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Fairpoint Pledges To Violate Net Neutrality

timothy posted more than 5 years ago | from the we'll-read-it-to-you-over-the-phone dept.

The Internet 249

wytcld writes "Fairpoint Communications, which has taken over Verizon's landline business in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont, has announced that on February 6, 'AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third-party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third-party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.' Since Verizon spun off its lines to Fairpoint in a maneuver that got debt off of Verizon's balance sheets by saddling Fairpoint with it, there was concern by the public service boards of the three states about how Fairpoint would deal with that debt. Fairpoint's profit plan: force all Webmail users through Fairpoint's portal, by blocking all direct access to Webmail portals other than its own. Will Fairpoint's own search engine portal be next? What can stop them?"

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249 comments

I present (1)

Sylos (1073710) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243493)

the first of many. and not comments. I mean Fairpoint communications. How soon until it no longer matters whether or not someone wants network neutrality and the ISP's just don't follow through anyways?

Re:I present (4, Informative)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243941)

I see this as an experimental issue from them, and that means that if they don't have an outrage from their users then it's OK to not have a net neutrality and that we soon will see others following them.

Personally I think that they are shooting themselves in the foot just to later discover that they have burnt all their bridges.

So in order to complain about this I think that anybody disagreeing should send an email to their contact email address: information@fairpoint.com [mailto] .

I don't think so, Tim. (3, Insightful)

Ceiynt (993620) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243507)

And as soon as there support lines are ringing non-stop, and they start losing some of thier bigger customers, that will stop pretty soon.

Re:I don't think so, Tim. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243611)

And as soon as there support lines are ringing non-stop, and they start losing some of thier bigger customers, that will stop pretty soon.

Their and their, you stupid cunt.

Re:I don't think so, Tim. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243973)

Your penis is small. It's a shame there's no cure for your inadequacies.

Re:I don't think so, Tim. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243995)

And as soon as there support lines are ringing non-stop, and they start losing some of thier bigger customers, that will stop pretty soon.

Their and their, you stupid cunt.

Ewe mussed dye now.

The customers may only speak with their dollar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243515)

and do not sign up with them. It sucks because there are many areas of the united states that have only one choice of service provider. I feel sorry for those stuck with this one.

(un)Fairpoint's Profit Plan (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243519)

Step 1.) Irritate your customers by reducing their connectivity, censoring the internet and trying to change their habits
Step 2.) ????
Step 3.) Profit

Re:(un)Fairpoint's Profit Plan (5, Funny)

BSAtHome (455370) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243565)

No, no, there is no secret sauce; let me have a crack at it for you:
1) Irritate your customers by reducing their connectivity
2) get into greater debt
3) ask for Govt. bailout package
4) profit
5) get bought by competition to salvage the broken pieces
6) more profit

Re:(un)Fairpoint's Profit Plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243921)

anyone have a car analogy?

Re:(un)Fairpoint's Profit Plan (2, Interesting)

Guil Rarey (306566) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244043)

...pretty much, yeah.

Which is why it took about exactly one encounter with Fairpoint customer dissservice for us to completely dump them as any kind of service provider whatsover and switch everything over to our cable provider.

what can stop them (5, Insightful)

portscan (140282) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243521)

watching their customers dropping like flies...

Re:what can stop them (4, Interesting)

Repossessed (1117929) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244265)

How many of their customers are in areas with only one non dialup provider?

I doubt this will last though, Fairpoint isn't big enough to stand up against MSFT's legal department, and the Tier 1 contract probably requires them to be a neutral provider.

This wont effect me at all. (4, Insightful)

deft (253558) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243525)

Which is why I'm not looking for a new provider right now.

if it did, I'd be looking up new plans in my area. Thats just rediculous. They are altering and restricting service, with no added benefits anywhere?

The competitors should be advertising that they arent fairpoint as their best marketing campaign ever.

Re:This wont effect me at all. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243595)

rediculous

YOU MUST DIE NOW

Re:This wont effect me at all. (1)

residieu (577863) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243895)

You have the added benefit of that warm feeling knowing the poor executives will be getting a better bonus.

Re:This wont effect me at all. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243943)

Green Mountain Access.

spelling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243949)

ridiculous

Re:This wont effect me at all. (2, Interesting)

jonadab (583620) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244165)

> The competitors should be advertising

They're *the* local telephone company across multiple states. They have no direct competitors in that market.

I suppose cellular providers and cable providers will try to take advantage of this, but cellphonscht kshcht bzsakt shchtkischt rural kschischt bzczoscht, and cable providers only offer internet and maybe VOIP (err, and television if you're into that), which in the general case are not necessarily very good substitutes for an actual phone line.

Having said that, the fact that Fairpoint is a spinoff from Verizon makes me very glad I stopped doing business with Verizon a couple of years ago. This is a cut and dry case of abusing a monopoly in one market (phone lines) to elbow your way into (and competitors out of) another market (email), so hopefully they'll get the book thrown at them good and hard. Full-blown net neutrality may not even be necessary in this particular case; standard antitrust regulation should be good enough, I would think. (But IANAL,ATINLA.)

Re:This wont effect me at all. (4, Funny)

nextekcarl (1402899) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244417)

Okay, I just have to ask, is this:

... but cellphonscht kshcht bzsakt shchtkischt rural kschischt bzczoscht, and ...

and internet meme I just haven't heard of yet, or did you have a stroke?

Well, as they say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243531)

If you don't like it, feel free to start your own massive broadband ISP.

Re:Well, as they say... (4, Insightful)

calmofthestorm (1344385) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243591)

Sure, just have the government hand me a monopoly and free lines and I'll get started!

Re:Well, as they say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244381)

Or you could just not use their service and initiate an ad campaign to educate people of the downside of this event from continuing.

Fill their airwaves.

Send luncheon meat to these addresses (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243539)

Fairpoint contact addresses:

Northern New England

521 E. Morehead Street,
Suite 240 Box #29,
Charlotte, NC 28202
Email: information@fairpoint.com

Corporate

521 E. Morehead Street,
Suite 250 Box F,
Charlotte, NC 28202
Email: information@fairpoint.com

Also tell everyone you know about, Streisand effect, tor, ssh tunnels, and other anti censorship tools.

Re:Send luncheon meat to these addresses (-1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243721)

Also, with such tactics, doesn't an ISP lose "common carrier" status and be susceptible under the DMCA to lawsuits for copyright infringements they suddenly help deliver? (If I were a customer, I would consider a class action against them simply because I signed up for the internet, not fairpoint's approved subset.)

Re:Send luncheon meat to these addresses (4, Informative)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243969)

Also, with such tactics, doesn't an ISP lose "common carrier" status

I can't recall how many times I have posted that ISP's don't have common carrier status. They don't need common carrier status for protection under the DMCA.

Whoever modded up the parent: YOU FAIL!

ISPs don't have common carrier status?? (1)

bacchus612 (168559) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244189)

Also, with such tactics, doesn't an ISP lose "common carrier" status

I can't recall how many times I have posted that ISP's don't have common carrier status. They don't need common carrier status for protection under the DMCA.

Whoever modded up the parent: YOU FAIL!

I must have missed your earlier posts - could you please explain why ISPs don't have common carrier status under the law? (in the US)

Good thing (5, Interesting)

dreampod (1093343) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243541)

I think that ultimately this is good for the case for Net Neutrality. It is a blatant move that blocks access rather than slowing it which will provoke an outcry even from the computer illiterate. This gives a real world example of what can happen without Net Neutrality to hit back against tiered internet supporters who claim that there will be no real downsides if we allow companies to boost their bottom lines at the expense of consumers.

Re:Good thing (3, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243617)

My guess is users attempting to navigate to Yahoo's mail site are simply redirected to Fairpoint's portal page, so their access isn't blocked, and the average clueless luser may not notice a thing

(other than the page looks different)

Re:Good thing (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244123)

Which is pretty well the definition of Man-in-the-middle attack. While (hopefully) won't choose to exploit the approach with anything more than wasting your screen space with advertising, I would hope that they would be subject to two types of lawsuits. One from AOL, Yahoo, MSN, et al for brand dilution and/or copyright infringement (the resulting screen is a derived work), and one from users for illegal interception of communications.

Re:Good thing (4, Insightful)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243771)

I wouldn't even call it net neutrality, it makes it an internet issue while this is just plain old common carrier (this was a previous article recently somewhere). I, as a telephone customer, call whoever I want. AT&T can't stop a call and say "Sorry, that's not a customer of ours or an approved partner, sorry. Call someone else."

It is not the googles and amazons of the world "calling" various internet surfers and demanding attention. It's the internet surfers who go out and "call"/retrieve the web pages they want. As soon as an ISP blocks that, they are not providing the internet they promised and lose common carrier status and the legal benefits it occurs by staying neutral and not checking what web pages are retrieved.

I hope Fairpoint goes through with this and gets their ass handed to them.

Re:Good thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244273)

AT&T can't stop a call and say "Sorry, that's not a customer of ours or an approved partner, sorry. Call someone else."

No, but they can charge you $2.99 a minute for it, without telling you about the fee til you get a large bill. They won't do anything til you pay the bill, and if you pay the bill, you're not getting any bloody cent back.

Re:Good thing (5, Informative)

Miseph (979059) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244345)

"As soon as an ISP blocks that, they are not providing the internet they promised and lose common carrier status and the legal benefits it occurs by staying neutral and not checking what web pages are retrieved.'

Can't lose what they never had. ISPs don't have, and aren't required to have, common carrier status; the idea was floated, but they shot it down because, frankly, it would cost an awful lot of money and create criminal penalties for failing to meet service guidelines. They DO get some protections from the DMCA safe harbor provisions which are similar to those given to common carriers, but they are slightly different and DO NOT require ISPs to retain any sort of common carrier status.

Basically, common carrier is achieved by guaranteeing that transmissions will be delivered to the intended recipient without any sort of interference or monitoring on the part of the carrier, as well as meeting certain requirements for uptime and maintenance, and the free provision of service for the purpose of emergency communications (ie. 911 calls), and the protection given is that common carriers cannot be prosecuted for any crimes which are committed with the use of their services no matter how heinous or large in scale. The safe harbor provisions are achieved simply by connecting users to the internet, and only grant protection from civil suits regarding copyright infringement by users on their large and potentially semi-monitored (there are rules regarding monitoring, but they do not forbid all monitoring of traffic, merely on taking action with regards to certain aspects of it) network.

Not gonna happen (2, Informative)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243543)

Vermont's motto is "Freedom and unity". I don't think they have a snowball's chance in hell of doing this.

Re:Not gonna happen (3, Informative)

Terminal Saint (668751) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243559)

Let's not forget New Hampshire's "Live Free or Die."

Re:Not gonna happen (5, Informative)

Firehed (942385) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243685)

And as someone currently in NH who lived in VT for most of his life, I'll point out that, by and large, the only people who actually believe in those mottos are growing-pot-on-the-porch hippie types that nobody takes seriously, and suffice to say aren't exactly internet-savvy.

FWIW, I did see a bumper sticker on a Verizon service van saying something to the general effect of "Fairpoint is the only company worse than we are!" and had to agree. Even still, you're lucky to have one option for a broadband provider in many parts of VT and NH, let alone two. I can't speak for Maine but assume it's about the same.

HOWEVER, after looking at TFA (ignore sig, please), it looks like a quote has been pulled wildly out of context:

Starting Jan. 31, users of e-mail software applications like Microsoft Outlook can begin adjusting their e-mail settings. The process can be automated by visiting www.activate.MyFairPoint.net/emailupdate and following the instructions. Users can also update their settings manually.

Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6. After that date, Fastiggi said users will need to log on to www.MyFairPoint.net. Customers then click on Web mail and type in their existing user name@myfairpoint.net and existing password.

AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

Fastiggi said e-mail will automatically be forwarded from a customer's Verizon e-mail address to myfairpoint.net for three months, until April 30.

Sounds like all that's going to happen is Verizon will be killing off their portal which was previously doing some level of integration w/ AOL, Y!, and MSN, and those who have been bought out by Fairpoint will no longer be able to use it. Which makes sense, as they're no longer Verizon customers.

Re:Not gonna happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244339)

Indeed. To make it more clear, the third party website they are talking about here is the Verizon portal, not the Yahoo, MSN, ect site. That's what it seems from that quote.

What's in a name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243955)

Fox news' slogal is "Fair and Balanced"

The second iraq war was called "Operation Iraqi Freedom"

Haven't you read 1984? This is how you control the populous: tell them that the only way to truly be free is by having no freedom.

Re:Not gonna happen (1)

saigon_from_europe (741782) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244223)

Vermont's motto is "Freedom and unity".

This way they deliver "unity" - all mail web-services under one, united interface.

Also you get freedom from non-Fairpoint advertisements.

No it doesn't. (5, Informative)

barfy (256323) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243551)

Did anyone read the article???

Verizon provided a service to IT'S customers where they can read webmail of another provider on their web page. Fairpoint is saying that after x date that if you still want that kind of service you have to go through THEIR web page. You can still go to Yahoo, Gmail, AOL, and Hotmail, and read your mail from those pages directly.

This is NOT a net neutrality issue. It is an added feature provided by the provider.

I for instance have NEVER used any of my ISP features, as I have separate email provider. Nothing Changes.

Shenanigans!
Happy New Year

Re:No it doesn't. (4, Insightful)

Trahloc (842734) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243583)

Did *you* read the article?

"... will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal."

Sounds pretty straight forward to me. You wont be able to go to mail.yahoo.com, you'll have to go to allyourbasebelongtous.MyFairPoint.net to access your yahoo email.

Re:No it doesn't. (5, Funny)

pm_rat_poison (1295589) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243627)

allyourbasebelongtous.MyFairPoint.net

I'm pretty sure that would give you a 404. The correct url is
allyourbaseAREbelongtous.MyFairPoint.net

Re:No it doesn't. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243859)

hahaha. Domain names ARE not case sensitive. Your post is about as funny as the disconnection ones.

Re:No it doesn't. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244337)

He only capitalized the "ARE" to show that it was the part that was missing from the domain name in his parent. How does it feel to be so incredibly, painfully stupid? Retard.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

Ifni (545998) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244391)

The GP was not correcting capitalization, he was emphasizing that the GGP had omitted the word "are" from the URL. The capitalization was merely to call attention to the correction, which was wise since apparently some people are incapable of reading long sequences of concatenated words, as you have so aptly demonstrated.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244289)

No, don't you know that a website doesn't work if it doesn't have the magical www in front of it? So, it should be www.allyourbaseArebelongtous.MyFairPoint.net

(yes, I had someone tell me that as I was trying to get a site up... *sigh*)

Re:No it doesn't. (5, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243631)

Yes, I did RTFA, but unlike you, I did so with an open mind. Before the part you quote, it says, " Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6." In that context, it looks to me as though the Verizon webmail page is the "third party Web site" referred to. I'll grant that it's not written as clearly as it should be, but it does make more sense than the interpretation in the summary. Cutting off access to other provider's webmail site while allowing unhindered access to all of their other content just doesn't make sense. Telling new customers that if they want their third-party email on their homepage they need to use yours instead of their other providers does. My guess is that when the dust clears this will turn out to be Yet Another Slashdot Tempest In A Teapot.

Re:No it doesn't. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243743)

I understand and believe you, but can't resist:

just doesn't make sense

You must be new here.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243849)

Let me get this straight.

If I use gmail to read my email that's fine.

But if I use google/ig as my home page to read my email (as google allows me to do for the last 2-3 months), that's going to be blocked?

Re:No it doesn't. (3, Insightful)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243957)

No. If you were using Verizon's webmail page you're going to have to change to Fairpoint's. If you weren't, nothing changes.

Re:No it doesn't. (2, Insightful)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243853)

I agree that most likely the reporter simply got it wrong, but these two sentences, especially with the instead link, certainly imply that Yahoo is one of the third parties whose email will not be available except through fairpoint.

Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

rhizome (115711) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244149)

I agree that most likely the reporter simply got it wrong, but these two sentences, especially with the instead link, certainly imply that Yahoo is one of the third parties whose email will not be available except through fairpoint.

You inferred it but it's not implied (much less 'certainly'). If Yahoo was a "third party Web site" for the purpose of the article, then MSN would be too ("Yahoo and MSN subscribers") and they wouldn't have used the singular "site." All you have to do is replace "third party Web" with "Verizon's" and everything makes perfect sense without any interpretive gymnastics.

Re:No it doesn't. (3, Insightful)

Trahloc (842734) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243879)

Hmm well I read it as you can still use the "third party" email systems as meaning all those companies listed, such as yahoo. You just need to access it via the isp's portal. Now its possible the writer of that release whipped it up in 5 minutes without proof reading it for clarity so you might have the right of it... but strangely I'm going to continue leaning towards /.'s interpretation until proven otherwise. Better to holler and shout and be wrong than stay silent and be proven right when your no longer able to access your email on the official site.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243977)

Better to holler and shout and be wrong than stay silent and be proven right when your no longer able to access your email on the official site.

Even better is to go right to the source and ask the horse. Why not check with Fairpoint itself and find out just what's going on? If "m right, no problem; if I'm wrong, we'll know what to do next.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

Trahloc (842734) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244251)

True, but I've worked in call centers, they're the last ones to be told anything. I recall multiple times hearing about things from the customers that the higher ups never bothered to filter down to the front line.

Besides, this is more fun. :)

Re:No it doesn't. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243635)

Yes, but *VERIZON* is the third party. You'll have to use MyFairPoint instead of MyVerizon.

Re:No it doesn't. (2, Insightful)

ptbarnett (159784) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243663)

Sounds pretty straight forward to me. You wont be able to go to mail.yahoo.com, you'll have to go to allyourbasebelongtous.MyFairPoint.net to access your yahoo email.

I think the article is wrong, having been written by a typical clueless journalist.

This sounds like Verizon subscribers were getting some sort of "partner" package with Yahoo, MSN, and/or AOL -- i.e. certain things like email service were out-sourced.

My father was offered the same deal with Southwestern Bell (now AT&T) DSL. I steered him away from it.

Re:No it doesn't. (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243687)

Did *you* read the article?

Frequently the authors of such articles are not very technical and don't understand all details of the situation.

It is eminently plausible that the author of the article was confused, AND Fairpoint was talking about the third-party Verizon portal for accessing Yahoo mail and other webmail services.

In fact... it's much more likely than that an ISP would go to measures to block third-party webmail sites

Which would be extremely unpopular among subscribers, and might upset the third-party webmail services, causing them to take action against the ISP, i.e. by blocking access through the unauthorized "portal" site

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243861)

It is eminently plausible that the author of the article was confused, AND Fairpoint was talking about the third-party Verizon portal for accessing Yahoo mail and other webmail services.

...Verizon has a site called the "third-party portal"? Yeah, I can see how that could get confusing in a situation where there are real third parties, none of whom are Verizon.

Re:No it doesn't. (2, Informative)

Firehed (942385) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243725)

Context is really damn important, and you're using even less of it than the summary. The third party website in question is a Verizon portal, not AOL/Y!/MSN's respective sites.

Of course, Rutland VT (where TFA comes from) isn't exactly known for being tech-savvy, so the meaning could have been a bit clearer, but read enough of it and it's fairly clear. I go into it a bit more in a post above, but this quote without creative trimming makes it fairly clear what the intent is:

FairPoint spokeswoman Beth Fastiggi said Friday that Internet customers will keep their existing user names and passwords but will use a different domain: myfairpoint.net.

Starting Jan. 31, users of e-mail software applications like Microsoft Outlook can begin adjusting their e-mail settings. The process can be automated by visiting www.activate.MyFairPoint.net/emailupdate and following the instructions. Users can also update their settings manually.

Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6. After that date, Fastiggi said users will need to log on to www.MyFairPoint.net. Customers then click on Web mail and type in their existing user name@myfairpoint.net and existing password.

AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

Fastiggi said e-mail will automatically be forwarded from a customer's Verizon e-mail address to myfairpoint.net for three months, until April 30.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

void* (20133) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244127)

We have two paragraphs.

One paragraph says "Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6. After that date, Fastiggi said users will need to log on to www.MyFairPoint.net. Customers then click on Web mail and type in their existing user name@myfairpoint.net and existing password."

That says, if your webmail was at Verizon, it's going to be at MyFairPoint.net

Now we have the next paragraph

"AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal."

Why would the 'third-party website' be a back reference to the preceding paragraph, rather than to "AOL, Yahoo! and MSN" in the same sentence, when they are indeed third parties?

It may be that they're talking about 'we're moving whatever integrated AOL, Yahoo! and MSN stuff from the Verizon portal to our new one', but they certainly don't make it clear.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

Curmudgeonlyoldbloke (850482) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243781)

I read it, and what I saw was "Company A buys company B, after date C punters need to collect ISP email from mail.a.com instead of mail.b.com".

Doesn't seem like a "net neutrality" story (or indeed a story at all) to me.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

twoallbeefpatties (615632) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243621)

Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6. After that date, Fastiggi said users will need to log on to www.MyFairPoint.net. Customers then click on Web mail and type in their existing user name@myfairpoint.net and existing password.

AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

This is all rather vague. What is this "access to content" that I'll still have without having "access to e-mail?"

Re:No it doesn't. (0, Offtopic)

opec (755488) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243623)

You can still go to Yahoo, Gmail, AOL, and Hotmail, and read your mail from those pages directly.

Apparently not.

Sixth paragraph of TFA [rutlandherald.com] :

AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

Re:No it doesn't. (2, Insightful)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243625)

Verizon provided a service to IT'S customers where they can read webmail of another provider on their web page. Fairpoint is saying that after x date that if you still want that kind of service you have to go through THEIR web page. You can still go to Yahoo, Gmail, AOL, and Hotmail, and read your mail from those pages directly.

Article says:

Web-based e-mail users can continue to access their e-mail at the Verizon Web site until Feb. 6. After that date, Fastiggi said users will need to log on to www.MyFairPoint.net. Customers then click on Web mail and type in their existing user name@myfairpoint.net and existing password.

AOL, Yahoo! and MSN subscribers will continue to have access to content but will no longer be able to access their e-mail through the third party Web site. Instead, Yahoo! and other third party e-mail will be accessed directly at the MyFairPoint.net portal.

So, (1) customersl ISP email addresses are changing, and (2) people with certain non-Fairpoint webmails will have to read their email through MyFairPoint.net instead of "the third party Web site" which I take to mean the AOL/MSN/etc site ("third party" being, not Fairpoint or the subscriber).

I DID RTFA, and it certainly seems to be saying what you say it isn't. Do you have a better-worded article?

Re:No it doesn't. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243851)

It's referring to the Verizon portal which is third-party to the web service. Note the singular use of "the third party Web site" rather than sites.

How about someone settle this once and for all and call fairpoint asking for clarification.

Customers with questions can call FairPoint at (800) 240-5019.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243927)

It's referring to the Verizon portal which is third-party to the web service. Note the singular use of "the third party Web site" rather than sites.

How about someone settle this once and for all and call fairpoint asking for clarification.

Customers with questions can call FairPoint at (800) 240-5019.

But Verizon isn't a "third party", they're with Fairpoint as a first party (making the changes) against the subscribers as the other first party (who the changes were made to). Now, it sounds like Verizon might have a site with "third-party" in the name, so if that's the case...

Re:No it doesn't. (3, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243761)

Exactly. they are shutting down VERIZONS integrated email portal. NOT blocking access to mail.yahoo.com

The whole story headline is a troll and should be voted down.

Re:No it doesn't. (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243825)

I second this. I commented twice on this story based on the summary alone. This looks like they are cutting off integrated access to Verizon's portal based on them splitting from Verizon.

The summary is a troll to elicit reactions such as mine or the author just really misunderstood.

Re:No it doesn't. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243893)

Agreed. What this is referring to is way back when, Verizon partnered with Yahoo, MSN, and AOL to provide e-mail services for DSL Customers. These customers, that created these Verizon home pages that linked directly to these 3rd party accounts are going away.

So who sues them first? (2, Interesting)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243571)

  1. AOL
  2. Yahoo!
  3. MSN/Microsoft
  4. A class-action by their subscribers
  5. the FTC
  6. the FCC

...why didn't I see Gmail on their list?

Re:So who sues them first? (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243733)

...why didn't I see Gmail on their list?

Because nobody messes with Google. Google has very effective ways of getting even, if you toy with them.

You'll find your site permanently at the bottom of search results, or banned entirely.

Re:So who sues them first? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243873)

I'd venture a guess that Google would cut off access to search from all of Fairpoint's IP space and have their lawyers sit around waiting for Fairpoint's call.

Re:So who sues them first? (2, Funny)

Timothy Brownawell (627747) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243953)

  1. AOL
  2. Yahoo!
  3. MSN/Microsoft
  4. A class-action by their subscribers
  5. the FTC
  6. the FCC
  • United Grammarians of America sues the Herald for misleading use of "third party".

(un)Fairpoint Business Model (1)

pm_rat_poison (1295589) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243577)

Step 1.) Irritate your customers by censoring the internet, reducing their connectivity and forcing them new habits
Step 2.) ?????
Step 3.) Profit!

Net Neutrality is Worth Fighting For (1)

TechForensics (944258) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243579)

This chipping away at net neutrality is dangerous. Let's hope legislators in Maine, NH and VT see that compromising net neutrality is extending to large corporations the same preferences they enjoy offline, and granting their wealth the same citizen-crushing weight that enables travesties like the RIAA's greedy rape of innocents.

Net neutrality is more important than most know. It is *worth fighting for*. Educate others!

Net Neutrality can Discourage Online Monopolies (1)

TechForensics (944258) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243593)

.. and aren't monopolies bad enough offline when a corporation gets too much power?

I say let them do it (1)

TX297 (861307) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243681)

All it would prove to Joe Schmuck is that net neutrality is bad. We're relying on public awareness of net neutrality, and what better way to do it than to piss off a whole group of subscribers?

I doubt it (4, Insightful)

carlzum (832868) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243889)

I'll reserve my judgment until I see this reported in a better source. This article is written so poorly I suspect the author has no idea what his misstatement implies. If FairPoint is planning to block major webmail sites, the Rutland Herald missed out on a huge story. They seem to be the only news source with this information.

Look at what other sites [boston.com] are reporting about this deal. "In Maine, regulators have alerted FairPoint that it will be scrutinized more closely than probably any other utility in the state's history." If true, the details will come to light quickly as this hits the major news outlets.

I live in Vermont and have Fairpoint (5, Informative)

hansoloaf (668609) | more than 5 years ago | (#26243979)

I got their mailer and here what it says :

Yahoo!, AOL and MSN or Other Third-Party Portal Users

On Jan 31, 2009, you'll still have access to Yahoo!, AOL, and MSN content, but you'll no longer be able to access your email directly through the third-party portal. Instead, you'll now have access to the new MyFairPoint.net portal.

Beginning January 1, 2009, we'll start the migration of all Verizon-Yahoo! emails and settings to your new FairPoint WebMail account. You'll be able to access your FairPoint WebMail on this date, but your Verizon-Yahoo! messages may not be transferred until later in the month. Please check your new inbox periodically to find out when your messages are moved. The migration is expected to be complete by January 31, 2009.

Re:I live in Vermont and have Fairpoint (3, Interesting)

Skapare (16644) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244311)

Yahoo!, AOL and MSN or Other Third-Party Portal Users

On Jan 31, 2009, you'll still have access to Yahoo!, AOL, and MSN content, but you'll no longer be able to access your email directly through the third-party portal. Instead, you'll now have access to the new MyFairPoint.net portal.

If you were using the VERIZON third-party portal to access your email that is located at Yahoo!, AOL and/or MSN ... since you are no longer a customer of VERIZON, and instead are now a customer of FAIRPOINT, third-party access mechanism is now through FAIRPOINT's service. In other words, Fairpoint is going to be providing a similar kind of service that Verizon did.

I'm sure there will be problems for people with email addresses "@verizon.net". There should not be problems for people using other email addresses. I see nothing in this that says people cannot go to Yahoo!, AOL, or MSN directly for email address originally established through those providers (e.g. youremailaddress@aol.com). If such email accounts were previously restricted such that they could ONLY be accessed via the VERIZON web site, I could understand them being similarly restricted to the FAIRPOINT website. But as for people having their email addresses changed, I can't see that affecting anyone other than those who have an "@verizon.net" address.

A Glida Radner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26243981)

"You mean I'm going to have to go to Fairpoint's home page to check "all" my e-mail accounts. This is terrible and it'll bring about the collapse of the western civilization. Washington will be in flames and New York City will be reduced to rubble. How can they force us all to view our e-mail through their home page! Write your Congressman! Blog! Tell a friend!" "What was that? It only counts if you link your e-mail through your Verizon home page and only in Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire? Oh........NEVER MIND!"

U.exe (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244041)

There is no way they can block it without having an ssl proxy filter. That would allow them plain text views of user information. ie. bank account passwords, medical records... I think the government would stop that really quick.

http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.ultrareach.com/download_en.htm&sa=X&oi=smap&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=1&usg=AFQjCNE-DVlL7PRbTeO5epMPAh810jBVoA [google.com]

But then with, all the privacy protection governments are doing these days I could be wrong.

no competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244095)

fairpoint really doesn't have any competition up here besides cable, which is way too expensive for anyone up here to afford.

it's what web proxies are for (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26244159)

Seriously. take a lesson from the tech-savvy teenagers who routinely circumvent this kind of nonsense and use a web-based proxy. Or, use POP and SMTP access to the web-mail services. Now move along . . . .

Wouldn't fly with me (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | more than 5 years ago | (#26244375)

I wouldn't use their portal at all. Doing so would involve entering my e-mail password into a page potentially hosted by someone other than the e-mail provider. I don't do that. Period, end of discussion. Not with any password, ever. That kind of thing is exactly what the phishers try to get you to do, and I don't need my passwords leaking out.

And if they tried to force it by prohibiting direct access to those e-mail sites, I'd send them a little letter with an agreement to fill out. An agreement stating that they take full responsibility for any disclosure of my password, including responsibility for all costs of any sort directly or indirectly related to the disclosure. If they refuse, the whole exchange goes to the regulators attached to a complaint about them requiring me to disclose my passwords to them without them taking responsibility for them.

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