorry to bash), The US has the bill of rights but the thirteenth and fourteenth amendment is nowhere to be found. You can have free speech, firearms, freedom from billeting soldiers, protection from unreasonable searches etc. but until 3 amendments after it ends, you can own other people and until the next; black people aren't citizens. And bare in mind here, the nasty, oppressive British empire banned slavery ten years after American succession, the ideological US took four score and seven years to do the same. The original American view of citizenship was very close to the old "Civis Romanis Sum" school of thought: freedom should be absolute for the free, but those not entitled should be subject to the liberties of those who have them.

In Australia, you are granted generally the same rights as in the US but by common law and acts of parliament, not by constitutional amendments. Sure, it gives the government latitude to do stupid things like this Internet filter. But the government in this country has ALWAYS censored pornography, we just got a lucky break for twenty years with the Internet but it's the same laws creeping onto another medium, not really a new development. Nude pictures aren't considered part of free speech in this country, it pretty much has to be related to politics or religion to be protected. But within this definition, we do have free speech in this country. With or without this Internet filter, I can still say on the Internet or out on the street "Fuck Australia, fuck Keven Rudd and fuck our troops serving in Afghanistan" and nobody will block me, nobody will arrest me and nobody will show up in a truck and kick my arse for being un-patriotic.

I don't want this filter, I am embarrassed by this filter, I am writing to my local member about this filter and I will never vote for anyone who supports this filter. However, I still think there is a lot of silly hyperbole going around here about it.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

Dhalka226 (559740) | more than 5 years ago | (#26230863)

However, I still think there is a lot of silly hyperbole going around here about it.

You know, I had a rather long-winded retort post written, but it's not worth the breath. I'll just say this: Whatever the silly hyperbole going on here about the Internet filter, there's an awful lot of silly hyperbole and cherry-picked "issues" in your post as well. If you want to do ANY comparison of nations, for any purpose, you need to do so in a much more thoughtful manner and with a much better and more complete understanding of BOTH of their histories than this post exhibited. I deleted the contents of my post for precisely this reason; because I do not have and will not claim a complete-enough understanding of Australian history, regardless of whether my actual points were factual.

I like Australia; my best friends live there. Let's just try to hold ourselves to a more stringent degree of intellectual honesty.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26231263)

Hi post was at least as honest as all the "OMG, Australians are criminals", "Australia is the next China", and "This would never happen if Australia had guns" posts.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232547)

there's an awful lot of silly hyperbole and cherry-picked "issues" in your post as well.

The parent said Australia was not founded upon freedom like the US was. Whether comparing the moral history of two countries proves anything in todays society is another question, but I felt that the question had been asked and someone should discuss it a bit better than it had been in this thread.

I'm not sure how many issues I brought up. As for the factuality of this "issue" I did bring up; is the Fourteenth amendment in the bill of rights or not? If not, then who were the other ten written to protect? Did or did not the man who wrote: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." own slaves?

I think that Americans as a general rule have a slightly warped picture of their own founding. Many Americans picture the British Empire of 1775 as being run by a king, rather than the House of Commons and an elected Prime Minister. Many Americans feel that the thirteen colonies did not already have a large amount of self government. Many Americans feel that people like Thomas Jefferson had a view on freedom which extended to all Americans rather than just land owners. If these were true, then it would stand to reason that they idolise their founders. But in reality, they weren't men ahead of their time, they were men of their time, just like us all. America gained independence so as not to pay tax to an external government and to keep all decisions closer to home, much the same as Australia. This is not in any way ignoble but it was mainly practical rather than ideological. Both the British Empire at that time and the United States of America at that time were flawed democracies, known for upholding the rights of some and not of others, succession was not really a step in either direction.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

Shadon Oufrayor (1242796) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232851)

We invented the secret ballot

You may have been the first to use it for elections, however it was invented in the coffee houses of England where the patrons would vote on topical issues.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

ignavus (213578) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233487)

I can still say on the Internet or out on the street "Fuck Australia, fuck Keven Rudd and fuck our troops serving in Afghanistan" and nobody will block me, nobody will arrest me and nobody will show up in a truck and kick my arse for being un-patriotic.

Unless you are at a sporting event against New Zealand. Supporting Australia against New Zealand IS your patriotic duty. Running down Australia in any other context is allowable, and even compulsory on occasion.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#26294457)

And bare in mind here, the nasty, oppressive British empire banned slavery ten years after American succession, the ideological US took four score and seven years to do the same.

That is revisionist history. The British Empire abolished slavery in 1833. (Slavery within Britain itself was ruled illegal in court cases before and during the American Revolution, but this did not affect any colonies.)

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

ozphx (1061292) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232409)

*shrug* If you want to see who has the most criminals now, a quick check of wikipedia will tell you:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imprisonment#Incarceration_rates_by_country [wikipedia.org]

Highest incarceration rate in the world. 5% of the world's population, and 25% of the world's imprisoned population. Land of the free? LOL!! USA... USA... etc

Interestingly the Irish have the lowest incarcerations rates, presumably because they are too busy being drunk.

Re:Proud to be an American... (2, Funny)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229351)

Both Australia and the USA were founded by criminals. Literally.

Which is why I clearly cannot take the drink in front of ME.

Re:Proud to be an American... (4, Insightful)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229427)

Actually the US was founded by religious extremists which the british rightfully tried to get rid of.

The descendents of those extremists, still equally extreme, continue to gain power and dismantle any progress we make as a nation toward social equality

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229539)

Interesting. While the Puritans certainly could have been considered 'religious extremists' back in the time they settled here, they were, by far, not the majority.

Most of the Founding Fathers weren't Puritans -- most weren't even Christian. Like many educated, affluent people, these men were influenced by the Age of Enlightenment, thus, many of them were Deists and Freemasons. Their influence is found in our founding documents -- the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The stuff about all men being created equal, etc., is straight out of Deist thought and philosophy.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

shirro (17185) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229617)

Actually the US was founded by religious extremists which the british rightfully tried to get rid of.

I thought the US was founded by lawyers, merchants and plantation owners.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26230051)

Na, just lawyers.

Re:Proud to be an American... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26230523)

I thought it was stolen from native Americans.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233101)

It wasn't stolened, honest, it was founded!

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 5 years ago | (#26230771)

What happened to the plantation owners? The lawyers and merchants still run government, but we seem to need a few more plantation owners in the mix to keep government sane.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

ZmeiGorynych (1229722) | more than 5 years ago | (#26234419)

The civil war took care of those, I'm afraid...

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 5 years ago | (#26231311)

"rightfully tried to get rid of"? This is the first time that I've heard persecution on basis of religion so blithely justified and accepted in a single phrase. Let me guess, you rooted for the Afrikaaners against Nelson Mandela, too, right?

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26233865)

So what exactly are you to do to those who preach persecution of others.

In this case, you direct the same persecution toward them to marginalize them

this works like the military phalanx system, you send equal force in the opposite direction and nullify it.

Sometimes two wrongs do make a right, or is it really wrong to marginalize the intolerant?

Recursive hypocrisy? (1)

Xenographic (557057) | more than 5 years ago | (#26236769)

> So what exactly are you to do to those who preach persecution of others. In this case, you direct the same persecution toward them to marginalize them

Since you're preaching persecution of others, it's okay if we do that to you, right? Or is this one of those things that's only bad when other people do it?

Re:Recursive hypocrisy? (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26240311)

> So what exactly are you to do to those who preach persecution of others. In this case, you direct the same persecution toward them to marginalize them

Since you're preaching persecution of others, it's okay if we do that to you, right? Or is this one of those things that's only bad when other people do it?

When a foreign army is invading YOUR town, "thou shalt not kill" goes out the window.

Religious extremists work diligently to persecute others. Persecution of them is the rightful response.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232419)

You got a different bunch of extremists after 1906. I don't think any of the troublesome groups can be blamed on the early settlers. Mormons come somewhere in between in time but I wouldn't call them extreme, and scientologists came a lot later but I wouldn't call them a religeon.

Australia has (had?) the Magnificant Meal which was a fairly nasty cult designed for the personal power of the founder, who I think is now in jail for a very long list of fraud and theft offences. We also have the "Exclusive Bretheren" which appears to all be about segregation and control and unfortunately has a lot of money to spend on financing election campaigns (which is odd because they forbid their members from voting). From their point of view I would be a doubly evil bastard by using a computer and using a copmputer to say something about them. They are actually one of the groups that helped Feilding get elected and to keep Feilding happy the government is proposing this stupid filter. IMHO for it to be seen as a sucess it doesn't actually have to work, it just has to do something to convince Feilding that it works. It's ugly and grubby politics - this stupid filter is just a bribe to allow an idiot to get more money from a bunch of really nasty luddites.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

ErikZ (55491) | more than 5 years ago | (#26234607)

Actually, I've never seen any kind of god-based religious extremist try anything of the sort.

I'm not referring to the communists, socialists, vegetarians though. They're always trying to push their beliefs on others.

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26251951)

Actually, I've never seen any kind of god-based religious extremist try anything of the sort.

-Lifers
-evangelicals who destroyed the worldwide economy by putting a potted plant..a shrub if you will.. in charge of the world's largest consumer market.
-the mormon church (prop 8 anyone?)

that's just a small, short list off the top of my head, and my mind and body are severely addled by illness atm.

Re:Proud to be an American... (3, Insightful)

corstar (916066) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229493)

And both are still run by criminals!

OMG! !news (1)

278MorkandMindy (922498) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229031)

Surprising really. With all the effort gone to "think of the children" (read : We need your vote so will go along with a scheme that no-one thinks will work), it has been delayed?

Remember (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229033)

Never forget [goatse.fr]

Re:Remember (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229171)

We know you wear it in a heart shaped pendant around your neck 3

Don't forget the goods! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229269)

We can do it!!! [google.com]

*sigh* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229035)

Damn this country. Damn its impending membership in the Surveillance Kingdom. Canada next I say...

Is this the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229047)

Emperor's new firewall?

Actually, I'm wondering when Rudd will release his little red book.

On the first day of X-mas... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229135)

On the first day of Christmas the government brought me... A time extension for my isp. I must have faith in my ISP, iinet. Help me iinet, you're my only hope. I have around 20 days to download like the wind, then my 40 gig on peak - 60 gig off peak internet goes to hell and I need to start thinking about moving to... England...?

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (2, Interesting)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229143)

Nope. England is getting nearly as bad. I'm thinking Antarctica. Time to build a new civilization based on 21st century evolved values, not 16th century ones.

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229231)

How's about we make a civilisation based on liberty. That way we don't have to worry about losing our liberties.

Wait... I think there's already a country like this... and it's a damn sight better than ours!

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (1)

Hucko (998827) | more than 5 years ago | (#26237959)

But will Holland accept us?

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (1)

Samah (729132) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229405)

Nah I think you want an underwater city like Rapture [wikipedia.org] .

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229439)

Nope. England is getting nearly as bad. I'm thinking Antarctica. Time to build a new civilization based on 21st century evolved values, not 16th century ones.

canada.

Throttling, but not censorship. Liberal copyright laws, and a heavy weight copyright reform lobbyist with the ear of the newspapers and MSM.

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (1)

Pichu0102 (916292) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229949)

Good luck. If you tried that, I'm pretty sure most other countries would bomb you to nonexistence. Can't have the proles getting uppity and thinking they can form their own country where they aren't drained by the upper class.

Re:On the first day of X-mas... (1)

Xiroth (917768) | more than 5 years ago | (#26231667)

Remember, the trials are not going to be live [slashdot.org] , so it shouldn't affect you as a normal customer. Hopefully those trials will be the last we hear of this.

Ho ho ho! (-1, Offtopic)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229141)

Turkey and cranberry flavoured cheetos for dinner. Anime viewed on an ancient laptop for the hundredth time. Realising you can move out of your parents basement to a room upstairs because they died twenty years ago as you pick the cheeto crumbs out of you neckbeard and from the folds of your wolf shirt.

A cheap fortified wine to wash down the antidepressants and, later on, an overdose.

Slashdot Christmas.

Re:Ho ho ho! (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229655)

Class!

I just pitty that zombie with an offtopic mod.

Re:Ho ho ho! (1)

badkarmadayaccount (1346167) | more than 5 years ago | (#26236399)

Not really in the same situation, but even the obsessive, ADHD-addled highschooler here just felt the real spirit of slashdot. This is better than Christmas. This is home, my^H^Hour home. Cheers!

BTW, do you like whiskey or vodka?

There are other ways of suppressing information... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229149)

This just in from Guido's blog, premier political blog in the UK.

There is some rumour about a big political operator's son having his e-mail hacked. Minor story about a criminal act. And the lawyers have just slapped a writ on all the newspapers and bloggers forbidding them from mentioning this. Luckily, Guido is not so easily cowed....http://www.order-order.com/2008/12/up-yours-carter-ruck.html

Freedom demands that there should be a high traffic on this attempt to suppress news, so slashdot and spread all you can....

Re:There are other ways of suppressing information (1)

igb (28052) | more than 5 years ago | (#26231229)

If Zac Goldsmith is a big political operator, I'd hate to see what a small one was.

Re:There are other ways of suppressing information (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26241293)

This just in from Guido's blog, premier political blog in the UK.

There is some rumour about a big political operator's son having his e-mail hacked. Minor story about a criminal act. And the lawyers have just slapped a writ on all the newspapers and bloggers forbidding them from mentioning this. Luckily, Guido is not so easily cowed....http://www.order-order.com/2008/12/up-yours-carter-ruck.html

Freedom demands that there should be a high traffic on this attempt to suppress news, so slashdot and spread all you can....

It's so true and it's on Wikileaks

Merry Christmas (1)

aaron alderman (1136207) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229197)

Now that's one Christmas gift I'm happy to get!

Temporary reprieve, but (4, Insightful)

DaBookshah (1234170) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229225)

We need to ensure we have Conroys head on a stake when he comes up for re-election, and we need to make sure everyone knows why, too.

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (1)

corstar (916066) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229547)

Hell yeah! It's time to cut a few tall poppies down starting with these corrupt assholes. Does anyone remember Comrade Kevin promising a broadband initiative during his campaign? This filter was what he was promising! Fuck the government. They have far too much power in this country...

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (1)

TheSeer2 (949925) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229817)

Don't you get it! NBN = FASTER. FILTER = SLOW. They balance each other out! We can maintain the status quo, and for only several billion dollars! It's a bargain!

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (1)

TheSeer2 (949925) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229813)

Why only Conroy? It's not like he's a rogue minister pushing this against his party's will.

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (1)

Xiroth (917768) | more than 5 years ago | (#26231631)

Good luck: Conroy is a senate-based minister - he'd be pretty close to the top of his party's state list, which means that you'd have to vote out everyone under him on the state's Labor senate list before you could get him. You'd be looking at a shift of something like 35-40% of the vote.

That's the downside to proportional representation - you can't remove individuals unless they're from a small party/independent.

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26232035)

Unless you get of your lazy arse and vote below the line, that is.
Actually, voting below the line might allow you to sidestep fucked up Labor party backroom deals that see the likes of Steve Fielding elected.

Re:Temporary reprieve, but (1)

ian_from_brisbane (596121) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232475)

Yeah I was thinking along the same lines, but then I saw him tell Telstra to f*** off with regard to the National Broadband Network, which was a good call.

Still, no point having a good NBN if it's censored.

When will you learn? (1)

kramer2718 (598033) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229307)

When will you Aussie's stand up for your rights and oust that lout Mugabe. Ohh, wait. That's some other commonwealth country. Who's your dictator again?

Re:When will you learn? (1)

fractoid (1076465) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229421)

We get to choose the face every 3 years. The policies, not so much, but it keeps the sheepulous happy and the government generally doesn't shoot at you or lock you up unless you're misbehaving.

Re:When will you learn? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229507)

and the government generally doesn't shoot at you or lock you up unless you're misbehaving. So, it's like in North Korea, then.

Re:When will you learn? (2, Insightful)

shirro (17185) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229555)

and the government generally doesn't shoot at you or lock you up unless you're misbehaving.
So, it's like in North Korea, then.

More like the US really but with funny accents.

Oh, wait, no! They DO shoot you and lock you up for nothing in the US.

So yeah, North Korea. So ronery and sadry arone.

Cool (3, Interesting)

suckmysav (763172) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229329)

So Optarse are volunteering for the trial eh?

I couldn't ask for a better test case really. Those cretins are so goddamn incompetent that they have not a hope in hell of getting it working to an acceptable level.

Roll on the trial I say!

All aboard. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229417)

Australia's government is right on course to prove yet again that it is out of touch with its own society. Censorship, all aboard the fail train.

Ballad of the Clean Feed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26229463)

Take my torrents, take my sites, you're trying to take away my rights.
I don't care, I'm still free, you can't take the web from me.

I'm gonna fight, take it back, clean feed (can shove it up its arse). (faster, maybe bleeped :P).
Independents/Liberals, you're still free, you can save the net for me.

(instrumental)

There's no place, we can't be - now we've got the proxies.
You can't take the net from me.

-Seer.

Oh great my internet is going to go down. (1)

upuv (1201447) | more than 5 years ago | (#26229575)

An in line filter. Well all I see is a massive slow down and halt. Witch is soon followed by a renewed increase in encrypted traffic.

This thing is going to have a dramatic impact on Aussie commerce.

This is such an ill founded idea and complete waste of tax payers funds. This is simply going to start an arms race that the government and the ISP have little chance of winning.

Note in Aus that most Internet plans have byte limit caps. Thus the ISP's have little interest in being in a commanding position of this arms race.

All this is going to do is create a harbor where highly skilled individuals are going to create increasing harder to detect traffic. Which of course is going to ultimately result in increasing clandestine illegal traffic.

All I got to say is this is this is 100% the fault of business not being able to adapt to the capabilities of the Internet. P2P being one of the greatest advances. P2P is easily the greatest example of a missed opportunities. People tried to but the fearful mega-corp entities out there simple curled up in tight ball under there desks and ordered in the legal swat teams.

This will never work (1)

Techmeology (1426095) | more than 5 years ago | (#26231865)

Censoring The Internet (without enormous economic losses) does not work. Here's why: Step 1: Introduce content filters that work on HTTP only. They filter only "extreme stuff". Anti-Step 1: Use a simple web proxy based in another country to see what you want. Step 2: Block access to web proxies and similar sites Anti-Step 2: Use your own proxy server - based in another country, on another port. Step 3: Block access to all ports except port 80 Anti-Step 3: Create a redundant proxy mechanism that encrypts and decrypts the site to be beyond filterability - again the servers are in another country. Step 4: Make the internet available only between computers in your country/not at all. Anti-Step 4: Huge economic losses due to inability to trade effectively with other nations, and a secret underground internet society of DOOM! Short(ish) answer: in a democratic country, there would be outrage long before The Internet was effectively censored. Once this has happened, you've got a Nazi style nation. Make your conclusions from this as you will.

o rly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26231993)

old news is old

I for one am glad I'm an American. (1)

HyperNull (1438987) | more than 5 years ago | (#26232711)

This is my computer. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. Without me, my computer is useless.
Without my computer, I am useless.
I must program my computer true. I must hack faster than the enemy who is trying to kill me.
I must hack him before he hacks me.
I will.
My computer and I know that what counts in war is not the lines we write, the spread of our worms or the chaos we make.
We know that it is the hits that count.
We will hit.
My computer is human, even as I am human, because it is my life.
Thus, I will learn it as a brother.
I will learn its weaknesses, its strengths, its parts, its accessories, its keyboard and its monitor.
I will keep my computer clean and ready, even as I am clean and ready.
We will become part of each other.
Before God I swear this creed.
My computer and I are the defenders of the internet.
We are the masters of our enemy.
We are the saviors of my life.
So be it, until victory is the internet's and there is no enemy.

That's good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26233295)

The longer this gets delayed, the sooner this idiot [wikipedia.org] might finally be laughed out of Cabinet, and/or this nutjob [wikipedia.org] , who holds a swinging Senate vote and who this filter is designed to please, will lose his seat. Either will probably do, and the latter is a pretty safe bet to happen on 30 June 2010 (Fielding was extraordinarily lucky to get elected in the first place). Patience, Australia.

SOME INSIDE INFORMATION (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26234283)

For those of you who are not Australian you might be interested to know about some very suspicious ties to current events.

1)We Australians have been promised a NEW national high speed broadband network for several years. But it simply has not materialized in any way. It has been continually re-evaluated bogged down and delayed, again and again. Why ?

2)The countries massive monopolistic telco callled Telstra recently declined to submit a full proposal for the new broadband network on the basis that the government would not discose any of the regulation proposed for the new network. Let me reliterate - Our national Telco essentially walked away from a multi billion dollar contract. Why ?

3) Steven Conroy and the recently elected Government think it nessecary to implement a manditory filter, to block all Australians from viewing content THEY deem inappropriate. Why ?

Well people, from this armchair it seems painfully obvious that some invisible, powerfull force is pushing to have any new networks in Australia built with filtering and spying hardware inbuilt from ground up (rememeber AT&T POST 911?).

Hence why the telcos and people have found themselves fighting the government and hence why a new network remains a stagnating pipe dream.

People are learning too much on the net and its all about controll.

On the first day of X-mas... (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 5 years ago | (#26236783)

Interesting. While the Puritans certainly could have been considered 'religious extremists' back in the time they settled here, they were, by far, not the majority.Most of the Founding Fathers weren't Puritans

Re:Proud to be an American... (1)

clint999 (1277046) | more than 5 years ago | (#26237105)

Australia's constitution was not made by criminals. It was written by a wealthy land owning elite. The criminals were their parents cheap labour. Australia did not exist until federation in 1901. Transportation of convicts ended in 1857.Prior to 1901 the states were self governing colonies. The colony of South Australia was settled by free settlers not convicts. People settled my state for religious freedom, to own land and for profit - not a convict in sight.The reason the Australian constitution is not as noble as the US constitution is that Australia was not founded by revolutionaries. We remained part of the British empire and inherited the attitudes and structures of England. The US adopted a republic based on the French model which celebrated liberty and equality.The filter is the result of a coalition between anti-liberal socialists and catholics. The ALP right faction is strongly influenced by catholicism and is socially conservative. The ALP left factions may have championed social change once, but it I suspect it was just a reaction to the conservatism of the times and they have no real commitment to individual freedom being socialists.So the ALP are just as crazy as the GOP religious right but far more dangerous as there is not a libertarian amongst them to stand up for freedom.The current government used to be a socially progressive, center left workers party but probably should change their name to the Christian Democrats as they are basically a front for Roman Catholicism these days.
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