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Google Over IPv6 Coming Soon

CmdrTaco posted more than 5 years ago | from the what-no-ipv5 dept.

Google 264

fuzzel writes "Today Google announced Google over IPv6 where ISPs can sign up their DNS nameservers so that their users will get access to an almost fully IPv6-enabled Google, including http://www.google.com, images and maps, etc., just like in IPv4. Without this only http://ipv6.google.com is available, but then you go to IPv4 for most services. So, start kicking your ISPs to support IPv6 too, and let them sign up. Check this list of ISPs that already do native IPv6 to your doorstep. The question that now remains is: when will Slashdot follow?"

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Wow! (5, Insightful)

Atrox666 (957601) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371463)

Wow I can finally have all the advantages of IPv6 like

Until they run out of IPv4 addresses it really doesn't matter.
There are a few obscure tunneling applications to this but who cares.

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371479)

Speaking of IP V6, cracks are visible on the exterior of a settled suburban house in a lower middle-class neighborhood outside of Detroit. During the day, the house is mostly quiet save the occasional noise of babies' cries competing with shrill, high-pitched female voices. At night, the music of a handful of artists known as the "Three T's" - Tupac Shakur, Too Short, and Trick Daddy - blares from the domicile with aging blue-gray paint and bars on all of its windows. It is impossible to see into the house from outside because all of the windows are covered with aluminum foil. One window was broken but promptly taped together with the duct tape in the distinctive tell-tale pattern of brownian motion.

The interior of the house is barren save the sparse arrangement of old, unmatched furniture purchased(or, more likely, stolen) from an inner-city thrift shop; the centerpiece of it all being the stained, chintzy sofa peppered with the burns of marijuana and tobacco cigarettes. The place as a whole appears to be only a temporary living space, yet its inhabitants have lived here consistently for about ten years. The stench of dirty diapers, burned cooking oil, and the by-products of a metabolism so powerful it could fuel the outrunning of gazelles or a successful fistfight against 4 police officers at once permeates the entire home.

It may be mentioned in passing that this house's inhabitants are an assortment of African men, women, and children who live and sleep in intervals diametrically opposite to those of each other so that each inhabitant's productivity is maximized -- everybody in the house has their own role in a setup strikingly similar to the Smurfs' villiage or some other Socialist paradise.

A circular design of red, yellow, and brown was painted on the wall -- "Krylon on drywall" being the medium -- by the teenage male who is but one part of the small collective known as the Ubuntu developers.

The adult males do the brunt of the work. One bedroom of the house, the master bedroom, is the development studio. The whole outfit is the brainchild of Marcus Ubuntu, first-generation African immigrant who studied computer science at the university of Zimbabwe before fleeing the armed rebellion. At his left sit Reggie Omoko, associate programmer; and at his right sit Shawn James, graphic designer(it should be noted here that Shawn is the one who designed and painted the Ubuntu logo, reportedly gleaning Ubuntu's artistic inspiration from the color scheme and the shape of various public toilets).

The 2 women of the house serve as breeders and foragers, collecting the welfare and child support money and then buying copious amounts of food, drink, and dope in support of operations. The children of the house, in turn, support the women, though it is difficult to determine how exactly many children are in the house as they come and go as they please with some leaving permanently, some returning days or even years later.

The primary tools of this trade are an assortment of cutting-edge but stolen laptop and desktop computers. The Ubuntu operating system is coded in object-oriented C, a language Marcus developed at university because he didn't know that somebody had already invented C++. Years of crack and malt liquor-fueled hard work have transformed Ubuntu from a meager startup into the world's most popular open-source operating system.

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371697)

Your troll-fu is... ... um ... ...weird.

Re:Wow! (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371579)

Yea With NATs and DNS aliasing It will still be a while. Most likely there will be a point where they go to the people who reserved those big Class A and B networks, early on and edict of Use it or Loose it.

Re:Wow! (-1, Troll)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371905)

IPv6 is a myth, a lie. It's like when you used to believe in the Sasquatch or the easter bunny.

Let the dream die.

Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371471)

Now we will need 128bit computers to store these addresses

Re:Oh great (1)

LilGuy (150110) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372067)

Well I've had a 64-bit cpu for about two and a half years and I'm still running a 32-bit operating system for fear that none of my favorite games/programs will work properly under the 64 bit platform. Screw 128 bit.

hai2u 3la (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371477)

2676 = 2 x 2 x 3 x 223 [youtube.com]

Wait for it.... (4, Insightful)

growse (928427) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371489)

Cue people who don't understand routing and generally how the internet works saying "But why can't we just use NAT? HP don't need that many IP addresses!".

Re:Wait for it.... (1)

slugtastic (1437569) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371523)

But why can't we just use NA... No, the joke is too obvious.

Re:Wait for it.... (2, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372907)

You were only a NAT's cock away, why not finish up the joke? Are puns allowed? Oh wait, too late.

Re:Wait for it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371637)

I manage a few BGP AS and feel that I have a rather thorough understanding of routing including both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols.

I also fail to see any short-term (5-10 year) need or advantage. Would you care to educate me?

Re:Wait for it.... (5, Insightful)

growse (928427) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371801)

It's not about the short-term advantage because there is no short-term advantage. However, it's going to take a long time to do. Therefore, you start to think about doing it 10 years before it all goes tits-up.

We don't have a problem *now*. IPv4 is working great at the moment. However, we (people) are incredibly bad a doing global solutions to big problems quickly, so we need to start to migrate things early.

Re:Wait for it.... (5, Insightful)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371987)

We do have problems now. Which is why every residential Internet user is having to use NAT to connect more than one device to their always-on Internet connection, and why things like VoIP boxes (that require transparent two-way connectivity) require special ways of setting them up rather than just plugging into an Ethernet port in the wall.

We think we don't have problems because we're so used to jumping through the hoops, and even coming up with rationalizations for the mess we have ("Oh, but NAT gives me security because if my computer can't be connected to the Internet then it's completely impossible totally for a viroworm to assplode the packet fragmentation flag!")

We do have problems. If you don't think we do, fire up the configuration page of your router, and take a look at the "DMZ" and "port redirection" pages.

Re:Wait for it.... (2, Insightful)

growse (928427) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372049)

Oh, I know that individual users have problems now. But that's not the same sort of scale of problem of a large company requesting a new IP block from their ISP and being told 'no'. That sort of problem tends to get things moving.

Re:Wait for it.... (1, Interesting)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373103)

Given that NAT at least partially became popular due to a few ISPs trying to argue that you can have only 1 machine on your network connected or you're breaking "the law" (their idiotic TOS), I have some doubts that IPV6 would bring about any real advantages to end users.

I'm not sure that I even want all my machines to have globally routable IPs.

Re:Wait for it.... (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373525)

We do have problems. If you don't think we do, fire up the configuration page of your router, and take a look at the "DMZ" and "port redirection" pages.

I get what you're saying, but it's not like those things are complex, or even necessary for most home users. And even when IPv6 becomes commonplace they will still have their uses (thinking of stuff like workplaces and universities where you really want a single point of control for internet access).

Re:Wait for it.... (2, Interesting)

glennpratt (1230636) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373973)

Yes, a single point of access control, like a router. But it doesn't have to do NAT anymore.

Sure, they might run a transparent proxy on some services, but the point is they will be able to setup two way services without idiotic things like UPnP. IE they won't need dynamic port translations because every device will have it's own ports and specific applications can be allowed in advance.

For example, try to run multiple, simultaneous Xbox Live connections without UPnP. (It will probably work these days, but you won't be able to make two way connections ie host games, voice chat reliably, etc). This wouldn't be a problem if they both had their own address and port space.

Don't even get me started on IPSec, NAT-T etc.

Re:Wait for it.... (2, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373941)

We do have problems now. Which is why every residential Internet user is having to use NAT to connect more than one device to their always-on Internet connection, and why things like VoIP boxes (that require transparent two-way connectivity) require special ways of setting them up rather than just plugging into an Ethernet port in the wall.

I don't see what that has to do with IPv6. Sure, in an ideal world, the ISP will give every residential user their fair share of IPv6 addresses they're entitled to. No, most ISPs will probably give you an entire block of IPv6 addresses, but they'll only route packets to one of them, unless you pay $5/month for more (it's too lucrative a stream of cash - like text messaging). Some ISPs give every customer 2 IP(v4) addresses for "free", and I'll bet 99% of users still use NAT on the two computers they have.

No, it's stupid to think that IPv6 everywhere will mean the death of NAT. We'll just have NATv6 to deal with instead, and all the same problems we have with NAT today, will still be present in an IPv6 world. Even if the ISP decided to give everyone their fair share of IPv6 addresses, we'll still see deployment of NATv6 boxes, and since firewalls aren't going away anytime soon (if people don't deploy NATv6), end-to-end protocols will still break.

Firewalling has improved protocol design though - I still remember the days when to play online required opening 10 TCP ports and 10 UDP ports on your PC (per game, pretty much), due to some design decisions in some libraries (DirectPlay, notably). Nowadays, it's down to usually 1 TCP port, and a couple of UDP ports, if that (STUN helps). Or heck, sometimes you just don't need to do anything at all to get online gaming to work. Though you still do see the occasional game that requires DMZ mode...

Re:Wait for it.... (4, Insightful)

eln (21727) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372101)

However, we (people) are incredibly bad a doing global solutions to big problems quickly, so we need to start to migrate things early.

Unfortunately, we're also bad at doing global solutions to big problems ahead of time, especially when there's still disagreement as to whether or not the problem even exists or is as serious as some say it is. Nobody wants to spend all the money to redo their network infrastructure when no one can give them a good answer as to when or if the changes will actually be necessary.

IPv6 will only move forward in a big way when we actually run out of IPv4 space and no one can get the addresses they need, and no one can come up with a good workaround. Until then, it will only be in use in widely scattered installations, just like it is now.

Re:Wait for it.... (1)

Chang (2714) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373391)

Let me refer you to what Paul Vixie has to say on the subject. Quoting from the NANOG list a couple of months ago http://www.gossamer-threads.com/lists/nanog/users/109650#109650 [gossamer-threads.com]

the human, as a species in the animal kingdom, is known to be the kind of animal who fouls its own nest and overruns its habitat. the idea of a tipping point, whether it be for CO2 in the atmosphere or polar ice shelves or explosively deaggregated IPv4 routing tables, does not occur in the minds of individual decision makers. instead it's left to us "chicken little" types, and the only way the individual decision makers ever make their decisions on the basis of tipping points is if some kind of "governance" makes them do so.
--
Paul Vixie

Soon ? (1, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371495)

I got ipv6.google.com the night the IETF turned off IPv4 [arstechnica.com] , and that was
over 9 months ago.

Re:Soon ? (2, Informative)

dave420 (699308) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371949)

Maybe you should read the summary again.

tried google in ipv6 (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371511)

it's eerily similar to google in ipv4

Re:tried google in ipv6 (4, Funny)

timeOday (582209) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373101)

Really? The extra addressing overhead should have made it a little slower.

Is it just me (4, Insightful)

jandrese (485) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371515)

Or is that list of ipv6 capable ISPs depressingly short? All I see on there are a handful of tiny mom and pop shops and perhaps some larger foreign ISPs. Until Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, NTT, Telekom, or any other major ISPs start showing up on that list all of this IPv6 stuff is going to remain a research toy. I would use IPv6 now if my ISP supported it. I'm not really interested in setting up a complicated tunnel for effectively no benefit. That IPv6 porn site never even got off of the ground.

Re:Is it just me (1)

MacColossus (932054) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371619)

I noticed that only 5 US providers were listed. Kind of answers why Slashdot hasn't ran out and signed up as suggested by the post. Becomes a question of which comes first. The chicken or the egg?

Re:Is it just me (4, Informative)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372059)

It is tiny and that sucks.

You can, unless you're using an ISP that specifically blocks it, use IPv6 now however. Either use 6to4 (if you've rolled your own router, then check the web for implementation specifics - start here [multiply.com] if you can't find a better page. Another possibility are the Apple Airport routers, that generally have this built in. But before spending time on 6to4, ensure your ISP doesn't block it by ensuring you can ping 192.88.99.1. If you can, go right ahead), or use a Tunnel Broker. Hurricane Electric is a good example.

If you can't ping 192.88.99.1, please let your ISP know.

Re:Is it just me (4, Funny)

greg_barton (5551) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373501)

...use 6to4...

And, if you're on a WAN in Chicago, the choice could be: X.25 or 6to4?

Re:Is it just me (1)

Above (100351) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372377)

Many don't advertise well.

NTT/Verio has some of the best IPv6 support out there.

Hurricane Electric has made a point of being an aggressive IPv6 deployer.

Verizon Business (UUNet) now offers IPv6 on a "beta" basis.

Level 3 has some sort of offering, but I have no details on it.

It's true none of the consumer ISP's offer it to the consumer yet (Comcast, Cox, CableVision, Verizon FIOS), but then that may be premature at this point. Several of them have stood up in public forums and talked about the planning and prep they are doing, so its not like they are sitting around doing nothing.

If you have a "business" connection to a major ISP, ask them about IPv6. You may be surprised.

Re:Is it just me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372647)

It's true none of the consumer ISP's offer it to the consumer yet, but then they haven't figured out how to charge customers more for it and how that affects their routing and revenue...

Re: "Research Toy" (2, Interesting)

jc42 (318812) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373189)

Until Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, NTT, Telekom, or any other major ISPs start showing up on that list all of this IPv6 stuff is going to remain a research toy.

The phrase "research toy" strikes me as an excellent opportunity for the canonical auto analogy:

Imagine that all the commercial transport vendors had "standardized" on the Ford Model T (a very good car in its day). Your chain of stores needs to deliver tons of material from suppliers to warehouses to retail outlets? Organize a fleet of millions of Model Ts, each one carrying maybe 1/4 ton of material. Worldide shipping would be done by having the Model Ts board small ferries that would carry them across the oceans. You have 1 100-tone product? You simply break it down into 1/4-tone pieces, send them via Model T fleet, and assemble them at the customer's site. Maybe there would be some special 1- or 2-ton "extended" Model Ts, for use on the few highways that could support them.

Meanwhile, in academia, they would be using "research toys" like trucks, trains, airliners and huge ships to transport 100-ton objects (or packets of smaller objects) between campuses and research stations. The commercial world would look at this, and dismiss it as untried and unreliable. They wouldn't be willing to make the admittedly huge investment on giant vehicles and infrastructure (rail lines, superhighways, airports, and container seaport facilities) that it would take to change over. Customers wouldn't be demanding it, because they wouldn't understand the technology or economics, and this would be further grounds for the corporate world to "do what the customers want".

The nerdy tech types would be off at the side, discussing amongst themselves what the world might be like if these research toys could be somehow introduced to the public. But commerce would remail slow and crippled relative to our world. The commercial system would refuse to take such wild proposals seriously, because the current system works just fine for them. After all, the Model T is so much better and faster than the horse- and ox-drawn vehicles used by previous generations.

I'm sure that others here can extend the analogy. Maybe we could work out the details and turn it into a fun "alternate history" novel or video game.

Re: "Research Toy" (1)

Nevyn (5505) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373761)

Meanwhile, in academia, they would be using "research toys" like trucks, trains, airliners and huge ships to transport 100-ton objects (or packets of smaller objects) between campuses and research stations.

Terrible analogy, those trucks are interoperable if companyA moves to using trucks/trains/etc. then they can use those to ship to companyB. If any company moved to be ipv6 only they'd have the same effect as if they powered down their data center.

I currently pay ~$100 for a /29, and given I'm not a business I'd at least consider moving to ipv6 for economical reasons ... except the last time I asked my ISP they said they don't offer it as it'd be more expensive. And I'm also pretty sure it wouldn't "just work" even on outgoing connections, like playing on my PS3.

IPv6 will happen when they make the pain of moving less than the pain of not moving. One obvious way is to make it fully backwards compatible for 5 years, or so, and have it be at least a little cheaper/better than using IPv4 only. The next most obvious way (and my guess for what will happen) is that IPv4 will hit a wall that will be massively painful, at which point the POS that is current IPv6 will be the lesser of two evils.

Re:Is it just me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26373617)

Yeah, I thought so, too. At first, I was actually happy to see that a significant number of companies on the list were German (since I'm German, too), but then it of course turned out that all of them are small, local ISPs that a) nobody will ever have heard of and that b) cater mostly to businesses, not regular people who just want to get on the Internet, like my grandma (or me, for that matter).

Give us another holler when a large ISP switches, Slashdot.

Meh (1)

pondermaster (1445839) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371535)

Singularity is just around the corner. With all those nano machines wanting to go online, we're screwed anyway.

W00T fp.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371545)

are inherently I ever did. it sche8es. Frankly

Try it! (0)

Fear the Clam (230933) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371549)

I upgraded to Google over IPv6 and the whole thing just seems snappier.

Kudos, Google.

Re:Try it! (4, Funny)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371655)

Google over IPv6 is crisp and clean, with good intensity and a hint of citrus on the nose

Google HD! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372327)

Yay! Finally end users can enjoy Google as it was meant to be! I mean, standard IPv4 is fine and all, but it has been around ever since we switched to broadcasts in color, over 40 years ago. Such ancient technolology has no place in the 21st century, except in a museum [archive.org] . So now, with the help of our supportive ISPs, you can finally have the Sensational Internet Experience (tm) you so desperately need! ...

Now if only there would be a single consumer ISP in my country that would serve HD Internet addresses... right now, the only one that even acknowledges its existence is xs4all [xs4all.nl] , and they offer only a 6to4 tunnel.

Re:Try it! (3, Funny)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 5 years ago | (#26374087)

Google over IPv6 is crisp and clean, with good intensity and a hint of citrus on the nose

Even more importantly, MP3s over IPv6 have an open, airy feel that is notoriously lacking over IPv4. It's even enough to compensate for the jitter they pick up when going over WiFi.

/stands back to watch audiophiles trample each other to get IPv6.
//plans to market IPv6 "enhancers" to audiophiles, both speeding adoption and lining my pockets with "stupidity tax".

Re:Try it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371703)

Yeah, I've been using Google over IPv6 for couple months now and search results are much better than over IPv4.

Re:Try it! (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372011)

How exactly? I've read the howto, but it's not clear to me how to get a valid ipv6 address assigned to me. I understand that I can just use ifconfig, but I use dhcp to get my ipv4 address. Does dhclient support ipv6?

Re:Try it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372971)

Short answer: 10-1 odds says you can't, because your ISP will not offer you an IPv6 address.

Long answer:
Last I looked (which is over a year ago), the dhcp v6 specification [ietf.org] was not even finished, and dhclient 3.1 (which is shipped with all distributions I know of) does not support it. A year ago I experimented with a client based on the DHCPv6 draft specification, Dibbler [klub.com.pl] , but ISC has now released dhcp 4.0 (and 4.1) which can act as both dhcpv6 server and dhcpv6 client. However, it will not help you to switch to dhclient 4.x, because your ISP probably does not offer you an ipv6 address.

One of the advantages of IPv6 is that should not really need a DHCP client, because IPv6 has a lot better autoconfiguration than ipv4. If your (or your ISP's) router correctly advertises that it supports IPv6, current OSes (Vista, Linux, OS X) automatically set up an IPv6 address for you.

If you're really up for it, and you have a globally visible IPv4 address, you can also configure your PC to use IPv6-in-IPv4 routing, which gives you IPv6 connectivity using only your IPv4 address. Look up 6to4 routing [wikipedia.org] , but don't expect any miracles. If implemented correctly, you should not (yet) notice any difference between using IPv4 and IPv6.

One quetsion (4, Funny)

slugtastic (1437569) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371561)

What ever happened to IPv5?

Re:One quetsion (4, Informative)

compro01 (777531) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372269)

The Internet Stream Protocol (RFC 1819) used 5 in the protocol version field.

Re:One quetsion (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372543)

it was a development-only version. Some parts of it were backported into v4, but once it was stable enough to be released it was renamed to v6.

smash felonious corepirate nazi execrable.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371571)

to prevent identity mesh/mush. we've given up most all of our excessive ways by now. still no real clouds.

greed, fear & ego (in any order) are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of yOUR dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & any notion of prosperity for us, or our children. not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one. see you on the other side of it. the lights are coming up all over now. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be yOUR guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. we now have some choices. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on yOUR brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

we note that yahoo deletes some of its' (relevant) stories sooner than others. maybe they're short of disk space, or something?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081112/ap_on_re_as/as_nepal_buddha_boy;_ylt=A0wNdN1I6RpJfGoBfhWs0NUE
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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081114/ap_on_re_us/obama_catholics;_ylt=A0wNdOs0AR1Jam0AfE2s0NUE
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/09/23/what.matters.thirst/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/opinion/31mon1.html?em&ex=1199336400&en=c4b5414371631707&ei=5087%0A
(deleted)http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080918/ap_on_re_us/tent_cities;_ylt=A0wNcyS6yNJIZBoBSxKs0NUE
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/world/29amnesty.html?hp
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/06/02/nasa.global.warming.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/05/severe.weather.ap/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/06/02/honore.preparedness/index.html
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/09/28/what.matters.meltdown/index.html#cnnSTCText
http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/books/10/07/atwood.debt/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/opinion/01dowd.html?em&ex=1212638400&en=744b7cebc86723e5&ei=5087%0A
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/06/05/senate.iraq/index.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/17/washington/17contractor.html?hp
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/world/middleeast/03kurdistan.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin
(deleted, still in google cache)http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080708/cheney_climate.html
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20080805/pl_politico/12308;_ylt=A0wNcxTPdJhILAYAVQms0NUE
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081107/ts_alt_afp/environmentclimatewarmingatlantic_081107145344
(deleted)http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080903/ts_nm/environment_arctic_dc;_ylt=A0wNcwhhcb5It3EBoy2s0NUE
(talk about cowardlly race fixing/bad theater/fiction?) http://money.cnn.com/2008/09/19/news/economy/sec_short_selling/index.htm?cnn=yes
http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylt=ApTbxRfLnscxaGGuCocWlwq7YWsA/SIG=11qicue6l/**http%3A//biz.yahoo.com/ap/081006/meltdown_kashkari.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/04/opinion/04sat1.html?_r=1&oref=slogin
(the teaching of hate as a way of 'life' synonymous with failed dictatorships) http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081004/ap_on_re_us/newspapers_islam_dvd;_ylt=A0wNcwWdfudITHkACAus0NUE
(some yoga & yogurt makes killing/getting killed less stressful) http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081007/ap_on_re_us/warrior_mind;_ylt=A0wNcw9iXutIPkMBwzGs0NUE
(the old bait & switch...your share of the resulting 'product' is a fairytail nightmare?)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081011/ap_on_bi_ge/where_s_the_money;_ylt=A0wNcwJGwvFIZAQAE6ms0NUE

  it's time to get real now. A LOT of energy/resource has been squandered in attempts to keep US in the dark. in the end (give or take a few 1000 years), the creators will prevail (world without end, etc...), as it has always been. the process of gaining yOUR release from the current hostage situation may not be what you might think it is. butt of course, many of US don't know, or care what a precarious/fatal situation we're still in.

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http://weatherwars.info/
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=weather+manipulation&btnG=Search
http://video.google.com/videosearch?hl=en&q=video+cloud+spraying

'The current rate of extinction is around 10 to 100 times the usual background level, and has been elevated above the background level since the Pleistocene. The current extinction rate is more rapid than in any other extinction event in earth history, and 50% of species could be extinct by the end of this century. While the role of humans is unclear in the longer-term extinction pattern, it is clear that factors such as deforestation, habitat destruction, hunting, the introduction of non-native species, pollution and climate change have reduced biodiversity profoundly.' (wiki)

"I think the bottom line is, what kind of a world do you want to leave for your children," Andrew Smith, a professor in the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences, said in a telephone interview. "How impoverished we would be if we lost 25 percent of the world's mammals," said Smith, one of more than 100 co-authors of the report. "Within our lifetime hundreds of species could be lost as a result of our own actions, a frightening sign of what is happening to the ecosystems where they live," added Julia Marton-Lefevre, IUCN director general. "We must now set clear targets for the future to reverse this trend to ensure that our enduring legacy is not to wipe out many of our closest relatives."

"The wealth of the universe is for me. Every thing is explicable and practical for me .... I am defeated all the time; yet to victory I am born." --emerson

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land."--chronicles

Great News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371629)

This is great news for the staggering 5 US ISPs with IPv6 support.

Google looking at Ninnle! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371631)

Since Ninnle Linux already has full featured support for IPv6, Google is now looking at Ninnle to implement their plans.

Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (3, Informative)

Danathar (267989) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371669)

One BIG carrot for Universities and Labs that use google (gmail, docs, etc) is that this means that all that google traffic can be routed over their Internet2 connections which are MUCH faster and of lower latency than their commercial internet connections.

As an IPv6 user, I would LOVE to use google over IPv6.

I smell the hand of Vint Cerf at google...

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26371829)

I smell the hand of Vint Cerf at google...

Sorry, I finger-banged my secretary this morning and didn't wash my hands afterwards.

--V.C.

Hygiene? (1)

haapi (16700) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371845)

Are you implying Vint has a hygiene problem?

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (2, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371863)

"One BIG carrot for Universities and Labs that use google (gmail, docs, etc)"

Those universities should lose their access to the Internet if they are using Google apps. In the past year, I have seen several leaks of student information (SSN, financial, etc.) caused JUST by the use of Google docs. Maybe if their students are using Google, they will reap some benefit, but even that is a bad idea -- a recent leak at Columbia was caused by a student using Google docs for a research project involving Columbia undergraduates, and thousands of SSNs and financial records were exposed to the world.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (2, Insightful)

evanbd (210358) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372407)

Why did the student have access to those records? The breach occurred when the student got the financial data. To be sure, it got worse when it spread beyond them, but I doubt there was a reason a student needed to have that data in non-anonymized form.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

grommit (97148) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371895)

Except that the traffic won't be going over the I2 unless Google decides that it wants to pay for connections between their data centers and the I2. Even then, I'm not sure the I2 group would allow it unless Google could bring something of value to the research effort other than faster searches, gmail and google docs.

I2 != IPv6

Sure, you can use IPv6 on the I2 but most people are still only using IPv4 on the I2. The I2 runs on completely different fiber than the regular internet. You aren't all of a sudden on I2 when you switch to IPv6.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

Danathar (267989) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372091)

Check your data.....google is a member of I2.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

grommit (97148) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372223)

Being a member and having connections to the I2 are two different things.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (3, Informative)

Danathar (267989) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372483)

My IPv6 connection is over I2 only, tracerouting to ipv6.google.com works.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

bruce_the_loon (856617) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372641)

Google has direct peering to quite a number of IPv6-capable NREN's around the world.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372137)

Hmm, I wonder if that doesn't also get them some cheap redundancy, just update DNS if their I2 connection goes down and then the Google traffic goes out the commercial pipe.

Re:Excellent for Internet2 connected institutions (1)

ionix5891 (1228718) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373621)

thats no hand your smelling...

IPv6 on Slashdot? (3, Funny)

MiniMike (234881) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371757)

The question that now remains is: when will Slashdot follow?

I heard that Taco is skipping IPv6, and going straight to IPv7.

Re:IPv6 on Slashdot? (1)

slugtastic (1437569) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371813)

The hardcore hackers are already on IPv16.

The problem with IP6 is... (3, Informative)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371833)

.. that for quick and dirty use the numeric address are just too complicated. Sure it has benefits wrt security, routing and a load of other behind the scenes stuff. But for people who are used to using numeric ip4 addresses when DNS is slow or for testing purpose or setting up various IP tables or 101 miscellanious things , ip6 is a royal PITA.

Ok , thats hardly a reason for not using it but I suspect its perhaps one reason why people are relunctant to try it. Half a line of hex is not user friendly.

Re:The problem with IP6 is... (4, Interesting)

AlXtreme (223728) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372023)

Ok , thats hardly a reason for not using it but I suspect its perhaps one reason why people are relunctant to try it. Half a line of hex is not user friendly.

When was the last time you used an IP address instead of a domain name? The only thing I could think of was setting up my DSL modem a year ago, but I'm not a network admin.

The reason why nearly nobody is using IPv6 is because it doesn't offer any direct benefit to those who need to deploy it.

Re:The problem with IP6 is... (2, Informative)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373773)

"When was the last time you used an IP address instead of a domain name"

About 30 minutes ago ftp'ing to one of the many boxes here than arn't assigned a DNA name on the local network.

DNS , not DNA. (2, Funny)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373831)

Though DNA addresses could be the future!

This is true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372097)

It's a perfectly valid reason. Larger addresses will NOT solve problems.

IPv6 supporters are the type of people who think the solution to the recession is to print more money.

Re:The problem with IP6 is... (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373263)

for people who are used to using numeric ip4 addresses when DNS is slow or for testing purpose or setting up various IP tables or 101 miscellanious thing

Just as a guess, you won't really care in the end when you get v6-ified. And what kind of DNS service are you using if you resort to typing addresses? You might want to make some improvements.

On a similar note, why is there so much FUD surrouding IPv6 here on slashdot? It's as if it was invented by Microsoft, by the sound of it sometimes.

Re:The problem with IP6 is... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373863)

"And what kind of DNS service are you using if you resort to typing addresses? You might want to make some improvements."

Here in many firms I've worked in they don't bother assigning even auto generated DNS names to internal desktop workstations. They get an IP number from DHCP and thats it. If you have to access the box from elsewhere in the building its via the numeric address only.

Re:IPv6 on Slashdot? (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372263)

IPv6?

No wireless, less space than a Nomad. Lame.

CES2009: no consumer routers (1)

golfbum (1408137) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371769)

I hoped that Linksys, et.al., would intro consumer routers at CES2009 with IPv6/IPv4 dual stacks. So far...nada. When are they going to wake up? gb

Re:CES2009: no consumer routers (1)

jamus (1439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371843)

Apple's Airport line supports IPv6 and 6to4 for those on IPv4.

Re:CES2009: no consumer routers (2, Informative)

rxmd (205533) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372051)

I hoped that Linksys, et.al., would intro consumer routers at CES2009 with IPv6/IPv4 dual stacks.

As I wrote elsewhere, you can get IPv6 on Linksys (et al.) routers at present as well, but you have to use custom firmware, meaning OpenWRT or DD-WRT.

Unfortunately this means that it can be quite difficult to configure. OpenWRT is not really suitable for non-technical users anyway, so for their userbase it won't be much of a problem. For DD-WRT, IPv6 was supported quite well in v23, but has been having problems for some years in v24 out of the box. If you want IPv6 in recent DD-WRT versions (v24 or higher), you need some manual configuration [dd-wrt.com] as well as a custom build [dd-wrt.com] , but then it's possible.

This arguably doesn't really qualify as a consumer solution, though.

Re:CES2009: no consumer routers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372185)

It seems dlink's DIR-615 supports IPv6.

Re:CES2009: no consumer routers (1)

golfbum (1408137) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372363)

curious they don't mention ipv6 on their web page for that product... gb

Routers? (3, Insightful)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26371885)

Sweet, so I have Google doing IPv6, my OS doing IPv6, yet there are still a finger full of gateway/routers, targeted at the home market, providing IPv6 support. The only router claiming IPv6 support in their specifications is the Apple Airport. Linksys and D-Link apparently have plans, yet nothing in the user documentation. For me, if the manufacturer doesn't document IPv6 in its user document or specification on its web site, then it is as good as not supporting IPv6 - after all I doubt their support team would be any more clued in.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for IPv6, its just that I am fed up having to deal with tunnels because certain parties are dragging their feet.

Re:Routers? (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372277)

So... buy the Apple product, and be sure to let them know that IPv6 support is why you did it. Vote with dollars. The Apple wireless hardware is actually some of the best ones out there anyway feature-wise, they're just a little hard to configure without the special client admin software.

IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

DarkHorseman (1150085) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372369)

You know, is IPv6 really necessary for the home user. What I mean is couldn't you just have a router that has a WAN port on IPv6, and then keep the same old IPv4 network at home? It's much easier to ping 127.1, than to ping some odd hex thing with : : : : all over the place...

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

R0UTE (807673) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372479)

Of course, because pinging ::1 is loads more difficult than pinging 127.1 .....

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

INTERNET EXPERT (1447871) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372495)

IPv6 is compatible with IPv4. Your 192.168.1.1 would be ::FFFF:192.168.1.1.

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373081)

I am not sure there is much benefit in pinging the localhost ;)

Joking aside, the colon form is probably a pain the butt, but it is one of the side-effects of more available addresses. You should learn to deal with it. At the same time, I would like to see stuff like 'Bonjour' become more common, so that local networks don't even need to use numbers. For example if your router supports Bonjour, then you would simply need to point your browser to router.local, or something of the sort.

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

j_sp_r (656354) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373317)

Your router can also run it's own DNS (as most do) and you can just type in it's name. I have to type http://speedtouch.lan/ [speedtouch.lan]

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373739)

If the ISP has a web proxy, it could quite easily take connections from the users with IPv4 and connect to the destination server with v4 or v6 as appropriate.

But there is no generic way to connect to an IPv6 address from an IPv4 network, so you couldn't have an IPv4 network at home and play IPv6-only games for example.

Re:IPv4 vs IPv6 (1)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373993)

How exactly do you expect the IPv4-only hosts behind the router to indicate which IPv6 addresses their packets are to be sent to? It's relatively easy to go the other way around, since all IPv4 addresses map to IPv6 addresses -- /48 subnets, actually -- but having an IPv4-only local network would limit you to accessing the IPv6 web via a proxy server.

Anyway, you can already access both IPv4 and IPv6 local hosts by mDNS names (hostname.local) rather than IPs provided they're running Avahai (on Linux) or Bonjour (on Mac OS X or Windows). The former two are standard, and Bonjour for Windows is available as a free download. You're not expected to memorize IPv6 addresses, or type them in by hand.

P.S. The IPv6 localhost address is just ::1, which is actually somewhat easier to remember and type than 127.0.0.1.

Re:Routers? (1)

Eil (82413) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373643)

Linksys and D-Link apparently have plans, yet nothing in the user documentation.

OpenWRT [openwrt.org] and DD-WRT [dd-wrt.com] are third-party firmware for a rather large variety of consumer-level routers and both of them support IPv6.

Not fer sarious... looking for mods! (1)

DarkHorseman (1150085) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372339)

Does Comcast have IPv6 Support yet?

Do not want (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26372429)

ipv6 is a sham

What's in it for me? Nothing! (4, Insightful)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372471)

see subject: spoken as a consumer/end-user/Joe Sixpack.

Looking at my Internet connection: it works fine.

Looking at my small office network: it works fine.

Does ipv6 bring any improvement in this? Not that I am aware of!

From a consumer pov there is no reason for the change. It's purely technical. And even technical there are obviously very few reasons (at least at the moment) to move to ipv6. It ain't broke, so why fix it? Why should I really care anyway? NAT works fine, and anyway I really don't want my networked printer to be reachable from the outside world, unless I very very specifically say so.

Re:What's in it for me? Nothing! (3, Insightful)

fbjon (692006) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373315)

Sixpacks don't really get a say in IPv6, any more than Sixpacks have say on anything else about the inner workings of the Internet.

No, the real question is (1)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372531)

When my USD 50 router will be upgradeable to IPv6?

NOW ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26374085)

http://www.dd-wrt.com/

Thanks to Linux and Busybox !

And, moreover, IPv6 Google (1)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372595)

Looks prettier than IPv4 counterpart!

Other stuff available over IPv6 (1)

larz (23116) | more than 5 years ago | (#26372619)

There's a fair number of sites available via IPv6 [ipv6links.net] besides Google.

Word is that OpenID Provider 87id [87id.com] even gets a good percentage of traffic via IPv6.

Just because Americans are using it doesn't mean it's not being used.

It works rather well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26373159)

I've already set this up when my ISP started offering this service a few weeks ago. Nobody in the house noticed a thing.

I suggest everyone to try this if their ISP is participating.

Stupid question (1)

maino82 (851720) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373419)

I apologize if this is a ridiculously simplistic question, but how do you have a LAN with IPv6? If I want to connect to my file server from my laptop now, I just use a local 192.x.x.x address now and it goes straight to my server. Is there something like that for IPv6 so that I don't have to go all the way out to the internet to get back to my file server? I'm assuming there is but I'm a novice when it comes to some of this networking stuff.

A Google search for "LAN over IPv6" turned up the following, but it's mostly a lot of technical jargon that I don't really understand:

http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc2464.txt [rfc-editor.org]
http://www-uxsup.csx.cam.ac.uk/courses/ipv6_basics/x84.html [cam.ac.uk]

Re:Stupid question (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 5 years ago | (#26374057)

Well, I have my own /64 so I just use the public IP addresses of my machines but you could also use the "link local" addresses of your machines (fe80::/10) or "Unique local addresses" (fc00::/7). The best way would probably be to use public addresses though...

/Mikael

Public DNS Servers? (1)

cybaz (538103) | more than 5 years ago | (#26373581)

Are there any public DNS servers that are using this? I have to use a tunnel to get to the IPv6 Internet, so I'm pretty sure my ISP is not interested.

Teh futur! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 5 years ago | (#26373823)

This was supposed to be a seamless upgrade that should've happened years ago. Instead it's world news when one big search engine finally gets around to taking the technology seriously. Coincidence?

I think it's safe to say we botched this one, folks. Yes, all of us. It's a fail, Jim, we just don't know it.

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